History Main / AuthorityEqualsAssKicking

29th Nov '17 2:58:18 PM Theriocephalus
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The AlmightyJanitor is an [[InvertedTrope inversion]], who is far more powerful than his lowly rank would imply. The DeskJockey is a different [[InvertedTrope inversion]], who has been promoted out of the field into authority. Compare YouCanBarelyStand. See also FourStarBadass, LargeAndInCharge, ShopliftAndDie, RoyalsWhoActuallyDoSomething, and FixedRelativeStrength. Sometimes a sister trope to RiskingTheKing. May be the result of the ConservationOfNinjutsu.

to:

The AlmightyJanitor is an [[InvertedTrope inversion]], Inversions]] include the AlmightyJanitor, who is far more powerful than his lowly rank would imply. The DeskJockey is a different [[InvertedTrope inversion]], imply; StrongEmpireShriveledEmperor, when the leader of the pack turns out to be its weakest and frailest member; and the DeskJockey, who has been promoted out of the field into authority. Compare YouCanBarelyStand. See also FourStarBadass, LargeAndInCharge, ShopliftAndDie, RoyalsWhoActuallyDoSomething, and FixedRelativeStrength. Sometimes a sister trope to RiskingTheKing. May be the result of the ConservationOfNinjutsu.
28th Nov '17 1:43:57 PM NoSpoilerz
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The AlmightyJanitor is an [[InvertedTrope inversion]], who is far more powerful than his lowly rank would imply. The DeskJockey is a different [[InvertedTrope inversion]], who has been promoted out of the field into authority. Compare YouCanBarelyStand. See also FourStarBadass, LargeAndInCharge, IzchaksWrath, RoyalsWhoActuallyDoSomething, and FixedRelativeStrength. Sometimes a sister trope to RiskingTheKing. May be the result of the ConservationOfNinjutsu.

to:

The AlmightyJanitor is an [[InvertedTrope inversion]], who is far more powerful than his lowly rank would imply. The DeskJockey is a different [[InvertedTrope inversion]], who has been promoted out of the field into authority. Compare YouCanBarelyStand. See also FourStarBadass, LargeAndInCharge, IzchaksWrath, ShopliftAndDie, RoyalsWhoActuallyDoSomething, and FixedRelativeStrength. Sometimes a sister trope to RiskingTheKing. May be the result of the ConservationOfNinjutsu.
22nd Nov '17 6:03:43 PM AnoneMouseJr
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''FanFic/ThePiecesLieWhereTheyFell'': The guard captains have all ''earned'' their positions, being highly skilled in combat and other related areas.
1st Nov '17 12:08:08 AM obhave
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Furthermore, unlike their fictional counterparts, real commanding officers don't put themselves in InHarmsWay unless there is absolutely no other option available. Why? Because even if the commanding officer isn't killed or incapacitated during the trip, he's still abandoning his job for a few hours or days, thus leaving it in the hands of a less capable person, which could end up getting a lot of people killed.

to:

Furthermore, unlike their fictional counterparts, real commanding officers don't put themselves in InHarmsWay unless there is absolutely no other option available. Why? Because even if the commanding officer isn't killed or incapacitated during the trip, he's still abandoning his job for a few hours or days, thus leaving it in the hands of a less capable person, which could end up getting a lot of people killed.
killed. And in many cases, the effect is actually way worse than that, because not only do you need to replace the commanding officer who abandoned his job, but you also need to find a replacement for his replacement, and a replacement for his replacement´s replacement, etc, down the entire chain of command.
31st Oct '17 1:53:31 AM obhave
Is there an issue? Send a Message


There was some limited truth to this trope in medieval Europe and Japan, in societies where it was mandatory for all male nobles to train with weapons from an early age, and forbidden for all commoners, male or female, to own anything that they could possibly fight with (other than their farming tools). Furthermore, a male noble would generally kill any commoner who didn't submit to the authority of his family, either by killing the commoner immediately and without ceremony, or by challenging the commoner to an intentionally uneven duel, using weapons that the commoner had never even touched before. Maybe this is where the trope comes from, that is to say, maybe this is what originally created the strong correlation between authority and asskicking that we see in European and Japanese storytelling.

