History Main / AncientGrome

6th Apr '18 11:51:25 AM LavonPapillon1
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[[quoteright:350:[[VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/sunny_villa_ancientgrome_spyro.jpg]]]]


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* Sunny Villa is the first world Spyro explores in Sunrise Spring in ''VideoGame/SpyroYearOfTheDragon''. The world is populated by a race of anthropomorphic lions dressed in togas and wreath-crowns who bred [[CluckingFunny giant chickens]] before [[BigBad the Sorceress]] sent her Rhynoc hordes to invade the place. The Rhynoc enemies that populate it are all dressed like gladiators.
15th Mar '18 11:40:29 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* Similarly, all the [[Myth/EgyptianMythology Egyptian gods]] are usually called by the Ancient Greek versions of their names, not the actual Egyptian. For instance, the far more popular Greek translation of "Anubis", compared to the original Egyptian name "Anupev".

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* Similarly, all the [[Myth/EgyptianMythology Egyptian gods]] (except Sobek) are usually called by the Ancient Greek versions of their names, not the actual Egyptian. For instance, the far more popular Greek translation of "Anubis", compared to the original Egyptian name "Anupev".
6th Mar '18 8:38:12 PM CaptainCrawdad
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** There is a very good reason for this. The Egyptian systems of writing (hieroglyphic, hieratic, and demotic) were rather complex and peculiar--imagine a mishmash of the Japanese writing system (with symbols both for words and for sounds) with Arabic or Hebrew (where when writing with symbols for sounds, you drop vowels right and left) and you have a good approximation. As a result, the Egyptians themselves eventually adopted a variant of the Greek alphabet to write their language (called Coptic in the late stages and today) and forgot how the ancient system worked. Language change was also a factor; Coptic, already quite different from the Egyptian spoken in the days of the native Pharaohs, became very heavily influenced by Greek and adopted certain Hellenized pronunciations, further obscuring the original pronunciations. Finally, the Greeks' massive collective case of [[ForeignCultureFetish Egyptomania]] meant that until hieroglyphics were decoded in the 19th century, there was more written on Egypt and its myths in Greek than in any other language. To make a long story short, Greek names are used for Ancient Egyptian myths (as well as places) because for the longest time we didn't know what the original Egyptian names even were. It's actually thanks to the Greeks that we even know the Egyptian alphabet, since the Rosetta Stone was a decree by some Ptolemaic (i.e. Greek) ruler that he had written in Greek (his language) Demotic (Egyptian spelled cursive, the language of secular literate elites) and Hieroglyphs (the language of Egyptian priests). It took some two decades after its discovery in 1799, when Jean-François Champollion [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decipherment_of_Egyptian_hieroglyphs deciphered the system]] using the Greek as a base [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decipherment_of_Egyptian_hieroglyphs to decipher the Egyptian]] hieroglyphs.



* In the Creator/MaryRenault trilogy about him, the UsefulNotes/AlexanderTheGreat is referred to as "Alexander" (his Roman name), even though the rest of the characters are called by their Greek names rather than their Roman ones e.g. Cassander becomes Kassandros, etc. WordOfGod justified this on the basis that the reader was more familiar with the Roman name, and it helped differentiate Alexander the Great from the two other prominent Alexanders in the novels (who go by "Alexandros").
** Occasionally she used a flat English translation, e.g. "Oxhead" for "Bucephalos" (Alexander's horse), whose name meant, well, "ox-head".

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* In the Creator/MaryRenault trilogy about him, the UsefulNotes/AlexanderTheGreat is referred to as "Alexander" (his Roman name), even though the rest of the characters are called by their Greek names rather than their Roman ones e.g. Cassander becomes Kassandros, etc. WordOfGod justified this on the basis that the reader was more familiar with the Roman name, and it helped differentiate Alexander the Great from the two other prominent Alexanders in the novels (who go by "Alexandros").
**
"Alexandros"). Occasionally she used a flat English translation, e.g. "Oxhead" for "Bucephalos" (Alexander's horse), whose name meant, well, "ox-head".
11th Feb '18 6:40:59 PM Burmy
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---> '''Crew Chief:''' [[LampshadeHanging Okay, but why Rome? Aren't you, y'know... a Greek god? I mean, if you were a Roman god, wouldn't you be called Maxie Jupiter?]]
---> ''[[DeathGlare Maxie glares directly at him]]''
---> '''Crew Chief:''' You know what? I'm an idiot. I'm an idiot who doesn't deserve to be in your mighty and, uh, infallible presence so [[ShuttingUpNow I'm going to leave now]].

