History Main / AdultsAreUseless

28th Mar '17 1:33:51 PM Golondrina
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* In Marvel's ''Comicbook/{{Runaways}}'', the teen heroes don't trust any of the adult characters, even Comicbook/CaptainAmerica. ''ComicBook/CivilWar'' only cements their "Adults are tools" mentality.
** Comicbook/CloakAndDagger nearly subvert this, by finding out what's really going on in Los Angeles and telling the kids that they'll get in contact with Captain America and send him to take out the Pride. [[spoiler:Unfortunately, they are caught and brainwashed by Molly's parents into forgetting everything.]]
** Franchise/SpiderMan's cameo also subverts it, to a degree.
** Parodied when the Runaways show up at Comicbook/AvengersAcademy. Chase goes off on a defensive tirade about how adults are always meddling in the Runaways' business... before sheepishly admitting that he actually needs the Avengers' help in retrieving Old Lace. That arc also finally put an end to the Runaways' abuse of this trope; after a pointless fight breaks out between the Runaways and the Avengers, Nico breaks it up with a spell that magically forces both sides to see each other's viewpoints, and the Runaways realize that their longstanding distrust of adults has left them with some disadvantages. They ultimately decide that adults don't suck as much as they thought.
* The ''Comicbook/UltimateSpiderMan'' series by Creator/BrianMichaelBendis puts a big emphasis on Peter Parker being a teenager, and hanging out with his teenage friends. The other books of the ''ComicBook/UltimateMarvel'' line also retool every other major Marvel hero as an asshole ([[DarkerAndEdgier because that's way edgier]]). This can lead to plenty of times when Peter risks his neck for his heroes only to find they don't share his ideals or views of responsibility, and are often ungrateful for his efforts. While the Adults aren't exactly useless, Spidey has good reason to be pissed off whenever he deals with them.
** Even Comicbook/NickFury can often make stupid decisions that come back to haunt Peter, like building the Spider-Slayers or locking up supervillains without trial. Peter even once got beaten up by Daredevil for attempting to help him in a fight and yelled at for being too young. Really, binging on the Ultimate Spider-Man books really makes you realize just how many people are dicks in the Ultimate Universe.
*** When you think about it, you have to feel really bad for the guy. The entire series takes place over only 6 months, and he's still just a high schooler who's in way over his head. And he can't get help from the super-hero community, because they're ALL JERKS. There is not a single super-hero who was kind or supportive to him except maybe for three X-Men and the Fantastic Four, and they're the same age he is. Kitty even got kicked out of the X-Men when she insisted they go help him.
*** Peter even lampshades this in one exchange with a teacher at his high school; he questions why the Kingpin (a known crime lord) is allowed to walk free, she gives a pat answer about due process and such, and he explodes, asking whether people's idealism somehow disappears the moment they turn twenty.



* Aversion: The adults in ''Comicbook/GladstonesSchoolForWorldConquerors'' are typically famous super villains and are quite important to the plot.



* Averted in ''ComicBook/SuperDinosaur'' where the adults perform important support roles if they aren't directly in the action. The Kingstons repair SD's armor while Dr. Dynamo creates valuable new technology.
* Justified in the second volume of ''ComicBook/YoungAvengers'' - [[BigBad Mother]] is a trans-dimensional parasite, who feeds on kids and teenagers with {{reality warp|er}}ing superpowers and one of her abilities is to hide her existence from adults, so they won't belive their kids telling them about her and won't notice her activities, even as they're happening in front of them. Worse, if you're a parent, the first person a kid targeted by her would come to, she can turn you into her brainwashed minion. And if your parents are dead, she will bring them back as her minions [[spoiler: through they cannot get too far away from the place of their death]].
* Webcomic/{{Dreamkeepers}}: Mostly played straight as an arrow in Prelude, especially when Mace and Whip are the focus. Averted in the graphic novels, with several competent adults in the story.
** Although Mr. Nibbs plays it straight in the novels as well.
* In ''Comicbook/SexCriminals'', middle-school girl Suzie tries to find out what happens when someone has an orgasm. She turns first to a gynecologist and than her mom. Neither are any help.
* In ''ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}}'', it was just as well that adults were never fully seen, because the rare situations where the main characters had to interact with them portrayed them as ''incompetent''. In one story arc, Charlie Brown went to talk to his pediatrician to find out why the school board (which the doctor was a member of) had banned a book called ''The Three Bunny Wunnies Freak Out'' from the school library. The doctor ''fainted''. The nurse later told Charlie Brown that ''little kids made him nervous''. (Remember, this was a ''pediatrician''.) Later, Charlie Brown told Linus that the doctor admitted that he only reads medical journals, but the pictures upset him.
** Another story arc shows that Peppermint Patty's teacher is a LawfulStupid type. A hole in the ceiling classroom was causing rain to fall on Patty's head. According to Marcie, the teacher couldn't move Patty to another desk, because that would disrupt the alphabetical seating arrangement.
* {{Justified| Trope}} in ''ComicBook/LockeAndKey'' - similar to ''Literature/PeterPan'', children are the only ones who can believe in magic. Adults might see it, but they wouldn't quite process it as being abnormal. If fact, once the children hit 18, they forget everything to do with magic, meaning the Locke siblings are more or less on their own when all hell quite literally breaks loose. This is averted in more mundane situations, where adults are shown to be anything but useless. Like in issue 1, when Nina kills a psycho [[AnAxeToGrind with a hatchet]] for [[MamaBear threatening her son]].
* ''ComicBook/MyFriendDahmer'' presents a tragic RealLife example. No adult during [[SerialKiller Jeffrey Dahmer]]'s formative years noticed his mounting psychological problems. His parents are too consumed with their marital strife and both eventually abandon him. His teachers are either clueless or indifferent to his binge drinking at school. His classmate-turned-biographer, Derf Backderf, links the lack of attention from adults to Dahmer's obsessive drive to find the perfect victim who would never leave him, resulting in his grisly killing spree.



* Aversion: The adults in ''Comicbook/GladstonesSchoolForWorldConquerors'' are typically famous super villains and are quite important to the plot.
* {{Justified| Trope}} in ''ComicBook/LockeAndKey'' - similar to ''Literature/PeterPan'', children are the only ones who can believe in magic. Adults might see it, but they wouldn't quite process it as being abnormal. If fact, once the children hit 18, they forget everything to do with magic, meaning the Locke siblings are more or less on their own when all hell quite literally breaks loose. This is averted in more mundane situations, where adults are shown to be anything but useless. Like in issue 1, when Nina kills a psycho [[AnAxeToGrind with a hatchet]] for [[MamaBear threatening her son]].
* ''ComicBook/MyFriendDahmer'' presents a tragic RealLife example. No adult during [[SerialKiller Jeffrey Dahmer]]'s formative years noticed his mounting psychological problems. His parents are too consumed with their marital strife and both eventually abandon him. His teachers are either clueless or indifferent to his binge drinking at school. His classmate-turned-biographer, Derf Backderf, links the lack of attention from adults to Dahmer's obsessive drive to find the perfect victim who would never leave him, resulting in his grisly killing spree.
* In ''ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}}'', it was just as well that adults were never fully seen, because the rare situations where the main characters had to interact with them portrayed them as ''incompetent''. In one story arc, Charlie Brown went to talk to his pediatrician to find out why the school board (which the doctor was a member of) had banned a book called ''The Three Bunny Wunnies Freak Out'' from the school library. The doctor ''fainted''. The nurse later told Charlie Brown that ''little kids made him nervous''. (Remember, this was a ''pediatrician''.) Later, Charlie Brown told Linus that the doctor admitted that he only reads medical journals, but the pictures upset him.
** Another story arc shows that Peppermint Patty's teacher is a LawfulStupid type. A hole in the ceiling classroom was causing rain to fall on Patty's head. According to Marcie, the teacher couldn't move Patty to another desk, because that would disrupt the alphabetical seating arrangement.
* In Marvel's ''Comicbook/{{Runaways}}'', the teen heroes don't trust any of the adult characters, even Comicbook/CaptainAmerica. ''ComicBook/CivilWar'' only cements their "Adults are tools" mentality.
** Comicbook/CloakAndDagger nearly subvert this, by finding out what's really going on in Los Angeles and telling the kids that they'll get in contact with Captain America and send him to take out the Pride. [[spoiler:Unfortunately, they are caught and brainwashed by Molly's parents into forgetting everything.]]
** Franchise/SpiderMan's cameo also subverts it, to a degree.
** Parodied when the Runaways show up at Comicbook/AvengersAcademy. Chase goes off on a defensive tirade about how adults are always meddling in the Runaways' business... before sheepishly admitting that he actually needs the Avengers' help in retrieving Old Lace. That arc also finally put an end to the Runaways' abuse of this trope; after a pointless fight breaks out between the Runaways and the Avengers, Nico breaks it up with a spell that magically forces both sides to see each other's viewpoints, and the Runaways realize that their longstanding distrust of adults has left them with some disadvantages. They ultimately decide that adults don't suck as much as they thought.
* In ''Comicbook/SexCriminals'', middle-school girl Suzie tries to find out what happens when someone has an orgasm. She turns first to a gynecologist and than her mom. Neither are any help.
* Averted in ''ComicBook/SuperDinosaur'' where the adults perform important support roles if they aren't directly in the action. The Kingstons repair SD's armor while Dr. Dynamo creates valuable new technology.
* The ''Comicbook/UltimateSpiderMan'' series by Creator/BrianMichaelBendis puts a big emphasis on Peter Parker being a teenager, and hanging out with his teenage friends. The other books of the ''ComicBook/UltimateMarvel'' line also retool every other major Marvel hero as an asshole ([[DarkerAndEdgier because that's way edgier]]). This can lead to plenty of times when Peter risks his neck for his heroes only to find they don't share his ideals or views of responsibility, and are often ungrateful for his efforts. While the Adults aren't exactly useless, Spidey has good reason to be pissed off whenever he deals with them.
** Even Comicbook/NickFury can often make stupid decisions that come back to haunt Peter, like building the Spider-Slayers or locking up supervillains without trial. Peter even once got beaten up by Daredevil for attempting to help him in a fight and yelled at for being too young. Really, binging on the Ultimate Spider-Man books really makes you realize just how many people are dicks in the Ultimate Universe.
*** When you think about it, you have to feel really bad for the guy. The entire series takes place over only 6 months, and he's still just a high schooler who's in way over his head. And he can't get help from the super-hero community, because they're ALL JERKS. There is not a single super-hero who was kind or supportive to him except maybe for three X-Men and the Fantastic Four, and they're the same age he is. Kitty even got kicked out of the X-Men when she insisted they go help him.
*** Peter even lampshades this in one exchange with a teacher at his high school; he questions why the Kingpin (a known crime lord) is allowed to walk free, she gives a pat answer about due process and such, and he explodes, asking whether people's idealism somehow disappears the moment they turn twenty.
* Justified in the second volume of ''ComicBook/YoungAvengers'' - [[BigBad Mother]] is a trans-dimensional parasite, who feeds on kids and teenagers with {{reality warp|er}}ing superpowers and one of her abilities is to hide her existence from adults, so they won't belive their kids telling them about her and won't notice her activities, even as they're happening in front of them. Worse, if you're a parent, the first person a kid targeted by her would come to, she can turn you into her brainwashed minion. And if your parents are dead, she will bring them back as her minions [[spoiler: through they cannot get too far away from the place of their death]].



