History Main / ArrowsonFire

29th Jul '16 8:29:40 PM Doug86
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* ''Series/GameOfThrones''. Tyrion gives the specific order, "Rain fire on them" when Stannis is landing his forces before the castle walls in the Battle of Blackwater. There seems no reason to use flaming arrows except for psychological purposes (earlier a flaming arrow was used to set off a [[GreekFire wildfire]] explosion) and all it does it cause their toughest soldier to have a HeroicBSOD when he sees a ManOnFire. Tends to stick out as in [[Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire the novels on which its based]], GeorgeRRMartin avoids HollywoodTactics -- flaming arrows are only used when someone wants to set a building on fire. And in the wildlings' attack on Castle Black, ''both'' sides use flaming arrows for no discernible reason whatsoever.

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* ''Series/GameOfThrones''. Tyrion gives the specific order, "Rain fire on them" when Stannis is landing his forces before the castle walls in the Battle of Blackwater. There seems no reason to use flaming arrows except for psychological purposes (earlier a flaming arrow was used to set off a [[GreekFire wildfire]] explosion) and all it does it cause their toughest soldier to have a HeroicBSOD when he sees a ManOnFire. Tends to stick out as in [[Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire the novels on which its based]], GeorgeRRMartin Creator/GeorgeRRMartin avoids HollywoodTactics -- flaming arrows are only used when someone wants to set a building on fire. And in the wildlings' attack on Castle Black, ''both'' sides use flaming arrows for no discernible reason whatsoever.
23rd Jul '16 7:41:55 PM TheBigBopper
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Creators of fiction generally agree that [[IncendiaryExponent setting things on fire]] is awesome, so in military conflict they love to depict archers shooting volleys of flaming arrows at the enemy regardless of whether the situation is a field battle, a siege, or naval combat. A RainOfArrows looks cooler if the arrows trail fire as they streak through the sky, and it's especially cool when they're used at night so that they light up the air like laser beams. There is also a general assumption that any projectile that is on fire will inflict more damage than one that isn't. Whatever the arrows hit will catch on fire, be it tents, thatched roofs, wooden structures, or some hapless RedShirt, who--in addition to being pierced by an arrow--will immediately [[ManOnFire burst into flame]], writhing for a moment before falling off the battlements with a StockScream. On a larger scale, military forces might also fire giant flaming projectiles from siege artillery such as catapults and ballistae. Lastly, sometimes an archer will shoot a single flaming arrow into the sky like a flare, signaling a message to distant units.

to:

Creators of fiction generally agree that [[IncendiaryExponent setting things on fire]] is awesome, so in military conflict they love to depict archers shooting volleys of flaming arrows at the enemy regardless of whether the situation is a field battle, a siege, or naval combat. A RainOfArrows looks cooler if the arrows trail fire as they streak through the sky, and it's especially cool when they're used at night so that they light up the air like laser beams. There is also a general assumption that any projectile that is on fire will inflict more damage than one that isn't. Whatever the arrows hit will catch on fire, be it tents, thatched roofs, wooden structures, or some hapless RedShirt, who--in addition to being pierced by an arrow--will immediately [[ManOnFire burst into flame]], writhing for a moment in panic before falling off the battlements with a StockScream. On a larger scale, military forces might also fire giant flaming projectiles from siege artillery such as catapults and ballistae. Lastly, sometimes an archer will shoot a single flaming arrow into the sky like a flare, signaling a message to distant units.
23rd Jul '16 7:41:30 PM TheBigBopper
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Creators of fiction generally agree that [[IncendiaryExponent setting things on fire]] is awesome, so in military conflict they love to depict archers shooting volleys of flaming arrows at the enemy regardless of whether the situation is a field battle, a siege, or naval combat. A RainOfArrows looks cooler if the arrows trail fire as they streak through the sky, and it's especially cool when they're used at night so that they light up the air like laser beams. There is also a general assumption that any projectile that is on fire will inflict more damage than one that isn't. Whatever the arrows hit will catch on fire, be it tents, thatched roofs, wooden structures, or some hapless RedShirt, who--in addition to being pierced by an arrow--will [[ManOnFire burst into flame]], writhing for a moment before falling off the battlements with a StockScream. On a larger scale, military forces might also fire giant flaming projectiles from siege artillery such as catapults and ballistae. Lastly, sometimes an archer will shoot a single flaming arrow into the sky like a flare, signaling a message to distant units.

to:

Creators of fiction generally agree that [[IncendiaryExponent setting things on fire]] is awesome, so in military conflict they love to depict archers shooting volleys of flaming arrows at the enemy regardless of whether the situation is a field battle, a siege, or naval combat. A RainOfArrows looks cooler if the arrows trail fire as they streak through the sky, and it's especially cool when they're used at night so that they light up the air like laser beams. There is also a general assumption that any projectile that is on fire will inflict more damage than one that isn't. Whatever the arrows hit will catch on fire, be it tents, thatched roofs, wooden structures, or some hapless RedShirt, who--in addition to being pierced by an arrow--will immediately [[ManOnFire burst into flame]], writhing for a moment before falling off the battlements with a StockScream. On a larger scale, military forces might also fire giant flaming projectiles from siege artillery such as catapults and ballistae. Lastly, sometimes an archer will shoot a single flaming arrow into the sky like a flare, signaling a message to distant units.
23rd Jul '16 7:38:29 PM TheBigBopper
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* And most of all, set flammable material such as wooden buildings, siege engines, and ships on fire. Usually it would take a ''lot'' of fire arrows to accomplish this, since most of them would be duds, but the enemy would have to divert their manpower making sure that none of them caught, since it would only take one or two good ones out of a hundred to set the target on fire.

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* And most of all, set flammable material such as wooden buildings, siege engines, and ships on fire. Usually it would take a ''lot'' of fire arrows to accomplish this, since most of them would be duds, but the enemy would have to divert their manpower making sure that none of them caught, since it would only take one or two good ones out of a hundred to set the target on fire.
fire. When it worked, it was devastatingly effective.
23rd Jul '16 7:35:45 PM TheBigBopper
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* Adjusting the shot, since flaming arrows can possibly tell the shooters where most of the arrows are going so that they can adjust their shots accordingly, which is another function tracers occupy today.
* And most of all, set flammable material such as wooden buildings, siege engines, and ships on fire. Usually it would take a ''lot'' of fire arrows even to accomplish this, since most of them would be duds, but the enemy would have to divert their manpower making sure that none of them caught, since it would only take one or two good ones out of a hundred to set the target on fire.

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* Adjusting Adjust the shot, aim, since flaming arrows can possibly tell the shooters where most of the arrows are going so that they can adjust their shots accordingly, which is another function tracers occupy today.
* And most of all, set flammable material such as wooden buildings, siege engines, and ships on fire. Usually it would take a ''lot'' of fire arrows even to accomplish this, since most of them would be duds, but the enemy would have to divert their manpower making sure that none of them caught, since it would only take one or two good ones out of a hundred to set the target on fire.
23rd Jul '16 7:33:31 PM TheBigBopper
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Creators of fiction generally agree that [[IncendiaryExponent setting things on fire]] is awesome, so in military conflict they love to depict archers shooting volleys of flaming arrows at the enemy regardless of whether the situation is a field battle, a siege, or naval combat. A RainOfArrows looks cooler if the arrows trail fire as they streak through the sky, and it's especially cool when they're used at night so that they light up the air like laser beams. There is also a general assumption that any projectile that is on fire will inflict more damage than one that isn't. Whatever the arrows hit will catch on fire, be it tents, thatched roofs, wooden structures, or some hapless RedShirt, who in addition to being pierced by an arrow will [[ManOnFire burst into flame]], writhing for a moment before falling off the battlements with a StockScream. On a larger scale, military forces might also fire giant flaming projectiles from siege artillery such as catapults and ballistae. Lastly, sometimes an archer will shoot a single flaming arrow into the sky like a flare, signaling a message to distant units.

to:

Creators of fiction generally agree that [[IncendiaryExponent setting things on fire]] is awesome, so in military conflict they love to depict archers shooting volleys of flaming arrows at the enemy regardless of whether the situation is a field battle, a siege, or naval combat. A RainOfArrows looks cooler if the arrows trail fire as they streak through the sky, and it's especially cool when they're used at night so that they light up the air like laser beams. There is also a general assumption that any projectile that is on fire will inflict more damage than one that isn't. Whatever the arrows hit will catch on fire, be it tents, thatched roofs, wooden structures, or some hapless RedShirt, who in who--in addition to being pierced by an arrow will arrow--will [[ManOnFire burst into flame]], writhing for a moment before falling off the battlements with a StockScream. On a larger scale, military forces might also fire giant flaming projectiles from siege artillery such as catapults and ballistae. Lastly, sometimes an archer will shoot a single flaming arrow into the sky like a flare, signaling a message to distant units.
23rd Jul '16 7:32:59 PM TheBigBopper
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Creators of fiction generally agree that [[IncendiaryExponent setting things on fire]] is awesome, so in military conflict they love to depict archers shooting volleys of flaming arrows at the enemy regardless of whether the situation is a field battle, a siege, or naval combat. A RainOfArrows looks cooler if the arrows trail fire as they streak through the sky, and it's especially cool when they're used at night so that they light up the air like laser beams. There is also a general assumption that any projectile that is on fire will inflict more damage than one that isn't. Whatever the arrows hit will catch on fire, be it tents, thatched roofs, wooden structures, or some hapless RedShirt; in addition to being pierced by an arrow the poor sap will instantly [[ManOnFire burst into flame]], writhing for a moment before falling off the battlements with a StockScream. On a larger scale, military forces might also fire giant flaming projectiles from siege artillery such as catapults and ballistae. Lastly, sometimes an archer will shoot a single flaming arrow into the sky like a flare, signaling a message to distant units.

