History Main / BalanceBetweenGoodAndEvil

16th Nov '16 4:09:52 PM Ryusui
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* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII'', both Light and Darkness are shown to be capable of world-ending devastation: long before the events of the game, the world stood to be annihilated by a torrent of light, and four Warriors of Darkness rose to combat it. This time, it's darkness that threatens to overwhelm the world, with four Warriors of Light to oppose it. In the end, both the Warriors of Light and the Warriors of Darkness join forces to defeat the Cloud of Darkness, who despite her name does not embody darkness itself, but rather annihilation and oblivion.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' riffs on ''Final Fantasy III'''s plot in Patch 3.4: Soul Surrender. [[spoiler: As it turns out, the Warriors of Darkness who have been doing the bidding of the [[BigBad Ascians]] were in fact once another world's Warriors of Light: having defeated every evil which stood before them, they inadvertently unleashed a tide of overwhelming light that threatened to consume their world and consign all its inhabitants to a FateWorseThanDeath.]]
20th Oct '16 12:06:00 AM hagagaga
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* The ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'' shows that the prophecy was just a bunch of noodles, as there are tons of Dark Jedi and Sith and other users of the Dark Side left. GeorgeLucas considers everything besides the films and ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' as an AlternateContinuity so it's more a case of the ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'' and WordOfGod disagreeing.

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* The ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'' shows that the prophecy was just a bunch of noodles, as there are tons of Dark Jedi and Sith and other users of the Dark Side left. GeorgeLucas considers everything besides the films and ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' as an AlternateContinuity so it's more a case of the ''Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse'' and WordOfGod disagreeing.
17th Oct '16 3:53:15 PM Doodler
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* The ''Franchise/StarWars'' prequel trilogy has a Jedi prophecy about [[TheChosenOne Anakin Skywalker]] bringing "Balance to the Force". The Council had noticed that the Force had gone out of balance some 200 years before this, and by that point the Galactic Republic was mired in corruption. The lines from the movies that make the viewer think the Jedi misunderstand the prophecy are set as true by WordOfGod. Anakin fulfills the prophecy at the end of the original trilogy, when he as a Sith finally turns on his treacherous master and proves the death of them both.

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* The ''Franchise/StarWars'' prequel trilogy has a Jedi prophecy about [[TheChosenOne Anakin Skywalker]] bringing "Balance to the Force". The Council had noticed that the Force had gone out of balance some 200 years before this, and by that point the Galactic Republic was mired in corruption. The lines from the movies that make the viewer think the Jedi misunderstand the prophecy are set as true by WordOfGod. Anakin fulfills the prophecy at the end of the original trilogy, when he as a Sith finally turns on his treacherous master and proves the death of them both. [[spoiler:A few decades later, a new Dark Side order rises to replace the Sith, and in response the Force creates new heroes to oppose them.]]
9th Sep '16 4:49:25 PM skteosk
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** Willow's resurrection of Buffy at the beginning of season six allegedly caused an imbalance that created an opportunity for the First Evil to become the ArcVillain for season seven (now that [[TheChosenMany there's an army of Slayers]], the balance must have snapped like an elastic band).

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** Willow's resurrection of Buffy at the beginning of season six allegedly caused an imbalance that created an opportunity for the First Evil to become the ArcVillain for season seven (now that [[TheChosenMany there's an army of Slayers]], the balance must have snapped like an elastic band).band...or possibly been restored, since everyone acts like the First isn't a threat anymore [[HandWave somehow]]).
25th Aug '16 1:06:06 PM SpinAttaxx
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* The final arc of ''Anime/DragonBallGT'' is half this trope, half PhlebotinumOverload. Every wish made with the Dragon Balls produces an energy that is counter to the nature of the wish, i.e. good-natured wishes produce negative energy and vice versa. This energy was meant to dissipate between each use of the Dragon Balls, but due to the frequency of their use, there wasn't enough time for that to happen. This eventually led to the creation of seven dragons, born from the built-up energy. Because the majority of wishes were made by the heroes, the dragons were born from negative energy and therefore were evil, though one did have NobleDemon tendencies from the few wishes made by the villains.

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* ''Franchise/DragonBall'':
**
The final arc of ''Anime/DragonBallGT'' is half this trope, half PhlebotinumOverload. Every wish made with the Dragon Balls produces an energy that is counter to the nature of the wish, i.e. good-natured wishes produce negative energy and vice versa. This energy was meant to dissipate between each use of the Dragon Balls, but due to the frequency of their use, there wasn't enough time for that to happen. This eventually led to the creation of seven dragons, born from the built-up energy. Because the majority of wishes were made by the heroes, the dragons were born from negative energy and therefore were evil, though one did have NobleDemon tendencies from the few wishes made by the villains.villains.
** Gods of Destruction (e.g. Beerus) enforce a balance between creation and destruction, destroying planets so that new ones can be created. ''Anime/DragonBallSuper'' expands on this and reveals that if the Supreme Kai (essentially the god of creation) of a particular universe were to die, then the God of Destruction would die too (and vice versa) so as to preserve the universe's balance.
20th Aug '16 9:44:07 AM nombretomado
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* The ''{{Dragonlance}}'' campaign setting's backstory shows us why this whole balance business is necessary.