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---> --> '''Crew Chief:''' [[LampshadeHanging Okay, but why Rome? Aren't you, y'know... a Greek god? I mean, if you were a Roman god, wouldn't you be called Maxie Jupiter?]]
---> --> ''[[DeathGlare Maxie glares directly at him]]''
---> --> '''Crew Chief:''' You know what? I'm an idiot. I'm an idiot who doesn't deserve to be in your mighty and, uh, infallible presence so [[ShuttingUpNow I'm going to leave now]].
12th Dec '17 4:30:13 PM JulianLapostat
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* The Roman historian Plutarch wrote in Greek, and his ''Literature/ParallelLives'' is a book that specifically compares and contrasts the differences between Noble Greeks and Romans. Plutarch in general, though not overtly, sees the Greeks as too ornery, dissolute, and self-destructive as compared to Romans, who he admits are austere, cool, orderly, if maybe hypocritical and cynical.
12th Dec '17 4:26:53 PM JulianLapostat
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A sister trope to {{Mayincatec}}, {{Spexico}}, FarEast and {{Scotireland}}, a tendency for writers to overlap the Greek and Roman civilizations and confuse aspects of the two Classical civilizations, ''e.g.'' Roman numerals in an otherwise Greek setting, Greek gods in Rome, and vice versa, ''et cetera''.
No relation to {{Oxbridge}}; that one is a commonly accepted overlap.

Though due in part to research failure, the Romans themselves are not blameless; they were heavily influenced by the Greeks (Classical Greeks from their GloryDays, that is; contemporary modern Greeks were regarded more as petty {{Butt Monkey}}s). One of the most blatant examples is Myth/ClassicalMythology. Other examples can be found in politics, science, the hyper-realistic statues, ''et cetera''.

Some Roman authors had a habit of inserting Greek quotations into their works. At the time, Greece was seen as the source of culture, philosophy, science and learning in general, and Greek was seen as a symbol of cultivation and intelligence (and no doubt the Romans also thought it was downright awesome) hence why science, mathematics, philosophy and the like have a massively bad tendency to do this, reinforcing the idea that [[SmartPeopleKnowLatin intellectuals, scientists, mathematicians and such know both Latin and Greek]]. Romans of the late Republic and early Imperial era tended to use quite a lot of Greek in their speech (to the point where the letters Y and Z, not ordinarily used in Latin, had to be appended to the alphabet due to their frequent use in Greek loanwords), and Caesar is said to have quoted a Greek play in Greek when crossing the Rubicon.

The Romans would also continue placing plays in Athens or other Greek cities, to avoid slandering the state, but leave everything else Roman-like. The epics of Creator/{{Homer}} inspired the Literature/TheAeneid of Virgil (even though it was actually an attempt to connect Rome's distant past with Greece's enemies, by making Romans the descendants of Trojans), and authors such as Seneca the Younger wrote using Greek styles. The Roman Emperor UsefulNotes/{{Nero}} visited Greece in 66 AD, and performed at the Ancient Olympic Games, despite the rules against non-Greek participation. Also, due to massive Greek colonization (mainly before the rise of Rome), part of southern Italy was known as ''Magna Græcia'' (''Μεγάλη Ἑλλάς, Megálē Hellás'') -- "Great Greece."

to:

A sister trope to {{Mayincatec}}, {{Spexico}}, FarEast and {{Scotireland}}, a tendency for writers to overlap the Greek and Roman civilizations and confuse aspects of the two Classical civilizations, ''e.g.'' Roman numerals in an otherwise Greek setting, Greek gods in Rome, and vice versa, ''et cetera''.
cetera''. No relation to {{Oxbridge}}; that one is a commonly accepted overlap.