to:

Creators of fiction generally agree that [[IncendiaryExponent setting things on fire]] is awesome, so in military conflict they love to depict archers shooting volleys of flaming arrows at the enemy regardless of whether the situation is a field battle, a siege, or naval combat. A RainOfArrows looks cooler if the arrows trail fire as they streak through the sky, and it's especially cool when they're used at night so that they light up the air like laser beams. There is also a general assumption that any projectile that is on fire will inflict more damage than one that isn't. Whatever the arrows hit will catch on fire, be it tents, thatched roofs, wooden structures, or some hapless RedShirt; RedShirt, who in addition to being pierced by an arrow the poor sap will instantly [[ManOnFire burst into flame]], writhing for a moment before falling off the battlements with a StockScream. On a larger scale, military forces might also fire giant flaming projectiles from siege artillery such as catapults and ballistae. Lastly, sometimes an archer will shoot a single flaming arrow into the sky like a flare, signaling a message to distant units.
23rd Jul '16 7:32:04 PM TheBigBopper
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In battles you will often see arrows that are on fire (especially at night). These arrows are used to [[ManOnFire set enemies]] [[KillItWithFire on fire]].

This can also happen to ballista arrows, catapult rocks, and various other projectiles. Even if there is no [[InfernalRetaliation sane reason]] for them to be on fire. [[IncendiaryExponent Fire is just cool]]. [[TrickArrow Though arrows can still get even cooler,]] especially if shot en masse in a RainOfArrows.

In real life, flaming arrows were used in certain situations other than open battle, though to get them to burn reliably one had to wrap them in flammable material and light them first, making them heavier, reducing their range, and reducing the rate of fire because of the preparation necessary. Also, wrapping a cloth around the pointy bit of your arrow might affect its ability to, you know, ''kill people''; wrapping the cloth behind the arrowhead, as was mostly done in real life, would improve its ability to penetrate a target but still isn't ideal. Also, the mere speed of the arrow's flight is often enough to douse the flame, so flaming arrows had to be fired at a much slower velocity, making them much easier for enemies to dodge.

As a result, flaming arrows were practically never used in field battles like they are in fiction because they were rubbish at killing men and horses, as well as cumbersome and inefficient. The way that the movies depict them as more deadly against people than regular arrows is pure, inaccurate RuleOfCool. Lighted arrows in real life were used to:

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In battles you will often see arrows Creators of fiction generally agree that are on fire (especially at night). These arrows are used to [[ManOnFire set enemies]] [[KillItWithFire on fire]].

This can also happen to ballista arrows, catapult rocks, and various other projectiles. Even if there is no [[InfernalRetaliation sane reason]] for them to be on fire.
[[IncendiaryExponent Fire setting things on fire]] is just cool]]. [[TrickArrow Though awesome, so in military conflict they love to depict archers shooting volleys of flaming arrows can still get even cooler,]] at the enemy regardless of whether the situation is a field battle, a siege, or naval combat. A RainOfArrows looks cooler if the arrows trail fire as they streak through the sky, and it's especially if shot en masse cool when they're used at night so that they light up the air like laser beams. There is also a general assumption that any projectile that is on fire will inflict more damage than one that isn't. Whatever the arrows hit will catch on fire, be it tents, thatched roofs, wooden structures, or some hapless RedShirt; in addition to being pierced by an arrow the poor sap will instantly [[ManOnFire burst into flame]], writhing for a RainOfArrows.

In
moment before falling off the battlements with a StockScream. On a larger scale, military forces might also fire giant flaming projectiles from siege artillery such as catapults and ballistae. Lastly, sometimes an archer will shoot a single flaming arrow into the sky like a flare, signaling a message to distant units.

Much of this is unrealistic, and is depicted that way for RuleOfCool. It's true that in
real life, flaming arrows were used in certain situations other than open battle, though where you needed to set flammable structures on fire. However, fiction tends to ignore the drawbacks that made them unsuitiable for anti-personnel use, least of all in a pitched land battle. To get them to burn reliably one had to wrap them in flammable material and light them first, making them heavier, reducing their range, and reducing slowing the rate of fire because of the preparation necessary. Also, wrapping a cloth around the pointy bit of your arrow might affect arrowhead or having an arrowhead with a cage behind the point to contain the burning cloth would blunt its ability to, you know, to penetrate armor and ''kill people''; people'' like a regular arrow is supposed to; wrapping the cloth some distance behind the arrowhead, as was mostly done in real life, would arrowhead might improve its ability to penetrate a target target, but still isn't ideal. then it might slip off or be less likely to set a fire. Also, the mere speed of the arrow's flight is often enough to douse the flame, so flaming arrows had to be fired at a much slower velocity, making them much less powerful and easier for enemies to dodge.

