History Main / BlingofWar

10th Apr '17 9:59:18 AM AFP
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* One interesting example would be the way the US Army Air Forces painted their aircraft during WorldWarII. For the first part of the war, USAAF planes were typicaly painted in Olive Drab or Desert Pink to make them harder to spot when parked on the ground. Naturally, this served no particular benefit for them in the air, especially for the famed [[WeHaveReserves massive bomber formations]] with their massive collection of contrails being impossible to miss on a clear day anyways. By the end of the war, the USAAF had given up on this entirely and instead elected to send the planes into combat using only necessary identification markings (plus a strip of paint in front of the canopy to avoid sun glare), leaving them with a shiny metalic finish. This also saved a few hours per plane on the production lines, allowing the American industrial machine to crank out [[UpToEleven even more]] aircraft.
3rd Apr '17 6:03:28 PM nombretomado
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* In a similar gag to the Three Stooges one above, a production of ''ThePiratesOfPenzance'' had the ModernMajorGeneral bragging about the medals on his chest: "Yes, I got these on the frontier. I had a couple on the back 'ere ''*indicates coattails*'' but they fell off."

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* In a similar gag to the Three Stooges one above, a production of ''ThePiratesOfPenzance'' ''Theatre/ThePiratesOfPenzance'' had the ModernMajorGeneral bragging about the medals on his chest: "Yes, I got these on the frontier. I had a couple on the back 'ere ''*indicates coattails*'' but they fell off."
25th Mar '17 6:12:35 PM Euodiachloris
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** The one thing you'll find [[CainAndAbel Gregor and Sandor Clegane]] agreeing on is that bling for bling's sake is beyond stupid. The only thing close to it either of them owns is Sandor's snarling dog helm, and even ''that'' puts the "protect my nose and skull without giving me a headache" practicality before the very likely carefully crafted insult directed at his brother. The rest of their gear? Dark, plain, practical and well-made. Both are [[ProffesionalKiller killers]] rather than standard knights, though.

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** The one thing you'll find [[CainAndAbel Gregor and Sandor Clegane]] actually agreeing on is that bling for bling's sake is beyond stupid. The only thing things close to it either of them owns own is Sandor's snarling dog helm, and helm (and even ''that'' puts the "protect my nose and skull without giving me a headache" practicality before the very likely carefully crafted insult directed at his brother.brother) and Gregor's identify-me-by-this-crest, slightly sculpted helmet, which he often [[PaperThinDisguise doesn't even wear]]. The rest of their gear? Dark, plain, practical and well-made. Both are [[ProffesionalKiller [[ProfessionalKiller killers]] rather than standard knights, though.
14th Mar '17 5:17:24 AM Doug86
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* In Film/TheAlamo (2004) Davy Crockett lampshades this aspect of Santa Anna at one point, calling him a peacock.

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* In Film/TheAlamo ''Film/TheAlamo'' (2004) Davy Crockett lampshades this aspect of Santa Anna at one point, calling him a peacock.



* Ras the Exhorter in Literature/InvisibleMan applies this trope heavily after becoming [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Ras the Destroyer]], though rather than using gold and such, he wears "the costume of an Abyssinian chieftain." The narrator mocks him for it, but at least the spear comes in handy.

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* Ras the Exhorter in Literature/InvisibleMan ''Literature/InvisibleMan'' applies this trope heavily after becoming [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Ras the Destroyer]], though rather than using gold and such, he wears "the costume of an Abyssinian chieftain." The narrator mocks him for it, but at least the spear comes in handy.



* In Neil Rutledge's TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}} story ''Small Cog'' -- played with, with enthusiasm. The forces were on a ceremonial duty when the attack came. On one hand, this let them get to their current position in time to defend. On the other hand, they were in ceremonial uniforms. The colonel is ''not'' pleased with the latter fact.

