History Main / AccentUponTheWrongSyllable

19th Jul '17 10:11:11 PM immblueversion
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* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'':
** It happens several times in "At the Gala" from the [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS1E26TheBestNightEver first season finale]], especially the instances of "[=TOnight=] at the Gala".
** Zecora does this occasionally to [[PainfulRhyme get her rhymes to work]]. "Mon''STER''" in "Secret of My Excess" is particularly painful.



* From ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'':
** It happens several times in "At the Gala" from the [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS1E26TheBestNightEver first season finale]], especially the instances of "[=TOnight=] at the Gala".
** The [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pTPqjKk_xCo "EquesTRIa Girls"]] commercial.
** Zecora does this occasionally to get [[PainfulRhyme her rhymes to work]]. "Mon''STER''" in "Secret of My Excess" is particularly painful.

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* From ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'':
** It happens several times in "At
''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'': In "It's About Time", Twilight pronounces Tartarus as "Tar-TAR-us", rather than the Gala" from the [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS1E26TheBestNightEver first season finale]], especially the correct "TAR-tar-us". All instances of "[=TOnight=] at the Gala".
** The [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pTPqjKk_xCo "EquesTRIa Girls"]] commercial.
** Zecora does this occasionally to get [[PainfulRhyme her rhymes to work]]. "Mon''STER''"
name in "Secret of My Excess" is particularly painful.later episodes use the proper pronunciation.
20th Jun '17 7:15:32 PM Malady
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* In ''VideoGame/WarcraftIII'': The human says "Re-SEARCH complete" and "Up-GRADE complete," while the undead, orc, and night elf say "RE-search complete" and "UP-grade complete." The former may be an aversion, as both pronunciations of "research" are correct, but they are mutually inconsistent.
20th Jun '17 7:11:51 PM AnotherDuck
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* Spanish accents that use the vos pronoun come across as this to other Spanish speakers, due to the pronoun being derived from the vosotros pronoun, which places the accent on the last syllable in a lot of verb forms. "Prué-ba-lo", for example, becomes "pro-bá-lo".



* This is often used for comedy when lampooning the French Canadian accent.
* A fairly common coping mechanism for stutterers, who shift emphasis away from the syllable they are struggling with.



* New Orleans is pronounced by locals as "New OR-lins," not "New Ore-LEENS," as most of the rest of the country pronounces it. If you've got a thick accent, you might pronounce it more like "NAW-lins" anyway.
** People who heard of New Orleans first often use one or other of these for "old" Orleans in France. They are all wrong. This Orleans has three syllables and sounds like "Or-LEE-on".
* Similarly, Louisville, the biggest city in Kentucky, is pronounced by locals as "LULL-vull", when Loo-EE-vill is actually correct since it is named for the French Louis XIV. "LOO-is-vill" means you ain't never been here.
* Alabama's port city of Mobile is pronounced mo-BEEL, not mo-bil.



* Some languages, such as Russian, have what are called minimal stress pairs, where a misplaced stress accent completely changes the meaning of a word or phrase even if they are identical when written. Some examples include "трусы" (when pronounced TROO-suy, it means "cowards," when pronounced "troo-SUY" it means "underpants") and "заплачу" (when pronounced "za-pla-CHOO" it means "I'll pay," when pronounced "za-PLA-choo" it means "I'll cry.") Non-native speakers beware!
* Some people on the Autistic spectrum have this as a VerbalTic.
* Creator/ChristopherWalken and Creator/JeffGoldblum are ''very well known'' for this.
* Most places named "Lancaster" (e.g. in England and California) are pronounced "LAN-KASS-ter" (with equal emphasis on the first two syllables), but Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and Lancaster, Ohio, are pronounced "LANC-uh-ster" (with a strong accent on the first syllable). The latter is sometimes even pronounced "LANC-ster", entirely leaving out the middle syllable.
* Vermont: The US state is "Ver-MONT". The suburb of Melbourne, Australia is "VER-mont".
* There is a town called Amherst in both Massachusetts in New Hampshire. However the Massachusetts town is "AM-erst" (with no H) while the New Hampshire town is "am-HERST" and getting either of them wrong around natives is a dead giveaway that you're not from there.
* Many languages use pitch/tone changes to demarcate otherwise similar words.
** Japanese uses pitch accent, e.g. showing which syllable is Ďstressedí using falls and rises in pitch. In Standard Japanese the Ďaccentedí syllable is the one after which the pitch falls. This feature is phonemic (i.e. changing the pitch means changing the meaning), but the vast majority of dictionaries and textbooks donít indicate where the pitch is to begin with, making foreigners stumbling into this trope repeatedly. (Fortunately, while there is dialectical variations and some dialects, e.g. Kansai, have more complex pitch accent structures, some dialects just plain donít have this distinction, so one could theoretically emulate those when learning the language.)
** Norwegian also uses pitch in a number of words. For instance, bidrag (contribution) and bedrag (deception) are basically heterographs (same pronunciation, different spelling/meaning). The only difference is that bidrag has a very slight phonetic dip on the "i" while bedrag has a continuous tone through the "bed" portion. There are many Norwegian words whose meaning is quite different based solely on intonation.
** Swedish, like Norwegian, has pairs distinguished by whether they're said with one or the other "pitch": for example "anden" said "AND-en" means "the duck" while "anden" said more like "AND-DEN" means "the spirit".

