History LoopholeAbuse / RealLife

23rd Jun '17 6:50:45 PM Lirodon
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* In 1990, the FCC implemented the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children%27s_Television_Act Children's Television Act]] to address concerns over the lack of educational programming for children on television, and how advertisers are marketing to the demographic. These rules, made more rigid in 1996, require all full-power TV stations to air three hours of "core educational programming" per-week which "[[EdutainmentShow serves the "educational and informational needs of children"]]. The "E/I" rules have been looped around by broadcasters for decades; the act only stated that [=E/I=] programs had to be regularly-scheduled and air between 7:00 a.m. and 10 p.m., so at first broadcasters scheduled them [[FridayNightDeathSlot during the hours when their target demographic was at school]].[[note]](The idea of scheduling educational programs like this was not as far-fetched as it seemed. In the 1970's and 1980's, educational programs intended to be viewed live at school were actually a major fixture of daytime television in the United Kingdom, typically to comply with laws that restricted Creator/{{ITV}} from airing commercial-supported programming until later in the day, not to mention the lack of [=VCRs=]. Most of these programs were phased out or relegated to late-night hours for recording by the early 1990's.)[[/note]] Some stations attempted to justify non-edutainment programs as complying with this requirement, such as ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'', ABC's former ABC Kids block (which aired older reruns of Creator/DisneyChannel programs such as ''Series/HannahMontana'' and ''Series/ThatsSoRaven'') and more recently Creator/{{Univision}} with youth-oriented telenovelas (they actually got fined ''mucho grande'' for it too), but only Green Bay's WLUK was truly successful--having aired reruns of ''Series/LittleHouseOnThePrairie'' as E/I credit because it was a historical series based on children's novels (plus the author, Laura Ingalls Wilder, was born in Wisconsin).[[note]](it has since been replaced by more conventional E/I programming on weekends, with ''Little House'' giving away to Kelly Ripa)[[/note]]

to:

* In 1990, the FCC implemented the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children%27s_Television_Act Children's Television Act]] to address concerns over the lack of educational programming for children on television, and how advertisers are marketing to the demographic. These rules, made more rigid in 1996, require all full-power TV stations to air three hours of "core educational programming" per-week which "[[EdutainmentShow serves the "educational and informational needs of children"]]. The "E/I" rules have been looped around by broadcasters for decades; the act only stated that [=E/I=] programs had to be regularly-scheduled and air between 7:00 a.m. and 10 p.m., so at first broadcasters scheduled them [[FridayNightDeathSlot during the hours when their target demographic was at school]].[[note]](The idea of scheduling educational programs like this was not as far-fetched as it seemed. In the 1970's and 1980's, educational programs intended to be viewed live at school were actually a major fixture of daytime television in the United Kingdom, typically to comply with for public service remits, and laws that restricted Creator/{{ITV}} from airing commercial-supported programming until later in the day, not day. Not to mention the lack of [=VCRs=]. that [=VCRs=] were not as ubiquitous yet. Most of these programs were phased out out, or relegated to late-night off-peak hours so teachers could set their VCR for recording by the early 1990's.them, and networks could add more ''actual'' daytime programs.)[[/note]] Some stations attempted to justify non-edutainment programs as complying with this requirement, such as ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'', ABC's former ABC Kids block (which aired older reruns of Creator/DisneyChannel programs such as ''Series/HannahMontana'' and ''Series/ThatsSoRaven'') and more recently Creator/{{Univision}} with youth-oriented telenovelas (they actually got fined ''mucho grande'' for it too), but only Green Bay's WLUK was truly successful--having aired reruns of ''Series/LittleHouseOnThePrairie'' as E/I credit because it was a historical series based on children's novels (plus the author, Laura Ingalls Wilder, was born in Wisconsin).[[note]](it has since been replaced by more conventional E/I programming on weekends, with ''Little House'' giving away to Kelly Ripa)[[/note]]
23rd Jun '17 6:44:13 PM Lirodon
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* In 1990, the FCC implemented the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children%27s_Television_Act Children's Television Act]] to address concerns over the lack of educational programming for children on television, and how advertisers are marketing to the demographic. These rules, made more rigid in 1996, require all full-power TV stations to air three hours of "core educational programming" per-week which "[[EdutainmentShow serves the "educational and informational needs of children"]]. The "E/I" rules have been looped around by broadcasters for decades; the act only stated that [=E/I=] programs had to be regularly-scheduled and air between 7:00 a.m. and 10 p.m., so at first broadcasters scheduled them [[FridayNightDeathSlot during the hours when their target demographic was at school]].[[note]](The idea of scheduling educational programs like this was not as far-fetched as it seemed. In the 1970's and 1980's, educational programs intended to be viewed live at school were actually a major fixture of daytime television in the United Kingdom, typically to comply with laws that restricted Creator/{{ITV}} from airing commercial-supported programming until later in the day, not to mention the lack of [=VCRs=]. Most of these programs were phased out or relegated to late-night hours for recording by the early 1990's.)[[/note]]