* Parodied in Episode 3 of GagDub ''WebVideo/YuGiOhTheAbridgedSeries'' by, of all people, Tristan -- "Don't our parents even care that we're missing?"
* ''Fanfic/ShiningPrettyCure''. The only adult who even ''suspects'' something might be going on is Ren, the friendly owner of the neighbourhood cafe.
* In ''Fanfic/CoOpMode'', as this is Worm, this automatically applies. A special example though is the Winslow's gym coach Wolf Shane - due to James being possibly conducive to his own goals, he can be seen as a ReasonableAuthorityFigure when [[spoiler: James and Taylor get into a fight with the Trio and their cronies]]. However, he ends up as a DoubleSubversion, as he does not particularly care for his job, being more interested in [[ItsAllAboutMe his own wants]] than actually being a coach.
-->''Coach Shane'': “I’ll be honest here. [[DrugsAreBad I don’t approve of steroids.]] But with the girls’ track team bringing home medals, Blackwell wants the other teams to earn some trophies. If our football team doesn’t start winning games, she’s going to make me do weekend training for the guys. [[AdultsAreUseless And that would cut into my weekend plans.]] I think I can turn you into a decent running back or a passable lineman, but there’s no point if you’re going to get disqualified. So. Can you pass a drug test?”



* Lampshaded and then averted in ''Fanfic/FutariWaPrettyCureBlueMoon''. Dawn''/''[[spoiler:Ogata Kirei''/''Cure Dawn]] notes that she's supposed to leave fighting evil to the thirteen-year-old title characters [[spoiler:because she's without her powers]], but doesn't seem to be very happy about it. Near the end of the series, she becomes an active combatant.
* Stephen Ratliff's [[FanFic/MarissaPicard Marissa Star Trek universe]] is notorious for this. In order for Marissa's "kids crew" to be great, every adult they come up against has to be a bumbling imbecile. In one episode, the Maquis even invented a drug that knocked out everyone over the age of 15.
* In ''Fanfic/KyonBigDamnHero'', Kyon's parents are like this. Other adults are, fortunately, far more useful.
* A major topic of discussion in ''FanFic/HarryPotterAndTheMethodsOfRationality'', with Harry frequently telling others how adults who do not treat him as an equal are obstacles to be dodged or manipulated (including those very adults).
* The adults in ''Fanfic/OhGodNotAgain'' are more useless than usual, but mainly because, unlike Literature/{{Harry|Potter}}, they don't have knowledge [[PeggySue from the future]], so you can hardly blame them for being behind. Harry does sometimes get them involved on purpose when they can help, such as going straight to Dumbledore when Hagrid gets Norbert.

to:

* Lampshaded ''Fanfic/{{Atonement}}'': With few exceptions, the kids drive the story and then averted in ''Fanfic/FutariWaPrettyCureBlueMoon''. Dawn''/''[[spoiler:Ogata Kirei''/''Cure Dawn]] notes that she's supposed to leave fighting evil to handle the thirteen-year-old title characters [[spoiler:because she's without her powers]], but doesn't seem to be very happy about it. Near the end of the series, she becomes an active combatant.
* Stephen Ratliff's [[FanFic/MarissaPicard Marissa Star Trek universe]] is notorious for this. In order for Marissa's "kids crew" to be great, every adult they come up against has to be a bumbling imbecile. In one episode, the Maquis even invented a drug that knocked out everyone over the age of 15.
* In ''Fanfic/KyonBigDamnHero'', Kyon's parents are like this. Other adults are, fortunately, far more useful.
* A major topic of discussion in ''FanFic/HarryPotterAndTheMethodsOfRationality'', with Harry frequently telling others how adults who do not treat him as an equal are obstacles to be dodged or manipulated (including those very adults).
important things. Main character Madison lampshades it often.
* The adults counselors in ''Fanfic/OhGodNotAgain'' are more useless than usual, but mainly because, unlike Literature/{{Harry|Potter}}, they don't have knowledge [[PeggySue ''Fanfic/CalvinAtCamp'' let the kids get away with ''anything,'' aside from the future]], so you can hardly blame them for being behind. Harry does sometimes get them involved on purpose when they can help, such as going straight to Dumbledore when Hagrid gets Norbert.actually leaving.



* The counselors in ''Fanfic/CalvinAtCamp'' let the kids get away with ''anything,'' aside from actually leaving.
* Unusually for a story about runaway orphans, this trope is strongly averted in the WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic fan fiction ''Fanfic/OurTrueColors''. Here the adults catch on to the true state of affairs quickly and are working behind the scenes to help resolve things.
* Averted in [[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/9030904/1/Yu-Gi-Oh-GSTART Yu-Gi-Oh! GSTART]]: All adults seen so far are competent and helpful individuals who take the odd goings-on quite seriously.



* In ''Fanfic/CoOpMode'', as this is Worm, this automatically applies. A special example though is the Winslow's gym coach Wolf Shane - due to James being possibly conducive to his own goals, he can be seen as a ReasonableAuthorityFigure when [[spoiler: James and Taylor get into a fight with the Trio and their cronies]]. However, he ends up as a DoubleSubversion, as he does not particularly care for his job, being more interested in [[ItsAllAboutMe his own wants]] than actually being a coach.
-->''Coach Shane'': “I’ll be honest here. [[DrugsAreBad I don’t approve of steroids.]] But with the girls’ track team bringing home medals, Blackwell wants the other teams to earn some trophies. If our football team doesn’t start winning games, she’s going to make me do weekend training for the guys. [[AdultsAreUseless And that would cut into my weekend plans.]] I think I can turn you into a decent running back or a passable lineman, but there’s no point if you’re going to get disqualified. So. Can you pass a drug test?”
* Lampshaded and then averted in ''Fanfic/FutariWaPrettyCureBlueMoon''. Dawn''/''[[spoiler:Ogata Kirei''/''Cure Dawn]] notes that she's supposed to leave fighting evil to the thirteen-year-old title characters [[spoiler:because she's without her powers]], but doesn't seem to be very happy about it. Near the end of the series, she becomes an active combatant.
* A major topic of discussion in ''FanFic/HarryPotterAndTheMethodsOfRationality'', with Harry frequently telling others how adults who do not treat him as an equal are obstacles to be dodged or manipulated (including those very adults).
* In ''Fanfic/KyonBigDamnHero'', Kyon's parents are like this. Other adults are, fortunately, far more useful.
* ''Fanfic/LePapillonRising'' has Gabriel, who might not be useless, but is bad at parenting. Gabriel somehow doesn't notice that he's been neglecting his traumatized son so much that the kid's gone completely insane, even though Adrien is doing very little to hide it. Oh, but he's a great "Dad" to Ladybug, who he's protective of and tries many times to convince not to date Papillon... oh, the irony.



* In ''FanFic/SwingingPendulum'' the instructors at Shin'hou Academy never help Asuka with her coursework and ignore her when she's bullied. Her cousin, Kyouraku Shinsui tried to intervene, but it gave the impression that Asuka was coasting on her family name.

to:

* Stephen Ratliff's ''[[FanFic/MarissaPicard Marissa Star Trek universe]]'' is notorious for this. In ''FanFic/SwingingPendulum'' order for Marissa's "kids crew" to be great, every adult they come up against has to be a bumbling imbecile. In one episode, the instructors at Shin'hou Maquis even invented a drug that knocked out everyone over the age of 15.
* The adults in ''Fanfic/OhGodNotAgain'' are more useless than usual, but mainly because, unlike Literature/{{Harry|Potter}}, they don't have knowledge [[PeggySue from the future]], so you can hardly blame them for being behind. Harry does sometimes get them involved on purpose when they can help, such as going straight to Dumbledore when Hagrid gets Norbert.
* Unusually for a story about runaway orphans, this trope is strongly averted in the WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic fan fiction ''Fanfic/OurTrueColors''. Here the adults catch on to the true state of affairs quickly and are working behind the scenes to help resolve things.
* ''FanFic/RosarioVampireBrightestDarkness'': As in canon, Headmaster Mikogami's general response to any threat amounts to "sit on my ass and do nothing while Tsukune's group risks their lives in my place." Best displayed in Act III chapters 40-44; both Kuyou and a Fairy Tale armada invade and attack Yokai
Academy never help Asuka with her coursework one after the other, and ignore her when she's bullied. Her cousin, Kyouraku Shinsui tried instead of trying to intervene, but it gave the impression that Asuka was coasting on her family name.stop them, he sits back and watches as Tsukune's group fights them back in his stead.



* ''Fanfic/{{Atonement}}'': With few exceptions, the kids drive the story and handle the important things. Main character Madison lampshades it often.
* ''FanFic/RosarioVampireBrightestDarkness'': As in canon, Headmaster Mikogami's general response to any threat amounts to "sit on my ass and do nothing while Tsukune's group risks their lives in my place." Best displayed in Act III chapters 40-44; both Kuyou and a Fairy Tale armada invade and attack Yokai Academy one after the other, and instead of trying to stop them, he sits back and watches as Tsukune's group fights them back in his stead.
* Fanfic/LePapillonRising has Gabriel, who might not be useless, but is bad at parenting. Gabriel somehow doesn't notice that he's been neglecting his traumatized son so much that the kid's gone completely insane, even though Adrien is doing very little to hide it. Oh, but he's a great "Dad" to Ladybug, who he's protective of and tries many times to convince not to date Papillon... oh, the irony.

to:

* ''Fanfic/{{Atonement}}'': With few exceptions, ''Fanfic/ShiningPrettyCure''. The only adult who even ''suspects'' something might be going on is Ren, the kids drive friendly owner of the story and handle neighbourhood cafe.
* In ''FanFic/SwingingPendulum''
the important things. Main character Madison lampshades it often.
* ''FanFic/RosarioVampireBrightestDarkness'': As in canon, Headmaster Mikogami's general response to any threat amounts to "sit on my ass and do nothing while Tsukune's group risks their lives in my place." Best displayed in Act III chapters 40-44; both Kuyou and a Fairy Tale armada invade and attack Yokai
instructors at Shin'hou Academy one after never help Asuka with her coursework and ignore her when she's bullied. Her cousin, Kyouraku Shinsui tried to intervene, but it gave the other, and instead of trying to stop them, he sits back and watches as Tsukune's group fights them back in his stead.
* Fanfic/LePapillonRising has Gabriel, who might not be useless, but is bad at parenting. Gabriel somehow doesn't notice
impression that he's been neglecting his traumatized son so much Asuka was coasting on her family name.
* Parodied in Episode 3 of GagDub ''WebVideo/YuGiOhTheAbridgedSeries'' by, of all people, Tristan -- "Don't our parents even care
that we're missing?"
* Averted in [[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/9030904/1/Yu-Gi-Oh-GSTART Yu-Gi-Oh! GSTART]]: All adults seen so far are competent and helpful individuals who take
the kid's gone completely insane, even though Adrien is doing very little to hide it. Oh, but he's a great "Dad" to Ladybug, who he's protective of and tries many times to convince not to date Papillon... oh, the irony.odd goings-on quite seriously.