to:

There was some limited truth to this trope in medieval Europe and Japan, in societies where it was mandatory for all male nobles to train with weapons from an early age, and forbidden for all commoners, male or female, to own anything that they could possibly fight with (other than their farming tools). Furthermore, a male noble would generally kill any commoner who didn't submit to the authority of his family, either by killing the commoner immediately and without ceremony, or by challenging the commoner to an intentionally uneven duel, using weapons that the commoner had never even touched before. Maybe this is where the trope comes from, that is to say, maybe this is what originally created the strong correlation between authority and asskicking that we see today in European and Japanese storytelling.
31st Oct '17 1:52:03 AM obhave
Is there an issue? Send a Message


There was some limited truth to this trope in medieval Europe and Japan, in societies where it was mandatory for all male nobles to train with weapons from an early age, and forbidden for all commoners, male or female, to own anything that they could possibly fight with (other than their farming tools). Furthermore, a male noble would generally kill any commoner who didn't submit to his authority, either right away or by challenging the commoner to an extremely uneven duel, using weapons that the commoner had never even touched before. Maybe this is what caused the strong correlation between authority and asskicking that we still see today in European and Japanese storytelling.

to:

There was some limited truth to this trope in medieval Europe and Japan, in societies where it was mandatory for all male nobles to train with weapons from an early age, and forbidden for all commoners, male or female, to own anything that they could possibly fight with (other than their farming tools). Furthermore, a male noble would generally kill any commoner who didn't submit to the authority of his authority, family, either right away by killing the commoner immediately and without ceremony, or by challenging the commoner to an extremely intentionally uneven duel, using weapons that the commoner had never even touched before. Maybe this is where the trope comes from, that is to say, maybe this is what caused originally created the strong correlation between authority and asskicking that we still see today in European and Japanese storytelling.
31st Oct '17 1:40:50 AM obhave
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In modern military hierarchies, however, we see a strong correlation in the ''opposite'' direction. During combat, the lowest ranking soldiers (private, corporal, sergeant) obviously need a lot of fighting-related skills. And the main role of the middle ranks (lieutenant, captain) during combat is to manage their subordinates and communicate with their higher-ups, but since they're on the ground and in the thick of it, they need to know how to shoot. But once an officer reaches the highest ranks (major, colonel, general), then no one is going to care how accurately he can shoot or how well he can subdue an enemy in hand-to-hand combat. At that point, both his job and his education are going to be entirely focused on large-scale planning, strategy, and management. And in the rare event that he controls a battle, it's going to be a huge battle that he controls from far away. This means that the vast majority of colonels and generals have not done any combat training for several decades. There are a few rare exceptions, who choose to do combat training in their spare time, but high ranking officers are extremely busy people, and they just don't have enough time to be as good as the grunts. Also, they tend to be a lot older than the grunts, which puts them at an even greater disadvantage.

to:

In modern military hierarchies, however, we see a strong correlation in the ''opposite'' direction. During combat, the lowest ranking soldiers (private, corporal, sergeant) obviously need a lot of fighting-related skills. And the main role of the middle ranks (lieutenant, captain) during combat is to manage their subordinates and communicate with their higher-ups, but since they're on the ground and in the thick of it, they need to know how to shoot. But once an officer reaches the highest ranks (major, colonel, general), then no one is going to care how accurately he can shoot or how well he can subdue an enemy in hand-to-hand combat. At that point, both his job and his education are going to be entirely focused on large-scale planning, strategy, and management. And in the rare event that he controls a battle, it's going to be a huge battle that he controls from very far away. This means that the vast majority of colonels and generals have not done any combat training for several decades. There are a few rare exceptions, who choose to do combat training in their spare time, but high ranking officers are extremely busy people, and they just don't have enough time to be as good as the grunts. Also, they tend to be a lot older than the grunts, which puts them at an even greater disadvantage.



