History Main / BasedOnAGreatBigLie

28th Dec '16 5:23:19 PM Solicitr
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*The ''Iolo Manuscripts'' are a series of ancient manuscripts on Welsh Bardic and Druidic theology collected in the 18th century by Iolo Morganwg, edited by Taliesin Williams and published in 1848. Or so it was claimed: in fact "Iolo Morganwg", real name Edward Williams, faked them all. Nonetheless, the "Iolo" collection was taken as authentic and used as source material by generations of scholars before it was debunked.
28th Dec '16 5:04:45 PM Solicitr
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The ''Protocols'' remains a solid seller in the Arab world thanks to the Okhrana's successor the KGB, which during the Cold War translated it into Arabic and distributed copies liberally among Israel's neighbors.
7th Dec '16 5:21:59 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* William Shakespeare bent ArtisticLicense to the snapping point when writing some of his history plays. The real Theatre/{{Macbeth}}, for instance, defeated a young King Duncan in battle to win his throne. The real Macbeth also had a successful 17-year reign as King of the Scots before being himself defeated in battle by Duncan's son Malcolm (who had been a child, not a young adult, when Duncan was killed). Malcolm also seemingly killed Macbeth by his own hand; no person corresponding to Macduff existed in reality. And Malcolm did not immediately take the throne after killing Macbeth; the Macbeth's stepson Lulach (who does not even appear in the play) had a brief and apparently rather dismal reign as King before Malcolm had him assassinated and only ''then'' became King Malcolm III. A lot of it can be justified as him having to please the monarchy at the time, who were descendants of Duncan and Malcolm, and the rest can be justified by the rather inaccurate contemporary history books he had available. In any case, audiences at the time were relatively unconcerned about whether historical dramas got the details right.
* Ruggero Leoncavallo's opera ''{{Pagliacci}}'' is probably based on a lie. Leoncavallo said it was based on a court case that his father, who was a judge, presided over, and further claimed that he had the documentation to prove it. However, no such document, or indeed any corroborating evidence, has ever been found. It is now generally believed that Leoncavallo played the "true story" card to evade the charge of plagiarism.

to:

* William Shakespeare Creator/WilliamShakespeare bent ArtisticLicense to the snapping point when writing some of his history plays. The real Theatre/{{Macbeth}}, for instance, defeated a young King Duncan in battle to win his throne. The real Macbeth also had a successful 17-year reign as King of the Scots before being himself defeated in battle by Duncan's son Malcolm (who had been a child, not a young adult, when Duncan was killed). Malcolm also seemingly killed Macbeth by his own hand; no person corresponding to Macduff existed in reality. And Malcolm did not immediately take the throne after killing Macbeth; the Macbeth's stepson Lulach (who does not even appear in the play) had a brief and apparently rather dismal reign as King before Malcolm had him assassinated and only ''then'' became King Malcolm III. A lot of it can be justified as him having to please the monarchy at the time, who were descendants of Duncan and Malcolm, and the rest can be justified by the rather inaccurate contemporary history books he had available. In any case, audiences at the time were relatively unconcerned about whether historical dramas got the details right.
* Ruggero Leoncavallo's opera ''{{Pagliacci}}'' ''Theatre/{{Pagliacci}}'' is probably based on a lie. Leoncavallo said it was based on a court case that his father, who was a judge, presided over, and further claimed that he had the documentation to prove it. However, no such document, or indeed any corroborating evidence, has ever been found. It is now generally believed that Leoncavallo played the "true story" card to evade the charge of plagiarism.
6th Dec '16 6:58:43 PM Bissek
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Film/{{Amadeus}}'' was based on an apocryphal tale claiming Salieri, a contemporary of Creator/WolfgangAmadeusMozart, went mad late in his life and confessed to killing Mozart. It is a matter of historical record that Mozart died during a long period of illness. The film accepts ''both'' of these stories as true. Salieri is painted as a jealous competitor to Mozart who hated the man but adored his genius, and he "kills" him by encouraging a naive Mozart suffering from illness to make more music. The film is forced to stretch the truth to reach this result; historically, there is no evidence that Salieri worked on the Requiem Mass with Mozart (it is unknown how much of the piece Mozart wrote, but it was finished by Franz Xaver Süssmayr), and the film implies that Salieri was the anonymous patron who commissioned the Requiem Mass.[[note]]Mozart never did find out who the anonymous patron was, but we know now that it was Count Franz von Walsegg. Interestingly, the real-life scenario is also plausible in the film; the film doesn't show that Salieri ''planned'' for that to happen, but he also wasn't above exploiting the situation to ensure that the Requiem Mass got written.[[/note]] The film's writers [[TheyPlottedAPerfectlyGoodWaste did this intentionally]], however, claiming that they didn't need to write a faithful biography on Mozart; they just wanted to work with the interesting (but false) premise that Salieri was jealous of Mozart. They [[ShownTheirWork did their research]] on all the things that didn't need to be stretched to make this happen.[[labelnote:Examples include]] young Mozart's silly ChildhoodMarriageProposal to [[UsefulNotes/MarieAntoinette the Emperor's sister]] and the Emperor's complaint that one of Mozart's compositions contained "too many notes."[[/labelnote]]