* The entire town in ''WesternAnimation/TheBoxtrolls'' really but a special mention should go to Lord Portley-Rind, if it's not about cheese, he has absolutely no interest.
* Played straight and averted in ''WesternAnimation/TheChristmasTree''. Judy's a decent person, if a bit dim, and genuinely cares for the children. The mayor, however, doesn't seem to have the slightest inkling that anything is amiss at the OrphanageOfFear, and is perfectly willing to fork over large sums of cash to [[BigBad Mrs. Mavilda]] without much question.



* ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeagueVsTeenTitans'': Zigzagged -- Batman can't keep Damian on a leash forever and thus opts to send him to the Titans to cool him off. However, when the potential for Raven's danger is made real, the League steps in, not wanting a threat like this to spread. That last bit is vastly different from both the comics and previous animated variations, which they are either ignored or AdaptedOut.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheLandBeforeTime III''. Not long after a meteor storm, the Great Valley's main water supply, a river running down from beyond the wall, mysteriously dries up. Rather than say, investigating the river's source (they could have sent fliers if they were worried about carnivores), the adults decide to wait in the valley and hope the water returns. In the meantime, water is running low, tempers are running high and all the food is quickly dying off. In the end, it's the children who accidentally find out that the water was blocked off and the adults can't agree on a plan of action and guess what? The children save the day! Again! By accident! Again!
** This is a ''very'' common occurrence throughout the series. None of the adults want to risk personal safety going out into the Mysterious Beyond for ''any'' reason whatsoever, leaving the children to do everything themselves.
*** In the 4th film, where Littlefoot's grandmother (who had been willing before to leave and search for a flower with healing properties) and the mother of a new character not only fail to go after their runaway children but don't even seem worried or concerned that the kids are gone.



* The entire town in ''WesternAnimation/TheBoxtrolls'' really but a special mention should go to Lord Portley-Rind, if it's not about cheese, he has absolutely no interest.
* ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeagueVsTeenTitans'': Zigzagged -- Batman can't keep Damian on a leash forever and thus opts to send him to the Titans to cool him off. However, when the potential for Raven's danger is made real, the League steps in, not wanting a threat like this to spread. That last bit is vastly different from both the comics and previous animated variations, which they are either ignored or AdaptedOut.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheLandBeforeTime III''. Not long after a meteor storm, the Great Valley's main water supply, a river running down from beyond the wall, mysteriously dries up. Rather than say, investigating the river's source (they could have sent fliers if they were worried about carnivores), the adults decide to wait in the valley and hope the water returns. In the meantime, water is running low, tempers are running high and all the food is quickly dying off. In the end, it's the children who accidentally find out that the water was blocked off and the adults can't agree on a plan of action and guess what? The children save the day! Again! By accident! Again!
** This is a ''very'' common occurrence throughout the series. None of the adults want to risk personal safety going out into the Mysterious Beyond for ''any'' reason whatsoever, leaving the children to do everything themselves.
*** In the 4th film, where Littlefoot's grandmother (who had been willing before to leave and search for a flower with healing properties) and the mother of a new character not only fail to go after their runaway children but don't even seem worried or concerned that the kids are gone.
* Played straight and averted in ''WesternAnimation/TheChristmasTree''. Judy's a decent person, if a bit dim, and genuinely cares for the children. The mayor, however, doesn't seem to have the slightest inkling that anything is amiss at the OrphanageOfFear, and is perfectly willing to fork over large sums of cash to [[BigBad Mrs. Mavilda]] without much question.



* ''Franchise/ANightmareOnElmStreet'':
** The first ''Film/ANightmareOnElmStreet1984''. Nancy's mother helped start the whole thing, her father doesn't do anything and the rest of the police only hinder her or ignore her frantic cries for help.
** The sequels more or less follow suit, but there's a bizarre subversion in ''Film/FreddyVsJason''. It turns out that [[ClapYourHandsIfYouBelieve the more people are aware and afraid of Freddy (these two usually go hand by hand) the more powerful he becomes]]. Hence when the adults really got down to it they effectively eliminated the threat by erasing all written notions of Freddy, banning his name or any details from mentioning and submitting those kids who still remembered about him to a dream-depriving drug treatment. He did eventually find a loophole but still they did their best.
* Every single ''Creator/JohnHughes'' film. The adults are either oblivious (''Film/FerrisBuellersDayOff''), stupid (''Film/SixteenCandles''), or [[AbusiveParents causing]] [[ParentalNeglect all]] [[MyBelovedSmother the]] [[DeanBitterman problems]] (''Film/TheBreakfastClub'').



* Most of the adults in ''A Christmas Star'' either ignore Noelle's warnings about the CorruptCorporateExecutive trying to destroy their village or angrily rebuke her for trying to stop their town's main form of income being closed down or everyone in the village being made homeless! [[spoiler: Although when the villain's boss finds out what his employee has been doing (mainly, trying to demolish the village to create an amusement park instead of developing in the local area) he fires the man instantly.]]
* ''Film/TheGoodSon'' has Elijah Wood's character trying to tell the adults what a monster his cousin is, but nobody believes him.
* [[TheFamilyForTheWholeFamily The Fratellis]] in ''Film/TheGoonies'' suffer this from time to time in their confrontations with the Goonies. They seem to be able to handle the cops (and Feds) just fine, but they can't quite handle a bunch of teenagers.



* Every single Creator/JohnHughes film. The adults are either oblivious (''Film/FerrisBuellersDayOff''), stupid (''Film/SixteenCandles''), or [[AbusiveParents causing]] [[ParentalNeglect all]] [[MyBelovedSmother the]] [[DeanBitterman problems]] (''Film/TheBreakfastClub'').



* This was subverted in ''Film/TheKarateKid2010''. Mr Han trained Dre for the tournament. Dre's mother supported him and would have [[MamaBear beat the snot]] out of the kids who messed with her son, if she knew who they were. And the school principal sent both Dre and Cheng out after Cheng purposely tripped Dre, not favoring one side over the other. And she kept an eye out for Dre on the school trip, indirectly preventing Cheng from bullying him. The original plays it straight and subverts it. On one hand, Mr. Miyagi is there to stop the fighting between Daniel and Johnny. On the other hand, the kids' parents do nothing at all to prevent the fights. Daniel's mom provides moral support for her son, but doesn't do much. Ali's parents shrug off the fighting like it is nothing. Johnny's parents don't even appear in the film.
* Part of the charm of ''Film/TheLittleRascals'' film series was that the kids would regularly (and unintentionally) teach the adults a lesson.
* ''Film/TheLostBoys'' has a group of 12-year-old vampire hunters attempting (and at one point succeeding) to kill the group of teenage vampires. In fact all the main characters are younger than 20 with the adults being unaware until the big reveal at the end where one character displays he knew what was going on all along. Even then, he doesn't know everything that was going on, although he immediately knows that his house has just been destroyed in a vampire attack. That his daughter was dating a master vampire appears to have been completely unknown to him.



* ''Franchise/ANightmareOnElmStreet'':
** The first ''Film/ANightmareOnElmStreet1984''. Nancy's mother helped start the whole thing, her father doesn't do anything and the rest of the police only hinder her or ignore her frantic cries for help.
** The sequels more or less follow suit, but there's a bizarre subversion in ''Film/FreddyVsJason''. It turns out that [[ClapYourHandsIfYouBelieve the more people are aware and afraid of Freddy (these two usually go hand by hand) the more powerful he becomes]]. Hence when the adults really got down to it they effectively eliminated the threat by erasing all written notions of Freddy, banning his name or any details from mentioning and submitting those kids who still remembered about him to a dream-depriving drug treatment. He did eventually find a loophole but still they did their best.
* ''Film/TheNightOfTheHunter'': Rachel Cooper, the foster mother who takes in the Harper children, is the only adult in the film who is immune to [[ManipulativeBastard Harry Powell's]] charms. Uncle Birdie does put in an effort, but after [[spoiler: he discovers the mother's body he apparently doesn't report it because as the town eccentric/drunk he fears people will blame him]].
* In the Hallmark Channel made-for-TV movie ''The Santa Incident'', Santa has to rely on the help of a couple of kids. Most of the other adults are Homeland Security goons who mistake him for a terrorist.



* ''Film/TheGoodSon'' has Elijah Wood's character trying to tell the adults what a monster his cousin is, but nobody believes him.
* [[TheFamilyForTheWholeFamily The Fratellis]] in ''Film/TheGoonies'' suffer this from time to time in their confrontations with the Goonies. They seem to be able to handle the cops (and Feds) just fine, but they can't quite handle a bunch of teenagers.
* Part of the charm of ''Film/TheLittleRascals'' film series was that the kids would regularly (and unintentionally) teach the adults a lesson.
* This was subverted in ''Film/TheKarateKid2010''. Mr Han trained Dre for the tournament. Dre's mother supported him and would have [[MamaBear beat the snot]] out of the kids who messed with her son, if she knew who they were. And the school principal sent both Dre and Cheng out after Cheng purposely tripped Dre, not favoring one side over the other. And she kept an eye out for Dre on the school trip, indirectly preventing Cheng from bullying him. The original plays it straight and subverts it. On one hand, Mr. Miyagi is there to stop the fighting between Daniel and Johnny. On the other hand, the kids' parents do nothing at all to prevent the fights. Daniel's mom provides moral support for her son, but doesn't do much. Ali's parents shrug off the fighting like it is nothing. Johnny's parents don't even appear in the film.
* ''Film/TheLostBoys'' has a group of 12-year-old vampire hunters attempting (and at one point succeeding) to kill the group of teenage vampires. In fact all the main characters are younger than 20 with the adults being unaware until the big reveal at the end where one character displays he knew what was going on all along. Even then, he doesn't know everything that was going on, although he immediately knows that his house has just been destroyed in a vampire attack. That his daughter was dating a master vampire appears to have been completely unknown to him.
* ''Film/TheNightOfTheHunter'': Rachel Cooper, the foster mother who takes in the Harper children, is the only adult in the film who is immune to [[ManipulativeBastard Harry Powell's]] charms. Uncle Birdie does put in an effort, but after [[spoiler: he discovers the mother's body he apparently doesn't report it because as the town eccentric/drunk he fears people will blame him]].
* In the Hallmark Channel made-for-TV movie ''The Santa Incident'', Santa has to rely on the help of a couple of kids. Most of the other adults are Homeland Security goons who mistake him for a terrorist.



