History Main / ArbitraryGunPower

22nd Jan '17 6:13:16 PM thatother1dude
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** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' and ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' can take ''five'' head shots just to remotely damage an alert enemy, including regular humans, but then you make a sneak attack and suddenly they drop from a single pistol bullet to the torso.
** The tier system and western theme in ''New Vegas'' lead to a situation where the stereotypical cowboy weapon is better at any given level than most of the rest, especially with the "Cowboy" perk. This means a .357 Magnum revolver is more powerful than most .223/5.56mm rifles, and a .44 Magnum revolver is more powerful than both .308 rifles (as is the 12.7mm pistol, which is essentially the in-universe equivalent of the Desert Eagle). On the other hand, [[ArmorPiercingAttack AP]] rounds for the more modern rifles can ignore much more of an enemy's damage threshold than older rifles or pistol rounds (5.56mm, .308, and .50 MG AP all ignore 15; .45, .44, 45-70 Gov't can at best ignore between 4 and 6 while no 12.7mm variants have any AP properties). Still, you won't be using these rounds very often; point-for-point extra damage is objectively better than DT reduction, and these DT modifications apply even when those rifle rounds [[HandCannon are used by pistols]] (like [[Film/BladeRunner That Gun]] and its generic version the 5.56mm pistol, which both cause more damage per shot than any rifle using the same round).

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** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' The tier system and western theme in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' can take ''five'' head shots just to remotely damage an alert enemy, including regular humans, but then you make a sneak attack and suddenly they drop from a single pistol bullet to the torso.
** The tier system and western theme in ''New Vegas''
lead to a situation where the stereotypical cowboy weapon is better at any given level than most of the rest, especially with the "Cowboy" perk. This means a .357 Magnum revolver is more powerful than most .223/5.56mm rifles, and a .44 Magnum revolver is more powerful than both .308 rifles (as is the 12.7mm pistol, which is essentially the in-universe equivalent of the Desert Eagle). On the other hand, [[ArmorPiercingAttack AP]] rounds for the more modern rifles can ignore much more of an enemy's damage threshold than older rifles or pistol rounds (5.56mm, .308, and .50 MG AP all ignore 15; .45, .44, 45-70 Gov't can at best ignore between 4 and 6 while no 12.7mm variants have any AP properties). Still, you won't be using these rounds very often; point-for-point extra damage is objectively better than DT reduction, and these DT modifications apply even when those rifle rounds [[HandCannon are used by pistols]] (like [[Film/BladeRunner That Gun]] and its generic version the 5.56mm pistol, which both cause more damage per shot than any rifle using the same round).
22nd Jan '17 6:11:52 PM thatother1dude
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But of course, TropesAreTools - if it makes a game PVPBalanced because of it, it sure seems much less arbitrary then. Some weapons in multiplayer first-person shooters are balanced based on rate of fire rather than caliber to avoid min-maxing: in a game, a gun that fires rapidly ''and'' does high damage will always be more widely used than a gun that does only one of the two. However, some games tend to balance that with recoil, making the gun harder to control, or accuracy, making its rapid fire only useful in close ranges.

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But Depending on what you consider arbitrary, this trope is near universal to a varying extent in FPS video games, even seemingly realistic ones for a multitude of course, TropesAreTools - if it makes a game PVPBalanced because reasons. A major root of it, it sure seems much less arbitrary then. these differences is that games in general are designed to be fair, winnable, and balanced, whereas in RealLife the idea is to get as large an advantage as possible. In RealLife weapons designers love to produce Game Changers, whereas in games the exact opposite is true, in games [[GameBreaker Gamebreakers]] are to be avoided, as are unsporting and boring but effective tactics like spamming bullets. These core differences almost inevitably lead to a divergence between the abilities of firearms in games vs their RealLife counterparts, but as noted in some of the examples below, mods bringing guns closer to their reallife counterparts are often just as fun, so whether the necessity of employing this trope can be an open question.

Some weapons in multiplayer first-person shooters are balanced based on rate of fire rather than caliber to avoid min-maxing: in a game, a gun that fires rapidly ''and'' does high damage will always be more widely used than a gun that does only one of the two. However, some games tend to balance that with recoil, making the gun harder to control, or accuracy, making its rapid fire only useful in close ranges.



