History Magazine / PrivateEye

2nd Apr '17 11:09:19 AM nombretomado
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* BritishRockstar: Gary Bloke of the ''Celeb'' strip, and Spiggy Topes (later "Sir Spigismond Topes") of Spiggy Topes and the Turds. The latter is unusual in that the joke started contemporaneously with TheBritishInvasion and has continued in real-time, with his career paralleling that of RealLife musicians. This also makes Spiggy Topes a CompositeCharacter, as he is basically used as a stand-in for any has-been rock star who's been in the news, from PaulMcCartney to Rod Stewart and more.

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* BritishRockstar: Gary Bloke of the ''Celeb'' strip, and Spiggy Topes (later "Sir Spigismond Topes") of Spiggy Topes and the Turds. The latter is unusual in that the joke started contemporaneously with TheBritishInvasion and has continued in real-time, with his career paralleling that of RealLife musicians. This also makes Spiggy Topes a CompositeCharacter, as he is basically used as a stand-in for any has-been rock star who's been in the news, from PaulMcCartney Music/PaulMcCartney to Rod Stewart and more.
26th Mar '17 3:08:40 PM nombretomado
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* TransatlanticEquivalent: The second half of the ''Eye'' is similar to America's ''TheOnion'' in content.

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* TransatlanticEquivalent: The second half of the ''Eye'' is similar to America's ''TheOnion'' ''Website/TheOnion'' in content.
20th Feb '17 5:20:13 PM nombretomado
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* "The Broonites", (defunct) which featured the [[UsefulNotes/GordonBrown Brown]] camp of the now former Labour government and who all spoke in exaggerated Scottish accents- even the English ones. This was done in the style of ''ComicStrip/TheBroons'', a cartoon strip from [[BritishNewspapers The Sunday Post]].

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* "The Broonites", (defunct) which featured the [[UsefulNotes/GordonBrown Brown]] camp of the now former Labour government and who all spoke in exaggerated Scottish accents- even the English ones. This was done in the style of ''ComicStrip/TheBroons'', a cartoon strip from [[BritishNewspapers [[UsefulNotes/BritishNewspapers The Sunday Post]].



Pretty much every [[BritishNewspapers British newspaper]] has a well-known nickname that was given to them by the ''Eye''. A lot of politicians and celebrities have also been given nicknames, usually derisive.

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Pretty much every [[BritishNewspapers British newspaper]] {{UsefulNotes/British newspaper|s}} has a well-known nickname that was given to them by the ''Eye''. A lot of politicians and celebrities have also been given nicknames, usually derisive.



** Baillie Vass = former Prime Minister UsefulNotes/AlecDouglasHome (after the ''Aberdeen Evening Express''[[note]]''Not'' ''[[BritishNewspapers The Scotsman]]'', as commonly reported[[/note]] mixed up the captions for a photo of him with a photo of the titular castle)

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** Baillie Vass = former Prime Minister UsefulNotes/AlecDouglasHome (after the ''Aberdeen Evening Express''[[note]]''Not'' ''[[BritishNewspapers ''[[UsefulNotes/BritishNewspapers The Scotsman]]'', as commonly reported[[/note]] mixed up the captions for a photo of him with a photo of the titular castle)



There are also features on the hypocrisy of the [[BritishNewspapers Fleet Street]] press ("Street of Shame") and a great section called "Rotten Boroughs" on local council misbehaviour, along with annual awards -- such as for Tory bigots.

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There are also features on the hypocrisy of the [[BritishNewspapers [[UsefulNotes/BritishNewspapers Fleet Street]] press ("Street of Shame") and a great section called "Rotten Boroughs" on local council misbehaviour, along with annual awards -- such as for Tory bigots.
13th Feb '17 2:02:27 PM PresidentBrit
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** UsefulNotes/HMTheQueen is referred to as Brenda. Prince Charles is Brian.
27th Jan '17 1:59:28 AM LondonKdS
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Despite editorial's distrust of the internet (believing the main message you should get from their website is "Buy the magazine" - Street of Shame having reported on the collapsing fortunes of far too many newspapers whose websites mean you don't ''need'' to buy the paper), there is a {{podcast}}, ''[[http://www.private-eye.co.uk/eyeplayer/podcast Page 94]]'', which reveals behind-the-scenes stuff about how the journalists research their stories and where the jokewriters get their ideas.

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Despite editorial's distrust The magazine was notable in the early 21st-century for rejecting the choice of many newspapers to make the full content of the internet (believing print edition freely available on the main message you should get from their website is "Buy website, with the magazine" - Street of Shame having reported on column frequently (and, as it turned out, correctly) mocking the collapsing fortunes belief that relying on online advertising revenue would be a sustainable business model. The website has been used only to provide samples of far too many newspapers whose websites mean you don't ''need'' to buy the paper), humorous content, and sometimes to make available detailed data files resulting from investigative journalism. Although there is still no digital edition, there is a {{podcast}}, ''[[http://www.private-eye.co.uk/eyeplayer/podcast Page 94]]'', which reveals behind-the-scenes stuff about how the journalists research their stories and where the jokewriters get their ideas.
26th Jan '17 7:06:29 AM LondonKdS
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* "Dave Snooty and his New Pals"- UsefulNotes/DavidCameron in the style of ''ComicBook/TheBeano'' strip ''Lord Snooty''. UsefulNotes/BorisJohnson features quite a bit (crossing over from the earlier Beano parody ''[[ComicStrip/DennisTheMenaceUK Boris The Menace]]'').