* This was probably the single worst thing about the 2004 ''Film/{{Thunderbirds}}'' movie, which shoved most of International Rescue out of the way to leave the plot to the KidAppealCharacter Alan Tracy, Brains' [[GenerationXerox son]], and Tin Tin (all of whom are pre-teens). Yeeah.



* In the first ''Film/{{Transformers}}'' movie, much of the first tier of authority that Sam Witwicky encounters regarding the title being is best summed up by his disbelieving question of a police officer, "Are you on drugs?!" This only applies to the ''civilian'' adults. Those involved in the military usually perform rather well considering the circumstances, even if it's not always the best actions to take.
* In ''Film/WarGames'', two teenagers are the only people who seem to be willing and able to avert nuclear holocaust, while parents, four-star generals and nuclear scientists act befuddled or indifferent.



* This was probably the single worst thing about the 2004 ''Film/{{Thunderbirds}}'' movie, which shoved most of International Rescue out of the way to leave the plot to the KidAppealCharacter Alan Tracy, Brains' [[GenerationXerox son]], and Tin Tin (all of whom are pre-teens). Yeeah.
* In the first ''Film/{{Transformers}}'' movie, much of the first tier of authority that Sam Witwicky encounters regarding the title being is best summed up by his disbelieving question of a police officer, "Are you on drugs?!" This only applies to the ''civilian'' adults. Those involved in the military usually perform rather well considering the circumstances, even if it's not always the best actions to take.
* In ''Film/WarGames'', two teenagers are the only people who seem to be willing and able to avert nuclear holocaust, while parents, four-star generals and nuclear scientists act befuddled or indifferent.
* In Film/WhatWeDidOnOurHoliday the children end up honouring their granddad's wishes and [[spoiler: giving him a Viking funeral after he dies on the beach]] because the adults are too busy getting ready for a party and arguing for them to be able to tell them what has happened.
* Most of the adults in ''A Christmas Star'' either ignore Noelle's warnings about the CorruptCorporateExecutive trying to destroy their village or angrily rebuke her for trying to stop their town's main form of income being closed down or everyone in the village being made homeless! [[spoiler: Although when the villain's boss finds out what his employee has been doing (mainly, trying to demolish the village to create an amusement park instead of developing in the local area) he fires the man instantly.]]
* Miss Gulch in ''TheWizardofOz'' practically controls half the county even forcing Aunt Em and Uncle Henry to surrender Toto. In the Land of Oz Dorothy looks to many adult figures to solve her problems such as Glinda and the wizard, but the wizard is powerless. However Dorothy discovers the power to return home was inside of her and didn't need help from either Glinda or the wizard.

to:

* This was probably the single worst thing about the 2004 ''Film/{{Thunderbirds}}'' movie, which shoved most of International Rescue out of the way to leave the plot to the KidAppealCharacter Alan Tracy, Brains' [[GenerationXerox son]], and Tin Tin (all of whom are pre-teens). Yeeah.
* In the first ''Film/{{Transformers}}'' movie, much of the first tier of authority that Sam Witwicky encounters regarding the title being is best summed up by his disbelieving question of a police officer, "Are you on drugs?!" This only applies to the ''civilian'' adults. Those involved in the military usually perform rather well considering the circumstances, even if it's not always the best actions to take.
* In ''Film/WarGames'', two teenagers are the only people who seem to be willing and able to avert nuclear holocaust, while parents, four-star generals and nuclear scientists act befuddled or indifferent.
* In Film/WhatWeDidOnOurHoliday
''Film/WhatWeDidOnOurHoliday'' the children end up honouring their granddad's wishes and [[spoiler: giving him a Viking funeral after he dies on the beach]] because the adults are too busy getting ready for a party and arguing for them to be able to tell them what has happened.
* Most of the adults in ''A Christmas Star'' either ignore Noelle's warnings about the CorruptCorporateExecutive trying to destroy their village or angrily rebuke her for trying to stop their town's main form of income being closed down or everyone in the village being made homeless! [[spoiler: Although when the villain's boss finds out what his employee has been doing (mainly, trying to demolish the village to create an amusement park instead of developing in the local area) he fires the man instantly.]]
*
Miss Gulch in ''TheWizardofOz'' ''Film/TheWizardOfOz'' practically controls half the county even forcing Aunt Em and Uncle Henry to surrender Toto. In the Land of Oz Dorothy looks to many adult figures to solve her problems such as Glinda and the wizard, but the wizard is powerless. However Dorothy discovers the power to return home was inside of her and didn't need help from either Glinda or the wizard.



* With the exception of the Snicket siblings, nearly every adult in ''Literature/ASeriesOfUnfortunateEvents'' is outrageously stupid, and often cruel. Even the adults who genuinely want to help the Baudelaires fail them at a crucial moment due to their fears or strange philosophy.
** (This is referenced, at least, in ''Lemony Snicket -- The Unauthorized Autobiography'', in which it is revealed that the supposedly volunteer organization V.F.D. kidnaps small children to join its ranks.)
** "Mr. Poe meant well, but a jar of mustard probably also means well and would do a better job of keeping the Baudelaires out of danger."
** The adults in Snicket's prequel series ''Literature/AllTheWrongQuestions'' are just as stupid, or evil, or in some cases out of commission, leaving their children to run several businesses in their stead. At one point all the kids agree that their parents have given up on trying to make the town a better place, and it's up to them to fix everything.

to:

* With ''Literature/TheBabySittersClub'':
** Played straight and averted in
the exception books. Some of the Snicket siblings, nearly every adult in ''Literature/ASeriesOfUnfortunateEvents'' is outrageously stupid, parents, particularly those of the sitters themselves, are intelligent, reasonable, helpful people. Others are well-meaning but a bit clueless, and often cruel. Even have to be given insight into their children's fears and wants by the adults sitters because they don't pick up on them otherwise. Possibly the straightest example of the trope are Jessi's parents, who genuinely thought it was perfectly acceptable to leave their 11-year-old daughter in charge of her 8-year-old sister and 2-year-old brother for ''a weekend''.
** Mrs. Arnold not realising that her identical twin daughters are acting out because they're sick of being treated like they're one person.
** Mrs. Addison failing to realize that her kids
want to help the Baudelaires fail them at a crucial moment due to their fears or strange philosophy.
** (This is referenced, at least, in ''Lemony Snicket -- The Unauthorized Autobiography'', in which it is revealed that the supposedly volunteer organization V.F.D. kidnaps small children to join its ranks.)
** "Mr. Poe meant well, but a jar of mustard probably also means well and would do a better job of keeping the Baudelaires out of danger."
** The adults in Snicket's prequel series ''Literature/AllTheWrongQuestions'' are just as stupid, or evil, or in
spend some cases out time with her instead of commission, leaving their children to run several businesses in their stead. At one point being dumped on sitters all the kids agree that their parents have given up on trying to make time.
** Mrs. Barrett, when she's first introduced, is in
the town middle of an unpleasant divorce; as a better place, result she is highly disorganized and it's up does things like neglecting to them leave the sitters with contact information and even forgetting to fix everything.inform Dawn of one kid's allergies.
** In a later book, Mrs. Prezzioso not noticing her older daughter's obsessive finicky behavior and then acting out, as she was too distracted by becoming a pageant mom for her younger daughter.



* Zigzagged in ''Literature/TheCandyShopWar''. The kids parents are completely unhelpful [[spoiler: thanks to mind-controlling white fudge]]. The other adults, however, do manage to help the kids.



* Literature/EmilyTheStrangeTheLostDays: a thirteen-year-old girl who has amnesia is alone in a small town and lives in a refrigerator box behind a diner. Why should anyone care?

to:

* Literature/EmilyTheStrangeTheLostDays: ''Literature/{{Eludoran}}'': No one over the age of 14 seems capable of making important decisions or getting anything done. Somewhat TruthInFiction since the adults tend to become mired in larger issues of state security and politics. It takes a year-long absence of his daughter before Arulaine even starts to take matters seriously, and even more time to spur himself to do something about it. Then again, he WAS battling depression at the time, so that might be an explanation.
* ''Literature/EmilyTheStrangeTheLostDays'':
a thirteen-year-old girl who has amnesia is alone in a small town and lives in a refrigerator box behind a diner. Why should anyone care?



* The Literature/GreenSkyTrilogy has a lot of this. Raamo and his friends (considered young adults at 13) are members of a caste that actually shuts out family, so after meeting Raamo's parents in some detail at the beginning of Book One, they drop out of sight except for rare glimpses. Neither they nor Teera's parents are important to the plot. They cannot be confided in or help with the vastly important goings-on. On the other hand, the elderly priestess D'ol Falla is a central figure, and Genaa's dad contributes to Book Three.



* The ''Literature/GreenSkyTrilogy'' has a lot of this. Raamo and his friends (considered young adults at 13) are members of a caste that actually shuts out family, so after meeting Raamo's parents in some detail at the beginning of Book One, they drop out of sight except for rare glimpses. Neither they nor Teera's parents are important to the plot. They cannot be confided in or help with the vastly important goings-on. On the other hand, the elderly priestess D'ol Falla is a central figure, and Genaa's dad contributes to Book Three.



* Creator/JaneAusten tended to have ineffectual parents and guardians in her books.
** ''Literature/MansfieldPark'' has manifestly useless parents. Lady Bertram is more interested in her dog than her children. Sir Thomas overcompensates with his sternness, and otherwise leaves their upbringing in the care of Mrs. Norris, who raises Maria and Julia with rampant favoritism. Fanny, the Bertrams' niece, never gets any positive notice except from her ''cousin'', who is only a couple of years older.
** In ''Literature/NorthangerAbbey'', Mrs. Allen fails to do her job when it comes to advising Catherine on etiquette. Enough so, in fact, that Catherine finally complains that she's being left dangerously to her own devices.
** In ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice'', Elizabeth and Jane do a lot of futile work trying to improve their younger sisters. It never sticks because Mrs. Bennet spoils Lydia and neglects Kitty and Mary, and Mr. Bennet prefers to laugh at their antics rather than correct them. He, at least, finally admits his error after Lydia elopes.