* Depending on what you consider arbitrary, this trope is near universal to a varying extent in fps video games, even [[http://www.popularmechanics.com/culture/gaming/a2738/4255750/ seemingly realistic ones]] for a multitude of reasons. A major root of these differences is that games in general are designed to be fair, winnable, and balanced, whereas in RealLife the idea is to be as unfair, unwinnable, and unbalanced against your enemy as possible. In RealLife weapons designers love to produce Game Changers, whereas in games the exact opposite is true, in games [[GameBreaker Gamebreakers]] are to be avoided, as are unsporting and boring but effective tactics like spamming bullets. These core differences almost inevitably lead to a divergence between the abilities of firearms in games vs their RealLife counterparts, but as noted in some of the examples below, mods bringing guns closer to their reallife counterparts are often just as fun, so whether the necessity of employing this trope can be an open question.



*** The tier system and western theme in ''New Vegas'' lead to a situation where the stereotypical cowboy weapon is better at any given level than most of the rest, especially with the "Cowboy" perk. This means a .357 Magnum revolver is more powerful than most .223/5.56mm rifles, and a .44 Magnum revolver is more powerful than both .308 rifles (as is the 12.7mm pistol, which is essentially the in-universe equivalent of the Desert Eagle).
*** On the other hand, [[ArmorPiercingAttack AP]] rounds for the more modern rifles can ignore much more of an enemy's damage threshold than older rifles or pistol rounds (5.56mm, .308, and .50 MG AP all ignore 15; .45, .44, 45-70 Gov't can at best ignore between 4 and 6 while no 12.7mm variants have any AP properties). Still, you won't be using these rounds very often; point-for-point extra damage is objectively better than DT reduction, and these DT modifications apply even when those rifle rounds [[HandCannon are used by pistols]] (like [[Film/BladeRunner That Gun]] and its generic version the 5.56mm pistol, which both cause more damage per shot than any rifle using the same round).
** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'' carries on this tradition in earnest, despite the devs claiming combat is overhauled and less awkward. They also seem to take a page out of Boris The Bullet-Dodger's playbook that [[GunsDoNotWorkThatWay "heavy is good"]] in terms of damage; the heavier a gun is, the more damage it will deal.
** On the other hand, all bets are off when it comes to {{Game Mod}}s for any of the games. The fanbase has proven to have a number of gun nuts with programming experience who are willing to [[AvertedTrope make gun power as non-arbitrary as possible]], "game balance" be damned.

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*** ** The tier system and western theme in ''New Vegas'' lead to a situation where the stereotypical cowboy weapon is better at any given level than most of the rest, especially with the "Cowboy" perk. This means a .357 Magnum revolver is more powerful than most .223/5.56mm rifles, and a .44 Magnum revolver is more powerful than both .308 rifles (as is the 12.7mm pistol, which is essentially the in-universe equivalent of the Desert Eagle). \n*** On the other hand, [[ArmorPiercingAttack AP]] rounds for the more modern rifles can ignore much more of an enemy's damage threshold than older rifles or pistol rounds (5.56mm, .308, and .50 MG AP all ignore 15; .45, .44, 45-70 Gov't can at best ignore between 4 and 6 while no 12.7mm variants have any AP properties). Still, you won't be using these rounds very often; point-for-point extra damage is objectively better than DT reduction, and these DT modifications apply even when those rifle rounds [[HandCannon are used by pistols]] (like [[Film/BladeRunner That Gun]] and its generic version the 5.56mm pistol, which both cause more damage per shot than any rifle using the same round).
** A gun's damage in ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'' carries varies tremendously depending on this tradition in earnest, which mods are equipped, despite most of them not changing the devs claiming combat is overhauled and less awkward. They also seem to take a page out of Boris The Bullet-Dodger's playbook that ammunition used. [[GunsDoNotWorkThatWay "heavy is good"]] in terms of damage; Even stranger]], the heavier a gun is, the more part that affects damage it will deal.
** On
and fire rate is the other hand, all bets are off when it comes to {{Game Mod}}s for any of receiver, which in real life is just the games. The fanbase has proven to have a number of gun nuts with programming experience who are willing to [[AvertedTrope make gun power as non-arbitrary as possible]], "game balance" be damned.gun's ''casing''.f



* ''VideoGame/ParasiteEve'' plays this trope straight when you attempt to increase the firing rate. Modifying a single-shot weapon to fire two rounds at once causes its bullets to only deal around sixty percent their original damage, for instance.
** Averted, however, by the sequel, where a 9mm bullet will deal the same damage regardless of the gun that fires it. The difference between guns is weight (how much is slows you down/how long it takes to ready it), range, and rate of fire. Generally speaking, the higher rate of fire weapons, like the [=M93R=] you start with, have shorter ranges and weigh more. Single shot weapons also have a slightly better chance of a critical hit.