Though due in part to research failure, the Romans themselves are not blameless; they blameless. They were heavily influenced influenced, and totally transformed, by the Greeks (Classical Greeks from their GloryDays, that is; contemporary modern Greeks were regarded more as petty {{Butt Monkey}}s).which they conquered fully in 146 BCE. One of the most blatant examples is Myth/ClassicalMythology. Other examples can be found in politics, science, the hyper-realistic statues, ''et cetera''.

Some
cetera''. Most of the statues of Classical Greece come down to us via Roman copies of the same. The Romans generally were quite open about the fact that they had no culture and ideas of their own, and borrowed their ideas, concepts, and motifs from their neighbors. Many of Rome's greatest historians, and including the first one (Polybius), were Greek (Plutarch, Appian).

Roman authors had a habit of inserting Greek quotations into their works. At works, and even the time, few Romans who made a fuss about Greek culture, such as Cato the Elder, secretly learnt Greek and sent his children to study it. Greece was seen regarded as the source of culture, philosophy, science and learning in general, and Greek was seen as a symbol of cultivation and intelligence (and no doubt the Romans also thought it was downright awesome) hence why science, mathematics, philosophy and the like have a massively bad tendency to do this, reinforcing the idea that [[SmartPeopleKnowLatin intellectuals, scientists, mathematicians and such know both Latin and Greek]]. Romans of the late Republic and early Imperial era tended to use quite a lot of Greek in their speech (to the point where the letters Y and Z, not ordinarily used in Latin, had to be appended to the alphabet due to their frequent use in Greek loanwords), and Caesar is said to have quoted a Greek play in Greek by Menander, a Hellenistic Greek, when crossing the Rubicon.

Rubicon.

The Romans would also continue placing plays in Athens or other Greek cities, to avoid slandering the state, but leave everything else Roman-like. The epics of Creator/{{Homer}} inspired the Literature/TheAeneid of Virgil (even though it was actually an attempt to connect Rome's distant past with Greece's enemies, by making Romans the descendants of Trojans), and authors such as Seneca the Younger wrote using Greek styles.styles albeit adding more imitations and innovations ([[{{Gorn}} chiefly incredibly graphic descriptions of violence]] for which he became proverbial). The Roman Emperor UsefulNotes/{{Nero}} visited Greece in 66 AD, and performed at the Ancient Olympic Games, despite the rules against non-Greek participation. Also, due to massive Greek colonization (mainly before the rise of Rome), part of southern Italy was known as ''Magna Græcia'' (''Μεγάλη Ἑλλάς, Megálē Hellás'') -- "Great Greece."



* American college fraternities use Greek letters as names, and fraternity culture is called "Greek." A famous part of "Greek" college life is "toga parties," but togas were actually a Roman article of clothing. The Greeks wore chitons, not togas. On the other hand, the bedsheet-togas of "toga parties" is actually nothing like the Roman toga (which was a complexly draped semicircular piece of woolen cloth, typically worn over a tunic, and covering both shoulders anyway, it was the Roman equivalent of a three-piece suit and not good for parties) and a lot like... the Greek chiton (which were made of a rectangular piece of linen, and were often worn as a tunic with other garments like the chlamys--a rectangular woolen cloak--on top, often not covering one shoulder, they were the Greek equivalent of a white T-shirt and quite excellent for parties).
** Also, unlike at toga parties, women did not usually wear togas or chitons. Instead, they wore dresses or long tunics, and if they were married, they wore a garment called a ''stola'' over that.
* It's important to note that Rome eventually conquered Greece and most of the area they were settled in (such as the Levant and much of Italy) which resulted in Greeks becoming well assimilated into the Roman Empire. Greek, not Latin, was the lingua franca for much of the Empire and was the language of the educated classes in Rome proper (just like Latin would be in later eras). Julius Caesar was known to have preferred speaking Greek and it is thought that "et tu, Brute?" was a translation.
* Emperor Hadrian in particular was a noted Philhellene (lover of Greek culture) and he enthusiastically adopted a range of Greek practices such as growing a beard and taking a male lover. Commodus took all that further and dressed as Heracles.
* The word "Greek" comes from latin ("Graecus"), the "Greeks" called themselves (and still do today) "Hellenes". The mere popularity of the word "Greek" above the more historically correct "Hellen" is an example of this trope. To make matters more confusing, the Greeks from the time of the Byzantine Empire (when Greece really was all that was left of the Roman Empire) to independence in the 1820s called themselves "Romans".
* The Romans had Latin names for their gods, but several have names which are directly lifted from Greece: Apollo is the first one, the other one is Uranus, whose name replaced the god's original Latin name Caelus. Hence, Uranus can be both the Greek or the Latin name in English. Other languages do not have this ambiguity: in French, the Greek name is transcribed as "Ouranos", which is close but distinct from Latin "Uranus".

