History Main / AFoolAndHisNewMoneyAreSoonParted

7th Sep '17 10:15:56 AM SteveMB
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At that point, the character is sincerely worried about their future and the people they left behind, perhaps for the first time in their life. They are now so low that a life in PerpetualPoverty is starting to look good to them, having insulted their old friends, quit their old job, etc., they are likely on the streets. Expect the character to be EasilyForgiven; their friends blow it off as completely unimportant, their old boss hasn't been able to find anyone willing to apply for their old job, the person they sold their old house to is moving out of the area and sells it back to them, and the collection agents go home. In shows where StatusQuoIsGod, the episode's end will have [[EasyComeEasyGo the character's lifestyle restored to]] ''[[EasyComeEasyGo exactly]]'' [[EasyComeEasyGo what it had been before]]. If not, there may be a surprise twist which leaves the character with something after all, perhaps something that couldn't be had for AllThatGlitters. If a character's life ''isn't'' restored at the end, they've gone from RichesToRags.

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At that point, the character is sincerely worried about their future and the people they left behind, perhaps for the first time in their life. They are now so low that a life in PerpetualPoverty is starting to look good to them, having insulted their old friends, quit their old job, etc., they are likely on the streets. Expect the character to be EasilyForgiven; EasilyForgiven (perhaps [[CrossingTheBurntBridge being made to squirm a bit]] first); their friends blow it off as completely unimportant, their old boss hasn't been able to find anyone willing to apply for their old job, the person they sold their old house to is moving out of the area and sells it back to them, and the collection agents go home. In shows where StatusQuoIsGod, the episode's end will have [[EasyComeEasyGo the character's lifestyle restored to]] ''[[EasyComeEasyGo exactly]]'' [[EasyComeEasyGo what it had been before]]. If not, there may be a surprise twist which leaves the character with something after all, perhaps something that couldn't be had for AllThatGlitters. If a character's life ''isn't'' restored at the end, they've gone from RichesToRags.
22nd Aug '17 6:01:19 PM eroock
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** Fry discovers he'd left some cash in a forgotten bank account, and the [[CompoundInterestTimeTravelGambit accrued interest has made him fabulously wealthy]]. When he buys a can of (extinct) anchovies [[CorruptCorporateExecutive Mom]] has her boys kidnap him to get his PIN (1077) so she can steal all his money and be forced to sell the anchovies (which hold the secret to producing a very cheap, but potent, robot oil). She gives up when she learns he doesn't know this, instead intending to eat the anchovies. Also fulfills the "worse off than before" part: When Fry and co. actually ''do' eat the anchovies, everyone except Fry immediately coughs them up, due to their disgusting taste. Everyone, that is, except Zoidberg. He suffers the opposite effect, since his species is implied to be the reason anchovies went extinct in the first place due to having a strong HorrorHunger for them. Before the episode cuts to black, Zoidberg aggressively yanks Fry toward him, screaming "MORE! MORE!"

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** In "[[Recap/FuturamaS1E6AFishfulOfDollars A Fishful of Dollars]]", Fry discovers he'd left some cash in a forgotten bank account, and the [[CompoundInterestTimeTravelGambit accrued interest has made him fabulously wealthy]]. When he buys a can of (extinct) anchovies [[CorruptCorporateExecutive Mom]] has her boys kidnap him to get his PIN (1077) so she can steal all his money and be forced to sell the anchovies (which hold the secret to producing a very cheap, but potent, robot oil). She gives up when she learns he doesn't know this, instead intending to eat the anchovies. Also fulfills the "worse off than before" part: When Fry and co. actually ''do' eat the anchovies, everyone except Fry immediately coughs them up, due to their disgusting taste. Everyone, that is, except Zoidberg. He suffers the opposite effect, since his species is implied to be the reason anchovies went extinct in the first place due to having a strong HorrorHunger for them. Before the episode cuts to black, Zoidberg aggressively yanks Fry toward him, screaming "MORE! MORE!"
22nd Aug '17 5:46:55 PM eroock
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* In ''Manga/{{Eyeshield 21}}'' the Devil Bats' coach, Doburoku Sakaki, wins $17 million betting on their game against the Shinryuji Nagas. A few chapters later, he loses all the money he didn't squander celebrating their win by betting on another game, when the Taiyo Sphinx [[TheWorfEffect get stomped by the dark-horse Hakushu Dinosaurs]].

