History Main / BodyguardBetrayal

1st Jun '17 3:04:36 PM thatother1dude
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* 2011 saw the president of Afghanistan Hamid Karzais brother, Ahmad Karzai, shot dead by his own ''head of security.'' The Taliban claimed responsibility, with others expressing skepticism over their actual involvement.

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* 2011 saw the president of Afghanistan Hamid Karzais Karzai's brother, Ahmad Karzai, shot dead by his own ''head of security.'' The Taliban claimed responsibility, with others expressing skepticism over their actual involvement.
24th May '17 10:39:45 PM Odacon_Spy
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* In ''Webcomic/EbinAndMay'', Ebin was the only member of his family that survived this betrayal. http://www.radiocomix.com/ebin-and-may/2009/10/15/rumors-pt-2-pg2/

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* In ''Webcomic/EbinAndMay'', Ebin was the only member of his family that survived this betrayal. http://www.[[http://www.radiocomix.com/ebin-and-may/2009/10/15/rumors-pt-2-pg2/com/ebin-and-may/2009/10/15/rumors-pt-2-pg2 this betrayal]].
16th May '17 9:05:53 PM Fireblood
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* 2011 saw the president of Afghanistan Hamid Karzais brother, Ahmad Karzai, shot dead by his own ''head of security.'' The Taliban claimed responsibility, with others scepticism over their actual involvement.

to:

* 2011 saw the president of Afghanistan Hamid Karzais brother, Ahmad Karzai, shot dead by his own ''head of security.'' The Taliban claimed responsibility, with others scepticism expressing skepticism over their actual involvement.



** In 1981, Egyptian President and Nobel Peace Prize winner Anwar Sadat was assassinated by his royal guard during a military Parade.

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** In 1981, Egyptian President and Nobel Peace Prize winner Anwar Sadat was assassinated by his royal guard guards during a military Parade.parade.
16th May '17 9:00:37 PM Fireblood
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/Sense8'': It turns out Capheus's bodyguard has been hired to kill him, and he barely escapes with his life.
29th Apr '17 10:58:49 AM nombretomado
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* TimothyZahn's ''[[Literature/{{Blackcollar}} The Backlash Mission]]'' has bodyguards subjected to [[{{Brainwashed}} "loyalty conditioning"]]. One guard in particular knows '''very''' well how much reason he has to want a certain official dead, but loyalty conditioning means he'd give his life to defend the man. And then he gets dosed with a drug that neutralizes the conditioning...

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* TimothyZahn's Creator/TimothyZahn's ''[[Literature/{{Blackcollar}} The Backlash Mission]]'' has bodyguards subjected to [[{{Brainwashed}} "loyalty conditioning"]]. One guard in particular knows '''very''' well how much reason he has to want a certain official dead, but loyalty conditioning means he'd give his life to defend the man. And then he gets dosed with a drug that neutralizes the conditioning...
10th Apr '17 4:21:02 PM nombretomado
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* Averted in SergeyLukyanenko's ''[[Literature/LineOfDelirium Emperors of Illusions]]''. As Emperor Grey is sneaking out of his palace in order to [[spoiler:leave this universe for one tailored for him]], he asks a young bodyguard who earlier saved his sanity where he's from. The guard tells him, and the Emperor realizes that the guy is from a rebellious world that was sacked on his secret order. In fact, the guy only survived because [[spoiler:Kay refused to shoot him]]. The Emperor outright asks why the guard didn't kill him. After all, why else would he strive to become his bodyguard? The guard replies that that was his original plan, even though he knows that the [[DeathIsCheap death wouldn't stick]]. However, after getting close to Grey and finding out that he isn't happy at all, he lost his hate and decided that maybe leaving the Emperor alive wasn't a mercy after all.

