History Magazine / PrivateEye

21st Jun '16 10:40:34 AM AgProv
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* Gnome: a spoof editorial by the fictional proprieter Lord Gnome or his lackey E. Strobes. (Lord Gnome appeared in the 1993 TV special ''The Bore of the Year Awards'', played by the ''Eye''[='=]s real-life contributor and majority shareholder PeterCook.) Also, "The Curse of Gnome", where they point out that people who've won libel cases against them generally come to a bad end.

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* Gnome: a spoof editorial by the fictional proprieter Lord Gnome or his lackey E. Strobes. (Lord Gnome appeared in the 1993 TV special ''The Bore of the Year Awards'', played by the ''Eye''[='=]s real-life contributor and majority shareholder PeterCook.Creator/PeterCook.) Also, "The Curse of Gnome", where they point out that people who've won libel cases against them generally come to a bad end.
11th Jun '16 1:39:43 PM DaibhidC
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* "The Adventures of Mr Millibean"- Replacing ''The Broon-ites'', Ed Miliband and the Labour Shadow Cabinet in the style of the ''WesternAnimation/MrBean'' cartoon spinoff.

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* "The Adventures of Mr Millibean"- Replacing ''The Broon-ites'', Ed Miliband and the Labour Shadow Cabinet in the style of the ''WesternAnimation/MrBean'' cartoon spinoff. Itself replaced by ''ComicStrip/AndyCapp-in-Ring'', about Andy Burnham's bid for Labour leadership, then by a text piece which was simply "Jeremy Corbyn Writes" (after a brief experiment with a strip portraying Corbyn as [[Franchise/StarWars Obi-Wan Kenobi]]).
11th Jun '16 1:26:13 PM DaibhidC
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** A related joke is reporting banal celebrity or royal news in a generic way stripped of all names to show how CaptainObvious it is, such as reporting on Prince Harry having a scandal as "Nineteen year old boy goes out, gets drunk, does ill-advised things; nation stunned".

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** A related joke is reporting banal celebrity or royal news in a generic way stripped of all names to show how CaptainObvious it is, such as reporting on Prince Harry having a scandal as "Nineteen year old boy goes out, gets drunk, does ill-advised things; nation stunned". The ultimate example of this was the cover on the birth of Prince George, which just consisted of the huge headline "WOMAN HAS BABY".
12th May '16 3:24:52 PM AgProv
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%%[[caption-width-right:285: The very first edition, layout and cartooning by Creator/WillieRushton.]]

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%%[[caption-width-right:285: [[caption-width-right:285: The very first edition, layout and cartooning by Creator/WillieRushton.]]
]]


12th May '16 3:22:46 PM AgProv
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%%[[caption-width-right:285:The very first edition, layout and cartooning by Creator/WillieRushton.]]

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%%[[caption-width-right:285:The %%[[caption-width-right:285: The very first edition, layout and cartooning by Creator/WillieRushton.]]
12th May '16 3:21:57 PM AgProv
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%%[[caption-width-right:285:some caption text]]

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%%[[caption-width-right:285:some caption text]]
%%[[caption-width-right:285:The very first edition, layout and cartooning by Creator/WillieRushton.]]
12th May '16 3:20:42 PM AgProv
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A British [[http://www.private-eye.co.uk/ fortnightly magazine]] of current affairs and satirical humour, running since 1961.

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A British [[http://www.private-eye.co.uk/ fortnightly magazine]] of current affairs and satirical humour, running since 1961.
1961. Founders included its first editor Richard Ingrams, and comedians Creator/PeterCook and Creator/WillieRushton, who had all been contemporaries at Shrewsbury School and later at {{Oxbridge}}.
8th May '16 11:47:01 AM nombretomado
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It does a lot of investigative journalism and has been sued for libel a considerable number of times (it usually loses, and would have been bankrupted by the damages if not for donations from supporters and subscribers). Its editor, Ian Hislop (a team captain on ''HaveIGotNewsForYou''), even held the record for 'Most Sued Man in England' for a time. For many years it was verging on a point of pride how long it had been since they ''won'' a case. The first time Ian Hislop won a libel suit, the following issue was filled in celebratory manner with yet more libelous material, just because they knew they'd get away with it. [[note]]For those reading from outside the UK, it's important to point out that under English law it is possible for something to be both perfectly true ''and'' libelous, as it is up to the defendant to prove the truth of what he/she has said, and even then truth is not considered an absolute defense against libel. In the United States, the person bringing the suit has to prove that what was said is false, at least when the defendant is a newspaper or other media outlet (the standard for when the defendant is an individual [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFederalism varies from state to state]], but the law of defamation as applied to the media is largely controlled by the Free Press Clause of the Fist Amendment to the federal Constitution and is thus consistent across states). Also, American law ''does'' consider the truth to be an absolute defense; moreover, in the United States, statements of opinion are also protected, and the definition of "opinion" is quite broad--even factually false statements can be "opinion" in the right context. The flip side of this is that getting an injunction to prevent something being published in the first place is rather harder in Britain - otherwise known as ''Publish and be damned''. Or at least, it was, before the current fad for "super injunctions", where the target is not even allowed to say they have had an injunction put upon them, let alone talk about the original subject...[[/note]]

to:

It does a lot of investigative journalism and has been sued for libel a considerable number of times (it usually loses, and would have been bankrupted by the damages if not for donations from supporters and subscribers). Its editor, Ian Hislop (a team captain on ''HaveIGotNewsForYou''), ''Series/HaveIGotNewsForYou''), even held the record for 'Most Sued Man in England' for a time. For many years it was verging on a point of pride how long it had been since they ''won'' a case. The first time Ian Hislop won a libel suit, the following issue was filled in celebratory manner with yet more libelous material, just because they knew they'd get away with it. [[note]]For those reading from outside the UK, it's important to point out that under English law it is possible for something to be both perfectly true ''and'' libelous, as it is up to the defendant to prove the truth of what he/she has said, and even then truth is not considered an absolute defense against libel. In the United States, the person bringing the suit has to prove that what was said is false, at least when the defendant is a newspaper or other media outlet (the standard for when the defendant is an individual [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFederalism varies from state to state]], but the law of defamation as applied to the media is largely controlled by the Free Press Clause of the Fist Amendment to the federal Constitution and is thus consistent across states). Also, American law ''does'' consider the truth to be an absolute defense; moreover, in the United States, statements of opinion are also protected, and the definition of "opinion" is quite broad--even factually false statements can be "opinion" in the right context. The flip side of this is that getting an injunction to prevent something being published in the first place is rather harder in Britain - otherwise known as ''Publish and be damned''. Or at least, it was, before the current fad for "super injunctions", where the target is not even allowed to say they have had an injunction put upon them, let alone talk about the original subject...[[/note]]
16th Jan '16 10:41:44 AM StFan
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* "The Broonites", which features the [[UsefulNotes/GordonBrown Brown]] camp of the now former Labour government and who all speak in exaggerated Scottish accents- even the English ones. This is done in the style of ''TheBroons'', a cartoon strip from [[BritishNewspapers The Sunday Post]].

to:

* "The Broonites", which features the [[UsefulNotes/GordonBrown Brown]] camp of the now former Labour government and who all speak in exaggerated Scottish accents- even the English ones. This is done in the style of ''TheBroons'', ''ComicStrip/TheBroons'', a cartoon strip from [[BritishNewspapers The Sunday Post]].
28th Dec '15 4:22:24 PM karstovich2
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It does a lot of investigative journalism and has been sued for libel a considerable number of times (it usually loses, and would have been bankrupted by the damages if not for donations from supporters and subscribers). Its editor, Ian Hislop (a team captain on ''HaveIGotNewsForYou''), even held the record for 'Most Sued Man in England' for a time. For many years it was verging on a point of pride how long it had been since they ''won'' a case. The first time Ian Hislop won a libel suit, the following issue was filled in celebratory manner with yet more libelous material, just because they knew they'd get away with it. [[note]]For those reading from outside the UK, it's important to point out that under English law it is possible for something to be both perfectly true ''and'' libelous, as it is up to the defendant to prove the truth of what he/she has said, and even then truth is not considered an absolute defense against libel. In the United States, the person bringing the suit has to prove that what was said is false, and American law ''does'' consider the truth to be an absolute defense; moreover, in the United States, statements of opinion are also protected, and the definition of "opinion" is quite broad--even factually false statements can be "opinion" in the right context. The flip side of this is that getting an injunction to prevent something being published in the first place is rather harder in Britain - otherwise known as ''Publish and be damned''. Or at least, it was, before the current fad for "super injunctions", where the target is not even allowed to say they have had an injunction put upon them, let alone talk about the original subject...[[/note]]

to:

It does a lot of investigative journalism and has been sued for libel a considerable number of times (it usually loses, and would have been bankrupted by the damages if not for donations from supporters and subscribers). Its editor, Ian Hislop (a team captain on ''HaveIGotNewsForYou''), even held the record for 'Most Sued Man in England' for a time. For many years it was verging on a point of pride how long it had been since they ''won'' a case. The first time Ian Hislop won a libel suit, the following issue was filled in celebratory manner with yet more libelous material, just because they knew they'd get away with it. [[note]]For those reading from outside the UK, it's important to point out that under English law it is possible for something to be both perfectly true ''and'' libelous, as it is up to the defendant to prove the truth of what he/she has said, and even then truth is not considered an absolute defense against libel. In the United States, the person bringing the suit has to prove that what was said is false, at least when the defendant is a newspaper or other media outlet (the standard for when the defendant is an individual [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFederalism varies from state to state]], but the law of defamation as applied to the media is largely controlled by the Free Press Clause of the Fist Amendment to the federal Constitution and is thus consistent across states). Also, American law ''does'' consider the truth to be an absolute defense; moreover, in the United States, statements of opinion are also protected, and the definition of "opinion" is quite broad--even factually false statements can be "opinion" in the right context. The flip side of this is that getting an injunction to prevent something being published in the first place is rather harder in Britain - otherwise known as ''Publish and be damned''. Or at least, it was, before the current fad for "super injunctions", where the target is not even allowed to say they have had an injunction put upon them, let alone talk about the original subject...[[/note]]
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