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* In ''Manga/{{Eyeshield 21}}'' 21}}'', the Devil Bats' coach, Doburoku Sakaki, wins $17 million betting on their game against the Shinryuji Nagas. A few chapters later, he loses all the money he didn't squander celebrating their win by betting on another game, when the Taiyo Sphinx [[TheWorfEffect get stomped by the dark-horse Hakushu Dinosaurs]].
22nd Aug '17 5:45:14 PM eroock
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Opposite of BrokeEpisode. Contrast RagsToRiches, where they get to keep the money, as well as OnTheMoney, where they only don't keep it because their entire goal was spending the lot on something specific. Compare and contrast CreditCardPlot, in which the character only ''thinks'' they've hit the jackpot, and NeverWinTheLottery where failure is the only option. See also TaxmanTakesTheWinnings, when a character's new money all goes to taxes.

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Suptrope of EasyComeEasyGo. Opposite of BrokeEpisode. Contrast RagsToRiches, where they get to keep the money, as well as OnTheMoney, where they only don't keep it because their entire goal was spending the lot on something specific. Compare and contrast CreditCardPlot, in which the character only ''thinks'' they've hit the jackpot, and NeverWinTheLottery where failure is the only option. See also TaxmanTakesTheWinnings, when a character's new money all goes to taxes.
22nd Aug '17 5:44:26 PM eroock
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* In ''Manga/{{Eyeshield 21}}'' the Devil Bats' coach, Doburoku Sakaki, wins $17 million betting on their game against the Shinryuji Nagas. A few chapters later, he loses all the money he didn't squander celebrating their win by betting on another game, when the Taiyo Sphinx [[TheWorfEffect get stomped by the dark-horse Hakushu Dinosaurs]].



* In ''Film/ThingsChange'' (1988), Don Ameche plays a shoeshine man who is hired to take a murder rap for a mob boss. With several days until he is to turn himself in, his handler (Joe Montegna) takes him to Tahoe for a last (and probably first) spree. Unfortunately, Ameche is [[MistakenForBadass taken for a real mob bigshot]] and the casino makes sure he wins at a rigged roulette table but it goes too far, giving him a fortune which the casino wants back. When a terrified Montegna convinces him to return the money (which Ameche thinks he won fairly) because it wouldn't be polite to keep their host's money, he bets it all the no-limit Big Wheel. If he wins he bankrupts the casino (probably leading to their deaths). He misses by one number and, when the wheel girl says she's sorry, Ameche shrugs and says "Things change".



* ''VideoGame/SamAndMaxFreelancePolice'' acquire massively inflating amounts of money that they casually drop on Bosco for 'inventions' that experience has already shown will be a lame household item. A billion dollars for a snot rag? Sure, here you go!
* In ''VideoGame/SuikodenI'':
-->'''Grady''': Please take this. A small gift from the villagers.\\
'''Kanaan''': Well, thank you very much.\\
''Found 10,000 bits!''\\
'''Kanaan''': This is dangerous, so I'll hold on to it.\\
''10,000 bits stolen!''



* In ''Webcomic/OzyAndMillie'', Timulty is given a lot of money just for mentioning that he knows something about the internet (the comic was parodying the dot com bubble before it burst). He immediately blows all of it on candy.



*** The amount of money in Fry's account after a thousand years of compound interest is accurate. They've ShownTheirWork.
**** Good thing it wasn't adjusted for inflation and deflation.
**** Also good that they left out the part about dormant accounts being seized by the government after a number of years. The time varies by State but is always less then 1,000 years.



* The episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}}'' where Chuckie's dad won ten million dollars in a sweepstakes, but lost it all when he made a bad investment (on Drew's advice).

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* The ''WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}}'':
** In one
episode of ''WesternAnimation/{{Rugrats}}'' where Chuckie's dad won ten million dollars in a sweepstakes, but lost it all when he made a bad investment (on Drew's advice).advice).
** In the Las Vegas episode, Grandpa Lou wins the jackpot playing nickel slots. He later uses some of his winnings to pay for tickets to a Siegfried and Roy knockoff and later throws the rest at some security guards to save his family.



** Lois' aunt dies, leaving her a beautiful mansion in Newport, RI, along with a bit of money to get her started. Everything seems to be going well, until in a misguided attempt to fit in, Peter bids a ridiculous sum of money on a vase. To be able to pay for it, he sold the mansion, which was valuable enough because it was discovered it used to be a Presidential whorehouse. Peter even kept an old photo of Abe Lincoln to sale so he could buy back his old house (which he had sold to be able to pay for the mansion's hired help) for double the money he got when he sold it.
** The season 10 premiere plays this straight. The Griffins win $150M in the lottery. Peter being Peter, immediately quits his job, spends the money on outrageous items, treats his friends like crap, and becomes broke and homeless in a month's time. [[StatusQuoIsGod Everything is back to normal by the end of the episode.]] For double irony, the family, sitting homeless on the street, decides their only chance is to try to win the lottery again. Cut to the exact same scene with Lois saying she can't believe they won and lost all that money TWICE. It's never explained how anyone could be rendered ''completely'' destitute when many of those outrageous items were made of solid gold. The logical solution is to sell them for scrap gold.