* In ''Literature/SavingTheWorldAndOtherExtremeSports'', one of the characters starts a child uprising against adults. Naturally, there's no such thing as a web-faring adult to also support/argue the issues, and the adults really are responsible for it all. After all, ''every'' adult so far in the series is evil, no matter how long they spend being friendly to begin with, except Valencia Martinez, who is fairly useful and kind. [[note]]Although admittedly, [[spoiler:she did apparently allow her daughter to be made into an avian-human hybrid, but she does say that she was locked out of the project against her will. Possibly if she hadn't been, things might have turned out a little better]])[[/note]]
* Creator/JaneAusten tended to have ineffectual parents and guardians in her books.
** In ''Literature/NorthangerAbbey'', Mrs. Allen fails to do her job when it comes to advising Catherine on etiquette. Enough so, in fact, that Catherine finally complains that she's being left dangerously to her own devices.
** In ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice'', Elizabeth and Jane do a lot of futile work trying to improve their younger sisters. It never sticks because Mrs. Bennet spoils Lydia and neglects Kitty and Mary, and Mr. Bennet prefers to laugh at their antics rather than correct them. He, at least, finally admits his error after Lydia elopes.
** ''Literature/MansfieldPark'' has manifestly useless parents. Lady Bertram is more interested in her dog than her children. Sir Thomas overcompensates with his sternness, and otherwise leaves their upbringing in the care of Mrs. Norris, who raises Maria and Julia with rampant favoritism. Fanny, the Bertrams' niece, never gets any positive notice except from her ''cousin'', who is only a couple of years older.

to:

* In ''Literature/SavingTheWorldAndOtherExtremeSports'', one ''Literature/TheMortalInstruments'':
** Every single higher-up is at a Clave meeting. ''All
of them.'' While Jace's group of inexperienced youths are pursuing the characters starts a child uprising against adults. Naturally, there's no such thing as a web-faring adult Mortal Instruments, the maniacal Valentine, and attempting to stop TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt. Anyone who isn't is either insane with power, revenge, or a spy.
** Subverted with Magnus Bane. Physically he looks to be about nineteen, slightly older than the protagonists. But he is actually centuries old and thus technically more of an "adult" than even the oldest Shadowhunters. He is
also support/argue the issues, incredibly useful.
* Played with in ''Literature/TheMysteriousBenedictSociety''. Rhonda, Mr. Benedict, Milligan,
and the Number Two are actually quite useful however being adults really are responsible for it all. After all, ''every'' adult so far in the series is evil, no matter how long they spend being friendly are unable to begin with, except Valencia Martinez, who is fairly useful and kind. [[note]]Although admittedly, [[spoiler:she did apparently allow her daughter to be made into an avian-human hybrid, but she does say that she was locked out of the project against her will. Possibly if she hadn't been, do certain things might to prevent the Emergency. They have turned out a little better]])[[/note]]
* Creator/JaneAusten tended
to have ineffectual parents and guardians in her books.
** In ''Literature/NorthangerAbbey'', Mrs. Allen fails
get a gang of children to do her job when it comes to advising Catherine on etiquette. Enough so, in fact, that Catherine finally complains that she's being left dangerously to her own devices.
** In ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice'', Elizabeth and Jane do a lot of futile work trying to improve their younger sisters. It never sticks
which makes them ''feel'' useless because Mrs. Bennet spoils Lydia and neglects Kitty and Mary, and Mr. Bennet prefers to laugh at their antics rather than correct them. He, at least, finally admits his error after Lydia elopes.
** ''Literature/MansfieldPark'' has manifestly useless parents. Lady Bertram is more interested in her dog than her children. Sir Thomas overcompensates with his sternness, and otherwise leaves their upbringing in
they're stuck on an island while the care of Mrs. Norris, who raises Maria and Julia with rampant favoritism. Fanny, the Bertrams' niece, never gets any positive notice except from her ''cousin'', who is only kids are out undergoing a couple of years older.dangerous spy mission.



* In ''[[Literature/RachelGriffin The Unexpected Enlightenment of Rachel Griffin]]'', the teachers of the AcademyOfAdventure are good at helping deal with bullies, but not with invisible vampire-wraiths after curfew. [[spoiler: And at least one of them is evil.]] Summed up in this quote from one senior student:
--> "Someone please fetch one of the ''competent'' tutors."
* ''RoomOne'' by AndrewClements (author of ''Frindle'') zigzags and plays with this. The hero reads mysteries, and when he encounters one, decides not to tell adults because in all the books he has read, they are useless or obstructive.

to:

* In ''[[Literature/RachelGriffin The Unexpected Enlightenment of Rachel Griffin]]'', Generally averted in ''Literature/ThePosterChildren''. When informed, the teachers adults insist on helping; especially, when a pair of students are [[spoiler:savagely beaten and one almost drowned during a test out of campus]], the AcademyOfAdventure are good at helping deal with bullies, Sheriff is incredibly frustrated that such a thing was able to happen and wanting to find the perpetrators but not with invisible vampire-wraiths after curfew. [[spoiler: And at least one of them is evil.]] Summed up in this quote from one senior student:
--> "Someone please fetch one of the ''competent'' tutors."
being unable to.
* ''RoomOne'' ''Room One'' by AndrewClements Andrew Clements (author of ''Frindle'') ''Literature/{{Frindle}}'') zigzags and plays with this. The hero reads mysteries, and when he encounters one, decides not to tell adults because in all the books he has read, they are useless or obstructive.obstructive.
* In ''Literature/SavingTheWorldAndOtherExtremeSports'', one of the characters starts a child uprising against adults. Naturally, there's no such thing as a web-faring adult to also support/argue the issues, and the adults really are responsible for it all. After all, ''every'' adult so far in the series is evil, no matter how long they spend being friendly to begin with, except Valencia Martinez, who is fairly useful and kind. [[note]]Although admittedly, [[spoiler:she did apparently allow her daughter to be made into an avian-human hybrid, but she does say that she was locked out of the project against her will. Possibly if she hadn't been, things might have turned out a little better]])[[/note]]



* With the exception of the Snicket siblings, nearly every adult in ''Literature/ASeriesOfUnfortunateEvents'' is outrageously stupid, and often cruel. Even the adults who genuinely want to help the Baudelaires fail them at a crucial moment due to their fears or strange philosophy.
** (This is referenced, at least, in ''Lemony Snicket -- The Unauthorized Autobiography'', in which it is revealed that the supposedly volunteer organization V.F.D. kidnaps small children to join its ranks.)
** "Mr. Poe meant well, but a jar of mustard probably also means well and would do a better job of keeping the Baudelaires out of danger."
** The adults in Snicket's prequel series ''Literature/AllTheWrongQuestions'' are just as stupid, or evil, or in some cases out of commission, leaving their children to run several businesses in their stead. At one point all the kids agree that their parents have given up on trying to make the town a better place, and it's up to them to fix everything.



* ''Literature/TheBabySittersClub'':
** Played straight and averted in the books. Some of the parents, particularly those of the sitters themselves, are intelligent, reasonable, helpful people. Others are well-meaning but a bit clueless, and have to be given insight into their children's fears and wants by the sitters because they don't pick up on them otherwise. Possibly the straightest example of the trope are Jessi's parents, who thought it was perfectly acceptable to leave their 11-year-old daughter in charge of her 8-year-old sister and 2-year-old brother for ''a weekend''.
** Mrs. Arnold not realising that her identical twin daughters are acting out because they're sick of being treated like they're one person.
** Mrs. Addison failing to realize that her kids want to spend some time with her instead of being dumped on sitters all the time.
** Mrs. Barrett, when she's first introduced, is in the middle of an unpleasant divorce; as a result she is highly disorganized and does things like neglecting to leave the sitters with contact information and even forgetting to inform Dawn of one kid's allergies.
** In a later book, Mrs. Prezzioso not noticing her older daughter's obsessive finicky behavior and then acting out, as she was too distracted by becoming a pageant mom for her younger daughter.
* Zigzagged in ''Literature/TheCandyShopWar''. The kids parents are completely unhelpful [[spoiler: thanks to mind-controlling white fudge]]. The other adults, however, do manage to help the kids.
* ''Literature/TheMortalInstruments'':
** Every single higher-up is at a Clave meeting. ''All of them.'' While Jace's group of inexperienced youths are pursuing the Mortal Instruments, the maniacal Valentine, and attempting to stop TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt. Anyone who isn't is either insane with power, revenge, or a spy.
** Subverted with Magnus Bane. Physically he looks to be about nineteen, slightly older than the protagonists. But he is actually centuries old and thus technically more of an "adult" than even the oldest Shadowhunters. He is also incredibly useful.
* Generally averted in ''Literature/ThePosterChildren''. When informed, the adults insist on helping; especially, when a pair of students are [[spoiler:savagely beaten and one almost drowned during a test out of campus]], the Sheriff is incredibly frustrated that such a thing was able to happen and wanting to find the perpetrators but being unable to.



* The ''Literature/TrixieBelden'' series is full of this. The main characters are teenagers who solve mysteries that the adults cannot.



* The ''Literature/TrixieBelden'' series is full of this. The main characters are teenagers who solve mysteries that the adults cannot.
* This is the lesson Coira learns very young in ''Literature/WhiteAsSnow''; her parents don't remember she exists, her nurse resents having to take care of her, and her nurse's replacement fails to give her what she really needs. Coira ends up practically raising herself and talks to none of them.

to:

* In ''[[Literature/RachelGriffin The ''Literature/TrixieBelden'' series is full Unexpected Enlightenment of this. The main characters Rachel Griffin]]'', the teachers of the AcademyOfAdventure are teenagers who solve mysteries that good at helping deal with bullies, but not with invisible vampire-wraiths after curfew. [[spoiler: And at least one of them is evil.]] Summed up in this quote from one senior student:
--> "Someone please fetch one of
the adults cannot.
* This is the lesson Coira learns very young in ''Literature/WhiteAsSnow''; her parents don't remember she exists, her nurse resents having to take care of her, and her nurse's replacement fails to give her what she really needs. Coira ends up practically raising herself and talks to none of them.
''competent'' tutors."