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* The ''{{Dragonlance}}'' ''Literature/{{Dragonlance}}'' campaign setting's backstory shows us why this whole balance business is necessary.
10th Jul '16 12:34:21 PM Morgenthaler
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** In ''The Quest for Tanelorn'' (last of the ''[[TheHistoryOfTheRunestaff Chronicles of Castle Brass]]'' trilogy), the Cosmic Balance or at least a representation of it, is ''itself'' destroyed, with the narrative implying in places that it may be the ''belief'' in 'higher powers' in the first place that's holding mankind back from realizing its true potential.

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** In ''The Quest for Tanelorn'' (last of the ''[[TheHistoryOfTheRunestaff ''[[Literature/TheHistoryOfTheRunestaff Chronicles of Castle Brass]]'' trilogy), the Cosmic Balance or at least a representation of it, is ''itself'' destroyed, with the narrative implying in places that it may be the ''belief'' in 'higher powers' in the first place that's holding mankind back from realizing its true potential.
7th Jul '16 5:24:49 PM Doug86
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* ''BookOfSwords'' trilogy by Creator/MichaelMoorcock was the balance between the good (or at least ''sane'') Forces of Law and the depraved Forces of Chaos, both of whom were under the domination of the Cosmic Balance. That war ended when the hero Prince Corum, an incarnation of the Eternal Champion who had spent his existence fighting to preserve the balance, [[spoiler: unleashed two gods from ''outside'' the rules of the Cosmic Balance who went on to kill off both sides, freeing their subject worlds to grow and evolve without a pack of selfish gods interfering.]]

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* ''BookOfSwords'' ''Literature/BookOfSwords'' trilogy by Creator/MichaelMoorcock was the balance between the good (or at least ''sane'') Forces of Law and the depraved Forces of Chaos, both of whom were under the domination of the Cosmic Balance. That war ended when the hero Prince Corum, an incarnation of the Eternal Champion who had spent his existence fighting to preserve the balance, [[spoiler: unleashed two gods from ''outside'' the rules of the Cosmic Balance who went on to kill off both sides, freeing their subject worlds to grow and evolve without a pack of selfish gods interfering.]]
19th Jun '16 2:32:31 AM Doug86
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* The ''ComicBook/GreenLantern'' comics have examined this trope at length ever since Creator/GeoffJohns introduced the concept of the Emotional Spectrum to the mythos. The Red Lanterns, Orange Lanterns and Yellow Lanterns (who wield the power of [[UnstoppableRage anger]], {{greed}} and [[PrimalFear fear]], respectively) can all definitely be considered "evil", while the Blue Lanterns, the Indigo Tribe and the Star Sapphires (who wield the power of [[ThePollyanna hope]], [[TheEmpath compassion]] and [[ThePowerOfLove love]], respectively) can all be considered "good". But it's also pointless to try to wipe out the "evil" Lanterns, since they simply channel emotions exuded by living beings--which will ''always'' exist, regardless of how many Lanterns are defeated. And regardless of their noble intentions, the "good" Lanterns are also ineffectual in many ways: the Blue Lanterns lack the willpower to affect change, the Indigo Tribesmen are emotionally distant recluses, and the Star Sapphires lack the self-control necessary to act with clear judgment. That's why the titular Green Lanterns are so important: they lie at the center of the spectrum, and their central emotion ([[{{Determinator}} willpower]]) simply gives them the courage and fortitude to fight for what's right. The green light of willpower is the only force in the universe that can give its users great power without clouding their sense of morality.

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* The ''ComicBook/GreenLantern'' ''Franchise/GreenLantern'' comics have examined this trope at length ever since Creator/GeoffJohns introduced the concept of the Emotional Spectrum to the mythos. The Red Lanterns, Orange Lanterns and Yellow Lanterns (who wield the power of [[UnstoppableRage anger]], {{greed}} and [[PrimalFear fear]], respectively) can all definitely be considered "evil", while the Blue Lanterns, the Indigo Tribe and the Star Sapphires (who wield the power of [[ThePollyanna hope]], [[TheEmpath compassion]] and [[ThePowerOfLove love]], respectively) can all be considered "good". But it's also pointless to try to wipe out the "evil" Lanterns, since they simply channel emotions exuded by living beings--which will ''always'' exist, regardless of how many Lanterns are defeated. And regardless of their noble intentions, the "good" Lanterns are also ineffectual in many ways: the Blue Lanterns lack the willpower to affect change, the Indigo Tribesmen are emotionally distant recluses, and the Star Sapphires lack the self-control necessary to act with clear judgment. That's why the titular Green Lanterns are so important: they lie at the center of the spectrum, and their central emotion ([[{{Determinator}} willpower]]) simply gives them the courage and fortitude to fight for what's right. The green light of willpower is the only force in the universe that can give its users great power without clouding their sense of morality.
18th Jun '16 6:46:45 PM nombretomado
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* The characters in ''LegendOfTheFiveRings'' tend to frame themselves as good and the forces of Fu Leng as evil, and ThePowersThatBe seem to want a balance between the two, however this seems to be a case of UnreliableNarrator or ValuesDissonance.

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* The characters in ''LegendOfTheFiveRings'' ''TabletopGame/LegendOfTheFiveRings'' tend to frame themselves as good and the forces of Fu Leng as evil, and ThePowersThatBe seem to want a balance between the two, however this seems to be a case of UnreliableNarrator or ValuesDissonance.
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