History Main / AmbulanceChaser

28th Apr '18 3:15:06 PM nombretomado
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* WebOriginal/NotAlwaysRight has [[http://notalwaysright.com/it-turns-out-you-can-be-too-safe/ this story]] which inverts it. The lawyer is more worried about the fact that his client has a relative who's seriously hurt, while the client is the one concerned about lawsuits.

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* WebOriginal/NotAlwaysRight ''Website/NotAlwaysRight'' has [[http://notalwaysright.com/it-turns-out-you-can-be-too-safe/ this story]] which inverts it. The lawyer is more worried about the fact that his client has a relative who's seriously hurt, while the client is the one concerned about lawsuits.
21st Apr '18 7:33:09 AM HasturHasturHastur
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Note that within the legal profession, calling someone an ambulance chaser is equivalent to calling him/her bottom-feeding scum. The "polite" term (in North America at any rate) is "plaintiff's lawyer" or "personal-injury lawyer/attorney"...but even that doesn't do much to hide the disdain of pretty much every other form of lawyer for them. If a legal professional specifically refers to an attorney as an "ambulance chaser", they're straight-up calling them an asshole. Still, while they may not exactly be the most upstanding members of the legal profession, they stay around because the cases that they take, while seemingly asinine and ridiculous (and they very well may be), still have some basic legal ground, and no smart attorney is going to take a truly frivolous case. Doing so counts as barratry, and attorneys who repeatedly take ridiculous cases with no legal merit can and frequently will get disbarred. Contingent fee setups also offer a strong disincentive to accepting questionable cases, as the prospect of eating the cost of an unsuccessful case is something that gives most attorneys a very good reason to make a solid inquiry into the facts of the case before choosing to pursue it. If it's either complete bullshit or has no legal backing, they ''will'' decline unless they really want to get an entry on their public disciplinary record (or they think they can quickly settle it, which often leads right back to the former).

to:

Note that within the legal profession, calling someone an ambulance chaser is equivalent to calling him/her bottom-feeding scum. The "polite" term (in North America at any rate) is "plaintiff's lawyer" or "personal-injury lawyer/attorney"...but even that doesn't do much to hide the disdain of pretty much every other form of lawyer for them. If a legal professional specifically refers to an attorney as an "ambulance chaser", they're straight-up calling them an asshole. Still, while they may not exactly be the most upstanding members of the legal profession, they stay around because the cases that they take, while seemingly asinine and ridiculous (and they very well may be), still have some basic legal ground, and no smart attorney is going to take a truly frivolous case. Doing so counts as barratry, and attorneys who repeatedly take ridiculous cases with no legal merit can and frequently will get disbarred. Contingent fee setups also offer a strong disincentive to accepting questionable cases, as the prospect of eating the cost of an unsuccessful case is something that gives most attorneys a very good reason to make a solid inquiry into the facts of the case before choosing to pursue it. If it's either complete bullshit or has no legal backing, they ''will'' decline unless they really want to get an entry on their public disciplinary record (or they think they can quickly settle it, which often leads right back to the former).
former). Extreme rudeness and incivility in representation is also strongly discouraged, as it's a very easy way to get hit with sanctions when the opposing side reports to the judge that you've been a gigantic dick to them for no good reason. If your impertinence crosses into outright misconduct, you very well may lose what may have actually been a legitimate case for your client, as there are also very clear rules about how clients cannot profit from the unethical behavior of their attorneys, ''even'' if they likely would have had a favorable determination otherwise, and that sort of outcome will get you sued for malpractice by your furious client.
16th Mar '18 8:33:25 PM costanton11
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[[/folder]]
16th Mar '18 8:32:47 PM costanton11
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[[folder:Web Original]

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[[folder:Web Original]Original]]
4th Mar '18 5:31:16 PM AnonFangeekGirl
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Web Original]
* WebOriginal/NotAlwaysRight has [[http://notalwaysright.com/it-turns-out-you-can-be-too-safe/ this story]] which inverts it. The lawyer is more worried about the fact that his client has a relative who's seriously hurt, while the client is the one concerned about lawsuits.
3rd Mar '18 7:16:10 PM TheCuza
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* Saul Goodman from ''Series/BreakingBad'' and his own spinoff ''Series/BetterCallSaul'' is a clear example of this, though with a much darker and more complex background and business plan than most. [[ObfuscatingStupidity He actually seems to cultivate this image to both cover just how incredibly competent and crooked he is]]. See also his entry in AmoralAttorney.

