History Main / AdjacentToThisCompleteBreakfast

16th Apr '16 10:45:06 PM Mdumas43073
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Ironically, in the 1950s and 60s, having sugar added to a breakfast cereal was actually its ''selling point.'' You normally added your own sugar to your cereal anyway, and a pre-sweetened cereal meant you could save a step (and parents could know ''how much'' added sugar their kids were getting). By the end of the 1970s, though, [[ScienceMarchesOn sugar had become demonized]], so sugary cereals took steps to [[UnfortunateIngredients downplay their sugar content]]: They changed their names (e.g. from Sugar Smacks to Honey Smacks, or from Sugar Frosted Flakes to just Frosted Flakes), and they started splitting the sugar into multiple types so that "sugar" no longer appeared at the top of the ingredients list (e.g. instead of being "Sugar, wheat flour, oat flour, ...", the ingredients now read "Wheat and oat flour, sugar, glucose-fructose, ...", even though the contents of the box were identical).

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Ironically, in the 1950s and 60s, '60s, having sugar added to a breakfast cereal was actually its ''selling point.'' You normally added your own sugar to your cereal anyway, and a pre-sweetened cereal meant you could save a step (and parents could know ''how much'' added sugar their kids were getting). By the end of the 1970s, though, [[ScienceMarchesOn sugar had become demonized]], so sugary cereals took steps to [[UnfortunateIngredients downplay their sugar content]]: They changed their names (e.g. from Sugar Smacks to Honey Smacks, or from Sugar Frosted Flakes to just Frosted Flakes), and they started splitting the sugar into multiple types so that "sugar" no longer appeared at the top of the ingredients list (e.g. instead of being "Sugar, wheat flour, oat flour, ...", the ingredients now read "Wheat and oat flour, sugar, glucose-fructose, ...", even though the contents of the box were identical).
16th Apr '16 10:44:20 PM Mdumas43073
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Simple. Just set your sugar-laden product (in a nice place setting) alongside toast, bacon, cheese, pancakes, fruit, vegetables, orange juice, milk, etc., and advertise that the cereal is an essential ''part'' of this complete breakfast. After all, if Choco Woofers are right at home amidst all those other wholesome foods, they must be perfectly healthful, right?

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Simple. Just set your sugar-laden product (in a nice place setting) alongside toast, bacon, eggs, cheese, pancakes, fruit, vegetables, orange juice, milk, etc., and advertise that the cereal is an essential ''part'' of this complete breakfast. After all, if Choco Woofers are right at home amidst all those other wholesome foods, they must be perfectly healthful, right?
5th Apr '16 6:34:12 PM eroock
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-->--''WebAnimation/HomestarRunner'', "Cheat Commandos...O's"

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-->--''WebAnimation/HomestarRunner'', -->-- ''WebAnimation/HomestarRunner'', "Cheat Commandos...O's"
1st Nov '15 11:53:10 PM Chariset
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Simple. Just set your sugar-laden product (in a nice place setting) alongside toast, bacon, cheese, pancakes, fruit, vegetables, orange juice, milk, etc., and advertise that the cereal is an essential ''part'' of this complete breakfast. After all, if Choco Woofers look right at home amidst all those other wholesome foods, they must be perfectly healthful, right?

to:

Simple. Just set your sugar-laden product (in a nice place setting) alongside toast, bacon, cheese, pancakes, fruit, vegetables, orange juice, milk, etc., and advertise that the cereal is an essential ''part'' of this complete breakfast. After all, if Choco Woofers look are right at home amidst all those other wholesome foods, they must be perfectly healthful, right?
31st Oct '15 9:35:43 PM Chariset
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Breakfast cereals aimed at kids allure their target audience with bright colors, cute cartoon mascots, and of course tons of sugar. But the parents are the ones who have to fork over the cash, and they're not going to invest $3.99 in future dental bills. So how can you, the advertiser, convince Mom that [[ChocolateFrostedSugarBombs Choco Woofers]] are actually [[BlatantLies harmless, even healthful, and provide the vitamins and minerals that her growing child needs]]?

Simple. Just set your sugar-laden product (in a nice place setting) alongside toast, bacon, cheese, pancakes, fruit, vegetables, orange juice, milk, etc., and advertise that the cereal is an essential ''part'' of this complete breakfast. After all, if you need Choco Woofers to complete a breakfast that looks pretty solid already, they must be perfectly healthful, right?

The claim is technically a legal requirement, but, like a StealthCigaretteCommercial, the companies have hidden the obvious beneath the implications. (After all -- ''really!'' -- if you're still hungry after eating a bowl of cereal, do you cook yourself some eggs and bacon, or make toast? Or do you just grab the cereal box and pour yourself another bowl?)

In short, your Choco Woofers are "part of a complete breakfast" in much the same way that chocolate cake is "part of a complete dinner": as a delicious dessert that tastes good but doesn't add anything to the meal but calories.

to:

Breakfast cereals aimed at kids allure their target audience with bright colors, cute cartoon mascots, and of course tons of sugar. But the parents are the ones who have to fork over the cash, and they're not going to invest $3.99 in future dental bills. So how can you, the advertiser, convince Mom that [[ChocolateFrostedSugarBombs Choco Woofers]] are actually [[BlatantLies harmless, even healthful, beneficial, and provide the vitamins and minerals that her growing child needs]]?

Simple. Just set your sugar-laden product (in a nice place setting) alongside toast, bacon, cheese, pancakes, fruit, vegetables, orange juice, milk, etc., and advertise that the cereal is an essential ''part'' of this complete breakfast. After all, if you need Choco Woofers to complete a breakfast that looks pretty solid already, look right at home amidst all those other wholesome foods, they must be perfectly healthful, right?