As a result, flaming arrows were practically never used in field battles like they are in fiction because they were rubbish at killing ''less'' deadly to men and horses, as well as cumbersome and inefficient. The way that the movies depict them as more deadly against people than regular arrows is pure, inaccurate RuleOfCool. Lighted arrows in real life were actually used to:



There is therefore nothing mockable about them being used en masse to attack tents and wooden buildings or to try to panic a civilian population, but the trope gets taken to unrealistic extremes when they are ''always'' used in night battles even in situations where the lighting-things-on-fire factor would be a non-factor, such as when attacking a stone castle (except when the attacking army is in a position to shoot ''over'' the walls and there are wooden buildings on the inside--which there usually are--in which case it's justified). They would also ''not'' be able to set people on fire by hitting them like they do in the movies, since making arrows that rapidly flammable is impossible without the modern petrochemicals they use for this effect in films.

{{Molotov Cocktail}}s are the modern counterpart, though tracers can fit the "frighten enemies" and "adjusting the shot" parts.

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There Therefore there is therefore nothing mockable necessarily ridiculous about them being used en masse to attack tents and wooden buildings or to try to panic a civilian population, but the trope gets taken to unrealistic extremes when they are ''always'' used in night battles even in situations where the lighting-things-on-fire factor would be a non-factor, such as when attacking a stone castle (except when the attacking army is in a position to shoot ''over'' the walls and there are wooden buildings on the inside--which there usually are--in which case it's justified). They would also ''not'' be able to set people on fire by hitting them like they do in the movies, since making arrows that rapidly flammable is impossible without the modern petrochemicals they use for this effect in films.

{{Molotov Cocktail}}s are the modern counterpart, though tracers can fit the "frighten enemies" and "adjusting "adjust the shot" aim" parts.
21st Jun '16 9:55:27 PM MyFinalEdits
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* In ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series you can occasionally obtain fire arrows for your bow...as well as ice arrows that freeze enemies, light arrows that beat enemies in one hit, and ''[[TrickArrow bomb arrows]]''. Most arrows are implied to be magical, but you can still set regular arrows on fire by shooting them trough burning torches. ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'' gives fire arrows to Bulblins (and their twilight counterparts), which typically do [[AnnoyingArrows minimal damage]] and can be swatted out of the air with your sword. If you're wearing the Zora armor, however, they do a massive six times normal damage. Out of combat, Fire Arrows were used on two separate occasions to trap you on a bridge coated with oil.

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* In ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' series you can occasionally obtain fire arrows for your bow... as well as ice arrows that freeze enemies, light arrows that beat enemies in one hit, and ''[[TrickArrow bomb arrows]]''. Most arrows are implied to be magical, but you can still set regular arrows on fire by shooting them trough burning torches. ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'' gives fire arrows to Bulblins (and their twilight counterparts), which typically do [[AnnoyingArrows minimal damage]] and can be swatted out of the air with your sword. If you're wearing the Zora armor, however, they do a massive six times normal damage. Out of combat, Fire Arrows were are used on two separate occasions to trap you on a bridge coated with oil.



* In ''[[VideoGame/{{Civilization}} Civilization V]]'', ''everything'' shoots flaming projectiles when attacking cities! [[FridgeLogic Even swordsmen]]...
** Well, the swordsman and other non-gun using are just throwing some flaming bottles into the city, most likely to do damage to the city itself (and to make sure the city can attack back with a ranged attack). However, swordsman somehow throw heat seeking flaming bottles when being attacked by ''aircraft''.

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* In ''[[VideoGame/{{Civilization}} Civilization V]]'', ''everything'' shoots flaming projectiles when attacking cities! [[FridgeLogic Even swordsmen]]...
** Well, the swordsman and other non-gun using are just throwing some flaming bottles into the city, most likely to do damage to the city itself (and to make sure the city can attack back with a ranged attack). However, swordsman somehow throw heat seeking flaming bottles when being attacked by ''aircraft''.
swordsmen.
21st Jun '16 9:45:11 PM MyFinalEdits
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* One of skill items players can use in VideoGame/LufiaIIRiseOfTheSinistrals is this. Puzzle-wise, it's used to burn unreachable grasses.

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* One of skill items players can use in VideoGame/LufiaIIRiseOfTheSinistrals ''VideoGame/LufiaIIRiseOfTheSinistrals'' is this. Puzzle-wise, it's used to burn unreachable grasses.
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