* Literature/{{Eludoran}}: No one over the age of 14 seems capable of making important decisions or getting anything done. Somewhat TruthInFiction since the adults tend to become mired in larger issues of state security and politics. It takes a year-long absence of his daughter before Arulaine even starts to take matters seriously, and even more time to spur himself to do something about it. Then again, he WAS battling depression at the time, so that might be an explanation.
* Played with in ''Literature/TheMysteriousBenedictSociety''. Rhonda, Mr. Benedict, Milligan, and Number Two are actually quite useful however being adults they are unable to do certain things to prevent the Emergency. They have to get a gang of children to do so, which makes them ''feel'' useless because they're stuck on an island while the kids are out undergoing a dangerous spy mission.

to:

* Literature/{{Eludoran}}: No one over This is the age of 14 seems capable of making important decisions or getting anything done. Somewhat TruthInFiction since the adults tend to become mired lesson Coira learns very young in larger issues of state security and politics. It takes a year-long absence of his daughter before Arulaine even starts ''Literature/WhiteAsSnow''; her parents don't remember she exists, her nurse resents having to take matters seriously, care of her, and even more time her nurse's replacement fails to spur himself to do something about it. Then again, he WAS battling depression at the time, so that might be an explanation.
* Played with in ''Literature/TheMysteriousBenedictSociety''. Rhonda, Mr. Benedict, Milligan,
give her what she really needs. Coira ends up practically raising herself and Number Two are actually quite useful however being adults they are unable talks to do certain things to prevent the Emergency. They have to get a gang none of children to do so, which makes them ''feel'' useless because they're stuck on an island while the kids are out undergoing a dangerous spy mission.them.



* In ''Series/ThreeTwoOneContact'''s "The Bloodhound Gang" segments, the adults who are the targets of con artists are typically complete idiots to the point where one easy mark has ''his own child'' have control of his own finances.



* In ''Series/TheFactsOfLife'', the only adult who serves a purpose is Mrs. Garrett, the school's nutritionist.



* Based on the end of the ''Series/HenryDanger'' episode, "Jasper's Real Girlfriend," how could Charlotte's parents not have heard the commotion [[spoiler: involving their guest attacking their daughter with a mini chainsaw]] in Charlotte's room?



* ''Series/IncredibleCrew'' plays this trope for laughs in the "Cola Thief" sketch, where a teacher keeps her class after school because someone stole and drank nearly ''sixty'' sodas from her cabinet and won't let anyone leave until the thief confesses. One of the students points out that a boy named Wyatt, who's very plainly going out of his mind from a sugar rush, probably did it. The teacher just says they can't accuse someone without proof.



* In ''Series/TheFactsOfLife'', the only adult who serves a purpose is Mrs. Garrett, the school's nutritionist.

to:

* In ''Series/TheFactsOfLife'', the only adult who serves a purpose is Mrs. Garrett, the school's nutritionist. On ''Series/TheTroop'', when someone turns 18, they lose their courage and can no longer fight monsters.



* In ''Series/ThreeTwoOneContact'''s "The Bloodhound Gang" segments, the adults who are the targets of con artists are typically complete idiots to the point where one easy mark has ''his own child'' have control of his own finances.



* On ''Series/TheTroop'', when someone turns 18, they lose their courage and can no longer fight monsters.
* ''Series/IncredibleCrew'' plays this trope for laughs in the "Cola Thief" sketch, where a teacher keeps her class after school because someone stole and drank nearly ''sixty'' sodas from her cabinet and won't let anyone leave until the thief confesses. One of the students points out that a boy named Wyatt, who's very plainly going out of his mind from a sugar rush, probably did it. The teacher just says they can't accuse someone without proof.
* Based on the end of the ''Series/HenryDanger'' episode, "Jasper's Real Girlfriend," how could Charlotte's parents not have heard the commotion [[spoiler: involving their guest attacking their daughter with a mini chainsaw]] in Charlotte's room?



* Played straight in ''TabletopGame/LittleFears'', which is all ''about'' children fighting against not-so-imaginary monsters that even the most well-intentioned adults just plain can't see or otherwise perceive as real. As player characters grow older, they become more and more competent in the general sense but increasingly lose the inner "magic" that comes with childhood, until around their fourteenth birthday (if nothing worse has befallen them before then) they too will forget about or dismiss their adventures and join the ranks of the ignorant soon-to-be-adults...
* In ''TabletopGame/MonstersAndOtherChildishThings'', adults are completely useless as only monsters can fight monsters... and only kids have monsters. Well, an adult can have a monster, but he's more likely to be a PsychopathicManchild than anything remotely helpful. The closest most adults get to useful is if your character has a [[LevelUpAtIntimacy5 Relationship]] with one, like their parents, which means they inspire the kid to do better.



* Played straight in ''TabletopGame/LittleFears'', which is all ''about'' children fighting against not-so-imaginary monsters that even the most well-intentioned adults just plain can't see or otherwise perceive as real. As player characters grow older, they become more and more competent in the general sense but increasingly lose the inner "magic" that comes with childhood, until around their fourteenth birthday (if nothing worse has befallen them before then) they too will forget about or dismiss their adventures and join the ranks of the ignorant soon-to-be-adults...
* In ''TabletopGame/MonstersAndOtherChildishThings'', adults are completely useless as only monsters can fight monsters... and only kids have monsters. Well, an adult can have a monster, but he's more likely to be a PsychopathicManchild than anything remotely helpful. The closest most adults get to useful is if your character has a [[LevelUpAtIntimacy5 Relationship]] with one, like their parents, which means they inspire the kid to do better.



* In the musical ''Theatre/{{Thirteen}}'', the only kid whose parents are mentioned is Evan, when his parents get divorced and when Archie guilts Evan's mom into buying tickets to the R- rated movie "The Bloodmaster."



* This is probably the fourth strongest theme in ''Theatre/SpringAwakening''. The first three being sex, sex and sex.



* In the musical ''Theatre/{{Thirteen}}'', the only kid whose parents are mentioned is Evan, when his parents get divorced and when Archie guilts Evan's mom into buying tickets to the R- rated movie "The Bloodmaster."
* This is probably the fourth strongest theme in ''Theatre/SpringAwakening''. The first three being sex, sex and sex.



* [[BrattyHalfPint Carl Clover]] of ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'' holds this a core belief. All adults are stupid, selfish and usually outright evil. [[FreudianExcuse He has a very good reason for thinking like this]], though. He has since loosen up, now considering that there's at least two honest-to-god decent and good adults, Bang and Litchi. The jury's still out about that adult and CampGay performer chasing him (Amane).
* ''VideoGame/{{Bully}}''. Surprisingly one of the most accurate portrayals of this trope. It's set in a school, one that's plagued by bullying. Even if the student body consists of [[ThrivingGhostTown about 70 people]], the adults and the four prefects seem to just stand there going, "Duuuuuuuuh" while Gary manipulates all the cliques into fighting with each other. Even if the prefects (and adults) ''do'' chase Jimmy and can be seen occasionally busting a student, it's obvious the prefects are power-hungry jerks who're oblivious to most of the stuff that goes on in the school, and so are the adults. (i.e., the nerds are able to construct ''potato gun turrets'' in the astronomy club building without alerting adults and it's implied they have no supervision, the jocks throw ''explosive-laden footballs'' at a student, the gym gets ''lit on fire'' and nobody calls the police unless you fail and nobody even ''mentions'' it afterwords.) It's safe to say even if the game has a realistic portrayal of how useless adults can be in a school setting; you can probably rest easily given that if this happened in real life, people WOULD call the police and the school would be closed in a year. (Mr. Burton ''especially'' would be fired for ''encouraging'' the bullying and [[spoiler: the implications that he ''sexually harassed Zoe''. Which he is anyway]].)
** It's shown that Dr. Crabblesnitch actually ''can'' be a ReasonableAuthorityFigure, too. He just didn't ''know'' what was going on until it was too late. This leads to a couple of the (realistic) interpretations where the adults aren't necessarily useless, they just seem that way because they're unaware. Chances are, Dr. Crabblesnitch would have stepped in sooner or later; but [[GameplayAndStorySegregation you can beat up as many prefects as you want, even his own secretary, and merely get detention]].
* ''[[VideoGame/{{TCT RPG}} The Colour Tuesday]]'' has the adults of the world at the mercy of being turned into puppets by the Others. Children aren't affected. Combines with CompetenceZone.
* Defied in ''VideoGame/Conception2ChildrenOfTheSevenStars''. Despite a divinely-enforced CompetenceZone meaning only teenagers can actually fight, it's made clear everyone knows that leaving them to actually coordinate the war effort would be an unmitigated disaster. Senior military ranks, positions of authority, mission coordinators and the R&D team are all comprised of highly-educated adults.



* Strongly featured in the ''VideoGame/TouchDetective'' series. The most competent ones often turn out to be psychopaths.
* Oddly inverted in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 2}}''. The high schoolers that star in ''Innocent Sin'' mess everything up, and the adults in ''Eternal Punishment'' have to fix things. Although Tatsuya ''does'' join in later on.
** Absent in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' which features adults in on the masquerade to some extent and try to help you outside of the main conflict region of the Midnight Hour, but can't do anything directly. Also, one of the first tier {{Big Bad}}s is an adult.
** Justified in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' where the conflict occurs in a region where the police have no access and the people who do are either indoctrinated into the masquerade or are former victims. This trope applies because they just couldn't know what's really going on. The police close the case when someone falsely admits to all of the murders; and, even late in the game when you are straightforward about your "extracurricular activities," Dojima-san doesn't believe you.
** The series does a complete inversion in ''VideoGame/StrangeJourney''. The playable character and his crew are all highly-trained military personnel.
** Also inverted in ''VideoGame/DigitalDevilSaga'', where with only two exceptions the cast are exceptionally skilled doctors (Heat), scientists (Serph and Gale), and nurses (Argilla).
* ''VideoGame/MegamanBattleNetwork'' is ''especially'' cruel - ''all'' of the adults are either just standing around, willing to netbattle instead of try to fix things, or nothing. The only competent adults are either involved with the WWW (Even Baryl & Colonel), Mr. Higsby, (For different reasons) or Lan's dad.
** Chaud lampshades this when he mentions that the official netbattlers are all off in la-la-land.
** The spiritual sequel series ''VideoGame/MegamanStarForce'' also uses this, but since there are only a handful of people around the world capable of wave changing, including the villains, all of whom have roughly the same amount of experience, there is no logical reason why a kid can't be the most naturally gifted member of that group.
* ''VideoGame/{{Bully}}''. Surprisingly one of the most accurate portrayals of this trope. It's set in a school, one that's plagued by bullying. Even if the student body consists of [[ThrivingGhostTown about 70 people]], the adults and the four prefects seem to just stand there going, "Duuuuuuuuh" while Gary manipulates all the cliques into fighting with each other. Even if the prefects (and adults) ''do'' chase Jimmy and can be seen occasionally busting a student, it's obvious the prefects are power-hungry jerks who're oblivious to most of the stuff that goes on in the school, and so are the adults. (i.e., the nerds are able to construct ''potato gun turrets'' in the astronomy club building without alerting adults and it's implied they have no supervision, the jocks throw ''explosive-laden footballs'' at a student, the gym gets ''lit on fire'' and nobody calls the police unless you fail and nobody even ''mentions'' it afterwords.) It's safe to say even if the game has a realistic portrayal of how useless adults can be in a school setting; you can probably rest easily given that if this happened in real life, people WOULD call the police and the school would be closed in a year. (Mr. Burton ''especially'' would be fired for ''encouraging'' the bullying and [[spoiler: the implications that he ''sexually harassed Zoe''. Which he is anyway]].)
** It's shown that Dr. Crabblesnitch actually ''can'' be a ReasonableAuthorityFigure, too. He just didn't ''know'' what was going on until it was too late. This leads to a couple of the (realistic) interpretations where the adults aren't necessarily useless, they just seem that way because they're unaware. Chances are, Dr. Crabblesnitch would have stepped in sooner or later; but [[GameplayAndStorySegregation you can beat up as many prefects as you want, even his own secretary, and merely get detention]].
* There are whole two adults in the Rose Garden Orphanage in ''VideoGame/RuleOfRose'', and the one with actual authority is a problem, not a helper, with his implied sexual abuse of the teenaged residents, and while the cleaning lady is more observant, it doesn't matter since the PoliceAreUseless and won't listen to her, and she gets murdered for her troubles.
* [[VideoGame/{{TCT RPG}} The Colour Tuesday]] has the adults of the world at the mercy of being turned into puppets by the Others. Children aren't affected. Combines with CompetenceZone.