to:

* American college fraternities use Greek letters as names, and fraternity culture is called "Greek." A famous part of "Greek" college life is "toga parties," but togas were actually a Roman article of clothing. The Greeks wore chitons, not togas. On the other hand, the bedsheet-togas of "toga parties" is actually nothing like the Roman toga (which was a complexly draped semicircular piece of woolen cloth, typically worn over a tunic, and covering both shoulders anyway, it was the Roman equivalent of a three-piece suit and not good for parties) and a lot like... the Greek chiton (which were made of a rectangular piece of linen, and were often worn as a tunic with other garments like the chlamys--a rectangular woolen cloak--on top, often not covering one shoulder, they were the Greek equivalent of a white T-shirt and quite excellent for parties).
** Also, unlike at toga parties, women did not usually wear togas or chitons. Instead, they wore dresses or long tunics, and if they were married, they wore a garment called a ''stola'' over that.
* It's important to note that Rome eventually conquered Greece and most of the area they were settled in (such as the Levant and much of Italy) which resulted in Greeks becoming well assimilated into the Roman Empire. Greek, not Latin, was the lingua franca for much of the Empire and was the language of the educated classes in Rome proper (just like Latin would be in later eras). Julius Caesar was known to have preferred speaking Greek and it is thought that "et tu, Brute?" was a translation.
* Emperor Hadrian in particular was a noted Philhellene (lover of Greek culture) and he enthusiastically adopted a range of Greek practices such as growing a beard and taking a male lover. Commodus took all that further and dressed as Heracles.
* The word "Greek" comes from latin ("Graecus"), the "Greeks" called themselves (and still do today) "Hellenes". The mere popularity of the word "Greek" above the more historically correct "Hellen" is an example of this trope. To make matters more confusing, the Greeks from the time of the Byzantine Empire UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire (when Greece really was all that was left of the Roman Empire) to independence in the 1820s called themselves "Romans".
* ** The Romans had Latin names for their gods, but several have names which are directly lifted from Greece: Apollo is the first one, the other one is Uranus, whose name replaced the god's original Latin name Caelus. Hence, Uranus can be both the Greek or the Latin name in English. Other languages do not have this ambiguity: in French, the Greek name is transcribed as "Ouranos", which is close but distinct from Latin "Uranus"."Uranus".
** Emperor Hadrian in particular was a noted Philhellene (lover of Greek culture) and he enthusiastically adopted a range of Greek practices such as growing a beard and taking a male lover. Commodus took all that further and dressed as Heracles.


