History Main / Ariel

7th Apr '13 3:26:24 PM Xtifr
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* The Lawrence Block novel, ''Literature/ArielBlock''.

to:

* The Lawrence Block novel, ''Literature/ArielBlock''.''[[Literature/ArielBlock Ariel (Block)]]''.
7th Apr '13 3:26:03 PM Xtifr
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* The Lawrence Block novel, ''Literature/{{Ariel}}''.

to:

* The Lawrence Block novel, ''Literature/{{Ariel}}''.''Literature/ArielBlock''.
21st Mar '13 2:44:46 PM MacronNotes
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* A 1980 light novel and anime series, ''LightNovel/{{Ariel}}''

to:

* A 1980 1980's light novel and anime series, ''LightNovel/{{Ariel}}''
21st Mar '13 2:44:38 PM MacronNotes
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* The Creator/LawrenceBlock novel, ''Literature/{{Ariel}}''.
* A collection of poems by Sylvia Plath, ''Literature/ArielPlath''

to:

* The Creator/LawrenceBlock Lawrence Block novel, ''Literature/{{Ariel}}''.
* A collection of poems by Sylvia Plath, Creator/SylviaPlath, ''Literature/ArielPlath''
20th Mar '13 12:51:08 PM MacronNotes
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* A novel by Stephan Boyett, ''[[Literature/ArielBoyett Ariel]]''

to:

* A novel by Stephan Boyett, ''[[Literature/ArielBoyett Ariel]]''Ariel (Boyett)]]''
20th Mar '13 8:04:59 AM MacronNotes
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[[quoteright:177:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/arieltvtropes_2567.jpg]]

->''This is the light of the mind, cold and planetary.\\
The trees of the mind are black. The light is blue.''
-->"The Moon and the Yew Tree"

''Ariel'' is a collection of poetry by Creator/SylviaPlath. Published posthumously, it's her most well known work (well, that or ''TheBellJar''), and her most critically acclaimed. ''Ariel'' is generally regarded to be one of the most important books of poetry of the twentieth century.

''Ariel'' was originally published in 1965, two years after Plath died, by her husband Ted Hughes. However, the contents of this edition weren't exactly what Plath wrote the contents were to be, and another version (called "The Restored Edition") was published in 2004, with Plath's original table of contents.

Not to be mistaken for [[Theatre/TheTempest the Shakespeare character]], the [[Disney/TheLittleMermaid Disney Princess]] or the [[Literature/{{Ariel}} Lawrence Block novel]], or the Stephen Boyette novel.

to:

[[quoteright:177:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/arieltvtropes_2567.jpg]]

->''This is the light of the mind, cold and planetary.\\
The trees of the mind are black. The light is blue.''
-->"The Moon and the Yew Tree"

''Ariel'' is a collection of poetry by Creator/SylviaPlath. Published posthumously, it's her most well known work (well, that or ''TheBellJar''), and her most critically acclaimed. ''Ariel'' is generally regarded to be one of the most important books of poetry of the twentieth century.

''Ariel'' was originally published in 1965, two years after Plath died, by her husband Ted Hughes. However, the contents of this edition weren't exactly what Plath wrote the contents were to be, and another version (called "The Restored Edition") was published in 2004, with Plath's original table of contents.

Not to be mistaken for [[Theatre/TheTempest the Shakespeare character]], the [[Disney/TheLittleMermaid Disney Princess]] or the [[Literature/{{Ariel}} Lawrence Block novel]], or the Stephen Boyette novel.
can refer to:



!!This Book Contains:

* AudioAdaptation: Sylvia Plath read several of the poems from ''Ariel'' on a radio show for the BBC in 1952, including "Lady Lazarus," "Daddy," "Fever 103," "Ariel," "The Applicant," and "A Birthday Present." You can still find them, too - in a collection the Beeb did, or online (if you know where to look.)
* AuthorExistenceFailure: Pretty soon after she finished, which is why there's two versions with two different tables of contents.
* CreatorBreakdown: Near the end of the writing process ("Edge" was written a couple of days before Plath committed suicide).
* Creator/DrSeuss: Some poems, "Daddy" in particular, have a kind of Seussian rhyme thing going on. To illustrate, check out the opening stanza of "Daddy" :
--->''You do not do you do not do \\
Any more, black shoe\\
In which I have lived like a foot\\
For thirty years, poor and white, \\
Barely daring to breathe or achoo.''
* ForeignLanguageTitle: "Berck-Plage," "Purdah."
* GratuitousGerman: Lots, but most notable in "Daddy" and "Berck-Plage"
* TheGrotesque: The narrator of "Lady Lazarus" describes herself as a sideshow freak.
* LiteraryAllusionTitle: "Ariel," "Lady Lazarus," "Nick and the Candlestick," "Gulliver," "Mary's Song."
* MagnumOpus: ''Ariel'' as a whole, but probably more specifically "Lady Lazarus," "Daddy," and "Fever 103."
* TheMistress: The other woman in "The Rival."
* ParentalAbandonment: The father of the narrator of "Daddy" (and Sylvia Plath's own father) died when she was young, resulting in the narrator feeling abandoned.
* OedipusComplex: The poem "Daddy" is from the perspective of a woman with an Electra Complex.
* SignatureStyle: It's not until ''Ariel'' that Sylvia Plath really developed hers.
* SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped: The introduction to the 2004 edition, written by Frieda Hughes ([[TearJerker Sylvia Plath's daughter]]) is a long criticism of how people tend to revere and objectify her mother, and villify her father, to the point of losing perspective on who they really are.
* StayInTheKitchen: The narrator of "Lesbos" is definitely getting this vibe from her husband and friends.
* TakenForGranite: The woman in "Edge" is (metaphorically) this.
* Theatre/TheTempest: The poem "Ariel" is (presumably) about the spirit from the Shakespeare play.
** Actually, it's about a horse that Sylvia Plath rode some time prior to her death, named Ariel.
* UpdatedRerelease: The 2004 edition.

to:

!!This Book Contains:

* AudioAdaptation: Sylvia Plath read several of the poems from ''Ariel'' on a radio show for the BBC in 1952, including "Lady Lazarus," "Daddy," "Fever 103," "Ariel," "The Applicant," and "A Birthday Present." You can still find them, too - in a The Creator/LawrenceBlock novel, ''Literature/{{Ariel}}''.
* A
collection the Beeb did, or online (if you know where to look.)
* AuthorExistenceFailure: Pretty soon after she finished, which is why there's two versions with two different tables
of contents.
* CreatorBreakdown: Near the end of the writing process ("Edge" was written a couple of days before Plath committed suicide).
* Creator/DrSeuss: Some poems, "Daddy" in particular, have a kind of Seussian rhyme thing going on. To illustrate, check out the opening stanza of "Daddy" :
--->''You do not do you do not do \\
Any more, black shoe\\
In which I have lived like a foot\\
For thirty years, poor and white, \\
Barely daring to breathe or achoo.''
* ForeignLanguageTitle: "Berck-Plage," "Purdah."
* GratuitousGerman: Lots, but most notable in "Daddy" and "Berck-Plage"
* TheGrotesque: The narrator of "Lady Lazarus" describes herself as a sideshow freak.
* LiteraryAllusionTitle: "Ariel," "Lady Lazarus," "Nick and the Candlestick," "Gulliver," "Mary's Song."
* MagnumOpus: ''Ariel'' as a whole, but probably more specifically "Lady Lazarus," "Daddy," and "Fever 103."
* TheMistress: The other woman in "The Rival."
* ParentalAbandonment: The father of the narrator of "Daddy" (and
poems by Sylvia Plath's own father) died when she was young, resulting in the narrator feeling abandoned.
Plath, ''Literature/ArielPlath''
* OedipusComplex: A novel by Stephan Boyett, ''[[Literature/ArielBoyett Ariel]]''
* A 1980 light novel and anime series, ''LightNovel/{{Ariel}}''
*
The poem "Daddy" is from the perspective of a woman with an Electra Complex.
* SignatureStyle: It's not until ''Ariel'' that Sylvia Plath really developed hers.
* SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped: The introduction to the 2004 edition, written by Frieda Hughes ([[TearJerker Sylvia Plath's daughter]]) is a long criticism of how people tend to revere and objectify her mother, and villify her father, to the point of losing perspective on who they really are.
* StayInTheKitchen: The narrator of "Lesbos" is definitely getting this vibe from her husband and friends.
* TakenForGranite: The woman in "Edge" is (metaphorically) this.
* Theatre/TheTempest: The poem "Ariel" is (presumably) about the spirit from the Shakespeare play.
** Actually, it's about a horse that Sylvia Plath rode some time prior to her death, named Ariel.
* UpdatedRerelease: The 2004 edition.
Aki Kaurismäki film, ''Film/{{Ariel}}''
12th Mar '13 2:12:29 AM LordGro
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-->''This is the light of the mind, cold and planetary.\\