* [[BrattyHalfPint Carl Clover]] of ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'' holds this a core belief. All adults are stupid, selfish and usually outright evil. [[FreudianExcuse He has a very good reason for thinking like this]], though. He has since loosen up, now considering that there's at least two honest-to-god decent and good adults, Bang and Litchi. The jury's still out about that adult and CampGay performer chasing him (Amane).



* Defied in ''VideoGame/Conception2ChildrenOfTheSevenStars''. Despite a divinely-enforced CompetenceZone meaning only teenagers can actually fight, it's made clear everyone knows that leaving them to actually coordinate the war effort would be an unmitigated disaster. Senior military ranks, positions of authority, mission coordinators and the R&D team are all comprised of highly-educated adults.
* ''Sir Basil Pike Public School'', a ZapDramatic game about bullying, has the uselessness of adults as one of its central themes. There's no situation in the entire game where actually going to an adult for help will get you anything but a headache. At best, he'll tell you that it was a good idea, but he doesn't have time to listen to your crap right now and you should solve your own problems, at worst, he'll babble a warped version of the JudgmentOfSolomon that has no answer.
* ''VideoGame/YandereSimulator'' [[ZigZaggingTrope zig-zags]] this. If a teacher is called to a murder scene by a student, but Yandere-chan has successfully cleaned up after herself, she will assume it was a prank, scold the student and leave. Similarly, [[PoliceAreUseless the police]] won't conduct further investigation if multiple calls come from the school in a short space of time [[spoiler: thanks to the Headmaster bribing them to stay away from the school after his reputation was nearly ruined by a murder years ago]]. Otherwise, the police can quickly pick up on any evidence Yandere-chan leaves lying around and arrest her. And if the teachers know that you committed a crime, then [[BadassTeacher they WILL]] [[GameOver apprehend you]].
* ''Videogame/{{Psychonauts}}'': Pretty much every adult at Whispering Rock will be of little direct help once the serious trouble starts. Agents Nein and Vodelo get sent away on some unrelated mission, Coach Oleander [[spoiler:is a villain]], and Agent Cruller can't leave his HQ [[spoiler:because his mind is too fractured and keeps devolving into the custodial staff roles he has all over the camp if he tries to leave]]. Although Cruller does play a decent MissionCommand, providing useful tactics and advice. After freeing Fred Bonaparte (who's actually an orderly) from his psychological issues, Raz assumes he'll help get rid of Crispin (who's actually an inmate) and avoiding the need for a disguise. Fred decides to take a ''nap'' instead. (After you've gotten past Crispin, Fred will show up and chase him away. At least this means you'll be able to use the elevator again without a disguise.)



* ''VideoGame/MegamanBattleNetwork'' is ''especially'' cruel - ''all'' of the adults are either just standing around, willing to netbattle instead of try to fix things, or nothing. The only competent adults are either involved with the WWW (Even Baryl & Colonel), Mr. Higsby, (For different reasons) or Lan's dad.
** Chaud lampshades this when he mentions that the official netbattlers are all off in la-la-land.
** The spiritual sequel series ''VideoGame/MegamanStarForce'' also uses this, but since there are only a handful of people around the world capable of wave changing, including the villains, all of whom have roughly the same amount of experience, there is no logical reason why a kid can't be the most naturally gifted member of that group.
* Oddly inverted in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 2}}''. The high schoolers that star in ''Innocent Sin'' mess everything up, and the adults in ''Eternal Punishment'' have to fix things. Although Tatsuya ''does'' join in later on.
** Absent in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' which features adults in on the masquerade to some extent and try to help you outside of the main conflict region of the Midnight Hour, but can't do anything directly. Also, one of the first tier {{Big Bad}}s is an adult.
** Justified in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' where the conflict occurs in a region where the police have no access and the people who do are either indoctrinated into the masquerade or are former victims. This trope applies because they just couldn't know what's really going on. The police close the case when someone falsely admits to all of the murders; and, even late in the game when you are straightforward about your "extracurricular activities," Dojima-san doesn't believe you.
** The series does a complete inversion in ''VideoGame/StrangeJourney''. The playable character and his crew are all highly-trained military personnel.
** Also inverted in ''VideoGame/DigitalDevilSaga'', where with only two exceptions the cast are exceptionally skilled doctors (Heat), scientists (Serph and Gale), and nurses (Argilla).
* ''Videogame/{{Psychonauts}}'': Pretty much every adult at Whispering Rock will be of little direct help once the serious trouble starts. Agents Nein and Vodelo get sent away on some unrelated mission, Coach Oleander [[spoiler:is a villain]], and Agent Cruller can't leave his HQ [[spoiler:because his mind is too fractured and keeps devolving into the custodial staff roles he has all over the camp if he tries to leave]]. Although Cruller does play a decent MissionControl, providing useful tactics and advice. After freeing Fred Bonaparte (who's actually an orderly) from his psychological issues, Raz assumes he'll help get rid of Crispin (who's actually an inmate) and avoiding the need for a disguise. Fred decides to take a ''nap'' instead. (After you've gotten past Crispin, Fred will show up and chase him away. At least this means you'll be able to use the elevator again without a disguise.)
* There are whole two adults in the Rose Garden Orphanage in ''VideoGame/RuleOfRose'', and the one with actual authority is a problem, not a helper, with his implied sexual abuse of the teenaged residents, and while the cleaning lady is more observant, it doesn't matter since the PoliceAreUseless and won't listen to her, and she gets murdered for her troubles.
* ''[[Creator/ZapDramatic Sir Basil Pike Public School]]'', a game about bullying, has the uselessness of adults as one of its central themes. There's no situation in the entire game where actually going to an adult for help will get you anything but a headache. At best, he'll tell you that it was a good idea, but he doesn't have time to listen to your crap right now and you should solve your own problems, at worst, he'll babble a warped version of the JudgmentOfSolomon that has no answer.
* Strongly featured in the ''VideoGame/TouchDetective'' series. The most competent ones often turn out to be psychopaths.
* ''VideoGame/YandereSimulator'' [[ZigZaggingTrope zig-zags]] this. If a teacher is called to a murder scene by a student, but Yandere-chan has successfully cleaned up after herself, she will assume it was a prank, scold the student and leave. Similarly, [[PoliceAreUseless the police]] won't conduct further investigation if multiple calls come from the school in a short space of time [[spoiler: thanks to the Headmaster bribing them to stay away from the school after his reputation was nearly ruined by a murder years ago]]. Otherwise, the police can quickly pick up on any evidence Yandere-chan leaves lying around and arrest her. And if the teachers know that you committed a crime, then [[BadassTeacher they WILL]] [[GameOver apprehend you]].



* Miho from ''VisualNovel/LiarLiar'' was being stalked by [[StalkerWithACrush Wakabayashi]] for a while. He sent her letters daily, called her house, and took pictures of her behind her back and left some on her desk. She feared for her life but the police couldn't do anything until he physically harrassed her and the adults at school didn't believe her. She decided to kill him, though she couldn't get herself to do it so she got [[VillainProtagonist Yukari]] to do it instead.



* Miho from ''VisualNovel/LiarLiar'' was being stalked by [[StalkerWithACrush Wakabayashi]] for a while. He sent her letters daily, called her house, and took pictures of her behind her back and left some on her desk. She feared for her life but the police couldn't do anything until he physically harrassed her and the adults at school didn't believe her. She decided to kill him, though she couldn't get herself to do it so she got [[VillainProtagonist Yukari]] to do it instead.



* ''Webcomic/BugMartini'': Instead they [[http://www.bugmartini.com/comics/gamblin-guardians/ gamble on your every move]].



* ''Webcomic/{{Dreamkeepers}}'': Mostly played straight as an arrow in Prelude, especially when Mace and Whip are the focus. Averted in the graphic novels, with several competent adults in the story.
** Although Mr. Nibbs plays it straight in the novels as well.



* In Webcomic/ShootAround, adults are useless because they're generally not GenreSavvy about the ZombieApocalypse setting.



* In Webcomic/ShootAround, adults are useless because they're generally not GenreSavvy about the ZombieApocalypse setting.
* ''Webcomic/BugMartini'': Instead they [[http://www.bugmartini.com/comics/gamblin-guardians/ gamble on your every move]].



* In ''Literature/{{KIKEN}}'', this is a DeconstructedTrope. That's because adults aren't ''entirely'' useless -- some want to change the world, but are trying to balance their careers (i.e. Emiri, Juuri, Yukari and Yamato) and some are too cynical or apathetic to even ''believe'' in a changing Earth (i.e. Takeo).