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* Averted in SergeyLukyanenko's Creator/SergeyLukyanenko's ''[[Literature/LineOfDelirium Emperors of Illusions]]''. As Emperor Grey is sneaking out of his palace in order to [[spoiler:leave this universe for one tailored for him]], he asks a young bodyguard who earlier saved his sanity where he's from. The guard tells him, and the Emperor realizes that the guy is from a rebellious world that was sacked on his secret order. In fact, the guy only survived because [[spoiler:Kay refused to shoot him]]. The Emperor outright asks why the guard didn't kill him. After all, why else would he strive to become his bodyguard? The guard replies that that was his original plan, even though he knows that the [[DeathIsCheap death wouldn't stick]]. However, after getting close to Grey and finding out that he isn't happy at all, he lost his hate and decided that maybe leaving the Emperor alive wasn't a mercy after all.
2nd Apr '17 10:12:36 AM nombretomado
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* A rare heroic version of this trope appears in ''PandoraHearts'': In Retrace LXXIX, [[spoiler: Gilbert betrays his former master Glen in order to protect his current master and best friend, Oz.]]

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* A rare heroic version of this trope appears in ''PandoraHearts'': ''Manga/PandoraHearts'': In Retrace LXXIX, [[spoiler: Gilbert betrays his former master Glen in order to protect his current master and best friend, Oz.]]
10th Feb '17 10:49:27 AM Euodiachloris
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** As noted above, the culture of Westeros generally takes a very dim view of this kind of thing, regardless of which side is left writing or singing the histories. There is, however, one notable exception. When the last two members of House Durrandon both decided to defy the Targaryens, their remaining guards came to the reasonable conclusion that they'd rather ''not'' repeat the lesson learned from [[KillItWithFire Harrenhal]], thanks. After they learned of the defeat last Storm King (and his whole army) on the field, and upon hearing his daughter swearing DefiantToTheEnd vengeance in response, they promptly gave the walled city and keep of Stormsend up to the Targaryen army... after capturing, stripping and then wrapping their [[ItRunsInTheFamily stubbornly defiant]] "Storm Queen", Argella, in chains. They then unceremoniously dumped her at the feet of her future husband, Orys Baratheon, as part of the surrender. Although they're not lauded for these actions, they're conspicuously not condemned for them, either. Because... what ''the hell else'' are you supposed to do against a real, live [[WeaponOfMassDestruction fully-grown, castle-killing dragon]] ''known'' to be capable of melting stone (Meraxes, ridden by Rhaenys Targaryen), [[NeverBringAKnifeToAGunFight when all you have is, basically, a pike line]] on top of some suddenly very [[KnowWhenToFoldEm flimsy-feeling walls]], since most of your army buddies have already become mince or charcoal ''and'' you've got a city of civilians to defend? [[RealityEnsues Yeah]].

to:

** As noted above, the culture of Westeros generally takes a very dim view of this kind of thing, regardless of which side is left writing or singing the histories. There is, however, one other notable exception. exception living solidly in ConflictingLoyalty territory. When the last two members of House Durrandon both decided to defy the Targaryens, their remaining guards (both city and personal) came to the reasonable conclusion that they'd rather ''not'' repeat the lesson learned from [[KillItWithFire Harrenhal]], thanks. After they learned of the defeat last Storm King (and his whole army) on the field, and upon hearing his daughter swearing DefiantToTheEnd vengeance in response, they promptly gave the walled city and keep of Stormsend up to the Targaryen army... after capturing, stripping and then wrapping their [[ItRunsInTheFamily stubbornly defiant]] "Storm Queen", Argella, in chains. They then unceremoniously dumped her at the feet of her future husband, Orys Baratheon, as part of the surrender. Although they're not lauded for these actions, they're conspicuously not condemned for them, either. Because... what ''the hell else'' are you supposed to do against a real, live [[WeaponOfMassDestruction fully-grown, castle-killing dragon]] ''known'' to be capable of melting stone (Meraxes, ridden by Rhaenys Targaryen), [[NeverBringAKnifeToAGunFight when all you have is, basically, a pike line]] on top of some suddenly very [[KnowWhenToFoldEm flimsy-feeling walls]], since most of your army buddies have already become mince or charcoal ''and'' you've got a city of civilians to defend? [[RealityEnsues Yeah]].
10th Feb '17 10:44:22 AM Euodiachloris
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** Although King Maegor "[[AxCrazy The Cruel]]" Targaryen had his entire Kingsguard of seven knights famously abandon him in the only such mass betrayal in what is technically this trope, it's not widely considered a true example by those writing the histories of the Seven Kingdoms. Because this "disgraceful" Kingsguard went on to support his nephew, Jeahaerys "[[TheGoodKing The Wise]]" and, incidentally, the next king -- and, by doing so, stuck to others of their oaths as knights sworn to the Faith of the Seven, not just the Throne. The very Faith that Maegor partially got his sobriquet for ''messily'' persecuting in the first place.

