History Main / BlueBlood

4th Apr '18 10:25:37 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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SuperTrope of ImpoverishedPatrician, KnightInShiningArmor, RemittanceMan, NobleFugitive, AristocratsAreEvil and OfficerAndAGentleman.

Compare IdleRich, OldMoney, UpperClassWit.

Not to be confused with [[RoyalBlood royals]], people who just hold [[UsefulNotes/KnightFever knighthoods,]] BlackBlood, AlienBlood, "Literature/{{Bluebeard}}", the freeform vulgar joke "TheAristocrats", nor the [[Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon Disney]] film ''Disney/TheAristocats''. Or Angels from ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'' and Mulians from ''Anime/RahXephon'', both of which have "blue" as a blood type. ''Further'' not to be confused with the television series ''Series/BlueBloods'', although the title is an amusing play on words.

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SuperTrope of ImpoverishedPatrician, KnightInShiningArmor, RemittanceMan, NobleFugitive, AristocratsAreEvil and OfficerAndAGentleman.

OfficerAndAGentleman. Compare IdleRich, OldMoney, UpperClassWit.

GentlemanSnarker, and the upper echelons of the FantasticCasteSystem (as well as real ones, like [[TypeCaste the traditional castes]] of UsefulNotes/{{India}}).

Not to be confused with [[RoyalBlood royals]], people who just hold [[UsefulNotes/KnightFever knighthoods,]] knighthoods]], BlackBlood, AlienBlood, "Literature/{{Bluebeard}}", the freeform vulgar joke "TheAristocrats", nor the [[Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon Disney]] film ''Disney/TheAristocats''. Or Angels from ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'' and Mulians from ''Anime/RahXephon'', both of which have "blue" as a blood type. ''Further'' not to be confused with the television series ''Series/BlueBloods'', although the title is an amusing play on words.
20th Mar '18 12:53:08 PM margdean56
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* The nobility in the RealLife is usually divided in ''untitled nobility'' (i.e. noblemen whose status implies servant status to either a superior noble or to state), including gentlemen, esquires and knights and ''titled nobility'', also known as "peerage", i.e. land-owning nobility. Those would be baronets, barons, earls, viscounts, marquesses, counts and princes. The highest ranks of the nobility, such as Dukes, Grand Princes and Grand Dukes, would imply RoyalBlood instead of just BlueBlood.
* In the Middle Ages, nobility implied exemption of taxes - and duty to serve as a soldier. That is due to Feudal system. There were no standing armies, but the soldiers (knights and men-at-arms) were expected to train on their own and acquire their own armour and weapons. Exemption from taxes implied that the nobleman would spend all his income on weapons, gear and practising martial skills. Usually the core of the feudal army would be supplemented either by mercenaries or conscripted commoners (''arriere-ban'').
* Depending of the country, the nobility would consist of 1% (France) up to 20% (Hungary) of the populace. The greater the likelihood of the state being involved in warfare, the more noblemen there would also be.

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* The nobility in the RealLife is usually divided in into ''untitled nobility'' (i.e. noblemen whose status implies servant status to either a superior noble or to state), including gentlemen, esquires and esquires, knights and baronets, and ''titled nobility'', also known as "peerage", i.e. land-owning nobility. Those would be baronets, barons, earls, viscounts, marquesses, counts and princes. The highest ranks of the nobility, such as Dukes, Grand Princes and Grand Dukes, would imply RoyalBlood instead of just BlueBlood.
* In the Middle Ages, nobility implied exemption of taxes - and from taxes--and the duty to serve as a soldier. That is due to the Feudal system. There were no standing armies, but the soldiers (knights and men-at-arms) were expected to train on their own and acquire their own armour and weapons. Exemption from taxes implied that the nobleman would spend all his income on weapons, gear and practising martial skills. Usually the core of the feudal army would be supplemented either by mercenaries or conscripted commoners (''arriere-ban'').
* Depending of on the country, the nobility would consist of 1% (France) up to 20% (Hungary) of the populace. The greater the likelihood of the state being involved in warfare, the more noblemen there would also be.