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* In Neil Rutledge's TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}} ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' story ''Small Cog'' -- played with, with enthusiasm. The forces were on a ceremonial duty when the attack came. On one hand, this let them get to their current position in time to defend. On the other hand, they were in ceremonial uniforms. The colonel is ''not'' pleased with the latter fact.



* Also subverted in Robert Heinlein's Literature/SpaceCadet. Both cadets and officers in the Patrol wear extremely plain uniforms. Heinlein briefly discusses the psychology behind plain and jazzy uniforms.

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* Also subverted in Robert Heinlein's Literature/SpaceCadet.''Literature/SpaceCadet''. Both cadets and officers in the Patrol wear extremely plain uniforms. Heinlein briefly discusses the psychology behind plain and jazzy uniforms.



* The ''Literature/SPQR'' novel ''Nobody Loves a Centurian'' gives an avid CostumePorn description of the protagonist Decius putting on his Roman officer's uniform, complete with an anatomically correct breastplate and a push-broom helmet. After he finishes, another officer arrives with the message that their commanding officer wants everyone to wear their combat uniforms to the meeting instead. There's no time to change, and everyone has a good laugh at Decius's expense.

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* The ''Literature/SPQR'' ''Literature/{{SPQR}}'' novel ''Nobody Loves a Centurian'' gives an avid CostumePorn description of the protagonist Decius putting on his Roman officer's uniform, complete with an anatomically correct breastplate and a push-broom helmet. After he finishes, another officer arrives with the message that their commanding officer wants everyone to wear their combat uniforms to the meeting instead. There's no time to change, and everyone has a good laugh at Decius's expense.



* Somewhat more understated in Literature/TolkiensLegendarium, but still present. The armor worn by the Dwarves and Bilbo in ''Literature/TheHobbit'' is made in part or entirely of ''mithril'', with gold and gems (and in fact, ''mithril'' is widely used in ''any'' war-gear of Dwarven and even Elven make), and even the helms of the Tower Guard in ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' are made using ''mithril''. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] here since while Mythril is the rarest and most precious of metals, it's also the STRONGEST (as evidenced in in ''Literature/FellowshipOfTheRing'' when Frodo survives a blow from a cave troll with nothing more than bruises thanks to a mythirl mailshirt). The armies of the Noldor in particular are noted for this (it helps that the High King at the beginnings of their trouble with Morgoth in Valinor may have been the greatest smith the world had ever known). The Rohirrim, having been inspired by the UsefulNotes/AngloSaxons, often use gold on their armor, helms, shields and sword-hilts. Gold is also used by the Southrons and Easterlings in Sauron's armies. Scabbards (such as Andúril's) and other fittings are also often fit with precious metals and gems.

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* Somewhat more understated in Literature/TolkiensLegendarium, but still present. The armor worn by the Dwarves and Bilbo in ''Literature/TheHobbit'' is made in part or entirely of ''mithril'', with gold and gems (and in fact, ''mithril'' is widely used in ''any'' war-gear of Dwarven and even Elven make), and even the helms of the Tower Guard in ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' are made using ''mithril''. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] here since while Mythril is the rarest and most precious of metals, it's also the STRONGEST (as evidenced in in ''Literature/FellowshipOfTheRing'' ''Literature/TheFellowshipOfTheRing'' when Frodo survives a blow from a cave troll with nothing more than bruises thanks to a mythirl mailshirt). The armies of the Noldor in particular are noted for this (it helps that the High King at the beginnings of their trouble with Morgoth in Valinor may have been the greatest smith the world had ever known). The Rohirrim, having been inspired by the UsefulNotes/AngloSaxons, often use gold on their armor, helms, shields and sword-hilts. Gold is also used by the Southrons and Easterlings in Sauron's armies. Scabbards (such as Andúril's) and other fittings are also often fit with precious metals and gems.



* In Original StarTrek the male MirrorUniverse uniforms aren't that different (except maybe for Kirk's) but the women's uniforms include a bare midrif - and a ceremonial but very effective dagger for any male crewman who crosses the line.