Furthermore, unlike their fictional counterparts, real commanding officers don't put themselves in InHarmsWay unless there is absolutely no other option available. Why? Because even if the high ranking officer isn't killed or incapacitated during the trip, he's still abandoning his job for a few hours or days, thus leaving it in the hands of a less capable person, which could end up getting a lot of people killed.

There was some limited truth to this trope in medieval Europe and Japan, in societies where it was mandatory for all male nobles to train with weapons from an early age, and forbidden for all commoners to own anything that they could possibly fight with, other than their farming tools. Furthermore, a male noble would generally kill any commoner that insulted him, either immediately or by challenging the commoner to an extremely uneven duel, using weapons that the commoner had never even touched before. Maybe this is what caused such a strong correlation between authority and asskicking in European and Japanese storytelling.

to:

Furthermore, unlike their fictional counterparts, real commanding officers don't put themselves in InHarmsWay unless there is absolutely no other option available. Why? Because even if the high ranking commanding officer isn't killed or incapacitated during the trip, he's still abandoning his job for a few hours or days, thus leaving it in the hands of a less capable person, which could end up getting a lot of people killed.

There was some limited truth to this trope in medieval Europe and Japan, in societies where it was mandatory for all male nobles to train with weapons from an early age, and forbidden for all commoners commoners, male or female, to own anything that they could possibly fight with, other with (other than their farming tools. tools). Furthermore, a male noble would generally kill any commoner that insulted him, who didn't submit to his authority, either immediately right away or by challenging the commoner to an extremely uneven duel, using weapons that the commoner had never even touched before. Maybe this is what caused such a the strong correlation between authority and asskicking that we still see today in European and Japanese storytelling.
storytelling.
30th Oct '17 7:03:00 AM obhave
Is there an issue? Send a Message


''The higher a character is in his hierarchy, the better he is in a fight. This goes double for non-protagonists.''

In the real world, soldiers are usually promoted for their leadership and management skills, not for their fighting prowess. If anything, senior ranking soldiers tend to be worse at fighting than the rank-and-file, because they are generally older, and they do not train as much because they are not expected to actually engage in combat. There are exceptions, but they usually don't put themselves InHarmsWay. In fact, in the US military, Special Forces officers rarely are promoted as high as General (or Admiral in the Navy) and tend not to rise any higher than Colonel (or Naval Captain).

And yet, in many works of fiction, especially video games, the opposite is true. The higher someone's rank, the deadlier he is in personal combat. A sergeant can kick a grunt's ass. A captain can kick a sergeant's ass. A general can kick everybody's ass. The [[FinalBoss "boss fight"]] at the climax of a game will often be against the literal boss of the enemy army.

to:

''The higher a character is in his a political, business, or military hierarchy, the better he is in a fight. This goes double for non-protagonists.''

In Of course, in the real world, soldiers are usually promoted no such correlation exists today for their leadership and management skills, not for their political or business hierarchies. An entry-level clerk is just as likely as a CEO to be good at fighting, since fighting prowess. If anything, senior has absolutely nothing to do with either person's job role.

In modern military hierarchies, however, we see a strong correlation in the ''opposite'' direction. During combat, the lowest
ranking soldiers tend to be worse at fighting than (private, corporal, sergeant) obviously need a lot of fighting-related skills. And the rank-and-file, because main role of the middle ranks (lieutenant, captain) during combat is to manage their subordinates and communicate with their higher-ups, but since they're on the ground and in the thick of it, they are generally older, and they do not train as much because they are not expected need to actually engage know how to shoot. But once an officer reaches the highest ranks (major, colonel, general), then no one is going to care how accurately he can shoot or how well he can subdue an enemy in hand-to-hand combat. At that point, both his job and his education are going to be entirely focused on large-scale planning, strategy, and management. And in the rare event that he controls a battle, it's going to be a huge battle that he controls from far away. This means that the vast majority of colonels and generals have not done any combat training for several decades. There are a few rare exceptions, who choose to do combat training in their spare time, but high ranking officers are extremely busy people, and they usually just don't put themselves InHarmsWay. In fact, in have enough time to be as good as the US military, Special Forces officers rarely are promoted as high as General (or Admiral in the Navy) and grunts. Also, they tend not to rise any higher be a lot older than Colonel (or Naval Captain).

the grunts, which puts them at an even greater disadvantage.