* In America, the most famous type of blue blood is the Boston Brahmin, a loose association of wealthy old Protestant families around New England, with roots in the earliest English settlers. Many people mistake the Kennedys as Boston Brahmins, but they are comparatively NuveauRiche and Catholic to boot. Other locations along the East Coast have their own local blue blood families.

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* In America, the most famous type of blue blood is the Boston Brahmin, a loose association of wealthy old Protestant families around New England, with roots in the earliest English settlers. Many people mistake the Kennedys as Boston Brahmins, but they are comparatively NuveauRiche NouveauRiche and Catholic to boot. Other locations along the East Coast have their own local blue blood families.
20th Mar '18 12:48:03 PM margdean56
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* Various families in Creator/PatriciaAMcKillip's ''Literature/TheBellAtSealeyHead''. Because Raven Sproule is courting Gwyneth Blair, a merchant's daughter, Gwyneth rather suspects the Sproules are ImpoverishedPatrician.
* In Creator/KerryGreenwood's ''The Castlemaine Murders'', the Honourable Miss Literature/PhryneFisher's sister Eliza plays the disdainful UpperClassTwit trope straight in the early part of the book - only to subvert the trope after Eliza finally tells Phryne why she was sent to Australia (she was acting out because of how unhappy she was).

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* Various families in Creator/PatriciaAMcKillip's ''Literature/TheBellAtSealeyHead''. Because Raven Sproule is courting Gwyneth Blair, a merchant's daughter, Gwyneth rather suspects the Sproules are ImpoverishedPatrician.
{{Impoverished Patrician}}s.
* In Creator/KerryGreenwood's ''The Castlemaine Murders'', the Honourable Miss Literature/PhryneFisher's sister Eliza plays the disdainful UpperClassTwit trope straight in the early part of the book - only book--only to subvert the trope after Eliza finally tells Phryne why she was sent to Australia (she was acting out because of how unhappy she was).



* Virtually all of the major and minor characters in the Literature/{{Deryni}} works are in this class. The better ones treat members of the lowers orders (such as Revan in the ''Legends of Camber'' and ''Heirs off Camber'' and Morgan's pagan swordsmith Ferris from the story "Trial") quite well. The rest, well, see AristocratsAreEvil.

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* Virtually all of the major and minor characters in the Literature/{{Deryni}} works are in this class. The better ones treat members of the lowers orders (such as Revan in the ''Legends of Camber'' and ''Heirs off of Camber'' and Morgan's pagan swordsmith Ferris from the story "Trial") quite well. The rest, well, see AristocratsAreEvil.



* In one of the oldest surviving RobinHood tales, Robin carefully inquires of the sorrowful knight whether he was a newly created one, finding out he is of BlueBlood before he helps him. Robin himself is a yeomen then and for centuries after, but in the Elizabethean to Victorian times, he became, often, a disinherited earl. Maid Marian, likewise for centuries a shepherdess, also became a frequent noblewoman then. In the 20th century, Robin went back to yeoman, for a RagsToRiches rise, but Marian still is often noble.

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* In one of the oldest surviving RobinHood tales, Robin carefully inquires of the sorrowful knight whether he was a newly created one, finding out he is of BlueBlood before he helps him. Robin himself is a yeomen yeoman then and for centuries after, but in the Elizabethean Elizabethan to Victorian times, he became, often, a disinherited earl. Maid Marian, likewise for centuries a shepherdess, also became a frequent noblewoman then. In the 20th century, Robin went back to yeoman, for a RagsToRiches rise, but Marian still is often noble.