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** It's important to note that Rome eventually conquered Greece and most of the area they were settled in (such as the Levant and much of Italy) which resulted in Greeks becoming well assimilated into the Roman Empire. Greek, not Latin, was the lingua franca for much of the Empire and was the language of the educated classes in Rome proper (just like Latin would be in later eras). UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar was known to have preferred speaking Greek and of his three most famous sayings, only one of it was muttered originally in Latin ("Veni, vidi, vici" in a letter where he incidentally gloated about the defeat of a Hellenistic King as it happens). The others "Alea iacta est" and "Et tu, Brute?"(which is Shakespearean Latin, and not the real kind), were originally in English. And in the case of "Alea iacta est", the Latin transcription conveys a significantly different meaning and intent than the Greek original, and is often invoked as an example of BlindIdiotTranslation[[note]]Alea iacta est is popularly translated as "The die is cast". The Greek original, whose transliteration is "anerriphtho kybos" however is usually understood to translate as "Let's roll the dice". The more proverbial and famous "The die is cast" presents Caesar as decisive, commanding, authoritative, and fully aware that NothingIsTheSameAnymore. The latter phrase, "Let's roll the dice" presents Caesar as cautious, hopeful, uncertain as to what might happen, and see it as an acknowledgment that [[IndyPloy he's acting as and when the situation advances and develops]]. More recent historians favour "Let's roll the dice" because they see it as more consistent and typical of Caesar's moderate bridging factions approach, emphasizes the contingent element, and removes the idea of inevitability that was more appealing to Suetonius (whose 12 Caesars is obviously favorable to a direct continuity from Caesar onwards) but which modern historians don't agree with.[[/note]]
* American college fraternities use Greek letters as names, and fraternity culture is called "Greek." A famous part of "Greek" college life is "toga parties," but togas were actually a Roman article of clothing. The Greeks wore chitons, not togas. On the other hand, the bedsheet-togas of "toga parties" is actually nothing like the Roman toga (which was a complexly draped semicircular piece of woolen cloth, typically worn over a tunic, and covering both shoulders anyway, it was the Roman equivalent of a three-piece suit and not good for parties) and a lot like... the Greek chiton (which were made of a rectangular piece of linen, and were often worn as a tunic with other garments like the chlamys--a rectangular woolen cloak--on top, often not covering one shoulder, they were the Greek equivalent of a white T-shirt and quite excellent for parties). Also, unlike at toga parties, women did not usually wear togas or chitons. Instead, they wore dresses or long tunics, and if they were married, they wore a garment called a ''stola'' over that.
12th Dec '17 4:06:51 PM JulianLapostat
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** There is a very good reason for this. The Egyptian systems of writing (hieroglyphic, hieratic, and demotic) were rather complex and peculiar--imagine a mishmash of the Japanese writing system (with symbols both for words and for sounds) with Arabic or Hebrew (where when writing with symbols for sounds, you drop vowels right and left) and you have a good approximation. As a result, the Egyptians themselves eventually adopted a variant of the Greek alphabet to write their language (called Coptic in the late stages and today) and forgot how the ancient system worked. Language change was also a factor; Coptic, already quite different from the Egyptian spoken in the days of the native Pharaohs, became very heavily influenced by Greek and adopted certain Hellenized pronunciations, further obscuring the original pronunciations. Finally, the Greeks' massive collective case of [[ForeignCultureFetish Egyptomania]] meant that until hieroglyphics were decoded in the 19th century, there was more written on Egypt and its myths in Greek than in any other language. To make a long story short, Greek names are used for Ancient Egyptian myths (as well as places) because for the longest time we didn't know what the original Egyptian names even were. It's actually thanks to the Greeks that we even know the Egyptian alphabet, since the Rosetta Stone was a decree by some Ptolemaic (i.e. Greek) ruler that he had written in Greek (his language) Demotic (Egyptian spelled cursive, the language of secular literate elites) and Hieroglyphs (the language of Egyptian priests). It took some time to figure out which word corresponded to which, but as the Greek text was easy enough to decipher, the Hieroglyphs were ultimately decoded.

to:

** There is a very good reason for this. The Egyptian systems of writing (hieroglyphic, hieratic, and demotic) were rather complex and peculiar--imagine a mishmash of the Japanese writing system (with symbols both for words and for sounds) with Arabic or Hebrew (where when writing with symbols for sounds, you drop vowels right and left) and you have a good approximation. As a result, the Egyptians themselves eventually adopted a variant of the Greek alphabet to write their language (called Coptic in the late stages and today) and forgot how the ancient system worked. Language change was also a factor; Coptic, already quite different from the Egyptian spoken in the days of the native Pharaohs, became very heavily influenced by Greek and adopted certain Hellenized pronunciations, further obscuring the original pronunciations. Finally, the Greeks' massive collective case of [[ForeignCultureFetish Egyptomania]] meant that until hieroglyphics were decoded in the 19th century, there was more written on Egypt and its myths in Greek than in any other language. To make a long story short, Greek names are used for Ancient Egyptian myths (as well as places) because for the longest time we didn't know what the original Egyptian names even were. It's actually thanks to the Greeks that we even know the Egyptian alphabet, since the Rosetta Stone was a decree by some Ptolemaic (i.e. Greek) ruler that he had written in Greek (his language) Demotic (Egyptian spelled cursive, the language of secular literate elites) and Hieroglyphs (the language of Egyptian priests). It took some time to figure out which word corresponded to which, but as two decades after its discovery in 1799, when Jean-François Champollion [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decipherment_of_Egyptian_hieroglyphs deciphered the system]] using the Greek text was easy enough as a base [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decipherment_of_Egyptian_hieroglyphs to decipher, decipher the Hieroglyphs were ultimately decoded.Egyptian]] hieroglyphs.
12th Dec '17 3:19:08 PM Jhonny
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** There is a very good reason for this. The Egyptian systems of writing (hieroglyphic, hieratic, and demotic) were rather complex and peculiar--imagine a mishmash of the Japanese writing system (with symbols both for words and for sounds) with Arabic or Hebrew (where when writing with symbols for sounds, you drop vowels right and left) and you have a good approximation. As a result, the Egyptians themselves eventually adopted a variant of the Greek alphabet to write their language (called Coptic in the late stages and today) and forgot how the ancient system worked. Language change was also a factor; Coptic, already quite different from the Egyptian spoken in the days of the native Pharaohs, became very heavily influenced by Greek and adopted certain Hellenized pronunciations, further obscuring the original pronunciations. Finally, the Greeks' massive collective case of [[ForeignCultureFetish Egyptomania]] meant that until hieroglyphics were decoded in the 19th century, there was more written on Egypt and its myths in Greek than in any other language. To make a long story short, Greek names are used for Ancient Egyptian myths (as well as places) because for the longest time we didn't know what the original Egyptian names even were. It's actually thanks to the Greeks that we even know the Egyptian alphabet, since the Rosetta Stone was the translation written by some anonymous Greek student who apparently was studying the language there in Egypt.

to:

** There is a very good reason for this. The Egyptian systems of writing (hieroglyphic, hieratic, and demotic) were rather complex and peculiar--imagine a mishmash of the Japanese writing system (with symbols both for words and for sounds) with Arabic or Hebrew (where when writing with symbols for sounds, you drop vowels right and left) and you have a good approximation. As a result, the Egyptians themselves eventually adopted a variant of the Greek alphabet to write their language (called Coptic in the late stages and today) and forgot how the ancient system worked. Language change was also a factor; Coptic, already quite different from the Egyptian spoken in the days of the native Pharaohs, became very heavily influenced by Greek and adopted certain Hellenized pronunciations, further obscuring the original pronunciations. Finally, the Greeks' massive collective case of [[ForeignCultureFetish Egyptomania]] meant that until hieroglyphics were decoded in the 19th century, there was more written on Egypt and its myths in Greek than in any other language. To make a long story short, Greek names are used for Ancient Egyptian myths (as well as places) because for the longest time we didn't know what the original Egyptian names even were. It's actually thanks to the Greeks that we even know the Egyptian alphabet, since the Rosetta Stone was the translation a decree by some Ptolemaic (i.e. Greek) ruler that he had written by some anonymous in Greek student who apparently was studying (his language) Demotic (Egyptian spelled cursive, the language there in Egypt.of secular literate elites) and Hieroglyphs (the language of Egyptian priests). It took some time to figure out which word corresponded to which, but as the Greek text was easy enough to decipher, the Hieroglyphs were ultimately decoded.
11th Dec '17 10:56:04 PM Fireblood
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** There is a very good reason for this. The Egyptian systems of writing (hieroglyphic, hieratic, and demotic) were rather complex and peculiar--imagine a mishmash of the Japanese writing system (with symbols both for words and for sounds) with Arabic or Hebrew (where when writing with symbols for sounds, you drop vowels right and left) and you have a good approximation. As a result, the Egyptians themselves eventually adopted a variant of the Greek alphabet to write their language (called Coptic in the late stages and today) and forgot how the ancient system worked. Language change was also a factor; Coptic, already quite different from the Egyptian spoken in the days of the native Pharaohs, became very heavily influenced by Greek and adopted certain Hellenized pronunciations, further obscuring the original pronunciations. Finally, the Greeks' massive collective case of [[ForeignCultureFetish Egyptomania]] meant that until hieroglyphics were decoded in the 19th century, there was more written on Egypt and its myths in Greek than in any other language. To make a long story short, Greek names are used for Ancient Egyptian myths (as well as places) because for the longest time we didn't know what the original Egyptian names even were. It's actually thanks to the Greeks that we even know the Egyptian alphabet, since the Rubik Stone was written on by some anonymous Greek student who apparently was studying the language there in Egypt.