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* In Original StarTrek ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'' the male MirrorUniverse uniforms aren't that different (except maybe for Kirk's) but the women's uniforms include a bare midrif - and a ceremonial but very effective dagger for any male crewman who crosses the line.



* The Bounty Hunter in ''Tabletopgame/BattleTech// is known for painting every mech he pilots bright green and covering it with symbols for different forms of currency (dollars, pounds, yen, C-Bills, etc.).

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* The Bounty Hunter in ''Tabletopgame/BattleTech// ''Tabletopgame/BattleTech'' is known for painting every mech he pilots bright green and covering it with symbols for different forms of currency (dollars, pounds, yen, C-Bills, etc.).



* In ''Minecraft'', you can forge gold armor and weapons, [[RealityEnsues but in a subversion]], they're nearly useless as anything other than a display of wealth, since iron is much easier to find and the resulting equipment is twice as strong.

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* In ''Minecraft'', ''VideoGame/{{Minecraft}}'', you can forge gold armor and weapons, [[RealityEnsues but in a subversion]], they're nearly useless as anything other than a display of wealth, since iron is much easier to find and the resulting equipment is twice as strong.



* Prince Gilgamesh in the VideoGame/TowerOfDruaga wears golden armor.

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* Prince Gilgamesh in the VideoGame/TowerOfDruaga ''VideoGame/TheTowerOfDruaga'' wears golden armor.



** In fact, the Jägermonsters ARE this trope in spades. Originally, in their "generic monster" days, they wore uniforms that actually were uniforms, but it's pretty much unknown these days to see two wearing the same outfit.

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** In fact, the Jägermonsters ARE this trope in spades. Originally, in their "generic monster" days, they wore uniforms that actually were uniforms, but it's pretty much unknown these days to see two wearing the same outfit.



** Averted, interestingly enough, by [[UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler Hitler]] himself, who wore a simple party uniform to portray himself as a man of the people and remind them that he had been a lance-corporal in UsefulNotes/WW1. Even though he could have covered his chest in medals, he made a point of only wearing his war decorations and his party badge.
** Oh, the uniforms of Reichsmarschall Göring. They couldn't even be called "uniforms" because they, well, [[CustomUniform weren't uniform]]. Perfectly tailored and designed by him, to reflect his unique position, self-aggrandizing titles, and the amount of loot he stole along the way. He also loved medals. His StaffOfAuthority was also superior to the regular officer's [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baton_(symbol) baton]]. There was a joke in Nazi Germany: "What is one gör? It's the maximum amount of metal a man can wear on his chest without tipping over."
*** There's another joke about Göring and Hitler going to inspect ships under construction at a naval yard. Göring arrived first and went aboard a ship; when Hitler showed up the Reichsmarschall put his head through a porthole to watch Hitler's arrival. When Der Führer saw this, he mentioned to an aide, "Now he really has gone too far -- he's hung an entire battleship around his neck!"

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** Averted, interestingly enough, by [[UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler Hitler]] himself, who wore a simple party uniform to portray himself as a man of the people and remind them that he had been a lance-corporal in UsefulNotes/WW1.UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. Even though he could have covered his chest in medals, he made a point of only wearing his war decorations and his party badge.
** Oh, the uniforms of Reichsmarschall Göring. They couldn't even be called "uniforms" because they, well, [[CustomUniform weren't uniform]]. Perfectly tailored and designed by him, to reflect his unique position, self-aggrandizing titles, and the amount of loot he stole along the way. He also loved medals. His StaffOfAuthority was also superior to the regular officer's [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baton_(symbol) baton]]. There was a joke in Nazi Germany: "What is one gör? It's the maximum amount of metal a man can wear on his chest without tipping over."
*** There's another joke about Göring and Hitler going to inspect ships under construction at a naval yard. Göring arrived first and went aboard a ship; when Hitler showed up the Reichsmarschall put his head through a porthole to watch Hitler's arrival. When Der Führer saw this, he mentioned to an aide, "Now he really has gone too far -- he's hung an entire battleship around his neck!"



