History Main / AncientGrome

19th May '16 10:17:24 AM TheOneWhoTropes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** [[{{QI}} They say of the Acropolis, where the Parthenon is...]]

to:

** [[{{QI}} [[Series/{{QI}} They say of the Acropolis, where the Parthenon is...]]
23rd Apr '16 3:40:12 PM Kimarous
Is there an issue? Send a Message
































* ''Gods of Rome'', a mobile game, oftentimes seems more based in Greek mythology than Roman. Of the God characters, only Vulcan goes by his Roman name. The majority of Roman characters are the Champion class (consisting mostly of notable opponents or Rome) and a few Demigods. The rest seem to go by their Greek names.





















17th Apr '16 4:01:28 PM DiagorasCinna
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/OneNationUnderJupiter'': Much of Nova Roma's religion, particularly the emphasis on myth, is more Greek than Roman. Justified as Maxentius' campaign of piety changed traditional Roman paganism to be more substantial.
16th Apr '16 9:56:53 PM Dimas28
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Riordan sometimes takes liberties with this trope, though. Pluto, for example, isn't the Roman counterpart of Hades or even a Roman god at all. He's an obscure Greek god of the riches and the Greek counterpart of Dis Pater, the Roman god of the riches; the original Roman underworld god was named Orcus. When the Greek influence poured in, Dis Pater and Orcus were equated with Pluto and Hades, respectively, but all four were somehow eventually crammed up so that only Hades and whatever god of the remaining three that the author liked the most remained, hence the confusion. Funnily enough, Orcus is actually mentioned to be a separate god in ''The Blood of Olympus'' with his domain of the underworld, though he's probably just another "[[FantasticRacism D-list god]]" like Khione.
* The Egyptian sister series of above, ''Literature/TheKaneChronicles'', however, plays this straight by mostly using the Hellenized spelling of the Egyptian gods instead of the actual (well, approximated, but it's the closest thing we got) Egyptian spellings. "Horus", "Isis", "Osiris, "Anubis", "Nephthys", and "Apophis", for example, would be called "Haru", "Iset, "Ausir", "Anupev", "Nebthet", and "Apep", respectively, in Egyptian. There are exceptions, though, such as "Set" and "Ptah", which are the same in both languages.
* In ''Literature/TheHungerGames'' series, the given names for the Capitol residents are mostly in Latin, reflecting the Capitol as a futuristic Ancient Rome. However, there are five characters who have Greek first names: Effie (short for Euphemia), Atala (possibly short for Atalanta), Castor and Pollux (the mythological twin sons of Zeus), and Cressida (from [[Theatre/TroilusAndCressida the Shakespeare's play]] based on the Trojan War).


Added DiffLines:

** The best application for this is the name of the planets of the Solar System not named Earth. All of them are named after Roman gods, except for UsefulNotes/{{Uranus}}. While some may challenge it by using "Caelus" as an alternative, it's perfectly credible, because the Romans ''did'' refer to their sky god as Uranus, in addition to Caelus.
15th Apr '16 4:58:24 PM Doug86
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[TheDCU DC's]] Amazons: The Golden Age Amazons as created by William Marston had a ton of Roman stuff, including the gods going by their Roman names (Mars, Venus, and Minerva most prominently; hence "Merciful Minerva!"). The Post-Crisis rebooted version stripped out all the Roman stuff (Mars becoming Ares, for example), except for [[WonderWoman Diana's]] Latin name, which was justified as her being named after a female pilot named Diana who crashed on Themyscira in the 20th century. This has also been lampshaded on several occasions, such as when a bunch of Neo-Nazis invade Themyscira and comment that some of the statues look vaguely Roman.

to:

* [[TheDCU [[Franchise/TheDCU DC's]] Amazons: The Golden Age Amazons as created by William Marston had a ton of Roman stuff, including the gods going by their Roman names (Mars, Venus, and Minerva most prominently; hence "Merciful Minerva!"). The Post-Crisis rebooted version stripped out all the Roman stuff (Mars becoming Ares, for example), except for [[WonderWoman Diana's]] Latin name, which was justified as her being named after a female pilot named Diana who crashed on Themyscira in the 20th century. This has also been lampshaded on several occasions, such as when a bunch of Neo-Nazis invade Themyscira and comment that some of the statues look vaguely Roman.
10th Apr '16 3:07:38 AM morane
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The usual (and somewhat unfortunate) convention in English is to Latinize and not to translitterate Greek names. This does lead into very unfortunate mistranslations and mispronunciations. For ecample, "Cynoscephalae" (ΚυνόςΚεφαλαί) is neigh [[TheUnpronounceable unpronounceable]] for an average English reader, but translitteration, Kinoskefali, ("dogs' heads") renders it immediately readable.
21st Mar '16 7:13:47 PM 940131
Is there an issue? Send a Message