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* ''VideoGame/ParasiteEve'' plays this trope straight when you attempt to increase the firing rate. Modifying a single-shot weapon to fire two rounds at once causes its bullets to only deal around sixty percent their original damage, for instance.
**
instance. Averted, however, by the sequel, ''VideoGame/ParasiteEve2'', where a 9mm bullet will cartridges deal the same damage regardless of the gun that fires it. it--instead of getting more powerful guns, you get more powerful ''ammo''. The difference between guns of the same caliber is weight (how much is slows you down/how long it takes to ready it), range, and rate of fire. fire, and critical hit rate. Generally speaking, the higher rate of fire weapons, like the [=M93R=] you start with, have shorter ranges and ranges, weigh more. Single shot weapons also more, and have a slightly better worse chance of a critical hit.
22nd Jan '17 3:20:41 AM icewater
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* Depending on what you consider arbitrary, this trope is near universal to a varying extent in fps video games, even [[http://www.popularmechanics.com/culture/gaming/a2738/4255750/ seemingly realistic ones]] for a multitude of reasons. A major root of these differences is that games in general are designed to be fair, winnable, and balanced, whereas in RealLife the idea is to be as unfair, unwinnable, and unbalanced against your enemy as possible. In RealLife weapons designers love to produce Game Changers, whereas in games the exact opposite is true, in games [[GameBreaker Gamebreakers]] are to be avoided, as are unsporting and boring but effective tactics like spamming bullets. These core differences almost inevitably lead to a divergence between the abilities of firearms in games vs their RealLife counterparts.

to:

* Depending on what you consider arbitrary, this trope is near universal to a varying extent in fps video games, even [[http://www.popularmechanics.com/culture/gaming/a2738/4255750/ seemingly realistic ones]] for a multitude of reasons. A major root of these differences is that games in general are designed to be fair, winnable, and balanced, whereas in RealLife the idea is to be as unfair, unwinnable, and unbalanced against your enemy as possible. In RealLife weapons designers love to produce Game Changers, whereas in games the exact opposite is true, in games [[GameBreaker Gamebreakers]] are to be avoided, as are unsporting and boring but effective tactics like spamming bullets. These core differences almost inevitably lead to a divergence between the abilities of firearms in games vs their RealLife counterparts.counterparts, but as noted in some of the examples below, mods bringing guns closer to their reallife counterparts are often just as fun, so whether the necessity of employing this trope can be an open question.
22nd Jan '17 3:15:47 AM icewater
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* Depending on what you consider arbitrary, this trope is near universal to a varying extent in fps video games, even [[http://www.popularmechanics.com/culture/gaming/a2738/4255750/ seemingly realistic ones]] for a multitude of reasons. A major root of these differences is that games in general are designed to be fair, winnable, and balanced, whereas in RealLife the idea is to be as unfair, unwinnable, and unbalanced against your enemy as possible. In RealLife weapons designers love to produce game changers, whereas in games the exact opposite is true games [[GameBreaker Gamebreakers]] are to be avoided, and unsporting but effective tactics like spam are to be discouraged. These core differences almost inevitably lead to differences in abilities of weapons, even those with the same name and appearance.

to:

* Depending on what you consider arbitrary, this trope is near universal to a varying extent in fps video games, even [[http://www.popularmechanics.com/culture/gaming/a2738/4255750/ seemingly realistic ones]] for a multitude of reasons. A major root of these differences is that games in general are designed to be fair, winnable, and balanced, whereas in RealLife the idea is to be as unfair, unwinnable, and unbalanced against your enemy as possible. In RealLife weapons designers love to produce game changers, Game Changers, whereas in games the exact opposite is true true, in games [[GameBreaker Gamebreakers]] are to be avoided, and as are unsporting and boring but effective tactics like spam are to be discouraged. spamming bullets. These core differences almost inevitably lead to differences in a divergence between the abilities of weapons, even those with the same name and appearance.firearms in games vs their RealLife counterparts.
22nd Jan '17 3:09:58 AM icewater
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* Depending on what you consider arbitrary, this trope is near universal to a varying extent in fps video games, even [[http://www.popularmechanics.com/culture/gaming/a2738/4255750/ seemingly realistic ones]] for a multitude of reasons. A major root of these differences is that games in general are designed to be fair, winnable, and balanced, whereas in RealLife the idea is to be as unfair, unwinnable, and unbalanced against your enemy as possible. In RealLife weapons designers love to produce game changers, whereas in games the exact opposite is true games [[GameBreaker Gamebreakers]] are to be avoided, and unsporting but effective tactics like spam are to be discouraged. These core differences almost inevitably lead to differences in abilities of weapons, even those with the same name and appearance.
16th Jan '17 1:02:23 AM steam66
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** Then again, most personal armor in the 40th century is excellent compared to 21st century stock. The aforementioned "flak jacket", the Imperial Guard Flak Armor, is actually a very high-quality personal protection system capable of withstanding fire from a ''light machine gun'' and preventing its user's death. Though given the average weapon power of the present, it's as good as tissue paper most of the time.
23rd Dec '16 7:23:08 PM Kadorhal
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* The assault rifle in ''VideoGame/DeusEx'' was seriously underpowered, despite being chambered for 7.62mm NATO, a rifle cartridge that was considered excessively powerful for the purpose it was being used for. The pistol on the other hand, can mean a OneHitKill with a BoomHeadshot.

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* The assault rifle in ''VideoGame/DeusEx'' was seriously underpowered, despite being chambered for 7.62mm NATO, a rifle cartridge that was considered excessively powerful for the purpose it was being used for. The A pistol on the other hand, can mean will be a OneHitKill with on nearly any enemy across the game if you [[BoomHeadshot nail them in the head]], but a BoomHeadshot.full five-round burst from the rifle will only do a ''single'' extra point of base damage over that pistol shot.
16th Oct '16 3:39:01 PM zarpaulus
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* In the LowFantasy RPG ''TabletopGame/{{Ironclaw}}'' wheel-lock guns deal Slaying damage, meaning each successful attack dice deals two damage instead of the normal one. While in ''TabletopGame/MyriadSong'' and ''Urban Jungle'', sci-fi and noir games from the same company using derivatives of the same rules, guns deal normal damage.
16th Sep '16 11:54:13 AM Kadorhal
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* The ''VideoGame/DevilMayCry'' series is a huge offender in this regard. A shot from one of Dante's handguns, at least [[CutscenePowerToTheMax in gameplay]], is about as powerful as a mosquito bite. Of course, [[GunsAkimbo he wields two]], they have BottomlessMagazines, and they can be [[MoreDakka rapid-fired]] or [[ChargedAttack charged up]], but as far as raw damage goes you're better off marching up to the enemy and slashing it to death. In this case, it may be as the enemies are typically demons they're highly resistant to small arms even when shot in the head - Dante himself actually takes a bullet to the forehead on at least one occasion and is only mildly annoyed about it. When you have to overcome their healing, slashing them up with an enormous sword would likely be more efficient.

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* The ''VideoGame/DevilMayCry'' series is a huge offender in this regard. A shot from one of Dante's handguns, at least [[CutscenePowerToTheMax in gameplay]], is about as powerful as a mosquito bite. Of course, [[GunsAkimbo he wields two]], they have BottomlessMagazines, and they can be [[MoreDakka rapid-fired]] or [[ChargedAttack charged up]], but as far as raw damage goes you're better off marching up to the enemy and slashing it to death. In this case, it may be as the enemies are typically demons they're highly resistant to small arms even when shot in the head - Dante himself Dante, even only being half-demon himself, actually takes a bullet to the forehead on at least one occasion in a cutscene and is only mildly annoyed about it. When you have to overcome their healing, slashing them up with an enormous sword would likely be more efficient.



* In ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' guns, bows and crossbows of the same level are generally equal in power and choice depends on what you can get your hands on. In hands of warriors and rogues, they are next to useless (and in Mists Of Pandaria ExpansionPack, unusable at all), while when used by Hunter class they are as deadly as magic and other weapons of other classes (that is to say, ''still'' not ''nearly'' as deadly as they would be in real life).

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* In ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' guns, bows and crossbows of the same level are generally equal in power and choice depends on what you can get your hands on. In hands of warriors and rogues, they are next to useless (and in Mists Of Pandaria the ''Mists of Pandaria'' ExpansionPack, unusable at all), while when used by Hunter class they are as deadly as magic and other weapons of other classes (that is to say, ''still'' not ''nearly'' as deadly as they would be in real life).