to:

** Although King Maegor "[[AxCrazy The Cruel]]" Targaryen had his entire Kingsguard of seven knights famously abandon him in the only such mass betrayal in what is technically this trope, it's not widely considered a true example by those writing the histories of the Seven Kingdoms. Because this "disgraceful" Kingsguard went on to support his nephew, Jeahaerys Jaehaerys "[[TheGoodKing The Wise]]" and, incidentally, the next king -- and, by doing so, [[ConflictingLoyalty stuck to others of their oaths as knights sworn to the Faith of the Seven, not just the Throne.Throne]]. The very Faith that Maegor partially got his sobriquet for ''messily'' persecuting in the first place.
10th Feb '17 10:35:20 AM Euodiachloris
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** The culture of Westeros generally takes a very dim view of this kind of thing, regardless of which side is left writing or singing the histories. There is, however, one notable exception. When the last two members of House Durrandon both decided to defy the Targaryens, their remaining guards came to the reasonable conclusion that they'd rather ''not'' repeat the lesson learned from [[KillItWithFire Harrenhal]], thanks. After they learned of the defeat last Storm King (and his whole army) on the field, and upon hearing his daughter swearing DefiantToTheEnd vengeance in response, they promptly gave the walled city and keep of Stormsend up to the Targaryen army... after capturing, stripping and then wrapping their [[ItRunsInTheFamily stubbornly defiant]] "Storm Queen", Argella, in chains. They then unceremoniously dumped her at the feet of her future husband, Orys Baratheon, as part of the surrender. Although they're not lauded for these actions, they're conspicuously not condemned for them, either. Because... what ''the hell else'' are you supposed to do against a real, live [[WeaponOfMassDestruction fully-grown, castle-killing dragon]] ''known'' to be capable of melting stone (Meraxes, ridden by Rhaenys Targaryen), [[NeverBringAKnifeToAGunFight when all you have is, basically, a pike line]] on top of some suddenly very [[KnowWhenToFoldEm flimsy-feeling walls]], since most of your army buddies have already become mince or charcoal ''and'' you've got a city of civilians to defend? [[RealityEnsues Yeah]].

to:

** Although King Maegor "[[AxCrazy The Cruel]]" Targaryen had his entire Kingsguard of seven knights famously abandon him in the only such mass betrayal in what is technically this trope, it's not widely considered a true example by those writing the histories of the Seven Kingdoms. Because this "disgraceful" Kingsguard went on to support his nephew, Jeahaerys "[[TheGoodKing The Wise]]" and, incidentally, the next king -- and, by doing so, stuck to others of their oaths as knights sworn to the Faith of the Seven, not just the Throne. The very Faith that Maegor partially got his sobriquet for ''messily'' persecuting in the first place.
** As noted above, the
culture of Westeros generally takes a very dim view of this kind of thing, regardless of which side is left writing or singing the histories. There is, however, one notable exception. When the last two members of House Durrandon both decided to defy the Targaryens, their remaining guards came to the reasonable conclusion that they'd rather ''not'' repeat the lesson learned from [[KillItWithFire Harrenhal]], thanks. After they learned of the defeat last Storm King (and his whole army) on the field, and upon hearing his daughter swearing DefiantToTheEnd vengeance in response, they promptly gave the walled city and keep of Stormsend up to the Targaryen army... after capturing, stripping and then wrapping their [[ItRunsInTheFamily stubbornly defiant]] "Storm Queen", Argella, in chains. They then unceremoniously dumped her at the feet of her future husband, Orys Baratheon, as part of the surrender. Although they're not lauded for these actions, they're conspicuously not condemned for them, either. Because... what ''the hell else'' are you supposed to do against a real, live [[WeaponOfMassDestruction fully-grown, castle-killing dragon]] ''known'' to be capable of melting stone (Meraxes, ridden by Rhaenys Targaryen), [[NeverBringAKnifeToAGunFight when all you have is, basically, a pike line]] on top of some suddenly very [[KnowWhenToFoldEm flimsy-feeling walls]], since most of your army buddies have already become mince or charcoal ''and'' you've got a city of civilians to defend? [[RealityEnsues Yeah]].
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