While Latin was the official language in Rome, Greek was the actual international ''Lingua Franca'' of the Roman empire, at least in the eastern half of the Empire.[[note]]In the western half of the Empire, the ''lingua franca'' really was (Vulgar) Latin, which, in those countries that were not conquered by Germans or Arabs (and even [[UsefulNotes/{{France}} some]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Spain}} that]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Portugal}} were]]) became the Romance languages and Latin was the language of the military and administration everywhere.[[/note]] The vast majority of the [[Literature/TheBible New Testament]] was originally in Greek as a result, as it was written for a diverse audience living in the Eastern Roman empire. This is also why when the Roman Empire was formally split into its western and eastern halves, the Eastern Roman Empire (what would later come to be known to historians as the UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire) had Greek as its official language.

to:

While Latin was the official language in Rome, Greek was the actual international ''Lingua Franca'' of the Eastern a Roman empire, at least in the eastern half of the Empire.[[note]]In Empire[[note]]In the western half of the Empire, the ''lingua franca'' really was (Vulgar) Latin, which, in those countries that were not conquered by Germans or Arabs (and even [[UsefulNotes/{{France}} some]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Spain}} that]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Portugal}} were]]) became the Romance languages and Latin was the language of the military and administration everywhere.[[/note]] The vast majority of the [[Literature/TheBible New Testament]] was originally in Greek as a result, as it was written for a diverse audience living in the Eastern Roman empire. This is also why when the Roman Empire was formally split into its western and eastern halves, the Eastern Roman Empire (what would later come to be known to historians as the UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire) had Greek as its official language.
4th Mar '16 9:45:36 PM Hadjorim
Is there an issue? Send a Message


While Latin was the official language in Rome, Greek was the actual international ''Lingua Franca'' of the Eastern Roman empire, at least in the eastern half of the Empire.[[note]]In the western half of the Empire, the ''lingua franca'' really was (Vulgar) Latin, which, in those countries that were not conquered by Germans or Arabs (and even [[UsefulNotes/{{France}} some]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Spain}} that]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Portugal}} were]]) became the Romance languages and Latin was the language of the military and administration everywhere.[[/note]] The vast majority of the [[Literature/TheBible New Testament]] was originally in Greek as a result, as it was written for a diverse audience living in the Eastern Roman empire. This is also why when the Roman Empire was formally split into its western and eastern halves, the Eastern Roman Empire (what would later come to be known to historians as the UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire) had Greek as its official language.

to:

While Latin was the official language in Rome, Greek was the actual international ''Lingua Franca'' of the Eastern Roman empire, at least in the eastern half of the Empire.[[note]]In the western half of the Empire, the ''lingua franca'' really was (Vulgar) Latin, which, in those countries that were not conquered by Germans or Arabs (and even [[UsefulNotes/{{France}} some]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Spain}} that]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Portugal}} were]]) became the Romance languages and Latin was the language of the military and administration everywhere.[[/note]] The vast majority of the [[Literature/TheBible New Testament]] was originally in Greek as a result, as it was written for a diverse audience living in the Eastern Roman empire. This is also why when the Roman Empire was formally split into its western and eastern halves, the Eastern Roman Empire (what would later come to be known to historians as the UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire) had Greek as its official language.
4th Mar '16 3:11:01 AM Aquillion
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Has nothing to do with [[OurGnomesAreWeirder Gnomes]] from ancient civilizations, or with the King of the Earth Elementals in the [[Literature/TheElricSaga Elric of Melnibone]] universe, and the other title choice -- "Ancient Reece" -- would have been even less indicative due to sounding too much like a slang term for stale peanut butter cups. Or an aging actress with a surname of [[Creator/ReeseWitherspoon Witherspoon]].

to:

Has nothing to do with [[OurGnomesAreWeirder Gnomes]] from ancient civilizations, or with the King of the Earth Elementals in the [[Literature/TheElricSaga Elric of Melnibone]] universe, and the other title choice -- "Ancient Reece" -- would have been even less indicative due to sounding too much like a slang term for stale peanut butter cups. Or an aging actress with a surname of [[Creator/ReeseWitherspoon Witherspoon]].universe.
21st Feb '16 2:56:10 PM Tarlonniel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


A sister trope to {{Mayincatec}}, {{Spexico}}, FarEast and {{Scotireland}}, a tendency for writers to overlap the Greek and Roman civilizations and confuse aspects of the two Classical civilizations, ''e.g.'' Roman numerals in an otherwise Greek setting, Greek Gods in Rome, and vice versa, ''et cetera''.

to:

A sister trope to {{Mayincatec}}, {{Spexico}}, FarEast and {{Scotireland}}, a tendency for writers to overlap the Greek and Roman civilizations and confuse aspects of the two Classical civilizations, ''e.g.'' Roman numerals in an otherwise Greek setting, Greek Gods gods in Rome, and vice versa, ''et cetera''.