* The hunting rifle in the ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' series is based on a weapon that should be firing the same bullets as the assault rifle, and is noted for a lack of accuracy in the real world, but in-game it's a pixel-perfectly-accurate terror that will penetrate and [[OneHitPolykill instantly kill as many zombies as you can line up in one shot]]; meanwhile the assault rifle will barely penetrate one zombie and often requires multiple bullets to put them down. The pistol-versus-rifle issue is at least played somewhat closer to reality, as the standard pistols suffer in accuracy and damage per shot compared to any of the primary weapons, though the HandCannon Magnum introduced in ''VideoGame/Left4Dead2'' trades capacity and fire rate for damage close to the sniper rifles' - even the ridiculously-tough common Infected in Realism mode can take two shots from a sniper rifle with no problem, but drop on the spot from a Magnum shot.

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* The hunting rifle in the ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' series is based on a weapon that should be firing the same bullets as the assault rifle, and is noted for a lack of accuracy in the real world, but in-game it's a pixel-perfectly-accurate terror that will penetrate and [[OneHitPolykill instantly kill as many zombies as you can line up in one shot]]; meanwhile the assault rifle will barely penetrate one zombie and often requires multiple bullets to put them down. The pistol-versus-rifle issue is at least played somewhat closer to reality, as the standard pistols suffer in accuracy and damage per shot compared to any of the primary weapons, though but because they have [[BottomlessMagazines infinite reserve ammo]] and a high yet controllable maximum rate of fire, a lot of players still swear by them (even without the achievement for completing a campaign using nothing but the pistols). Meanwhile, the HandCannon Magnum introduced in ''VideoGame/Left4Dead2'' trades capacity and fire rate for damage jacked-up close to that of the sniper rifles' - hell, even the Realism mode's ridiculously-tough common Infected in Realism mode can take tank two or three shots from a sniper rifle with no problem, but drop on the spot will die where they stand from a Magnum shot.



* The Spanish film, ''800 Bullets'' includes a scene where the BadassGrandpa blows up a backhoe with one shot from a lever-action rifle.

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* The Spanish film, film ''800 Bullets'' includes a scene where the BadassGrandpa blows up a backhoe with one shot from a lever-action rifle.



* In Sci-Fi RPG ''{{Traveller}}'', crossbows have better damage than any slug pistol, better range than any energy pistol, and better accuracy than any rifle - some of the deadliest weapons of the Space Age!

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* In Sci-Fi RPG ''{{Traveller}}'', ''TabletopGame/{{Traveller}}'', crossbows have better damage than any slug pistol, better range than any energy pistol, and better accuracy than any rifle - some of the deadliest weapons of the Space Age!



* {{Franchise/Warhammer40000}} has an odd version, in that lasguns (which are explicitly more powerful than modern assault rifles, but still among the weakest weapons in the game) have no armor penetration value. This means a normal human wearing a flak jacket has a 1 in 3 chance of shrugging off a lethal wound, under the justification that their "armor" which covers at best their upper chest, shoulders, and head, stopped it. And then, other weapons pack the same strength as the lasgun, but are impossibly better at piercing armor despite no other change in performance. For example, the hellgun, which has just as much theoretical power as the lasgun, is capable of ignoring space marine armor. That puts it a factor of two better at piercing armor than the Marines' own full-auto-rocket-propelled-grenade-firing guns.

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* {{Franchise/Warhammer40000}} {{TabletopGame/Warhammer 40000}} has an odd version, in that lasguns (which are explicitly more powerful than modern assault rifles, but still among the weakest weapons in the game) have no armor penetration value. This means a normal human wearing a flak jacket has a 1 in 3 chance of shrugging off a lethal wound, under the justification that their "armor" which covers at best their upper chest, shoulders, and head, stopped it. And then, other weapons pack the same strength as the lasgun, but are impossibly better at piercing armor despite no other change in performance. For example, the hellgun, which has just as much theoretical power as the lasgun, is capable of ignoring space marine armor. That puts it a factor of two better at piercing armor than the Marines' own full-auto-rocket-propelled-grenade-firing guns.



* The OldWorldOfDarkness used this trope but not as flagrantly as many {{Role Playing Game}}s. All guns were fairly lethal, though a bit less so than real life weapons. Additionally, a weapon's lethality was more like real world lethality than many games. Velocity and caliber, not rate of fire, dictated damage. Supernatural creatures only resisted firearms by virtue of their powers, not because the guns themselves weren't deadly. Finally, a shot with more successes was a more well-placed shot and rolled more dice for damage. It was still extraordinarily difficult to kill anyone instantly with a handgun, however, regardless of how many successes the attack rolled since the damage dice would usually reduce this to a survivable but deadly level.