** An interesting case with the titular character, who holds noble titles in ''two'' star nations. She is first granted the title of Steadholder Harrington on the planet Grayson for helping to protect it from Masadan {{Church Militant}}s. Since she's a Manticoran citizen, the Queen chooses to grant her the "equivalent" title of Countess Harrington (although, without any holdings). After Honor is captured and presumed dead for several years, the Mantirocan title passes to her first cousin Devon, while her Grayson title is given to her baby sister Faith. When Honor returns alive, her Grayson title is returned, but the Queen chooses not to deprive Devon of his Earldom (despite the fact that he never wanted the title in the first place) and instead grants Honor the higher title of Duchess, with holdings this time. Also, for reference, the Grayson title of Steadholder can actually be considered higher than even a Manticoran Duke, since the Grayson society is much more [[FeudalFuture feudal]] than Manticoran.

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** An interesting case with the titular character, who holds noble titles in ''two'' star nations. She is first granted the title of Steadholder Harrington on the planet Grayson for helping to protect it from Masadan {{Church Militant}}s. Since she's a Manticoran citizen, the Queen chooses to grant her the "equivalent" title of Countess Harrington (although, (although without any holdings). After Honor is captured and presumed dead for several years, the Mantirocan Manticoran title passes to her first cousin Devon, while her Grayson title is given to her baby sister Faith. When Honor returns alive, her Grayson title is returned, but the Queen chooses not to deprive Devon of his Earldom (despite the fact that he never wanted the title in the first place) and instead grants Honor the higher title of Duchess, with holdings this time. Also, for reference, the Grayson title of Steadholder can actually be considered higher than even a Manticoran Duke, since the Grayson society is much more [[FeudalFuture feudal]] than Manticoran.



* In the ''Literature/EddieLaCrosse'' series, Eddie is officially Baron Edward [=LaCrosse=] of Arentia, and an old friend of the king, but he lives in self-imposed exile after a [[MyGreatestFailure monumental mistake]]. He's certainly not living a noble lifestyle, but he doesn't quite fit the normal pattern of an ImpoverishedPatrician, because it's deliberate and he doesn't really regret it but at the same time, he's not a DefectorFromDecadence, since it wasn't decadence that led him to leave. (And King Phil is a nice guy anyway.) Most of the time, his background is irrelevant enough that it never comes up.

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* In the ''Literature/EddieLaCrosse'' series, Eddie is officially Baron Edward [=LaCrosse=] of Arentia, and an old friend of the king, but he lives in self-imposed exile after a [[MyGreatestFailure monumental mistake]]. He's certainly not living a noble lifestyle, but he doesn't quite fit the normal pattern of an ImpoverishedPatrician, because it's deliberate and he doesn't really regret it but it--but at the same time, he's not a DefectorFromDecadence, since it wasn't decadence that led him to leave. (And King Phil is a nice guy anyway.) Most of the time, his background is irrelevant enough that it never comes up.



* The ''Literature/VillageTales'' novels feature the Duke of Taunton and his family and extended family, most of them titled; and his HeterosexualLifePartner HH the Nawab of Hubli; and a fair few others. Dukes, marquesses, viscounts, earls, Scots Lords of Parliament, barons, Scots lairds, Senators of the College of Justice, baronets, knights, courtesy titles including a Scots "Master"; post-nominals everywhere; even a Nawab. And Professor Lacy may have been given a mere Life Peerage, but she's a ''Lacy'' all the same. And with all that, the real [[WorkingClassHero heroes are all working-class, all the same]].