Some stations attempted to justify non-edutainment programs as complying with this requirement, such as ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'', ABC's former ABC Kids block (which aired older reruns of Creator/DisneyChannel programs such as ''Series/HannahMontana'' and ''Series/ThatsSoRaven'') and more recently Creator/{{Univision}} with youth-oriented telenovelas (they actually got fined ''mucho grande'' for it too), but only Green Bay's WLUK was truly successful--having aired reruns of ''Series/LittleHouseOnThePrairie'' as E/I credit because it was a historical series based on children's novels (plus the author, Laura Ingalls Wilder, was born in Wisconsin).[[note]](it has since been replaced by more conventional E/I programming on weekends, with ''Little House'' giving away to Kelly Ripa)[[/note]]

to:

* In 1990, the FCC implemented the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children%27s_Television_Act Children's Television Act]] to address concerns over the lack of educational programming for children on television, and how advertisers are marketing to the demographic. These rules, made more rigid in 1996, require all full-power TV stations to air three hours of "core educational programming" per-week which "[[EdutainmentShow serves the "educational and informational needs of children"]]. The "E/I" rules have been looped around by broadcasters for decades; the act only stated that [=E/I=] programs had to be regularly-scheduled and air between 7:00 a.m. and 10 p.m., so at first broadcasters scheduled them [[FridayNightDeathSlot during the hours when their target demographic was at school]].[[note]](The idea of scheduling educational programs like this was not as far-fetched as it seemed. In the 1970's and 1980's, educational programs intended to be viewed live at school were actually a major fixture of daytime television in the United Kingdom, typically to comply with laws that restricted Creator/{{ITV}} from airing commercial-supported programming until later in the day, not to mention the lack of [=VCRs=]. Most of these programs were phased out or relegated to late-night hours for recording by the early 1990's.)[[/note]]

)[[/note]] Some stations attempted to justify non-edutainment programs as complying with this requirement, such as ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'', ABC's former ABC Kids block (which aired older reruns of Creator/DisneyChannel programs such as ''Series/HannahMontana'' and ''Series/ThatsSoRaven'') and more recently Creator/{{Univision}} with youth-oriented telenovelas (they actually got fined ''mucho grande'' for it too), but only Green Bay's WLUK was truly successful--having aired reruns of ''Series/LittleHouseOnThePrairie'' as E/I credit because it was a historical series based on children's novels (plus the author, Laura Ingalls Wilder, was born in Wisconsin).[[note]](it has since been replaced by more conventional E/I programming on weekends, with ''Little House'' giving away to Kelly Ripa)[[/note]]
23rd Jun '17 6:43:57 PM Lirodon
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* In 1990, the FCC implemented the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children%27s_Television_Act Children's Television Act]] to address concerns over the lack of educational programming for children on television, and how advertisers are marketing to the demographic. These rules, made more rigid in 1996, require all full-power TV stations to air three hours of "core educational programming" per-week which "[[EdutainmentShow serves the "educational and informational needs of children"]]. The "E/I" rules have been looped around by broadcasters for decades; the act only stated that [=E/I=] programs had to be regularly-scheduled and air between 7:00 a.m. and 10 p.m., so at first broadcasters scheduled them [[FridayNightDeathSlot during the hours when their target demographic was at school (well, if they were healthy, that is)]]. Some stations attempted to justify non-edutainment programs as complying with this requirement, such as ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'', ABC's former ABC Kids block (which aired older reruns of Creator/DisneyChannel programs such as ''Series/HannahMontana'' and ''Series/ThatsSoRaven'') and more recently Creator/{{Univision}} with youth-oriented telenovelas (they actually got fined ''mucho grande'' for it too), but only Green Bay's WLUK was truly successful--having aired reruns of ''Series/LittleHouseOnThePrairie'' as E/I credit because it was a historical series based on children's novels (plus the author, Laura Ingalls Wilder, was born in Wisconsin).[[note]](it has since been replaced by more conventional E/I programming on weekends, with ''Little House'' giving away to Kelly Ripa)[[/note]]

