History Main / AsceticAesthetic

19th Apr '18 3:47:27 AM TastySauce
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-->-- Antoine de Saint Exupéry

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-->-- Antoine '''Antoine de Saint Exupéry
Exupéry'''
6th Apr '18 2:05:01 PM AFP
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** Cloud City follows this trope to a 'T' with its interior decoration dominated by the use of white, though underneath the shiny veneer of the public spaces most of the place is actually dark and industrial.

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** Cloud City follows this trope to a 'T' with its interior decoration dominated by the use of white, though underneath the shiny veneer of the public spaces most of the place is actually dark and industrial. Further, the clean and neat appearance of the place neatly foreshadows that [[spoiler: it is not a safe haven for Han, Leia, Chewie, and C-3PO, but has been secretly seized by Darth Vader and The Empire.]]


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** This trope isn't limited to bad guys by any stretch in the Original Trilogy. Princess Leia's starship in ''Film/ANewHope'', the ''Tantine IV'', has mostly white and chrome interiors, befitting a diplomatic starship belonging to the Imperial senator from the very wealthy world of Alderaan, although we see a few darker interior spaces when Leia is trying to hide from the Imperial Stormtroopers. Meanwhile, the Rebel flagship, ''Home One'', is shown in ''Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack'' and ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'' to share the clean regal asthetics of the ''Tantine IV''.
25th Feb '18 3:58:43 PM eroock
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Please note that authors don't always cover every inch of their settings with an Ascetic Aesthetic. It can be localized to just one room as easily as a planet. For this reason, stories that feature a place with an AsceticAesthetic will often be contrasted at one or more points with at least one homey, hearthy, or all-natural location, where the characters who are closer to Earth dwell. If two factions embrace these opposite aesthetic and philosophical views, expect SlobsVersusSnobs.

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Please note that authors don't always cover every inch of their settings with an Ascetic Aesthetic. It can be localized to just one room as easily as a planet. For this reason, stories that feature a place with an AsceticAesthetic Ascetic Aesthetic will often be contrasted at one or more points with at least one homey, hearthy, or all-natural location, where the characters who are closer to Earth dwell. If two factions embrace these opposite aesthetic and philosophical views, expect SlobsVersusSnobs.
11th Feb '18 6:52:16 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* The International architectural style and its offshoots, Bauhaus and mid-century modern, codified a lot of this look, and its prevalence in modern buildings in the early-mid 20th century probably helped make it synonymous with "the future" in a lot of period sci-fi. It tended to go a bit easier on the sterile white, though, especially in the furniture that was influenced by it.
8th Feb '18 11:01:45 AM __Vano
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* ''VideoGame/Fallout4'''s Institute plays this up, with a RaygunGothic-inspired aesthetic dominated by gleaming white and orange plastic, chrome, and glass structures. On the surface, it appears to be a technological utopia, being the only group in all of the Wasteland to have significantly advanced technology since the Great War. However, this belies the fact that the Institute is single-handedly responsible for destabilizing the Commonwealth, regularly kidnaps wastelanders for unethical experiments, and utilizes synthetically-created humans as slaves. Their aesthetic nicely contrasts the DieselPunk aesthetic of the Brotherhood of Steel, the SteamPunk aesthetic of the Railroad, and the CattlePunk/American Revolutionary War aesthetic of the Minutemen.