to:

* Some languages, such as Russian, have what are called minimal stress pairs, where a misplaced stress accent completely changes the meaning of a word or phrase even if they are identical when written. Some examples include "трусы" (when pronounced TROO-suy, it means "cowards," when pronounced "troo-SUY" it means "underpants") and "заплачу" (when pronounced "za-pla-CHOO" it means "I'll pay," when pronounced "za-PLA-choo" it means "I'll cry.") Non-native speakers beware!
* Some people on the Autistic spectrum have this as a VerbalTic.
*
%%* Creator/ChristopherWalken and Creator/JeffGoldblum are ''very well known'' for this.
* Most places named "Lancaster" (e.g. in England and California) are pronounced "LAN-KASS-ter" (with equal emphasis on the first two syllables), but Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and Lancaster, Ohio, are pronounced "LANC-uh-ster" (with a strong accent on the first syllable). The latter is sometimes even pronounced "LANC-ster", entirely leaving out the middle syllable.
* Vermont: The US state is "Ver-MONT". The suburb of Melbourne, Australia is "VER-mont".
* There is a town called Amherst in both Massachusetts in New Hampshire. However the Massachusetts town is "AM-erst" (with no H) while the New Hampshire town is "am-HERST" and getting either of them wrong around natives is a dead giveaway that you're not from there.
* Many languages use pitch/tone changes to demarcate otherwise similar words.
** Japanese uses pitch accent, e.g. showing which syllable is Ďstressedí using falls and rises in pitch. In Standard Japanese the Ďaccentedí syllable is the one after which the pitch falls. This feature is phonemic (i.e. changing the pitch means changing the meaning), but the vast majority of dictionaries and textbooks donít indicate where the pitch is to begin with, making foreigners stumbling into this trope repeatedly. (Fortunately, while there is dialectical variations and some dialects, e.g. Kansai, have more complex pitch accent structures, some dialects just plain donít have this distinction, so one could theoretically emulate those when learning the language.)
** Norwegian also uses pitch in a number of words. For instance, bidrag (contribution) and bedrag (deception) are basically heterographs (same pronunciation, different spelling/meaning). The only difference is that bidrag has a very slight phonetic dip on the "i" while bedrag has a continuous tone through the "bed" portion. There are many Norwegian words whose meaning is quite different based solely on intonation.
** Swedish, like Norwegian, has pairs distinguished by whether they're said with one or the other "pitch": for example "anden" said "AND-en" means "the duck" while "anden" said more like "AND-DEN" means "the spirit".
this.
20th Jun '17 8:21:28 AM johnnye
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Added DiffLines:

* The ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' MusicalEpisode "Once More With Feeling" cleverly exploits this for purposes of GettingCrapPastTheRadar. Imagine you're a censor reading a script in which a girl in bed with her lover sings the repeated line "you make me complete". Tame enough, right? Except that to fit the tune, the stress happens to fall on the first syllable of "complete"...
7th Jun '17 2:02:52 PM StFan
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[[folder:Anime and Manga]]

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[[folder:Anime and & Manga]]



[[folder:Film]]

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[[folder:Film]][[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]