The claim is technically a legal requirement, but, like a StealthCigaretteCommercial, the companies have hidden the obvious beneath the implications. (After all -- ''really!'' -- if you're still hungry after eating a bowl of cereal, do you don't cook yourself some eggs bacon and bacon, eggs, or make toast? Or do you toast. You just grab the cereal box and pour yourself another bowl?)

bowl).

In short, other words, your Choco Woofers are "part of a this complete breakfast" in much the same way that chocolate cake is "part of a complete dinner": as a delicious dessert that tastes good but doesn't add anything to the meal but calories.
21st Oct '15 2:41:41 PM Chariset
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Breakfast cereals aimed at kids tend to be candy in a bowl -- bright colors, cute cartoon mascots, and of course tons of sugar. But you've got to sell it to the parents, who aren't going to invest $3.99 in future dental bills. So how can you, the advertiser, convince Mom that ChocolateFrostedSugarBombs are actually [[BlatantLies harmless, even healthy, and have all the vitamins and minerals her growing kid needs]]?

to:

Breakfast cereals aimed at kids tend to be candy in a bowl -- allure their target audience with bright colors, cute cartoon mascots, and of course tons of sugar. But you've got to sell it to the parents, parents are the ones who aren't have to fork over the cash, and they're not going to invest $3.99 in future dental bills. So how can you, the advertiser, convince Mom that ChocolateFrostedSugarBombs [[ChocolateFrostedSugarBombs Choco Woofers]] are actually [[BlatantLies harmless, even healthy, healthful, and have all provide the vitamins and minerals that her growing kid child needs]]?
18th Aug '15 7:22:34 PM Aquillion
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* A cereal touted for its independent nutrition content once poked fun at this trope.
5th Aug '15 7:32:17 PM johnnyfog
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->''I am curious about the expression, "Part of this complete breakfast." The way it comes up is, my 5-year-old will be watching TV cartoon shows in the morning, and they'll show a commercial for a children's compressed breakfast compound such as "Froot Loops" or "Lucky Charms", and they always show it sitting on a table next to a some actual food such as eggs, and the announcer always says: "Part of this complete breakfast." Don't they really mean, [[TropeNamer "Adjacent to this complete breakfast]]", or "On the same table as this complete breakfast"? And couldn't they make essentially the same claim if, instead of Froot Loops, they put a can of shaving cream there, or a dead bat?''
-->--'''Creator/DaveBarry''', [[http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/10/03/1845203/tips-for-writers.html#ixzz1WKpIsczl "Tips for Writers"]]

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->''I am curious about the expression, "Part ->''"New Cheat Commandos... O's sugar cereal is a delicious part of this complete breakfast." The way it comes up is, my 5-year-old will be watching TV cartoon shows in the morning, and they'll show a commercial for a children's compressed breakfast compound such as "Froot Loops" or "Lucky Charms", and they always show it sitting on a table next to a delicious [[strike:nutritious]] breakfast! And take some actual food such as eggs, and the announcer always says: "Part of this complete breakfast." Don't they really mean, [[TropeNamer "Adjacent to this complete breakfast]]", or "On the same table as this complete breakfast"? And couldn't they make essentially the same claim if, instead of Froot Loops, they put a can of shaving cream there, or a dead bat?''
-->--'''Creator/DaveBarry''', [[http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/10/03/1845203/tips-for-writers.html#ixzz1WKpIsczl "Tips for Writers"]]
vitamins, too!"''
-->--''WebAnimation/HomestarRunner'', "Cheat Commandos...O's"
12th Jul '15 9:01:50 PM Prfnoff
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** NTNO'CN also parodied a British breakfast cereal based on porridge oats (but with lots of added sugar and other strange ingredients not to be found in regular porridge). The regular advert showed happy smiling kids being waved off to school on dark cold winter mornings by doting mothers. The advert was enhanced to show each kid enveloped in a warm glowing aura denoting the warm healthy feeling of starting the day with Redibrek oats. The parody kept the happy families and glowing aura surrounding the kids - only it was tinged an unhealthy green. The voiceover said
--> Give ''your'' kids that Redibrek glow. (beat). Send them to school in Sellafield. [[note]]Sellafield, formerly called Windscale, is the home of a dodgy nuclear power plant which on three separate occasions very nearly went Chernobyl.[[/note]]
6th Apr '15 1:14:44 PM ironballs16
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* Kellogg's was [[http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/05/30/187330235/no-frosted-mini-wheats-don-t-make-your-kids-smarter sued]] for false advertising claiming "A clinical study showed kids who had a filling breakfast of Frosted Mini-Wheats cereal improved their attentiveness by nearly 20 percent." This was 20% ([[ArtisticLicenseMath rounded up from 11%]]) over kids who had ''no breakfast'' at all. Obviously, the kids who had Mini-Wheats were more attentive because they weren't hungry, not because of the Mini-Wheats.

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* Kellogg's was [[http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/05/30/187330235/no-frosted-mini-wheats-don-t-make-your-kids-smarter sued]] for false advertising claiming "A clinical study showed kids who had a filling breakfast of Frosted Mini-Wheats cereal improved their attentiveness by nearly 20 percent." This was 20% ([[ArtisticLicenseMath ([[ArtisticLicenseStatistics rounded up from 11%]]) over kids who had ''no breakfast'' at all. Obviously, the kids who had Mini-Wheats were more attentive because they weren't hungry, not because of the Mini-Wheats.
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