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* Saul Goodman from ''Series/BreakingBad'' and his own spinoff ''Series/BetterCallSaul'' is a clear example of this, though complete with a much darker and more complex background and business plan than most. garish, low-budget TV commercials that would make [[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Lionel Hutz]] jealous. However, [[ObfuscatingStupidity He he is actually seems to cultivate deliberately cultivating this image image]] in order to hide both cover just how incredibly competent and crooked incredibly ''crooked'' he is]].actually is. See also his entry in AmoralAttorney.
24th Feb '18 9:48:19 AM HasturHasturHastur
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Note that within the legal profession, calling someone an ambulance chaser is equivalent to calling him/her bottom-feeding scum. The "polite" term (in North America at any rate) is "plaintiff's lawyer" or "personal-injury lawyer/attorney"...but even that doesn't do much to hide the disdain of pretty much every other form of lawyer for them. Still, while they may not exactly be the most upstanding members of the legal profession, they stay around because the cases that they take, while seemingly asinine and ridiculous (and they very well may be), still have some basic legal ground, and no smart attorney is going to take a truly frivolous case. Doing so counts as barratry, and attorneys who repeatedly take ridiculous cases with no legal merit can and frequently will get disbarred. Contingent fee setups also offer a strong disincentive to accepting questionable cases, as the prospect of eating the cost of an unsuccessful case is something that gives most attorneys a very good reason to make a solid inquiry into the facts of the case before choosing to pursue it. If it's either complete bullshit or has no legal backing, they ''will'' decline unless they really want to get an entry on their public disciplinary record (or they think they can quickly settle it, which often leads right back to the former).

to:

Note that within the legal profession, calling someone an ambulance chaser is equivalent to calling him/her bottom-feeding scum. The "polite" term (in North America at any rate) is "plaintiff's lawyer" or "personal-injury lawyer/attorney"...but even that doesn't do much to hide the disdain of pretty much every other form of lawyer for them. If a legal professional specifically refers to an attorney as an "ambulance chaser", they're straight-up calling them an asshole. Still, while they may not exactly be the most upstanding members of the legal profession, they stay around because the cases that they take, while seemingly asinine and ridiculous (and they very well may be), still have some basic legal ground, and no smart attorney is going to take a truly frivolous case. Doing so counts as barratry, and attorneys who repeatedly take ridiculous cases with no legal merit can and frequently will get disbarred. Contingent fee setups also offer a strong disincentive to accepting questionable cases, as the prospect of eating the cost of an unsuccessful case is something that gives most attorneys a very good reason to make a solid inquiry into the facts of the case before choosing to pursue it. If it's either complete bullshit or has no legal backing, they ''will'' decline unless they really want to get an entry on their public disciplinary record (or they think they can quickly settle it, which often leads right back to the former).
28th Jan '18 1:12:50 PM faunas
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* Roland T. Flakfizer from ''Film/BrainDonors'' is a ''literal'' Ambulance Chaser -- his very first appearance in the film features him chasing an ambulance ''on foot'' to the scene of an automobile accident, where he immediately begins to yell about the impending lawsuits he plans to file.

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* Roland T. Flakfizer from ''Film/BrainDonors'' is a ''literal'' Ambulance Chaser -- his very first appearance in the film film[[note]]our image at the top of this page[[/note]] features him chasing an ambulance ''on foot'' to the scene of an automobile accident, where he immediately begins to yell about the impending lawsuits he plans to file.
15th Jan '18 3:14:31 AM KidDynamite
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* ''Series/WhatsHappening'' had an episode where Rerun got sick while at Rob's Place and wound up in the hospital. The initial diagnosis was food poisoning. His roommate in the hospital is a man in a body cast (he was in a bus accident) and meets his lawyer, who then suggests suing Rob over it. Later, when Rerun's illness turns out to be appendicitis, the lawyer wants to turn it into a malpractice suit against the hospital, but Rerun (who's gotten fed up with all the drama) tells him, "The Pacific Ocean is that way. Keep walking until your briefcase floats."
7th Dec '17 9:09:39 PM PaulA
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* Anna's lawyer in MySistersKeeper travels with a service dog, despite the fact that (as everyone he meets is constantly noting) he isn't blind. Unwilling to admit that [[spoiler: he suffers from epilepsy]], his sarcastic responses to that observation are a running gag in the book. One is, "I'm a lawyer. He chases ambulances for me."

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* Anna's lawyer in MySistersKeeper ''Literature/MySistersKeeper'' travels with a service dog, despite the fact that (as everyone he meets is constantly noting) he isn't blind. Unwilling to admit that [[spoiler: he [[spoiler:he suffers from epilepsy]], his sarcastic responses to that observation are a running gag in the book. One is, "I'm a lawyer. He chases ambulances for me."
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