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* The ''Literature/VillageTales'' novels feature the Duke of Taunton and his family and extended family, most of them titled; and his HeterosexualLifePartner HH the Nawab of Hubli; and a fair few others. Dukes, marquesses, viscounts, earls, Scots Lords of Parliament, barons, Scots lairds, Senators of the College of Justice, baronets, knights, courtesy titles including titles--including a Scots "Master"; post-nominals everywhere; even a Nawab. And Professor Lacy may have been given a mere Life Peerage, but she's a ''Lacy'' all the same. And with all that, the real [[WorkingClassHero heroes are all working-class, all the same]].
20th Mar '18 12:29:05 PM margdean56
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The phrase ("blue blood") is a literal translation of the Spanish ''sangre azul''. The idea, originating in medieval times, was that common folk would have to work outside all day, and would thus develop tans. The wealthy, on the other hand, could spend all day inside, which would keep their skin pale (as they were fair-skinned Europeans). This would make their wrist veins with 'blue' blood easily visible, hence the term. It's also been [[http://www.wisegeek.com/what-does-it-mean-to-have-blue-blood.htm suggested]] that the term is race-based, since the pale-skinned European Spanish wanted to distinguish themselves from the darker-skinned "Moors". Yet another idea on the term's origin, which is erroneous but included here due to the likelihood of the reader encountering it in the context of nobility, is that crustaceans such as lobster literally have blue blood[[note]]because it's based on copper instead of iron[[/note]] and have always been very expensive. Thus, being able to afford these blue-blooded creatures would require considerable wealth, which usually meant noble station.[[note]]Lobster was neither expensive nor prized until the advent of canning in the 19th Century turned it into a delicacy. Although this more or less coincides with the advent of the English term, "blue blood", it came some 900 years after the Spanish introduced the concept of ''sangre azul'' nobility. Further complicating matters are all the wealthy merchants who could afford it and all the land-rich but cash-strapped nobles who could not.[[/note]] Another explanation could be that lobsters are heavily armoured --as would a KnightInShiningArmor be.

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The phrase ("blue blood") is a literal translation of the Spanish ''sangre azul''. The idea, originating in medieval times, was that common folk would have to work outside all day, and would thus develop tans. The wealthy, on the other hand, could spend all day inside, which would keep their skin pale (as they were fair-skinned Europeans). This would make their wrist veins with 'blue' blood easily visible, hence the term. It's also been [[http://www.wisegeek.com/what-does-it-mean-to-have-blue-blood.htm suggested]] that the term is race-based, since the pale-skinned European Spanish wanted to distinguish themselves from the darker-skinned "Moors". Yet another idea on the term's origin, which is erroneous but included here due to the likelihood of the reader encountering it in the context of nobility, is that crustaceans such as lobster literally have blue blood[[note]]because it's based on copper instead of iron[[/note]] and have always been very expensive. Thus, being able to afford these blue-blooded creatures would require considerable wealth, which usually meant noble station.[[note]]Lobster was neither expensive nor prized until the advent of canning in the 19th Century turned it into a delicacy. Although this more or less coincides with the advent of the English term, "blue blood", it came some 900 years after the Spanish introduced the concept of ''sangre azul'' nobility. Further complicating matters are all the wealthy merchants who could afford it and all the land-rich but cash-strapped nobles who could not.[[/note]] Another explanation could be that lobsters are heavily armoured --as -- as would a KnightInShiningArmor be.
20th Mar '18 12:28:21 PM margdean56
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Their effectiveness is frequently inversely related to their civilization. Dark Ages nobility often features AuthorityEqualsAsskicking, and the MiddleAges nobility ''will'' feature the KnightInShiningArmor and TheTourney, but a highly refined and civilized culture will feature an inordinate number of {{Upper Class Twit}}s (though an OfficerAndAGentleman is also possible) if not, indeed decadent courtiers.

Normal feature of the StandardRoyalCourt and DeadlyDecadentCourt. Endemic in HistoricalFiction, HighFantasy, and FeudalFuture. Oddly enough, often characters who have been MadeASlave have former nobility as their BackStory. The OfficerAndAGentleman is also often a BlueBlood, particularly if the ''noble'' code emphasizes [[TheMenFirst the duties and responsibilities]] that come with noble birth. Even in peacetime, they may regard readiness for war a duty; hence, TheTourney. As with Royalty, the ErmineCapeEffect can apply, so many should be expected to [[PimpedOutDress wear extremely fancy clothes]] if possible. Character related tropes are the EvilChancellor, GentlemanSnarker, RegentForLife, RoyalBrat, UpperClassTwit, ProperLady, SilkHidingSteel, and GrandeDame.