** Goring for the record was a UsefulNotes/WW1 fighter pilot and a legitimately successful one (he was the Red Baron's squadron XO). The Luftwaffe under his command achieved several great successes. So, with the caveat, his bling would have been impressive enough had he just kept the medals he had legitimately earned, but for some reason, he went excessive.

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** Goring for the record was a UsefulNotes/WW1 UsefulNotes/WorldWarI fighter pilot and a legitimately successful one (he was the Red Baron's squadron XO). The Luftwaffe under his command achieved several great successes. So, with the caveat, his bling would have been impressive enough had he just kept the medals he had legitimately earned, but for some reason, he went excessive.



* Since the late 18th century the number of orders and decorations increased dramatically as many countries instituted new ones; the 1780s and 1790s also saw the introduction of decorations for combattants below officer rank and the end of UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars that of campaign medals, i. e. decorations not just for those who performed deeds of valour or that were exceptional in other ways, but to everybody who had been part of the forces in the field. Thus the chests of military men became decorated with a lot more ribbons and pieces of enameled metal than before. This was also reflected in painted portraits, where an officer usually would be shown wearing all his decorations to the point that it was quite common that orders or medals awarded after an officer had sat for his portrait would be painted in additionally later. How many of his decorations an officer would actually wear every day was an entirely different matter, but of course these portraits often were used as reference by the makers of historical movies and television series, leading to slip-ups where people are shown wearing decorations that they only were awarded long after the year a film is set in.

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* Since the late 18th century the number of orders and decorations increased dramatically as many countries instituted new ones; the 1780s and 1790s also saw the introduction of decorations for combattants combatants below officer rank and the end of UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars that of campaign medals, i. i.e. decorations not just for those who performed deeds of valour or that were exceptional in other ways, but to everybody who had been part of the forces in the field. Thus the chests of military men became decorated with a lot more ribbons and pieces of enameled metal than before. This was also reflected in painted portraits, where an officer usually would be shown wearing all his decorations to the point that it was quite common that orders or medals awarded after an officer had sat for his portrait would be painted in additionally later. How many of his decorations an officer would actually wear every day was an entirely different matter, but of course these portraits often were used as reference by the makers of historical movies and television series, leading to slip-ups where people are shown wearing decorations that they only were awarded long after the year a film is set in.
11th Mar '17 3:06:13 PM RobTan
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* ZigZagged by UsefulNotes/JosefStalin. He had several self-awarded decorations, but for public appearances usually only wore one of them on an otherwise unadorned uniform. However, the decoration he wore was his Hero of the Soviet Union medal, the highest award granted to Soviet citizens. However however, that medal was a tastefully understated brass star and red ribbon. Say what you will about him, but Stalin was a master of subtle ostentation.

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* ZigZagged by UsefulNotes/JosefStalin. He had several self-awarded decorations, but for public appearances usually only wore one of them on an otherwise unadorned uniform. However, the decoration he wore was his Hero of the Soviet Union medal, the highest award granted to Soviet citizens. However however, that medal was a tastefully understated brass small gold star and red ribbon. Say what you will about him, but Stalin was a master of subtle ostentation.
11th Mar '17 12:53:42 PM RobTan
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* ZigZagged by UsefulNotes/JosefStalin. He had several self-awarded decorations, but for public appearances usually only wore one of them on an otherwise unadorned uniform. However, the decoration he wore was his Hero of the Soviet Union medal, the highest award granted to Soviet citizens. However however, that medal was a tasefully understated brass star and red ribbon, much less impressive than, say, an American Purple Heart.

to:

