History Magazine / PrivateEye

16th Jan '16 10:41:44 AM StFan
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* "The Broonites", which features the [[UsefulNotes/GordonBrown Brown]] camp of the now former Labour government and who all speak in exaggerated Scottish accents- even the English ones. This is done in the style of ''TheBroons'', a cartoon strip from [[BritishNewspapers The Sunday Post]].
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* "The Broonites", which features the [[UsefulNotes/GordonBrown Brown]] camp of the now former Labour government and who all speak in exaggerated Scottish accents- even the English ones. This is done in the style of ''TheBroons'', ''ComicStrip/TheBroons'', a cartoon strip from [[BritishNewspapers The Sunday Post]].
28th Dec '15 4:22:24 PM karstovich2
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It does a lot of investigative journalism and has been sued for libel a considerable number of times (it usually loses, and would have been bankrupted by the damages if not for donations from supporters and subscribers). Its editor, Ian Hislop (a team captain on ''HaveIGotNewsForYou''), even held the record for 'Most Sued Man in England' for a time. For many years it was verging on a point of pride how long it had been since they ''won'' a case. The first time Ian Hislop won a libel suit, the following issue was filled in celebratory manner with yet more libelous material, just because they knew they'd get away with it. [[note]]For those reading from outside the UK, it's important to point out that under English law it is possible for something to be both perfectly true ''and'' libelous, as it is up to the defendant to prove the truth of what he/she has said, and even then truth is not considered an absolute defense against libel. In the United States, the person bringing the suit has to prove that what was said is false, and American law ''does'' consider the truth to be an absolute defense; moreover, in the United States, statements of opinion are also protected, and the definition of "opinion" is quite broad--even factually false statements can be "opinion" in the right context. The flip side of this is that getting an injunction to prevent something being published in the first place is rather harder in Britain - otherwise known as ''Publish and be damned''. Or at least, it was, before the current fad for "super injunctions", where the target is not even allowed to say they have had an injunction put upon them, let alone talk about the original subject...[[/note]]
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It does a lot of investigative journalism and has been sued for libel a considerable number of times (it usually loses, and would have been bankrupted by the damages if not for donations from supporters and subscribers). Its editor, Ian Hislop (a team captain on ''HaveIGotNewsForYou''), even held the record for 'Most Sued Man in England' for a time. For many years it was verging on a point of pride how long it had been since they ''won'' a case. The first time Ian Hislop won a libel suit, the following issue was filled in celebratory manner with yet more libelous material, just because they knew they'd get away with it. [[note]]For those reading from outside the UK, it's important to point out that under English law it is possible for something to be both perfectly true ''and'' libelous, as it is up to the defendant to prove the truth of what he/she has said, and even then truth is not considered an absolute defense against libel. In the United States, the person bringing the suit has to prove that what was said is false, at least when the defendant is a newspaper or other media outlet (the standard for when the defendant is an individual [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFederalism varies from state to state]], but the law of defamation as applied to the media is largely controlled by the Free Press Clause of the Fist Amendment to the federal Constitution and is thus consistent across states). Also, American law ''does'' consider the truth to be an absolute defense; moreover, in the United States, statements of opinion are also protected, and the definition of "opinion" is quite broad--even factually false statements can be "opinion" in the right context. The flip side of this is that getting an injunction to prevent something being published in the first place is rather harder in Britain - otherwise known as ''Publish and be damned''. Or at least, it was, before the current fad for "super injunctions", where the target is not even allowed to say they have had an injunction put upon them, let alone talk about the original subject...[[/note]]
31st Oct '15 4:59:53 PM nombretomado
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** UsefulNotes/BorisJohnson is "[[TheBeano Beano Boris]]" due to his cartoonish antics. Also sometimes known as "Boris the Menace" for the same reason.
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** UsefulNotes/BorisJohnson is "[[TheBeano "[[ComicBook/TheBeano Beano Boris]]" due to his cartoonish antics. Also sometimes known as "Boris the Menace" for the same reason.
20th Oct '15 10:31:24 PM tenryufan
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* OldShame: For years, ''Private Eye'' campaigned against the MMR vaccine based on Dr. Andrew Wakefield's word that it caused autism, at one point running a 33-page "special report" supporting his claims. After it was discovered that Wakefield's claims were part of a hoax, the paper printed a column in which they admitted they "got it wrong."

* TechnologyMarchesOn: The ''Eye'' used to be known for publishing extracts from newspapers where the type had been set wrong, often producing a hilarious or bizarre juxtaposition. Now that newspapers are written electronically, this doesn't happen so much anymore; the modern equivalent, usually less funny, is when newspaper journalists put in filler text for a caption and forget to replace it with the real caption. These mistakes (together with AccidentalInnuendo examples) used to be collectively known as 'boobs' and, amusingly, a compilation was published called ''Private Eye's Bumper Book of Boobs''. In the following years, they started moving on to compilating screenshots of absurd contextual advertisements in newspapers' websites, such as ads selling a holiday cruise in an article about a cruise crashing and sinking.