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* ''VideoGame/Fallout'':
**
''VideoGame/Fallout4'''s Institute plays this up, with a RaygunGothic-inspired aesthetic dominated by gleaming white and orange plastic, chrome, and glass structures. On the surface, it appears to be a technological utopia, being the only group in all of the Wasteland to have significantly advanced technology since the Great War. However, this belies the fact that the Institute is single-handedly responsible for destabilizing the Commonwealth, regularly kidnaps wastelanders for unethical experiments, and utilizes synthetically-created humans as slaves. Their aesthetic nicely contrasts the DieselPunk aesthetic of the Brotherhood of Steel, the SteamPunk aesthetic of the Railroad, and the CattlePunk/American Revolutionary War aesthetic of the Minutemen.
** Cleaninness of the (operational) Vaults in the classical games is in stark contrast with the grit of the outside world, as noted by a few characters. Their inhabitants are effectively prisoners there, subjects to Overseer's authority who has secret, immoral orders from the government regarding them. After a Vault opens and the populations leaves (few are so lucky), its empty halls become even more reclusive. The background music for Vault 13 contributes to the atmosphere of nothingness and isolation.
3rd Feb '18 5:06:48 PM DraconisWombat13203
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* In ''Series/{{OrphanBlack}}, any scene where [[CorruptCorporateExecutive Rachel Duncan]] is in is likely to be in a room like this, particularly in the earlier three seasons, in which the Dyad Institute featured more prominently. This is even reflected in Rachel's style, almost always wearing some form of white, and mostly dressed in minimalistic outfits.
** [[MotherlyScientist Susan Duncan's]] hideout is a variant, where the designs are mostly minimalistic but the walls are a faded brown as opposed to white. As with Rachel, the clothes she and her companion Ira wear reflect this, being pristine white.
** P.T. Westmorland's mansion at Camp Revival averts the trope, being quite old-fashioned in a way that recalls the late nineteenth century and the early Edwardian Era. [[spoiler: This is done entirely on purpose to help sell the ruse that it is actually P.T. Westmorland who lives there, and not a fraud named John]].
2nd Feb '18 6:02:22 PM Jake
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* Subverted in ''Film/{{Alien}}''. The ''Nostromo'''s galley, messroom and bunks clearly started out as a CassetteFuturism version of this look when the ship was new, with lots of minimalist furniture and everything being painted white or beige. But after a few years of living and working in there the crew have added a few personal touches like sticking some pin-ups to the wall of their bunk or decorating the table in the centre of the room with a cheap nodding woodpecker desk toy, and magazines, discarded coffee cups and other detritus have started to accumulate. Averted totally in the cargo holds and engineering spaces, which are UsedFuture all the way.
14th Jan '18 11:46:20 PM Fireblood
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** Another example is given in the X-Wing series of Expanded Universe novels. When we are introduced to Ysanne Isard, director of Imperial Intelligence (basically running the Empire at this point), we are shown her huge office with nothing in it but a non-descript (though large) desk. The viewpoint character even comments of how luxurious it is to waste that much space on a crowded planet like Coruscant.

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** Another example is given in the X-Wing series of Expanded Universe novels. When we are introduced to Ysanne Isard, director of Imperial Intelligence (basically running the Empire at this point), we are shown her huge office with nothing in it but a non-descript (though large) desk. The viewpoint character even comments of over how luxurious it is to waste that much space on a crowded planet like Coruscant.
14th Jan '18 11:44:16 PM Fireblood
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* This was the standard design aesthetic for science fiction until ''Franchise/StarWars'' hit the scene. Chronologically, it is likely the first aversion in film with ''Star Wars: Film/ANewHope'', which debuted in 1977. Two years later, ''Film/{{Alien}}'' averted the trope yet further, as the starships were gritty and grimy, just as you should expect a giant long-haul vehicle that is its own repair garage would be ''in space''. Less "sports car," more "Australian outback 4WD". ''[[http://davidszondy.com/future/futurepast.htm Tales of Future Past]]'' has pages of examples.

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* This was the standard design aesthetic for science fiction until ''Franchise/StarWars'' hit the scene. Chronologically, it is likely the first aversion in film with ''Star Wars: Film/ANewHope'', which debuted in 1977. Two years later, ''Film/{{Alien}}'' averted the trope yet further, as the starships were gritty and grimy, just as you should expect a giant long-haul vehicle that is its own repair garage would be ''in space''. Less "sports car," more "Australian outback 4WD". ''[[http://davidszondy.com/future/futurepast.htm Tales of Future Past]]'' has pages of examples.
31st Dec '17 11:17:40 AM nombretomado
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* The time travel chamber in ''GuestFromTheFuture'' is a white room with a control stand in the center, and the Time Institute is made of polished metal panels.


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* The time travel chamber in ''Series/GuestFromTheFuture'' is a white room with a control stand in the center, and the Time Institute is made of polished metal panels.
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