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History Main / AndYouThoughtItWouldFail

17th May '16 12:37:11 PM TheUnknownUploader
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** Pierre Boulle, author of [[Literature/PlanetOfTheApes ''La Planete des Singes'']], considered it to be one of his lesser works and that [[Film/PlanetOfTheApes any film based off it]] had no potential for screen success.
15th May '16 1:44:32 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* ''Film/{{Jaws}}'' was initially picked up as a script treatment by {{Universal}} Pictures, [[TroubledProduction but ran into problems almost immediately]]. A rookie director who only had [[Film/TheSugarlandExpress one other feature film]] -- that bombed in theatres -- to his name was chosen to direct the film. An actor who believed he was now box-office poison because of his prior work signed up as one of the main characters. Filming ran over-budget and overtime, with executives denying funding for key reshoots (which then had to be paid out of pocket). There were accusations that the practical effects were cheap and laughable, [[SerendipityWritesThePlot forcing the filmmaker to improvise]] by keeping it off-screen for most of the run-time. Yet, contrary to Creator/StevenSpielberg and Richard Dreyfus' beliefs, ''Jaws'' became the first film to see wide-release distribution, became one of the highest-grossing films of all time and ushered in a new wave in American film-making.
* It's hard to believe now, but TwentiethCenturyFox had very little faith in ''Franchise/StarWars: Film/ANewHope'' making much money.[[note]]Both Creator/UnitedArtists and {{Universal}} had passed on the film before it even got to Fox.[[/note]] They put it out as sort of a "last hurrah" to hold off bankruptcy, and tasked Creator/AlanDeanFoster with writing ''Literature/SplinterOfTheMindsEye'', a sequel novel written for the sole purpose of facilitating a quick low-budget movie adaptation. Fox had to bully theaters into showing ''Star Wars'', as theaters simply wouldn't touch it and Fox had to make some money back on what they assumed would be a financial fiasco. Fox threatened to withhold the drama film ''The Other Side of Midnight'', which had been tipped to be a hit that Summer, unless the theater agreed to screen ''Star Wars'' for a couple weeks. ''The Other Side of Midnight'' made its budget back, but it was steamrolled at the box office by ''Star Wars''. Fox had given George Lucas exclusive rights on TheMerch related to Star Wars in exchange for paying him less. They figured the movie would bomb and no one would make, never mind buy the merchandise as a result. [[JustSoStory And that's why no publisher ever gives exclusive merchandising rights to the creator anymore.]]

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* ''Film/{{Jaws}}'' was initially picked up as a script treatment by {{Universal}} Creator/{{Universal}} Pictures, [[TroubledProduction but ran into problems almost immediately]]. A rookie director who only had [[Film/TheSugarlandExpress one other feature film]] -- that bombed in theatres -- to his name was chosen to direct the film. An actor who believed he was now box-office poison because of his prior work signed up as one of the main characters. Filming ran over-budget and overtime, with executives denying funding for key reshoots (which then had to be paid out of pocket). There were accusations that the practical effects were cheap and laughable, [[SerendipityWritesThePlot forcing the filmmaker to improvise]] by keeping it off-screen for most of the run-time. Yet, contrary to Creator/StevenSpielberg and Richard Dreyfus' beliefs, ''Jaws'' became the first film to see wide-release distribution, became one of the highest-grossing films of all time and ushered in a new wave in American film-making.
* It's hard to believe now, but TwentiethCenturyFox had very little faith in ''Franchise/StarWars: Film/ANewHope'' making much money.[[note]]Both Creator/UnitedArtists and {{Universal}} Creator/{{Universal}} had passed on the film before it even got to Fox.[[/note]] They put it out as sort of a "last hurrah" to hold off bankruptcy, and tasked Creator/AlanDeanFoster with writing ''Literature/SplinterOfTheMindsEye'', a sequel novel written for the sole purpose of facilitating a quick low-budget movie adaptation. Fox had to bully theaters into showing ''Star Wars'', as theaters simply wouldn't touch it and Fox had to make some money back on what they assumed would be a financial fiasco. Fox threatened to withhold the drama film ''The Other Side of Midnight'', which had been tipped to be a hit that Summer, unless the theater agreed to screen ''Star Wars'' for a couple weeks. ''The Other Side of Midnight'' made its budget back, but it was steamrolled at the box office by ''Star Wars''. Fox had given George Lucas exclusive rights on TheMerch related to Star Wars in exchange for paying him less. They figured the movie would bomb and no one would make, never mind buy the merchandise as a result. [[JustSoStory And that's why no publisher ever gives exclusive merchandising rights to the creator anymore.]]
14th May '16 5:03:33 PM rjd1922
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* While many fans were surprised to see it made and interested in it, there was '''A LOT''' of skepticism about VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}'s chances of success. It was a new I.P in an era not known to be kind to them, was a genre Nintendo had rarely worked on before, had a very different look and feel to it than most shooters, was on a platform without much of a shooter audience, did not support voice chat, and the release platform was severely underperforming. Less than a year later and over 4 million units later.......