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* "Dave Snooty and his New Pals"- Pals" - (defunct) UsefulNotes/DavidCameron in the style of ''ComicBook/TheBeano'' strip ''Lord Snooty''. UsefulNotes/BorisJohnson features quite a bit (crossing over from the earlier Beano parody ''[[ComicStrip/DennisTheMenaceUK Boris The Menace]]'').



** The Evening Standard is called "The Evening Boris" for its support of the current Mayor of London, Boris Johnson.

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** The Evening Standard is called "The Evening Boris" for its support of the current previous Mayor of London, Boris Johnson.
20th Jan '17 4:28:10 PM Outis
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Added DiffLines:

* MedalOfDishonour: The Eye bestows the Order of the Brown Nose (OBN) upon people who engage in egregious sycophantic praise. There are also three annual awards or sets thereof announced at Christmas or New Year:
** The ''Nooks and Corners'' architecture columnist "Piloti" awards the Sir Hugh Casson Medal for the Worst New Building of the year. (It's named after an architect whom Piloti despised because in his later years he routinely took a fee to give evidence in favour of demolishing worthwhile buildings.)
** ''Rotten Boroughs'', the local government column, presents a set of awards to local councillors, senior council staff etc. that it has reported on throughout the year. The categories vary from year to year but have included e.g. "Tory Bigot of the Year", "Jailbird of the Year" and "Nepotism Award".
** The ''Literary Review'' column presents the Christmas Log-Rolling Awards for the most blatant examples of log-rolling (i.e. writers trading favours by praising each other's books) and other such disreputable practices in newspapers' and magazines' "book of the year" pieces.
4th Jan '17 3:19:44 PM DaibhidC
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to:

Despite editorial's distrust of the internet (believing the main message you should get from their website is "Buy the magazine" - Street of Shame having reported on the collapsing fortunes of far too many newspapers whose websites mean you don't ''need'' to buy the paper), there is a {{podcast}}, ''[[http://www.private-eye.co.uk/eyeplayer/podcast Page 94]]'', which reveals behind-the-scenes stuff about how the journalists research their stories and where the jokewriters get their ideas.
2nd Jan '17 4:12:28 PM MadCormorant
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Added DiffLines:

*** In fact, this nickname has gotten prevalent enough that TheOtherWiki automatically redirects you to Douglas-Home's page if you type in Baillie Vass in the search bar.
14th Nov '16 8:37:05 AM Esteis
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It does a lot of investigative journalism and has been sued for libel a considerable number of times (it usually loses, and would have been bankrupted by the damages if not for donations from supporters and subscribers). Its editor, Ian Hislop (a team captain on ''Series/HaveIGotNewsForYou''), even held the record for 'Most Sued Man in England' for a time. For many years it was verging on a point of pride how long it had been since they ''won'' a case. The first time Ian Hislop won a libel suit, the following issue was filled in celebratory manner with yet more libelous material, just because they knew they'd get away with it. [[note]]For those reading from outside the UK, it's important to point out that under English law it is possible for something to be both perfectly true ''and'' libelous, as it is up to the defendant to prove the truth of what he/she has said, and even then truth is not considered an absolute defense against libel. In the United States, the person bringing the suit has to prove that what was said is false, at least when the defendant is a newspaper or other media outlet (the standard for when the defendant is an individual [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFederalism varies from state to state]], but the law of defamation as applied to the media is largely controlled by the Free Press Clause of the Fist Amendment to the federal Constitution and is thus consistent across states). Also, American law ''does'' consider the truth to be an absolute defense; moreover, in the United States, statements of opinion are also protected, and the definition of "opinion" is quite broad--even factually false statements can be "opinion" in the right context. The flip side of this is that getting an injunction to prevent something being published in the first place is rather harder in Britain - otherwise known as ''Publish and be damned''. Or at least, it was, before the current fad for "super injunctions", where the target is not even allowed to say they have had an injunction put upon them, let alone talk about the original subject...[[/note]]

to:

It does a lot of investigative journalism and has been sued for libel a considerable number of times (it usually loses, and would have been bankrupted by the damages if not for donations from supporters and subscribers). Its editor, Ian Hislop (a team captain on ''Series/HaveIGotNewsForYou''), even held the record for 'Most Sued Man in England' for a time. For many years it was verging on a point of pride how long it had been since they ''won'' a case. The first time Ian Hislop won a libel suit, the following issue was filled in celebratory manner with yet more libelous material, just because they knew they'd get away with it. [[note]]For those reading from outside the UK, it's important to point out that under English law it is possible for something to be both perfectly true ''and'' libelous, as it is up to the defendant to prove the truth of what he/she has said, and even then truth is not considered an absolute defense against libel. In the United States, the person bringing the suit has to prove that what was said is false, at least when the defendant is a newspaper or other media outlet (the standard for when the defendant is an individual [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFederalism varies from state to state]], but the law of defamation as applied to the media is largely controlled by the Free Press Clause of the Fist First Amendment to the federal Constitution and is thus consistent across states). Also, American law ''does'' consider the truth to be an absolute defense; moreover, in the United States, statements of opinion are also protected, and the definition of "opinion" is quite broad--even factually false statements can be "opinion" in the right context. The flip side of this is that getting an injunction to prevent something being published in the first place is rather harder in Britain - otherwise known as ''Publish and be damned''. Or at least, it was, before the current fad for "super injunctions", where the target is not even allowed to say they have had an injunction put upon them, let alone talk about the original subject...[[/note]]
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