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** In episode "Peter Peter Caviar Eater", one of Lois' aunt dies, leaving forebears dies and leaves her a beautiful luxurious home. Peter, attempting to fit in with upper-class society, bids $100 million for a vase at an auction -- more than the luxury home is worth. He tries to raise the value of the home by fabricating historical events, only to discover that it was actually a presidential brothel. This somehow allows him to trade the home for the vase (which is never seen again). Selling the story to a tabloid leaves him with enough cash to re-purchase their former home. Throughout the episode, Lois is more upset with Peter for acting phony than she is that he spent $100 million on a vase, and then gave away a mansion in Newport, RI, along with a bit of money that actually belonged to get her started. Everything her.
*** Although Lois never
seems to be going well, until in a misguided attempt mind the fact that she grew up incredibly rich only to fit in, Peter bids a ridiculous sum of marry someone with little money on a vase. To be able to pay for it, he sold and live as middle class.
** In
the mansion, which was valuable enough because it was discovered it used to be a Presidential whorehouse. Peter even kept an old photo of Abe Lincoln to sale so he could buy back his old house (which he had sold to be able to pay for Season 10 premiere, the mansion's hired help) for double the money he got when he sold it.
** The season 10 premiere plays this straight. The
Griffins win $150M in the lottery. Peter being Peter, immediately quits his job, spends the money on outrageous items, treats his friends like crap, and becomes broke and homeless in a month's time. [[StatusQuoIsGod Everything is back to normal by the end of the episode.]] For double irony, the family, sitting homeless on the street, decides their only chance is to try to win the lottery again. Cut to the exact same scene with Lois saying she can't believe they won and lost all that money TWICE. It's never explained how anyone could be rendered ''completely'' destitute when many of those outrageous items were made of solid gold. The logical solution is to sell them for scrap gold.



* Episodes of ''WesternAnimation/TopCat'' feature this happening a few times. The most notable one is where a millionaire gives Benny a check to T.C for one million dollars after he finds out how rough the gang has it. When the merchants' association finds out, T.C and the gang are treated like royalty. In the end, it all goes away [[NiceJobBreakingItHero because Top Cat]], [[NotNowKiddo who didn't give Benny a chance to explain about the million dollars]], [[NiceJobBreakingItHero tore up the check]]. To be fair, Top Cat thought that Benny had been tricked at given a ticket for a 25 cent raffle, so he didn't know any better.



* ''WesternAnimation/TaleSpin'':
** In "Save the Tiger", Baloo saves Shere Khan's life, who [[Main/IOweYouMyLife now owes Baloo a debt]]. Baloo first asks for a few simple things, before being reminded that Shere Khan is one of the most wealthy and powerful men in the world. Baloo then buys back his plane, isolates most of his friends, and becomes bored with his new wealth and gifts. Eventually Baloo ends up [[Main/YouOweMe irritating Khan with endless lists of demands]]; Khan secretly arranges for Baloo to be kidnapped and the ransom equals the amount from selling all the things that Baloo asked from Khan [[spoiler:''and'' Higher for Hire]]. By the end of the episode, Baloo's friends get him back, and Baloo's last request is for the status quo to return.
** In "The Balooest of the Blue Bloods", Baloo inherits a mansion and the butler and maid try to kill him so they can inherit it for themselves. The mansion gets repossessed at the end of the episode.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TaleSpin'':
''WesternAnimation/TaleSpin'' used this trope often:
** In "The Road to Macadamia": When Baloo and Louie save the desert kingdom of Macadamia from an EvilChancellor, they expect a huge cash reward. Instead, the king pays them only the paltry sum he owed them at the beginning of the episode.
** "Your Baloo's in the Mail": Rebecca wins a lottery, then entrusts Baloo to turn in the winning Lottery Ticket before the deadline. To make a long story short, he doesn't. Although it is justified in that Rebecca told him the letter wasn't important.
** "Idol Rich": After going through alot of trouble to obtain a valuable idol, Baloo loses all the money it was worth to a tab he had run up at Louie's.
** "Baloo Thunder": Sher Khan gives Baloo a sizable reward for helping to keep his secret project (a helicopter) out of the hands of his competition, only for his secretary (under Khan's orders) to reclaim it for outrageous purposes.
**
"Save the Tiger", Tiger": Baloo saves Shere Khan's life, who [[Main/IOweYouMyLife now owes Baloo a debt]]. Baloo first asks for a few simple things, before being reminded that Shere Khan is one of the most wealthy and powerful men in the world. Baloo then buys back his plane, isolates most of his friends, and becomes bored with his new wealth and gifts. Eventually Baloo ends up [[Main/YouOweMe irritating Khan with endless lists of demands]]; Khan secretly arranges for Baloo to be kidnapped and the ransom equals the amount from selling all the things that Baloo asked from Khan [[spoiler:''and'' Higher for Hire]]. By the end of the episode, Baloo's friends get him back, and Baloo's last request is for the status quo to return.
** In "The Balooest of the Blue Bloods", Bloods": Baloo inherits a mansion and the butler and maid try to kill him so they can inherit it for themselves. The mansion gets repossessed at the end of the episode.episode.
** "Pizza Pie in the Sky": When Baloo opens a pizza-delivery service, the money he earns is ''just'' enough to pay for all the health code violations he racks up while running the operation.