to:

* In 1990, the FCC implemented the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children%27s_Television_Act Children's Television Act]] to address concerns over the lack of educational programming for children on television, and how advertisers are marketing to the demographic. These rules, made more rigid in 1996, require all full-power TV stations to air three hours of "core educational programming" per-week which "[[EdutainmentShow serves the "educational and informational needs of children"]]. The "E/I" rules have been looped around by broadcasters for decades; the act only stated that [=E/I=] programs had to be regularly-scheduled and air between 7:00 a.m. and 10 p.m., so at first broadcasters scheduled them [[FridayNightDeathSlot during the hours when their target demographic was at school]].[[note]](The idea of scheduling educational programs like this was not as far-fetched as it seemed. In the 1970's and 1980's, educational programs intended to be viewed live at school (well, if they were healthy, actually a major fixture of daytime television in the United Kingdom, typically to comply with laws that is)]].restricted Creator/{{ITV}} from airing commercial-supported programming until later in the day, not to mention the lack of [=VCRs=]. Most of these programs were phased out or relegated to late-night hours for recording by the early 1990's.)[[/note]]

Some stations attempted to justify non-edutainment programs as complying with this requirement, such as ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'', ABC's former ABC Kids block (which aired older reruns of Creator/DisneyChannel programs such as ''Series/HannahMontana'' and ''Series/ThatsSoRaven'') and more recently Creator/{{Univision}} with youth-oriented telenovelas (they actually got fined ''mucho grande'' for it too), but only Green Bay's WLUK was truly successful--having aired reruns of ''Series/LittleHouseOnThePrairie'' as E/I credit because it was a historical series based on children's novels (plus the author, Laura Ingalls Wilder, was born in Wisconsin).[[note]](it has since been replaced by more conventional E/I programming on weekends, with ''Little House'' giving away to Kelly Ripa)[[/note]]
23rd Jun '17 6:29:16 PM Lirodon
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* In 1990, the FCC implemented the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children%27s_Television_Act Children's Television Act]] to address concerns over the lack of educational programming for children on television, and how advertisers are marketing to the demographic. These rules, made more rigid in 1996, require all full-power TV stations to air three hours of "core educational programming" per-week which "[[EdutainmentShow serves the "educational and informational needs of children"]]. The "E/I" rule has been looped around by broadcasters for decades; at first, broadcasters elected to air these educational programs during the hours when their target demographic was at school--a ''de facto'' [[FridayNightDeathSlot death slot]] for children's television. The act only stated that [=E/I=] programs had to be regularly-scheduled and air between 7:00 a.m. and 10 p.m. Some stations have attempted to justify non-edutainment programs as complying with this requirement, such as ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'', ABC's former ABC Kids block (which aired older reruns of Creator/DisneyChannel programs such as ''Series/HannahMontana'' and ''Series/ThatsSoRaven'') and more recently Creator/{{Univision}} with youth-oriented telenovelas (they actually got fined ''mucho grande'' for it too), but only Green Bay's WLUK was truly successful--having aired reruns of ''Series/LittleHouseOnThePrairie'' as E/I credit because it was a historical series based on children's novels (plus the author, Laura Ingalls Wilder, was born in Wisconsin).[[note]](it has since been replaced by more conventional E/I programming on weekends, with ''Little House'' giving away to Kelly Ripa)[[/note]]
* The CTA contains restrictions on advertising during programs aimed at children, including the prohibition of ''any'' ads for a product or service related to the show that it airs during ("host-selling"), as it will turn the entire show into a commercial, thus violating a limit on the amount of commercials that can be broadcast during such a program. The FCC claims no jurisdiction over cable channels when it comes to these sorts of content rules. That meant that the practical effect of the Children's Television Act was to basically slowly kill kids' shows on broadcast television, while the practical effect of restrictions on content in shows for adults is to cripple broadcasters' ability to show the sort of edgy programming cable has become known for. E/I programs have largely moved to the graveyard slot of weekends. National sports broadcasts shuffle things further, especially on the west coast.