Since the duty of the nobility in the Middle Ages was [[KnightInShiningArmor warfare]], the sons of the nobility traditionally choose military career. ''Even today'' most military academies around the world are over-represented by sons of old noble families. The word ''cadet'' for an officer trainee stems from French, meaning "younger": the eldest son inherited the manor and estate, and the younger sons went to military academies. Tragically, since in the past the military education was begun at a ''very'' early age (7 to 11 years old), the nobility has also produced a lot of KidSamurai, but also a lot of ChildSoldiers. Today the old noble families are ''very'' likely to produce an OfficerAndAGentleman.

The phrase ("blue blood") is a literal translation of the Spanish ''sangre azul''. The idea, originating in medieval times, was that common folk would have to work outside all day, and would thus develop tans. The wealthy, on the other hand, could spend all day inside, which would keep their skin pale (as they were fair-skinned Europeans). This would make their wrist veins with 'blue' blood easily visible, hence the term. It's also been [[http://www.wisegeek.com/what-does-it-mean-to-have-blue-blood.htm suggested]] that the term is race-based, since the pale-skinned European Spanish wanted to distinguish themselves from the darker-skinned "Moors". Yet another idea on the term's origin, which is erroneous but included here due to the likelihood of the reader encountering it in the context of nobility, is that crustaceans such as lobster literally have blue blood[[note]]because it's based on copper instead of iron[[/note]] and have always been very expensive. Thus, being able to afford these blue-blooded creatures would require considerable wealth, which usually meant noble station.[[note]]Lobster was neither expensive nor prized until the advent of canning in the 19th Century turned it into a delicacy. Although this more or less coincides with the advent of the English term, "blue blood", it came some 900 years after the Spanish introduced the concept of ''sangre azul'' nobility. Further complicating matters are all the wealthy merchants who could afford it and all the land-rich but cash-strapped nobles who could not.[[/note]] Another explanation could be that lobsters are heavily armoured - as would a KnightInShiningArmor be.

to:

Their effectiveness is frequently inversely related to their civilization. Dark Ages nobility often features AuthorityEqualsAsskicking, and the MiddleAges nobility ''will'' feature the KnightInShiningArmor and TheTourney, but a highly refined and civilized culture will feature an inordinate number of {{Upper Class Twit}}s (though an OfficerAndAGentleman is also possible) if not, not indeed decadent courtiers.

Normal feature of the StandardRoyalCourt and DeadlyDecadentCourt. Endemic in HistoricalFiction, HighFantasy, and FeudalFuture. Oddly enough, often characters who have been MadeASlave have former nobility as their BackStory. The OfficerAndAGentleman is also often a BlueBlood, particularly if the ''noble'' code emphasizes [[TheMenFirst the duties and responsibilities]] that come with noble birth. Even in peacetime, they may regard readiness for war a duty; hence, TheTourney. As with Royalty, the ErmineCapeEffect can apply, so many should be expected to [[PimpedOutDress wear extremely fancy clothes]] if possible. Character related Related character tropes are the EvilChancellor, GentlemanSnarker, RegentForLife, RoyalBrat, UpperClassTwit, ProperLady, SilkHidingSteel, and GrandeDame.

Since the duty of the nobility in the Middle Ages was [[KnightInShiningArmor warfare]], the sons of the nobility traditionally choose chose a military career. ''Even today'' sons of old noble families are over-represented in most military academies around the world are over-represented by sons of old noble families.world. The word ''cadet'' for an officer trainee stems from French, meaning "younger": the eldest son inherited the manor and estate, and the younger sons went to military academies. Tragically, since in the past the military education was begun at a ''very'' early age (7 to 11 years old), the nobility has also produced a lot of KidSamurai, but also a lot of ChildSoldiers. Today the old noble families are ''very'' likely to produce an OfficerAndAGentleman.

