History Main / BondCreatures

29th Jun '16 9:38:55 AM Quanyails
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* In both of [[http://www.fanfiction.net/u/4199791 Lupine Horror]]'s stories the respective Harry has multiple of these, although they are mostly sentient human(oid) females. In [[http://www.fanfiction.net/s/9586702 Fate's Gamble]], these are Servants (from the Nasuverse, especially VisualNovel/{{FateStayNight}}), while in [[http://www.fanfiction.net/s/10181533 Reinforced Magic]] they are a book and several [[Familiar animals]] with human forms.

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* In both of [[http://www.fanfiction.net/u/4199791 Lupine Horror]]'s stories the respective Harry has multiple of these, although they are mostly sentient human(oid) females. In [[http://www.fanfiction.net/s/9586702 Fate's Gamble]], these are Servants (from the Nasuverse, especially VisualNovel/{{FateStayNight}}), ''VisualNovel/FateStayNight''), while in [[http://www.fanfiction.net/s/10181533 Reinforced Magic]] they are a book and several [[Familiar [[{{Familiar}} animals]] with human forms.
24th Jun '16 11:05:29 AM Doug86
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* Comicbook/GreenLantern [[GreenLanternRing rings]] (Actually, all of the spectrum rings for that matter) seek out hosts that they deem worthy based on their personal settings. Green Lanterns are chosen for their willpower, Red Lanterns for their rage, Yellow Lanterns for their ability to cause fear, etc.

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* Comicbook/GreenLantern Franchise/GreenLantern [[GreenLanternRing rings]] (Actually, all of the spectrum rings for that matter) seek out hosts that they deem worthy based on their personal settings. Green Lanterns are chosen for their willpower, Red Lanterns for their rage, Yellow Lanterns for their ability to cause fear, etc.
17th Jun '16 1:30:33 PM Sharlee
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* Lauren Beukes ''Zoo City'' plays with this. Animals are sent as by an unknown source to violent criminals who do however gain magic/psychic powers from the link, different with each pair. It's unclear whether the Animals are meant to act as consciences or provocateurs, this too seems to differ with each pairing, but any attempt to part them causes enormous pain in the human and killing an Animal summons a destructive, demonic force called the Undertow.

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* Lauren Beukes ''Zoo City'' ''Literature/ZooCity'' plays with this. Animals are sent as by an unknown source to violent criminals who do however gain magic/psychic powers from the link, different with each pair. It's unclear whether the Animals are meant to act as consciences or provocateurs, this too seems to differ with each pairing, but any attempt to part them causes enormous pain in the human and killing an Animal summons a destructive, demonic force called the Undertow.Undertow to make its human companion vanish without a trace.
15th Jun '16 11:29:22 PM Doug86
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* The short-lived MarvelComics book ''Sectaurs'' [[MerchandiseDriven (based on a toy line)]] involved a planet of insectoid humanoids who would each form a telepathic "binary bond" with a different insectoid animal, which would become their sidekick (or, in the case of larger ones, their steed). The hero, Dargon, was unusual in that he wound up bonded to ''two'' of them, his steed Dragon Flier and a smaller creature named Parafly.

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* The short-lived MarvelComics Creator/MarvelComics book ''Sectaurs'' [[MerchandiseDriven (based on a toy line)]] involved a planet of insectoid humanoids who would each form a telepathic "binary bond" with a different insectoid animal, which would become their sidekick (or, in the case of larger ones, their steed). The hero, Dargon, was unusual in that he wound up bonded to ''two'' of them, his steed Dragon Flier and a smaller creature named Parafly.
15th Jun '16 8:34:04 PM nombretomado
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* JenniferRoberson's ''Cheysuli'' series shows a semi-intelligent empathic alien species of which individuals occasionally (but not usually) bond with humans. (Although the series ''this'' troper read showed individuals of various animal species blessed by the gods with high intelligence with the specific intention of bonding with humans...)

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* JenniferRoberson's Creator/JenniferRoberson's ''Cheysuli'' series shows a semi-intelligent empathic alien species of which individuals occasionally (but not usually) bond with humans. (Although the series ''this'' troper read showed individuals of various animal species blessed by the gods with high intelligence with the specific intention of bonding with humans...)



* The ''{{Temeraire}}'' universe subverts the magical psychic soulbond stereotype, in that the bond between dragons and handlers is entirely emotional, rather like a platonic marriage -- and like a marriage, they can go horribly wrong, with neglect, abuse, abandonment and heartbreak all inferred over the course of the novels. Still, for the most part dragons and their captains share an intense and mutually beneficial relationship that ends only with the death of either or both of them. The bond is such that British captains (and probably captains of other nations too) rarely marry, as they couldn't share themselves between a dragon ''and'' a spouse; when they want sex (or heirs) they have scandalously casual relationships with other aviators, treating it as matter-of-factly as the dragons do.