to:

** There is a very good reason for this. The Egyptian systems of writing (hieroglyphic, hieratic, and demotic) were rather complex and peculiar--imagine a mishmash of the Japanese writing system (with symbols both for words and for sounds) with Arabic or Hebrew (where when writing with symbols for sounds, you drop vowels right and left) and you have a good approximation. As a result, the Egyptians themselves eventually adopted a variant of the Greek alphabet to write their language (called Coptic in the late stages and today) and forgot how the ancient system worked. Language change was also a factor; Coptic, already quite different from the Egyptian spoken in the days of the native Pharaohs, became very heavily influenced by Greek and adopted certain Hellenized pronunciations, further obscuring the original pronunciations. Finally, the Greeks' massive collective case of [[ForeignCultureFetish Egyptomania]] meant that until hieroglyphics were decoded in the 19th century, there was more written on Egypt and its myths in Greek than in any other language. To make a long story short, Greek names are used for Ancient Egyptian myths (as well as places) because for the longest time we didn't know what the original Egyptian names even were. It's actually thanks to the Greeks that we even know the Egyptian alphabet, since the Rubik Rosetta Stone was the translation written on by some anonymous Greek student who apparently was studying the language there in Egypt.
11th Dec '17 10:53:57 PM Fireblood
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** There is a very good reason for this. The Egyptian systems of writing (hieroglyphic, hieratic, and demotic) were rather complex and peculiar--imagine a mishmash of the Japanese writing system (with symbols both for words and for sounds) with Arabic or Hebrew (where when writing with symbols for sounds, you drop vowels right and left) and you have a good approximation. As a result, the Egyptians themselves eventually adopted a variant of the Greek alphabet to write their language (called Coptic in the late stages and today) and forgot how the ancient system worked. Language change was also a factor; Coptic, already quite different from the Egyptian spoken in the days of the native Pharaohs, became very heavily influenced by Greek and adopted certain Hellenized pronunciations, further obscuring the original pronunciations. Finally, the Greeks' massive collective case of [[ForeignCultureFetish Egyptomania]] meant that until hieroglyphics were decoded in the 19th century, there was more written on Egypt and its myths in Greek than in any other language. To make a long story short, Greek names are used for Ancient Egyptian myths (as well as places) because for the longest time we didn't know what the original Egyptian names even were.

to:

** There is a very good reason for this. The Egyptian systems of writing (hieroglyphic, hieratic, and demotic) were rather complex and peculiar--imagine a mishmash of the Japanese writing system (with symbols both for words and for sounds) with Arabic or Hebrew (where when writing with symbols for sounds, you drop vowels right and left) and you have a good approximation. As a result, the Egyptians themselves eventually adopted a variant of the Greek alphabet to write their language (called Coptic in the late stages and today) and forgot how the ancient system worked. Language change was also a factor; Coptic, already quite different from the Egyptian spoken in the days of the native Pharaohs, became very heavily influenced by Greek and adopted certain Hellenized pronunciations, further obscuring the original pronunciations. Finally, the Greeks' massive collective case of [[ForeignCultureFetish Egyptomania]] meant that until hieroglyphics were decoded in the 19th century, there was more written on Egypt and its myths in Greek than in any other language. To make a long story short, Greek names are used for Ancient Egyptian myths (as well as places) because for the longest time we didn't know what the original Egyptian names even were. It's actually thanks to the Greeks that we even know the Egyptian alphabet, since the Rubik Stone was written on by some anonymous Greek student who apparently was studying the language there in Egypt.
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