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* The OldWorldOfDarkness TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness used this trope but not as flagrantly as many {{Role Playing Game}}s. All guns were fairly lethal, though a bit less so than real life weapons. Additionally, a weapon's lethality was more like real world lethality than many games. Velocity and caliber, not rate of fire, dictated damage. Supernatural creatures only resisted firearms by virtue of their powers, not because the guns themselves weren't deadly. Finally, a shot with more successes was a more well-placed shot and rolled more dice for damage. It was still extraordinarily difficult to kill anyone instantly with a handgun, however, regardless of how many successes the attack rolled since the damage dice would usually reduce this to a survivable but deadly level.



* ''VideoGame/CallOfCthulhuDarkCornersOfTheEarth'' features both a 1911 pistol and a Model 1917 revolver, with the revolver being more powerful. In reality both guns fire the same .45 ACP round. The fully-automatic Thompson uses the same round. None of these weapons share an ammo pool.

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* ''VideoGame/CallOfCthulhuDarkCornersOfTheEarth'' features both a 1911 pistol and a Model 1917 revolver, with the revolver being more powerful. In reality both guns fire the same .45 ACP round. The fully-automatic Thompson uses the same round. None of these weapons [[UniversalAmmunition share an ammo pool.pool]], either.
10th Sep '16 7:20:16 PM Kadorhal
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** ''World At War'' gets ridiculous with its laughably-underpowered, damn-near-useless M1 Garand. As the basic US starter weapon, it's nerfed to the point that you'd think it was chambered in .22 Short. But the M1 carbine ([[MisidentifiedWeapons incorrectly called the [=M1A1=] in the game]]; that would actually be the paratrooper model with the folding stock) is somehow a HandCannon. Except that in RealLife, the .30-06 semiauto Garand was (and still is) known for being exceptionally accurate, exceptionally durable and reliable, and was a proven "one shot, one kill" man-stopper, meaning the American GI was significantly better armed than his British, Russian, German, Japanese, or Italian counterparts. The carbine, on the other hand, was lightweight and durable, but its .30 Carbine round lacked the punch of the .30-06, and could sometimes require half or more of its magazine to put down a charging Japanese berserker. That's also ignoring the purest embodiment of this trope with the Garand and the bolt-action rifles, which will have their damage ratings boosted upon the attachment of a sniper scope for absolutely zero reason.

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** ''World At War'' gets ridiculous with its laughably-underpowered, damn-near-useless M1 Garand. As the basic US starter weapon, it's nerfed to the point that you'd think it was chambered in .22 Short. But the M1 carbine ([[MisidentifiedWeapons incorrectly called the [=M1A1=] in the game]]; that would actually be the paratrooper model with the folding stock) is somehow a HandCannon.HandCannon because it's the last weapon unlocked in the game. Except that in RealLife, the .30-06 semiauto Garand was (and still is) known for being exceptionally accurate, exceptionally durable and reliable, and was a proven "one shot, one kill" man-stopper, meaning the American GI was significantly better armed than his British, Russian, German, Japanese, or Italian counterparts. The carbine, on the other hand, was lightweight and durable, but its .30 Carbine round lacked the punch of the .30-06, and could sometimes require half or more of its magazine to put down a charging Japanese berserker. That's also ignoring the purest embodiment of this trope with the Garand and the bolt-action rifles, which will have their damage ratings boosted upon the attachment of a sniper scope for absolutely zero reason.



** The SMG in ''VideoGame/Halo3ODST'' is rather odd. Despite only firing 5x23mm sub machine gun rounds, the weapon seems to drop Brute [[DeflectorShields Shields]] just as effectively as the much larger (and logically more powerful) 7.62x51mm rounds used by the assault rifle. This may be justified, as the SMG in ''ODST'' (as well as in ''Halo 2'' and ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'') does have a faster rate of fire.

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** The SMG in ''VideoGame/Halo3ODST'' is rather odd. Despite only firing 5x23mm sub machine gun rounds, the weapon seems to drop Brute [[DeflectorShields Shields]] shields]] just as effectively as the much larger (and logically more powerful) 7.62x51mm rounds used by the assault rifle. This may be justified, as the SMG in ''ODST'' (as well as in ''Halo 2'' and ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'') does have a faster rate of fire.