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* The ''{{Temeraire}}'' ''Literature/{{Temeraire}}'' universe subverts the magical psychic soulbond stereotype, in that the bond between dragons and handlers is entirely emotional, rather like a platonic marriage -- and like a marriage, they can go horribly wrong, with neglect, abuse, abandonment and heartbreak all inferred over the course of the novels. Still, for the most part dragons and their captains share an intense and mutually beneficial relationship that ends only with the death of either or both of them. The bond is such that British captains (and probably captains of other nations too) rarely marry, as they couldn't share themselves between a dragon ''and'' a spouse; when they want sex (or heirs) they have scandalously casual relationships with other aviators, treating it as matter-of-factly as the dragons do.
30th May '16 8:43:26 PM Doug86
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* AndreNorton created several of the oldest examples of Bond Creatures in western fiction: ''The Beast Master'', Falconers in the ''WitchWorld'' series and more. Probably she was the inspiration for Mercedes Lackey's and Anne [=McCaffrey's=] later evolutions of the concept.

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* AndreNorton Creator/AndreNorton created several of the oldest examples of Bond Creatures in western fiction: ''The Beast Master'', Falconers in the ''WitchWorld'' series and more. Probably she was the inspiration for Mercedes Lackey's and Anne [=McCaffrey's=] later evolutions of the concept.



* In AndreNorton's ''[[Literature/{{Warlock}} Ordeal in Otherwhere]]'', Tsste for Charis and Taggi for Shann. Their mutual PsychicLink makes it a four-way deal.

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* In AndreNorton's Creator/AndreNorton's ''[[Literature/{{Warlock}} Ordeal in Otherwhere]]'', Tsste for Charis and Taggi for Shann. Their mutual PsychicLink makes it a four-way deal.
5th May '16 7:58:55 PM PaulA
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* Creator/AnneMcCaffrey is probably the archetypal example of bond creatures. Her ''Literature/DragonridersOfPern'' series features dragons with near-human intelligence which choose a human partner at hatching (this is called Impression). Riders whose dragon dies often commit suicide; dragons whose rider dies pretty much invariably do. Fire lizards have a mild variant of the Impression (normally it merely helps to organize their swarms, but was turned UpToEleven for dragons). Less well known but also interesting, this author's ''Literature/TheShipWho...'' series features spaceships powered by the human minds of people whose bodies were defective or injured, and these {{Sapient Ship}}s, also known as Brains, form partnerships with human Brawns. This bond is not permanent, it may be friendly or romantic, and the telepathic element is enabled by technology.
** Early in the series, it's indicated that romantic feelings between a Brain and his/her Brawn is grounds for the partnership being broken up, as a Brawn who becomes ''too'' attracted to his/her Brain partner may become obsessed and attempt to access what is left of their body, which will kill the Brain. They find a way around this later, using androids.
** [=McCaffrey=]'s dragonriders are parodied in Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Discworld/TheColourOfMagic'', where the dragons only exist because their riders believe in them. Similarly, the dragon in ''Discworld/GuardsGuards!'' is bonded to [[spoiler: Lupine Wonse]], much to his discomfort.
** More recent Pern books, particularly those which [=Todd McCaffrey=] worked on, establish that whers -- dragons' humbler, uglier cousins -- also form psychic bonds with humans. Unlike either dragons or fire lizards, whers can sever their bond voluntarily if they form a solid emotional attachment to a different human, and the death of one partner needn't provoke suicide by the other (though it can) when a wher is involved.