The phrase ("blue blood") is a literal translation of the Spanish ''sangre azul''. The idea, originating in medieval times, was that common folk would have to work outside all day, and would thus develop tans. The wealthy, on the other hand, could spend all day inside, which would keep their skin pale (as they were fair-skinned Europeans). This would make their wrist veins with 'blue' blood easily visible, hence the term. It's also been [[http://www.wisegeek.com/what-does-it-mean-to-have-blue-blood.htm suggested]] that the term is race-based, since the pale-skinned European Spanish wanted to distinguish themselves from the darker-skinned "Moors". Yet another idea on the term's origin, which is erroneous but included here due to the likelihood of the reader encountering it in the context of nobility, is that crustaceans such as lobster literally have blue blood[[note]]because it's based on copper instead of iron[[/note]] and have always been very expensive. Thus, being able to afford these blue-blooded creatures would require considerable wealth, which usually meant noble station.[[note]]Lobster was neither expensive nor prized until the advent of canning in the 19th Century turned it into a delicacy. Although this more or less coincides with the advent of the English term, "blue blood", it came some 900 years after the Spanish introduced the concept of ''sangre azul'' nobility. Further complicating matters are all the wealthy merchants who could afford it and all the land-rich but cash-strapped nobles who could not.[[/note]] Another explanation could be that lobsters are heavily armoured - as --as would a KnightInShiningArmor be.
14th Mar '18 7:43:50 AM salvadorfranz
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* In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfHeroesTrailsOfColdSteel'', Jusis and Laura have noble blood in them (though Jusis only has half of it when he reveals that his dad slept with a commoner woman). Rean in comparison is adopted though [[spoiler:it turns out that his dad was a commoner who was elevated into a noble by the emperor. Said dad is also on a crusade to get rid of the nobility system in the empire.]]
11th Mar '18 9:21:52 PM CaptainCrawdad
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/UnbreakableKimmySchmidt'': The rich Vorhees family is one of America's oldest families, with roots straight from the first Dutch settlers.


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* In America, the most famous type of blue blood is the Boston Brahmin, a loose association of wealthy old Protestant families around New England, with roots in the earliest English settlers. Many people mistake the Kennedys as Boston Brahmins, but they are comparatively NuveauRiche and Catholic to boot. Other locations along the East Coast have their own local blue blood families.
11th Mar '18 9:10:22 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''VideoGame/{{Bully}}'': The Preppy social circle all come from old money. They're the last social circle the main character can take over.
13th Feb '18 2:48:35 PM WaxingName
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* Kal-El, aka Clark Kent aka Franchise/{{Superman}} is a scion of the House of El, a noble family of scientists who in most continuities had much wealth, power, and influence over all of Krypton. Of course, it didn't stop all of Krypton from disbelieving [[CassandraTruth Jor-El]]'s prediction that Krypton would nuke itself. ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} is also a part of this family, being Superman's cousin, and Superman's clone ComicBook/{{Superboy}} was made an honorary member of the family by Superman. All three of them wear the Superman S, which is generally explained as being the House of El's family crest.

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* Kal-El, aka Clark Kent aka Franchise/{{Superman}} is a scion of the House of El, a noble family of scientists who in most continuities had much wealth, power, and influence over all of Krypton. Of course, it didn't stop all of Krypton from disbelieving [[CassandraTruth Jor-El]]'s prediction that Krypton would nuke itself. ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} is By extension, Clark's cousin [[ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} Kara]] and son [[ComicBook/{{Superboy}} Jon]] are also a part of this family, being Superman's cousin, and Superman's clone ComicBook/{{Superboy}} [[ComicBook/{{Superboy}} Conner Kent]] was made an honorary member of the family by Superman. All three of them wear the Superman S, which is generally explained as being the House of El's family crest. Of course, given Krypton's destruction, all members of Superman's family live like normal everyday people on Earth.
29th Jan '18 2:29:07 PM Discar
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* In ''Literature/HonorHarrington'', the [[TheKingdom Star Kingdom of Manticore]] has a noble class that was mostly descended from the first wave of colonists. However, they also create new peerages for exceptionally distinguished commoners, such as the protagonist herself.

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* In ''Literature/HonorHarrington'', the [[TheKingdom Star Kingdom of Manticore]] Manticore has a noble class that was mostly descended from the first wave of colonists. However, they also create new peerages for exceptionally distinguished commoners, such as the protagonist herself.
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