Though due in part to research failure, the Romans themselves are not blameless; they imitated they were. Heavily influenced by the Greeks (Classical Greeks from their GloryDays, that is; contemporary modern Greeks were regarded more as petty {{Butt Monkey}}s). One of the most blatant examples is Myth/ClassicalMythology. Other examples can be found in Politics, Science, the hyper-realistic statues, ''et cetera''.

Some Roman authors had a habit of inserting Greek quotations into their works. At the time, Greece was seen as the source of culture, philosophy, science and learning in general, and Greek was seen as a symbol of cultivation and intelligence (and no doubt the Romans also thought it was downright awesome) hence why science, mathematics, philosophy and the like have a massively bad tendency to do this, reinforcing the association on how [[SmartPeopleKnowLatin Intellectuals, Scientists, Mathematicians and Such Know Both Latin and Greek]]. Romans of the late Republic and early Imperial era tended to use quite a lot of Greek in their speech (to the point where the letters Y and Z, not ordinarily used in Latin, had to be appended to the alphabet due to their frequent use in Greek loanwords), and Caesar is said to have quoted a Greek play in Greek when crossing the Rubicon.

to:

Though due in part to research failure, the Romans themselves are not blameless; they imitated imitated, they were. Heavily influenced by the Greeks (Classical Greeks from their GloryDays, that is; contemporary modern Greeks were regarded more as petty {{Butt Monkey}}s). One of the most blatant examples is Myth/ClassicalMythology. Other examples can be found in Politics, Science, politics, science, the hyper-realistic statues, ''et cetera''.

Some Roman authors had a habit of inserting Greek quotations into their works. At the time, Greece was seen as the source of culture, philosophy, science and learning in general, and Greek was seen as a symbol of cultivation and intelligence (and no doubt the Romans also thought it was downright awesome) hence why science, mathematics, philosophy and the like have a massively bad tendency to do this, reinforcing the association on how idea that [[SmartPeopleKnowLatin Intellectuals, Scientists, Mathematicians intellectuals, scientists, mathematicians and Such Know Both such know both Latin and Greek]]. Romans of the late Republic and early Imperial era tended to use quite a lot of Greek in their speech (to the point where the letters Y and Z, not ordinarily used in Latin, had to be appended to the alphabet due to their frequent use in Greek loanwords), and Caesar is said to have quoted a Greek play in Greek when crossing the Rubicon.



While Latin was the official language in Rome, Greek was the actual international ''Lingua Franca'' of the Eastern Roman empire, at least in the eastern half of the Empire.[[note]]In the western half of the Empire, the ''lingua franca'' really was (Vulgar) Latin, which, in those countries that were not conquered by Germans or Arabs (and even [[UsefulNotes/{{France}} some]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Spain}} that]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Portugal}} were]]) became the Romance languages and Latin was the language of the military and administration everrywhere.[[/note]] The vast majority of the [[Literature/TheBible New Testament]] was originally in Greek as a result, as it was written for a diverse audience living in the Easterb Roman empire. This is also why when the Roman Empire was formally split into its western and eastern halves, the Eastern Roman Empire (what would late come to be known to historians as the UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire) had Greek as its official language.

to:

While Latin was the official language in Rome, Greek was the actual international ''Lingua Franca'' of the Eastern Roman empire, at least in the eastern half of the Empire.[[note]]In the western half of the Empire, the ''lingua franca'' really was (Vulgar) Latin, which, in those countries that were not conquered by Germans or Arabs (and even [[UsefulNotes/{{France}} some]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Spain}} that]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Portugal}} were]]) became the Romance languages and Latin was the language of the military and administration everrywhere.everywhere.[[/note]] The vast majority of the [[Literature/TheBible New Testament]] was originally in Greek as a result, as it was written for a diverse audience living in the Easterb Eastern Roman empire. This is also why when the Roman Empire was formally split into its western and eastern halves, the Eastern Roman Empire (what would late later come to be known to historians as the UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire) had Greek as its official language.
This list shows the last 10 events of 240. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AncientGrome