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* Creator/AnneMcCaffrey is probably the archetypal example of bond creatures. Her ''Literature/DragonridersOfPern'' series features dragons with near-human intelligence which choose a human partner at hatching (this is called Impression). Riders whose dragon dies often commit suicide; dragons whose rider dies pretty much invariably do. Fire lizards have a mild variant of the Impression (normally it merely helps to organize their swarms, but was turned UpToEleven for dragons). Less well known but also interesting, this author's ''Literature/TheShipWho...'' series features spaceships powered by the human minds of people whose bodies were defective or injured, and these {{Sapient Ship}}s, also known as Brains, form partnerships with human Brawns. This bond is not permanent, it may be friendly or romantic, and the telepathic element is enabled by technology.
** Early in the series, it's indicated that romantic feelings between a Brain and his/her Brawn is grounds for the partnership being broken up, as a Brawn who becomes ''too'' attracted to his/her Brain partner may become obsessed and attempt to access what is left of their body, which will kill the Brain. They find a way around this later, using androids.
** [=McCaffrey=]'s dragonriders are parodied in Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Discworld/TheColourOfMagic'', where the dragons only exist because their riders believe in them. Similarly, the dragon in ''Discworld/GuardsGuards!'' is bonded to [[spoiler: Lupine Wonse]], much to his discomfort.
**
More recent Pern books, particularly those which [=Todd McCaffrey=] worked on, establish that whers -- dragons' humbler, uglier cousins -- also form psychic bonds with humans. Unlike either dragons or fire lizards, whers can sever their bond voluntarily if they form a solid emotional attachment to a different human, and the death of one partner needn't provoke suicide by the other (though it can) when a wher is involved.involved.
* [=McCaffrey=]'s dragonriders are parodied in Creator/TerryPratchett's ''Discworld/TheColourOfMagic'', where the dragons only exist because their riders believe in them. Similarly, the dragon in ''Discworld/GuardsGuards!'' is bonded to [[spoiler: Lupine Wonse]], much to his discomfort.
3rd May '16 6:25:38 PM Nire
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* The [[SummonMagic Aeons]] of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'' demand that the Summoner enter an intense, soul-binding pact with them before yielding their power. [[GameplayAndStoryIntegregation Extends to the gameplay]], as Yuna's Aeons grow in strength depending on her own stats. [[spoiler: The bond is particularly strong between a Summoner and his or her final Aeon due to the relationship they had before the final Aeon's fayth was created. This bond is so strong that when [[BigBad Yu Yevon]] posseses the final Aeon, the psychic backlash from the bond being severed kills the Summoner. At the game's end, when Yuna must destroy the Aeons to prevent [[BigBad Yu Yevon]] from taking them over, banishing them causes her physical and emotional pain]].

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* The [[SummonMagic Aeons]] of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'' demand that the Summoner enter an intense, soul-binding pact with them before yielding their power. [[GameplayAndStoryIntegregation [[GameplayAndStoryIntegration Extends to the gameplay]], as Yuna's Aeons grow in strength depending on her own stats. [[spoiler: The bond is particularly strong between a Summoner and his or her final Aeon due to the relationship they had before the final Aeon's fayth was created. This bond is so strong that when [[BigBad Yu Yevon]] posseses the final Aeon, the psychic backlash from the bond being severed kills the Summoner. At the game's end, when Yuna must destroy the Aeons to prevent [[BigBad Yu Yevon]] from taking them over, banishing them causes her physical and emotional pain]].
3rd May '16 6:25:19 PM Nire
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* The [[SummonMagic Aeons]] of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'' demand that the Summoner enter an intense, soul-binding pact with them before yielding their power. [[GameplayAndStorySegregation Extends to the gameplay]], as Yuna's Aeons grow in strength depending on her own stats. [[spoiler: The bond is particularly strong between a Summoner and his or her final Aeon due to the relationship they had before the final Aeon's fayth was created. This bond is so strong that when [[BigBad Yu Yevon]] posseses the final Aeon, the psychic backlash from the bond being severed kills the Summoner. At the game's end, when Yuna must destroy the Aeons to prevent [[BigBad Yu Yevon]] from taking them over, banishing them causes her physical and emotional pain]].

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* The [[SummonMagic Aeons]] of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX'' demand that the Summoner enter an intense, soul-binding pact with them before yielding their power. [[GameplayAndStorySegregation [[GameplayAndStoryIntegregation Extends to the gameplay]], as Yuna's Aeons grow in strength depending on her own stats. [[spoiler: The bond is particularly strong between a Summoner and his or her final Aeon due to the relationship they had before the final Aeon's fayth was created. This bond is so strong that when [[BigBad Yu Yevon]] posseses the final Aeon, the psychic backlash from the bond being severed kills the Summoner. At the game's end, when Yuna must destroy the Aeons to prevent [[BigBad Yu Yevon]] from taking them over, banishing them causes her physical and emotional pain]].
23rd Mar '16 9:58:29 AM Willbyr
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* The [[{{Mons}} Mamono/Mamodo]] from ''ZatchBell'' need to find a human partner to supply [[{{Mana}} Heart Power]] and activate spells while taking part in the king-election tournament on Earth. While a few of these pairs ([[spoiler:Won/Lee, Clear/Vino, Gash/Kiyo]]) develop {{Psychic Link}}s, the Heart Power-link is actually due to the rules of the tournament rather than part of the Mamono's nature and the Mamono don't even get to choose their partner themselves.

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* The [[{{Mons}} Mamono/Mamodo]] from ''ZatchBell'' ''Manga/ZatchBell'' need to find a human partner to supply [[{{Mana}} Heart Power]] and activate spells while taking part in the king-election tournament on Earth. While a few of these pairs ([[spoiler:Won/Lee, Clear/Vino, Gash/Kiyo]]) develop {{Psychic Link}}s, the Heart Power-link is actually due to the rules of the tournament rather than part of the Mamono's nature and the Mamono don't even get to choose their partner themselves.
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