History Main / BagOfSpilling

26th Jul '16 11:16:37 PM Gingerkitteh
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* ''VideoGame/DawnOfWar 2'': In between the vanilla and the first expansion, [[spoiler:the strike cruiser holding most of your wargear performs a HeroicSacrifice]], accounting for the loss of your gear, though fortunately your characters keep their levels and whatever gear you had on you during the final mission (if you have an OldGameBonus, that is). Played straight in the second expansion, where you need to relearn all your skills (somewhat justified in that an all-new skill system which no longer depends on storing items is used, not justified in that two characters apparently spent the last decade forgetting their skills).

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* ''VideoGame/DawnOfWar 2'': In between the vanilla and the first expansion, [[spoiler:the strike cruiser holding most of your wargear performs a HeroicSacrifice]], accounting for the loss of your gear, though fortunately your characters keep their levels and whatever gear you had on you during the final mission (if you have an OldGameBonus, OldSaveBonus, that is). Played straight in the second expansion, where you need to relearn all your skills (somewhat justified in that an all-new skill system which no longer depends on storing items is used, not justified in that two characters apparently spent the last decade forgetting their skills).
22nd Jul '16 11:21:30 AM DaibhidC
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** At the start of ''Submachine 9: The Temple'' you still have (and need) the hammer and layer-crossing machine from ''Submachine 8: The Plan''

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** At the start of ''Submachine 9: The Temple'' you still have (and need) the hammer and layer-crossing machine from ''Submachine 8: The Plan''Plan''.


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* In the ''Transmorpher'' series of Flash puzzle-platformers, you are a green blobby alien. The central game mechanic is transmorphing into a purple wheel-like alien who can climb walls, and a big orange alien who can smash things. In all three games you need to find and absorb these aliens before you can gain their powers. The intro to the second game shows the three of you getting separated by the baddie aliens, but in the third game it just happens somehow.
29th Jun '16 9:46:57 AM Quanyails
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* In VideoGame/SheepDogNWolf, you always start levels with an empty inventory. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] in that it's a TV game show and that it might be another of its rules.

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* In VideoGame/SheepDogNWolf, ''VideoGame/SheepDogNWolf'', you always start levels with an empty inventory. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] in that it's a TV game show and that it might be another of its rules.
28th Jun '16 12:28:41 PM Stealth
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** This trope is handled in a rather unusual way in ''VideoGame/XCOM2'', following on from ''VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown.'' ''XCOM 2'' takes place in a world where the first XCOM project to repulse the alien invasion ended in an early, utter failure. All those great weapons you built in the first game? AllJustADream, nothing more than decades of combat simulations playing out in your head as the aliens mine your thoughts for tactics. You start over with the basic ballistic weapons because that's all LaResistance has left.
16th Jun '16 11:09:51 AM DaibhidC
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** Averted in ''Submachine 2: The Lighthouse''. ''Submachine 1'' ended with you holding a diary page, a Wisdom Gem and a 50 Eurocent coin, and you still have the page and gem (not the coin, but then [[MindScrew you start off standing in front of a coin-op Submachine 1 game]]). The gem is actually useful as well.

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** Averted in ''Submachine 2: The Lighthouse''. ''Submachine 1'' ended with you holding a diary page, a Wisdom Gem and a 50 Eurocent coin, and you still have the page and gem (not the coin, but then [[MindScrew you start off standing in front of a coin-op Submachine 1 game]]). The gem is actually useful as well.



** At the start of ''Submachine 6: The Edge'', you still have the notes, cipher plates and wrench from ''Submachine 5'' but you have to deposite them in a bin before the Machine will let you proceed. Not that they'd have been any use here.

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** At the start of ''Submachine 6: The Edge'', you still have the notes, cipher plates and wrench from ''Submachine 5'' but you have to deposite deposit them in a bin before the Machine will let you proceed. Not that they'd have been any use here.


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** At the start of ''Submachine 9: The Temple'' you still have (and need) the hammer and layer-crossing machine from ''Submachine 8: The Plan''
** At the start of ''Submachine 10: The Exit'', you've lost the hammer, the machine and the jug of karma water. The point from ''Submachine 8'' applies again, perhaps even more so.
15th Jun '16 6:50:34 PM nombretomado
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* ''[[VideoGame/HamtaroHamHamHeartbreak Hamtaro: Ham-Ham Heartbreak]]'' justifies Hamtaro losing all of the Ham-Chat words from his dictionary by having him fall in a bucket of water at the start of the game, ruining his dictionary.
* The TelltaleGames ''SamAndMaxFreelancePolice'' games plays it straight and subverts it at times. A lot of the items are tossed out in between chapters, but a few are either kept in their inventory later on or handwaved with where it was. For instance, the hypnotizing-proof helmet from the very first game is said to be permanently woven into Sam's hat.