to:

-->''This ->''This is the light of the mind, cold and planetary.\\



--->"The Moon and the Yew Tree"

''Ariel'' is a collection of poetry by SylviaPlath. Published posthumously, it's her most well known work (well, that or TheBellJar), and her most critically acclaimed. ''Ariel'' is generally regarded to be one of the most important books of poetry of the twentieth century.

to:

--->"The -->"The Moon and the Yew Tree"

''Ariel'' is a collection of poetry by SylviaPlath. Creator/SylviaPlath. Published posthumously, it's her most well known work (well, that or TheBellJar), ''TheBellJar''), and her most critically acclaimed. ''Ariel'' is generally regarded to be one of the most important books of poetry of the twentieth century.



* AudioAdaptation: SylviaPlath read several of the poems from ''Ariel'' on a radio show for the BBC in 1952, including "Lady Lazarus," "Daddy," "Fever 103," "Ariel," "The Applicant," and "A Birthday Present." You can still find them, too - in a collection the Beeb did, or online (if you know where to look.)

to:

* AudioAdaptation: SylviaPlath Sylvia Plath read several of the poems from ''Ariel'' on a radio show for the BBC in 1952, including "Lady Lazarus," "Daddy," "Fever 103," "Ariel," "The Applicant," and "A Birthday Present." You can still find them, too - in a collection the Beeb did, or online (if you know where to look.)



* ParentalAbandonment: The father of the narrator of "Daddy" (and SylviaPlath's own father) died when she was young, resulting in the narrator feeling abandoned.

to:

* ParentalAbandonment: The father of the narrator of "Daddy" (and SylviaPlath's Sylvia Plath's own father) died when she was young, resulting in the narrator feeling abandoned.



* SignatureStyle: It's not until ''Ariel'' that SylviaPlath really developed hers.

to:

* SignatureStyle: It's not until ''Ariel'' that SylviaPlath Sylvia Plath really developed hers.
10th Feb '13 10:51:57 PM EatingPeopleIsEasy
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Added DiffLines:

** Actually, it's about a horse that Sylvia Plath rode some time prior to her death, named Ariel.
29th Oct '12 8:20:01 PM nombretomado
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* DrSeuss: Some poems, "Daddy" in particular, have a kind of Seussian rhyme thing going on. To illustrate, check out the opening stanza of "Daddy" :

to:

* DrSeuss: Creator/DrSeuss: Some poems, "Daddy" in particular, have a kind of Seussian rhyme thing going on. To illustrate, check out the opening stanza of "Daddy" :
14th Jul '12 7:57:41 PM PandaRosa
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Not to be mistaken for [[Theatre/TheTempest the Shakespeare character]], the [[Disney/TheLittleMermaid Disney Princess]] or the [[Literature/{{Ariel}} Lawrence Block novel]].

to:

Not to be mistaken for [[Theatre/TheTempest the Shakespeare character]], the [[Disney/TheLittleMermaid Disney Princess]] or the [[Literature/{{Ariel}} Lawrence Block novel]].novel]], or the Stephen Boyette novel.
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