* In ''Literature/{{KIKEN}}'', this is a DeconstructedTrope. That's because adults aren't ''entirely'' useless -- some want to change the world, but are trying to balance their careers (i.e. Emiri, Juuri, Yukari and Yamato) and some are too cynical or apathetic to even ''believe'' in a changing Earth (i.e. Takeo).
* Taylor Hebert, protagonist of the {{superhero}} story ''Literature/{{Worm}}'', begins the story as a student at Winslow High and subject of [[PlayedForDrama an extended and vicious]] [[TheBully bullying campaign]]. Of all the teachers and administrators at the school, exactly one notices, exactly zero offer any meaningful assistance, and some are actively, willfully against her. It's tragically telling that when Taylor finally meets a genuine ReasonableAuthorityFigure, she suspects she's under some mental compulsion.


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* Taylor Hebert, protagonist of the {{superhero}} story ''Literature/{{Worm}}'', begins the story as a student at Winslow High and subject of [[PlayedForDrama an extended and vicious]] [[TheBully bullying campaign]]. Of all the teachers and administrators at the school, exactly one notices, exactly zero offer any meaningful assistance, and some are actively, willfully against her. It's tragically telling that when Taylor finally meets a genuine ReasonableAuthorityFigure, she suspects she's under some mental compulsion.
27th Mar '17 8:31:51 PM Golondrina
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** In "Failsafe", the entire team is defeated by the invading aliens without achieving any victory where the team was successful in running numerous offense action. [[spoiler: The entire point of the training exercise was to see how the team could cope after losing the league as support.]]



** In "Failsafe", the entire team is defeated by the invading aliens without achieving any victory where the team was successful in running numerous offense action. [[spoiler: The entire point of the training exercise was to see how the team could cope after losing the league as support.]]
27th Mar '17 8:30:52 PM Golondrina
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%% Image removed per Image Pickin' thread: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=1411225234089351400.
%% Please start a new thread if you wish to suggest a new image.



%% This list of examples has been alphabetized. Please add your example in the proper place. Thanks!
%%
%% Image removed per Image Pickin' thread: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=1411225234089351400.
%% Please start a new thread if you wish to suggest a new image.
%%



* Out of all the competent adult characters in ''Manga/SangatsuNoLion'', Hina's homeroom teacher is the one character to embody this trope, being unable and unwilling to interfere with the bullying going on in her classroom, despite being spoken to directly about it and knowing about the bullying for some time.



* ''BibleBlack'' is probably the ultimate example. The teens who the story focus on are having sex everywhere, sometimes non-consensual, sometimes with teachers, and the only adults who seem to be around are Takashiro, who becomes a victim of this, and Kitami, who eggs it on and participates in it.



* ''LightNovel/SwordArtOnline'', the games get jacked by the villains to make it giant battle royales. No adult outside the game's context is seen doing much to solve the problems. The government and medical people are only there to [[MrExposition give expositions]]. Good adults ingame are either [[ButtMonkey Butt Monkeys]] or minor characters. Parents are painted as negative. Other people are either mean, manipulative, or downright evil. At the end of the day, the lives of more than 10,000 people are saved by one or two teenagers who are really good at MMORPG.



* ''LightNovel/SwordArtOnline'', the games get jacked by the villains to make it giant battle royales. No adult outside the game's context is seen doing much to solve the problems. The government and medical people are only there to [[MrExposition give expositions]]. Good adults ingame are either [[ButtMonkey Butt Monkeys]] or minor characters. Parents are painted as negative. Other people are either mean, manipulative, or downright evil. At the end of the day, the lives of more than 10,000 people are saved by one or two teenagers who are really good at MMORPG.
* Out of all the competent adult characters in ''Manga/SangatsuNoLion'', Hina's homeroom teacher is the one character to embody this trope, being unable and unwilling to interfere with the bullying going on in her classroom, despite being spoken to directly about it and knowing about the bullying for some time.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'' on the other hand may be the biggest [[AvertedTrope aversion of this trope]] in WesternAnimation. Not only are the four main characters all older teens (18-19), and by Season 4 are all full adults, nearly all of their mentors and allies, most of them extremely capable fighters in their own right, are adults. In fact, the only actual Kid characters in the entire series are Tenzin's children, plus Kai in Season 3 and 4.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'' on the other hand may be the biggest [[AvertedTrope aversion of this trope]] in WesternAnimation. Not only are the four main characters all older teens (18-19), and by Season 4 are all full adults, nearly all of their mentors and allies, most of them extremely capable fighters in their own right, are adults. In fact, the only actual Kid characters in the entire series are Tenzin's children, plus Kai in Season 3 and 4.



* Somewhat the case in the 80's Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} cartoon ''Anime/TheMysteriousCitiesOfGold''. The three child protagonists repeatedly outsmart, escape, or defeat in combat entire groups of Spanish soldiers. Even in times where they had adult help, either the children were treated as leaders and guiders, or they ultimately ended up not being very helpful at all. Along the way they manage to solve several Incan mysteries the rest of the adults were incapable of figuring out.



* Somewhat the case in the 80's Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} cartoon ''Anime/TheMysteriousCitiesOfGold''. The three child protagonists repeatedly outsmart, escape, or defeat in combat entire groups of Spanish soldiers. Even in times where they had adult help, either the children were treated as leaders and guiders, or they ultimately ended up not being very helpful at all. Along the way they manage to solve several Incan mysteries the rest of the adults were incapable of figuring out.



[[/folder]]



[[/folder]]
26th Mar '17 3:28:37 PM IdeaMaster
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* On ''WesternAnimation/ChalkZone'', this applies to most of the adults in the series- they're either villains (Vinnie Ratton, Terry Bouffant, Mrs. Tweaser), [[{{Jerkass}} jerkasses]] (Mr. Wilter), or completely oblivious (Joe and Millie Tabootie).

to:

* On ''WesternAnimation/ChalkZone'', this applies to most of the adults in the series- they're either villains (Vinnie Ratton, Terry Bouffant, Mrs. Tweaser), [[{{Jerkass}} jerkasses]] (Mr. Wilter), or completely oblivious (Joe and Millie Tabootie).Tabootie and Principal Stringet).
22nd Mar '17 2:10:39 AM Khrunwahl02
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* ''Film/BadMoms'': Applies to the protagonist Amy's children Jane and Dylan. Amy quits her motherly duties to party and run rampant. She doesn't appear too concerned about her children missing meals or falling behind in school, but she snaps right back to her senses when the kids run away to their dad and desert her as payback for her neglectful behavior.

to:

* ''Film/BadMoms'': Applies to the protagonist Amy's children Jane and Dylan. Amy quits her motherly duties to party and run rampant. She doesn't appear too concerned about her children missing meals or falling behind in school, but and insults them at every chance she gets whenever they ask her for help. She then snaps right back to her senses when the kids run away to their dad and desert her as payback for her neglectful behavior.



* ''Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay'': John Connor's foster parents Todd and Janet are very neglectful of him, which angrily coerces John to spend his whole time outside home. Later on, T-1000 mimicking Janet on the phone calling John "honey" and offering him beef stew for dinner makes John point out Janet would never do that.

to:

* ''Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay'': John Connor's foster parents Todd and Janet are very neglectful of him, which angrily coerces John to spend his whole time outside home. Later on, T-1000 mimicking Janet on the phone calling John "honey" and offering him beef stew for dinner makes John point out Janet would never do something like that.
9th Mar '17 7:14:05 PM Khrunwahl02
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* ''Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay'': John Connor's foster parents Todd and Janet are very neglectful of him, which angrily coerces John to spend his whole time outside home. Later on, T-1000 mimicking Janet on the phone calling John "honey" and offering him beef stew for dinner makes John point out Janet would never do that.
9th Mar '17 7:05:13 PM Khrunwahl02
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* ''Film/BattleRoyale''. Not only does the government allow the capture of entire classrooms of children, but they allow putting them on an island, giving them deadly weapons, and telling them to go kill each other, last one alive wins and is free to go. On top of that, the parents never even TRY to save their children from being murdered, and instead the entire country (or possibly even the world) allows it to happen, waiting for the competition to end and see the winner.

to:

* ''Film/BadMoms'': Applies to the protagonist Amy's children Jane and Dylan. Amy quits her motherly duties to party and run rampant. She doesn't appear too concerned about her children missing meals or falling behind in school, but she snaps right back to her senses when the kids run away to their dad and desert her as payback for her neglectful behavior.
* ''Film/BattleRoyale''. Not only does the government allow the capture of entire classrooms of children, but they allow putting them on an island, giving them deadly weapons, and telling them to go kill each other, last one alive wins and is free to go. On top of that, the parents never even TRY to save their children from being murdered, and instead the entire country (or possibly even the world) allows it to happen, waiting for the competition to end and see the winner. The protagonist, Shuya Nanahara, loses his father who commits suicide by hanging himself with a belt without any concern that Shuya now has to fend for himself, and Mitsuko's mother tried to pimp out Mitsuko when she was only 6 years old to a pedophile for the money.
8th Mar '17 7:00:59 PM infernape612
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* Averted in ''Literature/TheBFG''. Late in the book, the KidHero Sophie's plan to save the day is to tell the Queen of England everything and get her to send a gajilion soldiers to pump the evil giants full of holes.



** Subverted in the first book. When Harry and his friends tell Professor Mcgonnagal someone is planning to steal the Philosopher's Stone, she merely tells them off for interfering with business that isn't their own. The problem here is that the Stone's presence at Hogwarts should have been top secret and if three first year students know of it, she should have realized security has been compromised. On the other hand, Dumbledore saves Harry's life by arriving at the nick of time during his confrontation with the Voldemort possessed [[spoiler:Quirrel]].

to:

** Subverted in the first book. When Harry and his friends tell Professor Mcgonnagal [=McGonagall=] someone is planning to steal the Philosopher's Stone, she merely tells them off for interfering with business that isn't their own. The problem here is that the Stone's presence at Hogwarts should have been top secret and if three first year students know of it, she should have realized security has been compromised. On the other hand, Dumbledore saves Harry's life by arriving at the nick of time during his confrontation with the Voldemort possessed [[spoiler:Quirrel]].
26th Feb '17 11:23:18 AM Tsukireiko
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** Ran's ''mother'' Eri Kisaki is a highly successful lawyer and is actually quite competent at detective work when the need arises. However like Yuusaku above, she only makes a paltry handful of appearances in the series.
18th Feb '17 7:12:46 PM Oncefan21
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* Miss Gulch in ''TheWizardofOz'' practically controls half the county even forcing Aunt Em and Uncle Henry to surrender Toto. In the Land of Oz Dorothy looks to many adult figures to solve her problems such as Glinda and the wizard, but the wizard is powerless. However Dorothy discovers the power to return home was inside of her and didn't need help from either Glinda or the wizard.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AdultsAreUseless