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** This is an interesting example because Bojack is the type of show where every choice the characters make matters and things don't generally revert to status quo; except in this case, where they intentionally play the trope as straight as possible, all while drawing attention to it.
* [[WesternAnimation/RenAndStimpy Stimpy]] once won 47 million dollars and instant celebrity as part of a television contest. When Stimpy finds that his newfound fame and fortune are [[CelebrityisOverrated meaningless]] [[ThePowerOfFriendship without his best friend Ren]] he "gives away" all his money and returns home. Ren is [[YouFool less than joyous]] about this.
17th Jul '17 11:39:38 AM Morgenthaler
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* German actor KlausKinski typically starred in a successful movie, then spent all his salary on partying with friends, expensive clothing and 5-star hotels (and drugs), resulting in him becoming broke after a short time. After he had to live in a run-down single-room apartment for a few weeks, he often resorted to phoning his old friend Creator/WernerHerzog once again to ask if he had any more film roles available. Rinse and repeat.

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* German actor KlausKinski Creator/KlausKinski typically starred in a successful movie, then spent all his salary on partying with friends, expensive clothing and 5-star hotels (and drugs), resulting in him becoming broke after a short time. After he had to live in a run-down single-room apartment for a few weeks, he often resorted to phoning his old friend Creator/WernerHerzog once again to ask if he had any more film roles available. Rinse and repeat.
10th Jul '17 2:52:52 PM jamespolk
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* ''Film/ThePagan'': Sort of--it isn't new money, as Henry inherited the plantation, even if he's never bothered to work it. But Henry is a Pacific Islander with little knowledge of Western commerce. His attempt to become a businessman and start making money on his plantation rapidly results in his plantation being foreclosed, as he has no clue that the loans he's been taking out have to be repaid.
10th Jul '17 10:41:44 AM MikeW
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* On ''Series/SiliconValley'' Nelson is already shown to be a well-meaning guy but also basically a moron. Thus, it's no surprise that when he gets $20 million in a buyout from Hoolie, he ends up blowing it fast. After buying a big mansion, he has the pool moved to a different part of the yard then has it moved back when he realizes the new spot can't be hooked up to water lines. It's also revealed he was actually renting most of the furniture and items in his house which means he can't sell them off to pay his debts. True, his manager ends up embezzling a lot but it's obvious Nelson would have run through it fast.
** Erlich convinces Nelson to go into a business with him just so he can use Nelson's wealth for his own. Erlich then spends over a million dollars on a huge party at Alcatraz before discovering Nelson is broke. While Erlich figures out the manager has been stealing Nelson's money, a district attorney refuses to prosecute as she argues that Erlich and Nelson would have ended up blowing all the cash anyway.
21st Jun '17 6:23:47 PM luiz4200
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** Averted with the fortune Olive inherited from a long-lost Uncle. She merely gave it back to him once he turned out to be alive.
19th Jun '17 8:20:19 PM Kayube
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Opposite of BrokeEpisode. Contrast RagsToRiches, where they get to keep the money. Compare and contrast CreditCardPlot, in which the character only ''thinks'' they've hit the jackpot, and NeverWinTheLottery where failure is the only option. See also TaxmanTakesTheWinnings, when a character's new money all goes to taxes.

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Opposite of BrokeEpisode. Contrast RagsToRiches, where they get to keep the money.money, as well as OnTheMoney, where they only don't keep it because their entire goal was spending the lot on something specific. Compare and contrast CreditCardPlot, in which the character only ''thinks'' they've hit the jackpot, and NeverWinTheLottery where failure is the only option. See also TaxmanTakesTheWinnings, when a character's new money all goes to taxes.
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