** This shows up in every ''Resident Evil'' game with automatic weapons. Even 5.56 or 7.62mm automatic rifles that should completely devastate an enemy in a single quick burst will require a good four or five seconds of concentrated fire to drop one mook, while your substantially weaker-in-real-life 9mm handguns do more damage per shot and your also much-weaker-in-real-life .357 or .44 Magnum revolver is a consistent OneHitKill. Ostensibly, this is done for the sake of gameplay balance, since if your assault rifles were as effective in-game as they are in real life, combined with the percentage-based ammo count the earlier games give them ([=RE3=] lets an M4 magazine hold about ten times as many rounds as it does in real life), [[GameBreaker you wouldn't need to use much else]].

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** This shows up in every ''Resident Evil'' game with automatic weapons. Even 5.56 or 7.62mm automatic rifles that should completely devastate an enemy in a single quick burst will require a good four or five seconds of concentrated fire to drop one mook, while your substantially weaker-in-real-life 9mm handguns do more damage per shot and your also much-weaker-in-real-life .357 or .44 Magnum revolver is a consistent OneHitKill. Ostensibly, this is done for the sake of gameplay balance, since if your assault rifles were as effective in-game as they are in real life, combined with the percentage-based ammo count the earlier games give them ([=RE3=] lets an a thirty-round M4 magazine hold about ten times as many rounds as it does in real life), three ''hundred'' rounds), [[GameBreaker you wouldn't need to use much else]].



* Damage in ''VideoGame/TimeSplitters'' is just plain hilariously random. Being shot by the exact same gun can do a sliver of damage the first time, and flatline you the second. And due to the way 'character abilities' work when turned on, gets absolutely crazy with high-stamina enemies/characters, even human ones. Giant louts like Hector Barbosa can take a full auto magazine to the head then punch you to death while you reload, while little girls like Viola and Krayola will wilt if clipped in the hand.
* The ''VideoGame/{{Turok}}'' series fan favorite Mag 60 fires 3 bullets per tap in primary burst-fire mode. Does maybe 10-15 points of damage, a full load will barely kill a purim or another player in deathmatch. Move into alt-fire, however, and you charge up and use 15 at once, which does nearly double damage what 15 normal shots would do on the same creature in the same location. Damn near instant kill on small enemies (removes limbs, decapitates, EXPLODES IN HALF), one or (but usually) two to down a purim, aiming center mass and then firing upon a purim puts a truck-sized hole in its stomach on the second shot. The first time you see this in action, even you will stare as incredulously at it as he does. Typically most weapons follow this format, with alt-fire using more ammo but being stupidly overpowered for what it fires, especially the rapid-fire weapons.

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* Damage in ''VideoGame/TimeSplitters'' is just plain hilariously random. Being shot by the exact same gun can do a sliver of damage the first time, and flatline you the second. And due to the way 'character abilities' work when turned on, this gets absolutely crazy with high-stamina enemies/characters, even human ones. Giant louts like Hector Barbosa can take a full auto magazine to the head then punch you to death while you reload, while little girls like Viola and Krayola will wilt if clipped in the hand.
* The ''VideoGame/{{Turok}}'' series fan favorite Mag 60 fires 3 bullets per tap in primary burst-fire mode. Does maybe 10-15 points of damage, a full load will barely kill a purim or another player in deathmatch. Move into alt-fire, however, and you charge up and use 15 at once, which does nearly double damage what 15 normal shots would do on the same creature in the same location. Damn near instant kill on small enemies (removes limbs, decapitates, EXPLODES IN HALF), ''blows them in half''), one or (but usually) two to down a purim, aiming center mass and then firing upon a purim puts a truck-sized hole in its stomach on the second shot. The first time you see this in action, even you will stare as incredulously at it as he does. Typically most weapons follow this format, with alt-fire using more ammo but being stupidly overpowered for what it fires, especially the rapid-fire weapons.