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* ''[[VideoGame/HamtaroHamHamHeartbreak Hamtaro: Ham-Ham Heartbreak]]'' ''VideoGame/HamtaroHamHamHeartbreak'' justifies Hamtaro losing all of the Ham-Chat words from his dictionary by having him fall in a bucket of water at the start of the game, ruining his dictionary.
* The TelltaleGames Creator/TelltaleGames ''SamAndMaxFreelancePolice'' games plays it straight and subverts it at times. A lot of the items are tossed out in between chapters, but a few are either kept in their inventory later on or handwaved with where it was. For instance, the hypnotizing-proof helmet from the very first game is said to be permanently woven into Sam's hat.
13th Jun '16 9:22:08 PM Doug86
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* ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' avoids this beautifully in the move between ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Path of Radiance]]'' and its sequel ''Radiant Dawn'', by having each character able to gain an additional 20 levels (going from two Class tiers to three). So only a handful of characters really lost any level, stats, or experience. The only notable loss was that the main character Ike gave his Legendary weapon Ragnell to the Kingdom of Begnion as its rightful owner.

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* ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' avoids this beautifully in the move between ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Path of Radiance]]'' and its sequel ''Radiant Dawn'', by having each character able to gain an additional 20 levels (going from two Class tiers to three). So only a handful of characters really lost any level, stats, or experience. The only notable loss was that the main character Ike gave his Legendary weapon Ragnell to the Kingdom of Begnion as its rightful owner.
3rd Jun '16 8:27:35 AM Willbyr
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* ''InazumaEleven'' trilogy play with this. in each sequel, every character's levels are reduced to one, but they do have better base stats than in the previous game's level one. Major characters' skill losses are based on if they will require new skills in that game or not, since they only have four fixed ability slots out of six avaliable in each game. Thus they can't retain everything.

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* ''InazumaEleven'' ''VideoGame/InazumaEleven'' trilogy play with this. in each sequel, every character's levels are reduced to one, but they do have better base stats than in the previous game's level one. Major characters' skill losses are based on if they will require new skills in that game or not, since they only have four fixed ability slots out of six avaliable in each game. Thus they can't retain everything.
29th May '16 8:37:55 PM Willbyr
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* Downplayed in ''[[DragonBall Buu's Fury]]''. You start off at an even higher level than when the previous game ended. However, your stats at lowered to about half of what they were in the previous game.

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* Downplayed in ''[[DragonBall ''[[Franchise/DragonBall Buu's Fury]]''. You start off at an even higher level than when the previous game ended. However, your stats at lowered to about half of what they were in the previous game.
15th May '16 2:16:12 AM Doug86
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* Creator/TerryPratchett said in an interview that the ''{{Discworld}}'' character of The Luggage was born out of early D&D roleplaying as a take on the Bag of Holding idea. In theory it was a handy depository for captured booty, of infinite capacity, and capable of carrying things on its hundreds of dear little legs so that the players did not need to bother about weight limitations. But players in the game soon learnt that unless they gave The Luggage ''really precise'' instructions and kept track of what direction it was walking in, it soon became a Bag of Losing. In the books, the evolved character of The Luggage will still carry things for you. But it acts as a portal to an unspecified Other (witness its ubiquity as a corpse-disposal system) and has a mind of its own. Putting something in there is no guarantee that you'll ever see it again. It certainly carries a massive amount of gold bullion, for instance: but this has only been seen ''once''.

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* Creator/TerryPratchett said in an interview that the ''{{Discworld}}'' ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' character of The Luggage was born out of early D&D roleplaying as a take on the Bag of Holding idea. In theory it was a handy depository for captured booty, of infinite capacity, and capable of carrying things on its hundreds of dear little legs so that the players did not need to bother about weight limitations. But players in the game soon learnt that unless they gave The Luggage ''really precise'' instructions and kept track of what direction it was walking in, it soon became a Bag of Losing. In the books, the evolved character of The Luggage will still carry things for you. But it acts as a portal to an unspecified Other (witness its ubiquity as a corpse-disposal system) and has a mind of its own. Putting something in there is no guarantee that you'll ever see it again. It certainly carries a massive amount of gold bullion, for instance: but this has only been seen ''once''.
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