History Main / AFoolAndHisNewMoneyAreSoonParted

21st Jun '17 6:23:47 PM luiz4200
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Averted with the fortune Olive inherited from a long-lost Uncle. She merely gave it back to him once he turned out to be alive.
19th Jun '17 8:20:19 PM Kayube
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Opposite of BrokeEpisode. Contrast RagsToRiches, where they get to keep the money. Compare and contrast CreditCardPlot, in which the character only ''thinks'' they've hit the jackpot, and NeverWinTheLottery where failure is the only option. See also TaxmanTakesTheWinnings, when a character's new money all goes to taxes.

to:

Opposite of BrokeEpisode. Contrast RagsToRiches, where they get to keep the money.money, as well as OnTheMoney, where they only don't keep it because their entire goal was spending the lot on something specific. Compare and contrast CreditCardPlot, in which the character only ''thinks'' they've hit the jackpot, and NeverWinTheLottery where failure is the only option. See also TaxmanTakesTheWinnings, when a character's new money all goes to taxes.
29th May '17 8:41:24 AM Mooncalf
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* A variant happens in ''JojosBizarreAdventureDiamondIsUnbreakable'', when Josuke, Okuyasu and Shigeru win a small fortune on a lottery ticket. Josuke's mom takes his share and puts it in a secure bank account to keep him from pulling this trope, so he ends up not seeing a single yen. (Okuyasu intentionally puts his share in the bank, as he's actually very sensible with money.)
** Played straight in an earlier scene, where Joseph Joestar needs to buy baby supplies for the invisible baby they found, and borrows Josuke's card with all his saved up money (since he doesn't have his own money on hand). Due to a combination of being rich enough to not really think about money, not understanding the dollar-to-yen exchange rate, the onset of senility and a very pushy salesman, the money is soon gone.
24th May '17 9:18:20 AM KizunaTallis
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* On ''Series/ParksAndRecreation'' Jean-Ralphio gets a lot of money from what is implied to be a scam (he was hit by a Lexus and won the lawsuit), and he uses it to start [=Entertainment720=]. He hires Tom to help him and together they spend the money on extremely extravagant gimmicks, including hiring two professional basketball player to play one-on-one all day in their office, giving a free iPod to anyone who visits, and paying random women $100,000 a year with free medical benefits to do nothing more than sit at desks and look pretty. Though billed as an entertainment company, they initially have no source of revenue or a plan to ''get'' a source of revenue, and they go bankrupt in short order.

to:

* On ''Series/ParksAndRecreation'' Jean-Ralphio gets a lot of money from what is implied to be a scam (he ([[{{Flopsy}} he was hit by a Lexus Lexus]] and won the lawsuit), and he uses it to start [=Entertainment720=]. He hires Tom to help him and together they spend the money on extremely extravagant gimmicks, including hiring two professional basketball player players to play one-on-one all day in their office, giving a free iPod iPad to anyone who visits, and paying random women $100,000 a year with free medical benefits to do nothing more than sit at desks and look pretty. Though billed as an entertainment company, they initially have no source of revenue or a plan to ''get'' a source of revenue, and they go bankrupt in short order.
21st May '17 3:45:24 PM Jeduthun
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Opposite of BrokeEpisode. Contrast RagsToRiches, where they get to keep the money. Compare CreditCardPlot, in which the character only ''thinks'' they've hit the jackpot. See also TaxmanTakesTheWinnings, when a character's new money all goes to taxes. Compare ''and'' contrast NeverWinTheLottery, where the fool only ''thinks'' they've come into money in the first place.

to:

Opposite of BrokeEpisode. Contrast RagsToRiches, where they get to keep the money. Compare and contrast CreditCardPlot, in which the character only ''thinks'' they've hit the jackpot.jackpot, and NeverWinTheLottery where failure is the only option. See also TaxmanTakesTheWinnings, when a character's new money all goes to taxes. Compare ''and'' contrast NeverWinTheLottery, where the fool only ''thinks'' they've come into money in the first place.\n
21st May '17 3:42:41 PM Jeduthun
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Opposite of BrokeEpisode. Contrast RagsToRiches, where they get to keep the money. Compare CreditCardPlot, in which the character only ''thinks'' they've hit the jackpot. See also TaxmanTakesTheWinnings, when a character's new money all goes to taxes.

to:

Opposite of BrokeEpisode. Contrast RagsToRiches, where they get to keep the money. Compare CreditCardPlot, in which the character only ''thinks'' they've hit the jackpot. See also TaxmanTakesTheWinnings, when a character's new money all goes to taxes.
taxes. Compare ''and'' contrast NeverWinTheLottery, where the fool only ''thinks'' they've come into money in the first place.
24th Apr '17 11:45:13 AM megarockman
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Short career length (the average tenure of a pro athlete is only 3 1/2-6 years - most will be out of work by age 30) and failure to plan beyond it (because most of their income comes so early, their financial strategy needs to be different from other people)

to:

** Short career length (the average tenure of a pro athlete is only 3 1/2-6 3.5-6 years - most will be out of work by age 30) and failure to plan beyond it (because most of their income comes so early, their financial strategy needs to be different from other people)people - they should be planning as though they were 55-year-olds since their income is going to drop within a decade).
14th Apr '17 8:16:44 PM pretzelbetty
Is there an issue? Send a Message


There is an element of TruthInTelevision to this trope. An unfortunately common story among real-life lottery winners (to take one example) who suddenly come into a massive windfall is that they are often so unused to having and managing a large amount of wealth and are often so flush with the elation of having a seemingly unimaginably large amount of money that they don't realise how quickly they're able to spend it or the other financial commitments (such as tax) that come with it. As such, they've often ended up right back where they started or even worse off; sadly, unlike in fiction, many of these tales don't have happy endings.

to:

There is an element of TruthInTelevision to this trope. An unfortunately common story among real-life lottery winners (to take one example) who suddenly come into a massive windfall is that they are often so unused to having and managing a large amount of wealth and are often so flush with the elation of having a seemingly unimaginably large amount of money that they don't realise how quickly they're able to spend it or the other financial commitments (such as tax) taxes) that come with it. As such, they've often ended up right back where they started or even worse off; sadly, unlike in fiction, many of these tales don't have happy endings.



** And ''God forbid'' you let other people know about your sudden increase in wealth if you can actually stay anonymous. [[http://m.walb.com/walb/db_347747/contentdetail.htm?contentguid=eA5NDXZ6 Lottery winners such as this poor fellow have been murdered in an attempt to steal their earnings.]] Savvy people will realize that having a sudden influx of wealth generally makes you a big target for the likes of con artists, beggars, phony debt collectors, and even murders and kidnappers (to try and get ransom money). Ways to get around this include hiring security, moving to a secured location ''before'' securing the winnings, and having a trusted law firm claim the earnings for you (which would naturally mean a cut of the earnings going to them, but better than having the full amount and getting killed for it). Some people are desperate and even willing to kill for money.

to:

** And ''God forbid'' you let other people know about your sudden increase in wealth if you can actually stay anonymous. [[http://m.walb.com/walb/db_347747/contentdetail.htm?contentguid=eA5NDXZ6 Lottery winners such as this poor fellow have been murdered in an attempt to steal their earnings.]] Savvy people will realize that having a sudden influx of wealth generally makes you a big target for the likes of con artists, beggars, phony debt collectors, and even murders murderers and kidnappers (to try and get ransom money). Ways to get around this include hiring security, moving to a secured location ''before'' securing the winnings, and having a trusted law firm claim the earnings for you (which would naturally mean a cut of the earnings going to them, but better than having the full amount and getting killed for it). Some people are desperate and even willing to kill for money.
12th Apr '17 4:30:45 AM Blazer
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In one episode of ''Anime/TenchiUniverse'', Ryoko is tasked to get food for the gang as they're running low on their trip to Jurai. Ryoko, being a little more amoral than her OVA counterpart, runs off with the money, wins big in races and treats herself to a vacation. When Ryo-Ohki guilt-trips Ryoko into doing the right thing, she's blown the money on the vacation and what's left is converted to almost nothing, forcing her to rob a bank to get the money.
* An early episode of ''Anime/TenchiInTokyo'' had the girls make money on their own so they can use it to visit Tenchi (they had a gateway, but Tenchi got tired of it and blocked it). Sasami ends up being the one who makes the most money. The very next episode, Sasami uses the gateway to escape the girls - they became so desperate, they started hounding her for her money - and Tenchi decides to let her use it.
3rd Apr '17 6:19:56 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Subverted in the ''Series/PunkyBrewster'' episode "Punky's Millions." As part of a contest to win a jackpot of money, Punky and Henry have to spend $1 million in one week. Henry comes down with chicken pox, so Punky's pals help her out.



* Subverted in the ''PunkyBrewster'' episode "Punky's Millions." As part of a contest to win a jackpot of money, Punky and Henry have to spend $1 million in one week. Henry comes down with chicken pox, so Punky's pals help her out.
This list shows the last 10 events of 300. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AFoolAndHisNewMoneyAreSoonParted