* ZigZagged by UsefulNotes/JosefStalin. He had several self-awarded decorations, but for public appearances usually only wore one of them on an otherwise unadorned uniform. However, the decoration he wore was his Hero of the Soviet Union medal, the highest award granted to Soviet citizens. However however, that medal was a tasefully tastefully understated brass star and red ribbon, much less impressive than, say, an American Purple Heart.ribbon. Say what you will about him, but Stalin was a master of subtle ostentation.
11th Mar '17 12:52:20 PM RobTan
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* ZigZagged by UsefulNotes/JosefStalin. He had several self-awarded decorations, but for public appearances usually only wore one of them on an otherwise unadorned uniform. However, the decoration he wore was his Hero of the Soviet Union medal, the highest award granted to Soviet citizens. However however, that medal was a tasefully understated brass star and red ribbon, much less impressive than, say, an American Purple Heart.
4th Mar '17 9:38:39 AM ImperialMajestyXO
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* Idi Amin, who, like Brezhnev, had to have the length of his tunics extended to accommodate his absurdly large collection of awards.

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* Idi Amin, UsefulNotes/IdiAmin, who, like Brezhnev, had to have the length of his tunics extended to accommodate his absurdly large collection of awards.
27th Dec '16 5:32:48 PM gb00393
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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'' is an adaptation of the aforementioned ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', but it tones down a lot of the book's war-bling. Compare the descriptions of Tywin Lannister's armour in the novels to [[http://vignette1.wikia.nocookie.net/gameofthrones/images/b/b0/Tywin_S2.png/revision/latest?cb=20120315203024 what he wears in the show]] - still elaborate, but not nearly so gaudy. The show even discusses the trope with regard to the Kingsguard uniform: it's very fancy, in contrast to the armour worn by the Stark household guard. Ned Stark notes dryly to a member of the King's Guard: "Very handsome armor. Not a scratch on it." The member, Jaime, replies equally dryly, "I know. People have been swinging at me for years and [[BadassBoast they always seem to miss]]."

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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'':
**
''Series/GameOfThrones'' is an adaptation of the aforementioned ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', but it tones down a lot of the book's war-bling. Compare the descriptions of Tywin Lannister's armour in the novels to [[http://vignette1.wikia.nocookie.net/gameofthrones/images/b/b0/Tywin_S2.png/revision/latest?cb=20120315203024 what he wears in the show]] - still elaborate, but not nearly so gaudy. The show even discusses the trope with regard to the Kingsguard uniform: it's very fancy, in contrast to the armour worn by the Stark household guard. Ned Stark notes dryly to a member of the King's Guard: "Very handsome armor. Not a scratch on it." The member, Jaime, replies equally dryly, "I know. People have been swinging at me for years and [[BadassBoast they always seem to miss]]."


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** Joffrey's armor and gilded sword. His crossbow is adorned with gems as well.
** While acting as Hand of the King, Tyrion gets a lavish suit of armor cleverly adorned with golden hands.
** Prince Doran Martell's personal bodyguard Aero Hotah wields an large, bejeweled glaive.
** Sandor notices Oathkeeper's garish hilt and pommel and is quickly able to figure out who made it and gave it to its wielder.
25th Dec '16 9:49:28 AM Powoga
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* The [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/4/fe4-054.jpg enemy]] generals in the Archanea and Jugdral series of VideoGame/FireEmblem games often wear a [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/5/fe5-011l.jpg long]] [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/6/fe6-022.jpg extravagant]] [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/4/fe4-053.jpg Black]] BadAssLongCoat complete with a HighCollarOfDoom.

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* The [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/4/fe4-054.jpg enemy]] enemy generals in the Archanea and Jugdral series of VideoGame/FireEmblem games often wear a [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/5/fe5-011l.jpg long]] [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/6/fe6-022.jpg extravagant]] [[http://serenesforest.net/media/tcg/4/fe4-053.jpg Black]] long, extravagant, black BadAssLongCoat complete with a HighCollarOfDoom.
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