And yet, in many works of fiction, especially video games, the exact opposite is true. The higher someone's rank, the deadlier he is in personal combat. A sergeant can kick a grunt's ass. A captain can kick a sergeant's ass. A general can kick everybody's ass. The [[FinalBoss "boss fight"]] at the climax of a game will often be against the literal boss of the enemy army.
army.

Furthermore, unlike their fictional counterparts, real commanding officers don't put themselves in InHarmsWay unless there is absolutely no other option available. Why? Because even if the high ranking officer isn't killed or incapacitated during the trip, he's still abandoning his job for a few hours or days, thus leaving it in the hands of a less capable person, which could end up getting a lot of people killed.

There was some limited truth to this trope in medieval Europe and Japan, in societies where it was mandatory for all male nobles to train with weapons from an early age, and forbidden for all commoners to own anything that they could possibly fight with, other than their farming tools. Furthermore, a male noble would generally kill any commoner that insulted him, either immediately or by challenging the commoner to an extremely uneven duel, using weapons that the commoner had never even touched before. Maybe this is what caused such a strong correlation between authority and asskicking in European and Japanese storytelling.
29th Oct '17 12:46:21 PM nighttrainfm
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Marvel's ComicBook/TheKingpin is, on the surface, a tremendously fat man with a head for crime and a mean streak wider than he is. But he's also the {{Leader}} of TheSyndicate, and a DiabolicalMastermind besides, so he's got heavy-duty {{Charles Atlas Superpower}}s - enough to take out low-level heroes (and a room full of ninjas) in hand-to-hand combat; he could crush his nemesis Daredevil with his bare hands. Note that he does, in fact, work out, and some incarnations interpret his portly frame as being solid ''muscle''.

to:

* Marvel's ComicBook/TheKingpin is, on the surface, a tremendously fat man with a head for crime and a mean streak wider than he is. But he's also the {{Leader}} of TheSyndicate, and a DiabolicalMastermind besides, so he's got heavy-duty {{Charles Atlas Superpower}}s - enough to take out low-level heroes (and a room full of ninjas) in hand-to-hand combat; he could crush his nemesis Daredevil with his bare hands. Note that he does, in fact, [[KingpinInHisGym work out, out]], and some incarnations interpret his portly frame as being solid ''muscle''.
16th Sep '17 4:19:24 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* General UsefulNotes/AndrewJackson, who led American troops to victory at the Battle of New Orleans in the WarOf1812 and later became the 7th President of the United States, was a highly accomplished duelist who survived numerous pistol duels. His most famous duel was with Charles Dickenson in 1806. Dickenson got off the first shot, striking Jackson in the chest, just inches away from his heart, but Jackson was still able to fire his pistol and kill Dickenson. Against all odds, Jackson survived his own gunshot wound, though the bullet was too close to his heart to be removed and it would give him chronic pain for the rest of his life.

to:

* General UsefulNotes/AndrewJackson, who led American troops to victory at the Battle of New Orleans in the WarOf1812 UsefulNotes/WarOf1812 and later became the 7th President of the United States, was a highly accomplished duelist who survived numerous pistol duels. His most famous duel was with Charles Dickenson in 1806. Dickenson got off the first shot, striking Jackson in the chest, just inches away from his heart, but Jackson was still able to fire his pistol and kill Dickenson. Against all odds, Jackson survived his own gunshot wound, though the bullet was too close to his heart to be removed and it would give him chronic pain for the rest of his life.
This list shows the last 10 events of 870. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AuthorityEqualsAssKicking