** You'd think the Soldier's rocket launcher would be hilariously overpowered because they're [[StuffBlowingUp rockets]], right? No. While a close-range rocket is very powerful (though you'd probably kill yourself too with the splash damage), shooting a rocket from long-range does a rather small amount of damage (40-50 damage). This is because of "damage falloff", so players don't just stand back and spam projectiles all day (some still do anyway, but it's not very effective).
* The ''VideoGame/DevilMayCry'' series is a huge offender in this regard. A shot from one of Dante's handguns is about as powerful as a mosquito bite. Of course, [[GunsAkimbo he wields two]], [[MoreDakka they can rapidfire]], [[ChargedAttack and they can be charged]], but as far as raw damage goes you're better off marching up to the enemy and slashing it to death. (But during [[CutscenePowerToTheMax cutscenes]]...) In this case, it may be as the enemies are typically demons they're highly resistant to small arms even when shot in the head. When you have to overcome their healing, slashing them up with an enormous sword would likely be more efficient.
* ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' has an extremely wide range of damage dealt by similar guns that fire the same ammunition, although this is occasionally justified by the elemental damage that many deal. However, player characters can take skills that let them do more damage with certain weapon types, and even ''increase magazine sizes'' in various weapons, including ''revolvers''. That's right, you can somehow store ''nine'' bullets in a six-gun just by being good at it. [[MST3KMantra Don't ask how. Just go kill something with it.]]

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** You'd think the Soldier's rocket launcher would be hilariously overpowered because they're [[StuffBlowingUp rockets]], right? No. While a close-range rocket is very powerful (though you'd probably kill yourself too with the splash damage), shooting a rocket from long-range does a rather small amount of damage (40-50 damage). This is because of "damage falloff", so players don't just stand back and spam projectiles all day (some still do anyway, but it's not very effective).
effective even when they actually hit something).
* The ''VideoGame/DevilMayCry'' series is a huge offender in this regard. A shot from one of Dante's handguns handguns, at least [[CutscenePowerToTheMax in gameplay]], is about as powerful as a mosquito bite. Of course, [[GunsAkimbo he wields two]], they have BottomlessMagazines, and they can be [[MoreDakka they can rapidfire]], rapid-fired]] or [[ChargedAttack and they can be charged]], charged up]], but as far as raw damage goes you're better off marching up to the enemy and slashing it to death. (But during [[CutscenePowerToTheMax cutscenes]]...) In this case, it may be as the enemies are typically demons they're highly resistant to small arms even when shot in the head.head - Dante himself actually takes a bullet to the forehead on at least one occasion and is only mildly annoyed about it. When you have to overcome their healing, slashing them up with an enormous sword would likely be more efficient.
* ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' has an extremely wide range of damage dealt by similar guns that fire the same ammunition, although this is occasionally justified by the elemental damage that many deal. However, player characters can take skills that let them do more damage with certain weapon types, and even ''increase increased magazine sizes'' sizes in various weapons, including ''revolvers''. That's right, you can somehow store ''nine'' bullets in a six-gun just by being good at it. [[MST3KMantra Don't ask how. Just go kill something with it.]]



* The hunting rifle in the ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' series is based on a weapon that should be firing the same bullets as the assault rifle, and is noted for a lack of accuracy in the real world, but in-game it's a pixel-perfectly-accurate terror that will penetrate and [[OneHitPolykill instantly kill as many zombies as you can line up in one shot]]; meanwhile the assault rifle will barely penetrate one zombie and often requires multiple bullets to put them down.

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* The hunting rifle in the ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' series is based on a weapon that should be firing the same bullets as the assault rifle, and is noted for a lack of accuracy in the real world, but in-game it's a pixel-perfectly-accurate terror that will penetrate and [[OneHitPolykill instantly kill as many zombies as you can line up in one shot]]; meanwhile the assault rifle will barely penetrate one zombie and often requires multiple bullets to put them down. The pistol-versus-rifle issue is at least played somewhat closer to reality, as the standard pistols suffer in accuracy and damage per shot compared to any of the primary weapons, though the HandCannon Magnum introduced in ''VideoGame/Left4Dead2'' trades capacity and fire rate for damage close to the sniper rifles' - even the ridiculously-tough common Infected in Realism mode can take two shots from a sniper rifle with no problem, but drop on the spot from a Magnum shot.



* The guns in ''Film/DjangoUnchained'' seem to deal whatever damage makes the coolest shot at the time. During the final showdown, Django shoots [[spoiler:Lara Lee]] and the body is thrown clean out of the room in a different direction entirely, while another victims merely drops to the floor where he stands.

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* The guns in ''Film/DjangoUnchained'' seem to deal whatever damage makes the coolest shot at the time. During the final showdown, Django shoots [[spoiler:Lara Lee]] and the body is thrown clean out of the room in a different direction entirely, while another victims victim merely drops to the floor where he stands.
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