to:

* ''Film/{{Amadeus}}'' was based on an apocryphal tale claiming Salieri, a contemporary of Creator/WolfgangAmadeusMozart, went mad late in his life and confessed to killing Mozart. It is a matter of historical record that Mozart died during a long period of illness. The film accepts ''both'' of these stories as true. Salieri is painted as a jealous competitor to Mozart who hated the man but adored his genius, and he "kills" him by encouraging a naive Mozart suffering from illness to make more music. The film is forced to stretch the truth to reach this result; historically, Mozart and Salieri may have been professional rivals[[note]]They were in the same trade in a city with a limited market for that trade - as such at times a job won by one would be a job lost by the other[[/note]], but they respected each other's skills, [[http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-35589422 and even collaborated to produce a contata in 1785]]. Historically, there is no evidence that Salieri worked on the Requiem Mass with Mozart (it is unknown how much of the piece Mozart wrote, but it was finished by Franz Xaver Süssmayr), and the film implies that Salieri was the anonymous patron who commissioned the Requiem Mass.[[note]]Mozart never did find out who the anonymous patron was, but we know now that it was Count Franz von Walsegg. Interestingly, the real-life scenario is also plausible in the film; the film doesn't show that Salieri ''planned'' for that to happen, but he also wasn't above exploiting the situation to ensure that the Requiem Mass got written.[[/note]] The film's writers [[TheyPlottedAPerfectlyGoodWaste did this intentionally]], however, claiming that they didn't need to write a faithful biography on Mozart; they just wanted to work with the interesting (but false) premise that Salieri was jealous of Mozart. They [[ShownTheirWork did their research]] on all the things that didn't need to be stretched to make this happen.[[labelnote:Examples include]] young Mozart's silly ChildhoodMarriageProposal to [[UsefulNotes/MarieAntoinette the Emperor's sister]] and the Emperor's complaint that one of Mozart's compositions contained "too many notes."[[/labelnote]]
6th Dec '16 6:53:23 PM Bissek
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Film/{{Hidalgo}}'' is based on the actual stories of Frank Hopkins -- but Hopkins is known to history as a [[TheMunchausen con man]] and quite possibly a pathological liar. Hopkins was ''not'' part Native American, did not ever work in Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show, never visited the Middle East (and certainly was never in a gigantic race in the Middle East), etc. On some level, however, you've got to admire the guy for inventing a story that Hollywood thought was worthy of a movie, given that so many have tried and failed.

to:

* ''Film/{{Hidalgo}}'' is based on the actual stories of Frank Hopkins -- but Hopkins is known to history as a [[TheMunchausen con man]] and quite possibly a pathological liar. Hopkins was ''not'' part Native American, did not ever work in Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show, never visited the Middle East (and certainly was never in a gigantic race in the Middle East), East, which historians can't find any corroborating evidence to prove ever happened in the first place), etc. On some level, however, you've got to admire the guy for inventing a story that Hollywood thought was worthy of a movie, given that so many have tried and failed.
1st Dec '16 9:32:19 PM jormis29
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Film/{{Fargo}}'' is supposedly based on a true story. It isn't. Creator/TheCoenBrothers (eventually) tried to weasel their way out of this by saying that everything in the movie was meant to be interpreted as fiction, ''including the blurb at the beginning that claimed it was based on a true story''. Another lie they fed the media was that there was a news report in 1987 about a businessman who planned on having his wife fake-kidnapped for ransom money, but the police caught him before he could make his plan come to fruition, and the Coens asked themselves "what if he ''had'' succeeded?" On the special features on the ''Fargo'' DVD, the Coens claim they were afraid nobody would have believed the crazy plot they came up with any other way. (This backfired on the Coens when it was widely reported in the press that a Japanese woman who was found dead in the area in 2001 had frozen to death while trying to find a large sum of money that had been hidden by a character in the film and lost when he was murdered. In actual fact she almost certainly committed suicide, and the belief that she was searching for the money was due to a misinterpretation of a conversation that she had had with a police officer.)

to:

* ''Film/{{Fargo}}'' is supposedly based on a true story. It isn't. Creator/TheCoenBrothers (eventually) tried to weasel their way out of this by saying that everything in the movie was meant to be interpreted as fiction, ''including the blurb at the beginning that claimed it was based on a true story''. Another lie they fed the media was that there was a news report in 1987 about a businessman who planned on having his wife fake-kidnapped for ransom money, but the police caught him before he could make his plan come to fruition, and the Coens asked themselves "what if he ''had'' succeeded?" On the special features on the ''Fargo'' DVD, the Coens claim they were afraid nobody would have believed the crazy plot they came up with any other way. (This This backfired on the Coens when it was widely reported in the press that a Japanese woman who was found dead in the area in 2001 had frozen to death while trying to find a large sum of money that had been hidden by a character in the film and lost when he was murdered. In actual fact she almost certainly committed suicide, and the belief that she was searching for the money was due to a misinterpretation of a conversation that she had had with a police officer.) This story itself was turned into ''Film/KumikoTheTreasureHunter''
1st Dec '16 1:49:05 PM Miracle@StOlaf
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/OneThousandWaysToDie'' ping-pongs between this and VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory, with occasional flirtations with truth.

to:

* ''Series/OneThousandWaysToDie'' ping-pongs between this and VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory, with occasional (and still very heavily exaggerated) flirtations with truth.
29th Nov '16 6:46:34 AM LondonKdS
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Film/{{Fargo}}'' is supposedly based on a true story. It isn't. Creator/TheCoenBrothers (eventually) tried to weasel their way out of this by saying that everything in the movie was meant to be interpreted as fiction, ''including the blurb at the beginning that claimed it was based on a true story''. Another lie they fed the media was that there was a news report in 1987 about a businessman who planned on having his wife fake-kidnapped for ransom money, but the police caught him before he could make his plan come to fruition, and the Coens asked themselves "what if he ''had'' succeeded?" On the special features on the ''Fargo'' DVD, the Coens claim they were afraid nobody would have believed the crazy plot they came up with any other way.

to:

* ''Film/{{Fargo}}'' is supposedly based on a true story. It isn't. Creator/TheCoenBrothers (eventually) tried to weasel their way out of this by saying that everything in the movie was meant to be interpreted as fiction, ''including the blurb at the beginning that claimed it was based on a true story''. Another lie they fed the media was that there was a news report in 1987 about a businessman who planned on having his wife fake-kidnapped for ransom money, but the police caught him before he could make his plan come to fruition, and the Coens asked themselves "what if he ''had'' succeeded?" On the special features on the ''Fargo'' DVD, the Coens claim they were afraid nobody would have believed the crazy plot they came up with any other way. (This backfired on the Coens when it was widely reported in the press that a Japanese woman who was found dead in the area in 2001 had frozen to death while trying to find a large sum of money that had been hidden by a character in the film and lost when he was murdered. In actual fact she almost certainly committed suicide, and the belief that she was searching for the money was due to a misinterpretation of a conversation that she had had with a police officer.)
27th Nov '16 5:42:02 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** That book heavily inspired ''TheDaVinciCode'', which caused an identical resurgence in public interest. Amusingly, the authors of the first book sued Brown for copyright infringement and ran into a severe case of MortonsFork; since you can't copyright history or facts, if they wanted to claim infringement, they had to admit they were making it up. And even that wouldn't work because you can't copyright very general ideas either. Needless to say, [[HeadsIWinTailsYouLose they lost.]] Even more interestingly, TheDaVinciCode even name-drops ''Holy Blood, Holy Grail'' as one of Teabing's resource on the Grail,[[note]]"Teabing", by the way, is an anagram of "Baigent", one of the authors of ''Holy Blood, Holy Grail''[[/note]] which would counter accusations of directly ripping off the book. The ideas posited in ''Holy Blood, Holy Grail'' were essentially a MacGuffin in the story, as various Holy Grails so often are. But in the end, Dan Brown [[DanBrowned made the same mistake]] as the authors of ''Holy Blood'' and claimed it was all real.

to:

** That book heavily inspired ''TheDaVinciCode'', ''Literature/TheDaVinciCode'', which caused an identical resurgence in public interest. Amusingly, the authors of the first book sued Brown for copyright infringement and ran into a severe case of MortonsFork; since you can't copyright history or facts, if they wanted to claim infringement, they had to admit they were making it up. And even that wouldn't work because you can't copyright very general ideas either. Needless to say, [[HeadsIWinTailsYouLose they lost.]] Even more interestingly, TheDaVinciCode The da Vinci Code even name-drops ''Holy Blood, Holy Grail'' as one of Teabing's resource on the Grail,[[note]]"Teabing", by the way, is an anagram of "Baigent", one of the authors of ''Holy Blood, Holy Grail''[[/note]] which would counter accusations of directly ripping off the book. The ideas posited in ''Holy Blood, Holy Grail'' were essentially a MacGuffin in the story, as various Holy Grails so often are. But in the end, Dan Brown [[DanBrowned made the same mistake]] as the authors of ''Holy Blood'' and claimed it was all real.
24th Nov '16 3:35:29 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The US/Europe release of ''FatalFrame''/''[[MarketBasedTitle Project Zero]]'' is advertised as being based on a true story. Charitably, it could be said to actually be based on something that ''might'', at one time, have been an urban legend in Japan.
* At the start, ''ArmedAndDangerous'' says that it was based on a true story. Considering that this game includes a tea drinking robot, miniature black holes, and a land shark gun, among ''many'' other things, this was probably not supposed to be taken seriously.

to:

* The US/Europe release of ''FatalFrame''/''[[MarketBasedTitle ''VideoGame/FatalFrame''/''[[MarketBasedTitle Project Zero]]'' is advertised as being based on a true story. Charitably, it could be said to actually be based on something that ''might'', at one time, have been an urban legend in Japan.
* At the start, ''ArmedAndDangerous'' ''VideoGame/ArmedAndDangerous'' says that it was based on a true story. Considering that this game includes a tea drinking robot, miniature black holes, and a land shark gun, among ''many'' other things, this was probably not supposed to be taken seriously.



* One ''WoodyWoodpecker'' cartoon (a parody of ''Franchise/{{Dragnet}}'') begins with "The story you are about to see is a big fat lie. No names have been changed to protect anyone."

to:

* One ''WoodyWoodpecker'' ''WesternAnimation/WoodyWoodpecker'' cartoon (a parody of ''Franchise/{{Dragnet}}'') begins with "The story you are about to see is a big fat lie. No names have been changed to protect anyone."
This list shows the last 10 events of 193. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.BasedOnAGreatBigLie