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* While many fans were surprised to see it made and interested in it, there was '''A LOT''' of skepticism about VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}'s ''VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}'''s chances of success. It was a new I.P in an era not known to be kind to them, was a genre Nintendo had rarely worked on before, had a very different look and feel to it than most shooters, was on a platform without much of a shooter audience, did not support voice chat, and the release platform was severely underperforming. Less than a year later and over 4 million units later.......
11th May '16 7:55:55 AM emeriin
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* The DVD commentary of WebVideo/TheNosalgiaCritic's ''Pixels'' review had Rob mocking anti-clipless people by saying the episode was the second highest viewed on the youtube page, and that all the other clipless reviews have done really well regarding hits too.
15th Apr '16 4:19:53 PM KrspaceT
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* While many fans were surprised to see it made and interested in it, there was '''A LOT''' of skepticism about VideoGame/{{Splatoon}}'s chances of success. It was a new I.P in an era not known to be kind to them, was a genre Nintendo had rarely worked on before, had a very different look and feel to it than most shooters, was on a platform without much of a shooter audience, did not support voice chat, and the release platform was severely underperforming. Less than a year later and over 4 million units later.......
6th Apr '16 8:40:19 PM Eddy1215
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* JMichaelStraczynski had tremendous trouble getting ''BabylonFive'' on the air. He shopped the concept around to multiple networks but it was rejected by all of them for, essentially, being too different from Star Trek, which at that time was believed to have set an unbreakable standard for live-action tv science fiction. It was finally picked up by the teeny-tiny "network" Creator/PrimeTimeEntertainmentNetwork ("network" because it was essentially a syndication block operated by Chris-Craft the boat company and Creator/WarnerBros) and proved to be popular enough to keep the troubled "network" afloat single-handedly. Granted, the franchise was did not achieve the spectacular popularity of ''Star Wars'' or ''Star Trek'', but it left an indelible stamp on the scifi landscape even as just about every single critic predicted it would fail before its second season.

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* JMichaelStraczynski had tremendous trouble getting ''BabylonFive'' ''Series/BabylonFive'' on the air. He shopped the concept around to multiple networks but it was rejected by all of them for, essentially, being too different from Star Trek, which at that time was believed to have set an unbreakable standard for live-action tv science fiction. It was finally picked up by the teeny-tiny "network" Creator/PrimeTimeEntertainmentNetwork ("network" because it was essentially a syndication block operated by Chris-Craft the boat company and Creator/WarnerBros) and proved to be popular enough to keep the troubled "network" afloat single-handedly. Granted, the franchise was did not achieve the spectacular popularity of ''Star Wars'' or ''Star Trek'', but it left an indelible stamp on the scifi landscape even as just about every single critic predicted it would fail before its second season.



* ''Series/{{Gotham}}'' was a risky concept. It's "Franchise/{{Batman}} without Batman", a prequel set right after Bruce Wayne's parents were killed. Reception only got worse when it was known that they were shoving characters like Poison Ivy and Catwoman into it. Despite being a BaseBreaker with comic fans it did well.

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* ''Series/{{Gotham}}'' was a risky concept. It's "Franchise/{{Batman}} without Batman", a prequel set right after Bruce Wayne's parents were killed. Reception only got worse when it was known that they were shoving characters like Poison Ivy and Catwoman into it. Despite being a BaseBreaker with comic fans it did does well.
6th Apr '16 7:28:03 PM Doug86
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* ''Series/{{Gotham}}'' was a risky concept. It's "ComicBook/{{Batman}} without Batman", a prequel set right after Bruce Wayne's parents were killed. Reception only got worse when it was known that they were shoving characters like Poison Ivy and Catwoman into it. Despite being a BaseBreaker with comic fans it did well.

to:

* ''Series/{{Gotham}}'' was a risky concept. It's "ComicBook/{{Batman}} "Franchise/{{Batman}} without Batman", a prequel set right after Bruce Wayne's parents were killed. Reception only got worse when it was known that they were shoving characters like Poison Ivy and Catwoman into it. Despite being a BaseBreaker with comic fans it did well.
24th Mar '16 6:30:44 PM nombretomado
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* The U.S. adaptation of ''Series/{{The Office|US}}'' was heavily criticized by both media pundits (for being an adaptation of a [[Series/TheOfficeUK cult British series]] that lasted a grand total of [[BritishBrevity 12 episodes and a Christmas special]]) and its original creator, Ricky Gervais (who feared that viewers would hesitate watching an American reworking of a British show -- i.e. the American ''{{Coupling}}''). Although the show had a six-episode season, ratings fell sharply in between the premiere and season finale (due to NBC shuffling its timeslot around), and it was in danger of being cancelled (in addition to scathing reviews from major U.S. publications). However, the show quickly found a footing by differentiating itself in tone and content from the British series, and went on to become NBC's highest-rated comedy.

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* The U.S. adaptation of ''Series/{{The Office|US}}'' was heavily criticized by both media pundits (for being an adaptation of a [[Series/TheOfficeUK cult British series]] that lasted a grand total of [[BritishBrevity 12 episodes and a Christmas special]]) and its original creator, Ricky Gervais (who feared that viewers would hesitate watching an American reworking of a British show -- i.e. the American ''{{Coupling}}'').''Series/{{Coupling}}''). Although the show had a six-episode season, ratings fell sharply in between the premiere and season finale (due to NBC shuffling its timeslot around), and it was in danger of being cancelled (in addition to scathing reviews from major U.S. publications). However, the show quickly found a footing by differentiating itself in tone and content from the British series, and went on to become NBC's highest-rated comedy.
23rd Mar '16 10:59:35 AM nombretomado
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* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' of all things, started out miserably when Matt Stone and Trey Parker's tiny cult hit joke-animated short "The Spirit Of Christmas" got picked up for a pilot. The first episode "Cartman Gets An Anal Probe" was completed and submitted. It was pounded into the ground by test audiences who were baffled by the (intentionally) terrible animation, the juxtaposition of cute characters spewing heavily censored vulgarities in steady streams, and the overall bizarre nature of the plot. It was deemed a complete and utter failure and ComedyCentral was very unconvinced that ''South Park'' had any future, but still encouraged Matt & Trey to create a few more episodes such as "Weight Gain 4000". These too, did not impress the network, and many people thought the show was directionless. With much hesitancy and uncertainty they aired the shows. While mainstream critics even were very slow to warm up to the show, they eventually did, and it became a more impressive hit than ComedyCentral expected. However, major problems and waning fan interest after only Season 2 (a season Matt & Trey have gone on to say was their absolute worst season) they figured that South Park was all but finished. During Season 3, they produced ''WesternAnimation/SouthParkBiggerLongerAndUncut'', while being faced with immense ExecutiveMeddling from both Creator/{{Paramount}} and the MPAA, they figured the movie would flop miserably and would be their triumphant last hurrah. Instead it was critically acclaimed and a box office success and brought more attention to the show. Cut to today, where ''South Park'''s renewed contracts with Comedy Central will take the series up to ''twenty-three'' complete seasons.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' of all things, started out miserably when Matt Stone and Trey Parker's tiny cult hit joke-animated short "The Spirit Of Christmas" got picked up for a pilot. The first episode "Cartman Gets An Anal Probe" was completed and submitted. It was pounded into the ground by test audiences who were baffled by the (intentionally) terrible animation, the juxtaposition of cute characters spewing heavily censored vulgarities in steady streams, and the overall bizarre nature of the plot. It was deemed a complete and utter failure and ComedyCentral Creator/ComedyCentral was very unconvinced that ''South Park'' had any future, but still encouraged Matt & Trey to create a few more episodes such as "Weight Gain 4000". These too, did not impress the network, and many people thought the show was directionless. With much hesitancy and uncertainty they aired the shows. While mainstream critics even were very slow to warm up to the show, they eventually did, and it became a more impressive hit than ComedyCentral Comedy Central expected. However, major problems and waning fan interest after only Season 2 (a season Matt & Trey have gone on to say was their absolute worst season) they figured that South Park was all but finished. During Season 3, they produced ''WesternAnimation/SouthParkBiggerLongerAndUncut'', while being faced with immense ExecutiveMeddling from both Creator/{{Paramount}} and the MPAA, they figured the movie would flop miserably and would be their triumphant last hurrah. Instead it was critically acclaimed and a box office success and brought more attention to the show. Cut to today, where ''South Park'''s renewed contracts with Comedy Central will take the series up to ''twenty-three'' complete seasons.
18th Mar '16 11:32:44 PM Hossmeister
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