* In ''Film/TheAvengers'', Tony Stark mentions the video game ''Galaga'' with the stress in the first syllable, but the correct pronunciation stresses the middle one: [[http://triosdevelopers.com/jason.eckert/blog/Entries/2012/7/14_Entry_1.html "ga-LAG-a"]]

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* In ''Film/TheAvengers'', ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'', Tony Stark mentions the video game ''Galaga'' with the stress in the first syllable, but the correct pronunciation stresses the middle one: [[http://triosdevelopers.com/jason.eckert/blog/Entries/2012/7/14_Entry_1.html "ga-LAG-a"]]



* In one edition of 'Big Fat Quiz', notoriously camp comedian Alan Carr got the pronunciation of 'vuvuzela' appallingly, hilariously wrong; the correct pronunciation is 'voo-voo-ZAY-la'. Carr said 'vuh-VOO-ze-luh'.

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* In one edition of 'Big ''Big Fat Quiz', Quiz'', notoriously camp comedian Alan Carr got the pronunciation of 'vuvuzela' appallingly, hilariously wrong; the correct pronunciation is 'voo-voo-ZAY-la'. Carr said 'vuh-VOO-ze-luh'.



[[folder:Theatre]]

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[[folder:Theatre]][[folder:Theater]]



-->''Lovable, gullible, armless, harmless,''
-->''Ten foot tall and wet,''
-->''Cecil the Seasick [=SerPENT=]'',
-->''Created by Bob [=ClamPETT=]''.

to:

-->''Lovable, gullible, armless, harmless,''
-->''Ten
harmless,\\
Ten
foot tall and wet,''
-->''Cecil
wet,\\
Cecil
the Seasick [=SerPENT=]'',
-->''Created
[=SerPENT=],\\
Created
by Bob [=ClamPETT=]''.[=ClamPETT=].''
4th Jun '17 1:17:47 AM shokoshu
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Added DiffLines:

* "Volle Granate, Renate" by German band Torfrock (instant Viking rock, just add ships). At the end of the refrain, "Re-NA-te" suddenly turns into "Re-na-TE".
4th Jun '17 1:05:47 AM NiGHTS
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Film/TheAvengers'', Tony Stark mentions the video game ''Galaga'' with the stress in the first syllable, but the correct pronunciation stresses the middle one: [[http://triosdevelopers.com/jason.eckert/blog/Entries/2012/7/14_Entry_1.html "ga-LAG-a"]]
31st May '17 9:19:46 AM MikeK
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Added DiffLines:

* In "Goodbye Lament" by [[Music/BlackSabbath Tony Iommi]] and Music/DaveGrohl, Dave Grohl consistently pronounces "lament" as "LAY-ment". The proper pronunciation, "luh-MENT", wouldn't have fit with the rhythm of the music.
25th Apr '17 8:05:37 PM PaulA
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* In Creator/AlanDeanFoster's ''Glory Lane'', an alien in disguise on Earth is described as talking like this trope, stressing the wrong syllables and words, due to having learned English from a cheap crash course.

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* In Creator/AlanDeanFoster's ''Glory Lane'', ''Literature/GloryLane'', an alien in disguise on Earth is described as talking like this trope, stressing the wrong syllables and words, due to having learned English from a cheap crash course.
18th Mar '17 4:41:45 AM Max96
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* Some languages, such as Russian, have what are called minimal stress pairs, where a misplaced stress accent completely changes the meaning of a word or phrase even if they are identical when written. Some examples include "трусы" (when pronounced TROO-suy, it means "cowards," when pronounced "troo-SUY" it means "boxer shorts") and "заплачу" (when pronounced "za-pla-CHOO" it means "I'll pay," when pronounced "za-PLA-choo" it means "I'll cry.") Non-native speakers beware!

to:

* Some languages, such as Russian, have what are called minimal stress pairs, where a misplaced stress accent completely changes the meaning of a word or phrase even if they are identical when written. Some examples include "трусы" (when pronounced TROO-suy, it means "cowards," when pronounced "troo-SUY" it means "boxer shorts") "underpants") and "заплачу" (when pronounced "za-pla-CHOO" it means "I'll pay," when pronounced "za-PLA-choo" it means "I'll cry.") Non-native speakers beware!
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AccentUponTheWrongSyllable