* WhatCouldHaveBeen: Parodied with the "First Drafts" cartoon series, which features famous authors either in the process of inventing their distinctive style or trying to write before having discovered it (such as Creator/PhilipRoth starting a book with "I'm Jewish; I don't see much mileage in that, so, moving on...")
29th Sep '15 12:53:15 PM Anddrix
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* ADayInTheLimelight: Polly Filler's husband "The Useless Simon", normally TheGhost, took over her column in the wake of her reading ''FiftyShadesOfGrey'' and becoming a sexual submissive.
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* ADayInTheLimelight: Polly Filler's husband "The Useless Simon", normally TheGhost, took over her column in the wake of her reading ''FiftyShadesOfGrey'' ''Literature/FiftyShadesOfGrey'' and becoming a sexual submissive.
21st Aug '15 10:19:57 AM AgProv
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Expanding and revising on how grim it is to be an affluent arty in North London....
* "It's Grim Up North London" - features a group of friends of the new age liberal type.
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* "It's Grim Up North London" - features a group of artsy-pretentious friends of the new age liberal type.type. Replaced a long-running strip ''The Gays'' that was drawing complaints over perceived homophobia. Readers of IGUNL suspect this strip is still "The Gays" with a slant on affluent arty Islington pretentiousness.
20th Jun '15 2:21:42 PM EliasQFuntybunt
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** "The New Coalition Academy" - in the style of a posh school's newsletter for UsefulNotes/DavidCameron's Tory-Lib Dem coalition. Cameron is the headmaster, while UsefulNotes/NickClegg is his deputy. Inspired by the Academies that were part of the Coalition's [[BritishEducationSystem education policy]]. Following the 2015 General Election and Nick Clegg's departure from the Government, became the "Cameron Free School".
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** "The New Coalition Academy" - in the style of a posh school's newsletter for UsefulNotes/DavidCameron's Tory-Lib Dem coalition. Cameron is the headmaster, while UsefulNotes/NickClegg is his deputy. Inspired by the Academies that were part of the Coalition's [[BritishEducationSystem education policy]]. Following the 2015 General Election and Nick Clegg's departure from the Government, became the "Cameron Free School".School", with the Lib Dem bird poorly cut out of the previous logo (which combined it with the Conservative tree).
11th Jun '15 5:54:55 AM john_e
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** "The New Coalition Academy" - in the style of a posh school's newsletter for UsefulNotes/DavidCameron's Tory-Lib Dem coalition. Cameron is the headmaster, while UsefulNotes/NickClegg is his deputy. Inspired by the Academies that were part of the Coalition's [[BritishEducationSystem education policy]]. ** "Prime Ministerial Decrees"- UsefulNotes/GordonBrown as a Stalin-style leader. Inspired by a comment by one of Brown's underlings that he had "Stalinst" tendencies in his leadership.
to:
** "The New Coalition Academy" - in the style of a posh school's newsletter for UsefulNotes/DavidCameron's Tory-Lib Dem coalition. Cameron is the headmaster, while UsefulNotes/NickClegg is his deputy. Inspired by the Academies that were part of the Coalition's [[BritishEducationSystem education policy]]. policy]]. Following the 2015 General Election and Nick Clegg's departure from the Government, became the "Cameron Free School". ** "Prime Ministerial Decrees"- UsefulNotes/GordonBrown as a Stalin-style leader. Inspired by a comment by one of Brown's underlings that he had "Stalinst" "Stalinist" tendencies in his leadership.
5th Jun '15 12:37:01 PM MyFinalEdits
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* TechnologyMarchesOn: The ''Eye'' used to be known for publishing extracts from newspapers where the type had been set wrong, often producing a hilarious or bizarre juxtaposition. Now that newspapers are written electronically, this doesn't happen so much anymore; the modern equivalent, usually less funny, is when newspaper journalists put in filler text for a caption and forget to replace it with the real caption. ** HavingAGayOldTime: These mistakes (together with AccidentalInnuendo examples) used to be collectively known as 'boobs' and, amusingly, a compilation was published called ''Private Eye's Bumper Book of Boobs''. ** In recent years, they have moved on to compilating screenshots of absurd contextual advertisements in newspapers' websites, such as ads selling a holiday cruise in an article about a cruise crashing and sinking.
to:
* TechnologyMarchesOn: The ''Eye'' used to be known for publishing extracts from newspapers where the type had been set wrong, often producing a hilarious or bizarre juxtaposition. Now that newspapers are written electronically, this doesn't happen so much anymore; the modern equivalent, usually less funny, is when newspaper journalists put in filler text for a caption and forget to replace it with the real caption. ** HavingAGayOldTime: caption. These mistakes (together with AccidentalInnuendo examples) used to be collectively known as 'boobs' and, amusingly, a compilation was published called ''Private Eye's Bumper Book of Boobs''. ** Boobs''. In recent the following years, they have moved started moving on to compilating screenshots of absurd contextual advertisements in newspapers' websites, such as ads selling a holiday cruise in an article about a cruise crashing and sinking.
12th May '15 2:11:54 PM went
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Added DiffLines:
** In recent years, they have moved on to compilating screenshots of absurd contextual advertisements in newspapers' websites, such as ads selling a holiday cruise in an article about a cruise crashing and sinking.
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