to:

* In 1990, the FCC implemented the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children%27s_Television_Act Children's Television Act]] to address concerns over the lack of educational programming for children on television, and how advertisers are marketing to the demographic. These rules, made more rigid in 1996, require all full-power TV stations to air three hours of "core educational programming" per-week which "[[EdutainmentShow serves the "educational and informational needs of children"]]. The "E/I" rule has rules have been looped around by broadcasters for decades; at first, broadcasters elected to air these educational programs during the hours when their target demographic was at school--a ''de facto'' [[FridayNightDeathSlot death slot]] for children's television. The act only stated that [=E/I=] programs had to be regularly-scheduled and air between 7:00 a.m. and 10 p.m. , so at first broadcasters scheduled them [[FridayNightDeathSlot during the hours when their target demographic was at school (well, if they were healthy, that is)]]. Some stations have attempted to justify non-edutainment programs as complying with this requirement, such as ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'', ABC's former ABC Kids block (which aired older reruns of Creator/DisneyChannel programs such as ''Series/HannahMontana'' and ''Series/ThatsSoRaven'') and more recently Creator/{{Univision}} with youth-oriented telenovelas (they actually got fined ''mucho grande'' for it too), but only Green Bay's WLUK was truly successful--having aired reruns of ''Series/LittleHouseOnThePrairie'' as E/I credit because it was a historical series based on children's novels (plus the author, Laura Ingalls Wilder, was born in Wisconsin).[[note]](it has since been replaced by more conventional E/I programming on weekends, with ''Little House'' giving away to Kelly Ripa)[[/note]]
* The CTA also contains restrictions on advertising during programs aimed at children, including the prohibition of ''any'' ads for a product or service related to the show that it airs during ("host-selling"), as it will turn the entire show into a commercial, thus violating a limit on the amount of commercials that can be broadcast during such a program. The FCC claims no jurisdiction over cable channels when it comes to these sorts of content rules. That meant that the practical effect of the Children's Television Act was to basically slowly kill kids' shows on broadcast television, while the practical effect of restrictions on content in shows for adults is to cripple broadcasters' ability to show the sort of edgy programming cable has become known for. E/I programs have largely moved to the graveyard slot of weekends. National sports broadcasts shuffle things further, especially on the west coast.
23rd Jun '17 6:26:37 PM Lirodon
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*** Gray was seemingly preparing to do the same thing in Augusta (where it runs CBS station WRDW) with WAGT (NBC) through its purchase of Schurz; the company requested an exemption to the duopoly rule so it could own WAGT during the spectrum auction, but planned to shut it down upon closure of the purchase so they wouldn't be ''necessarily'' be running two of the top four stations in the market at the same time (It's the thought that counts, right?). The STA was primed and almost ready, but the FCC threw a wrench in Gray's ruse and stated that it had to continue operating WAGT. Said low-power station continues to serve as a bottom-feeder running programming from the equally bottom-feeder Yootoo America.

to:

*** Gray was seemingly preparing to do the same thing in Augusta (where it runs CBS station WRDW) with WAGT (NBC) through its purchase of Schurz; the company requested an exemption to the duopoly rule so it could own WAGT during the spectrum auction, but planned to shut it down upon closure of the purchase so they wouldn't be ''necessarily'' be running two of the top four stations in the market at the same time (It's the thought that counts, right?). The STA was primed and almost ready, but the FCC threw a wrench in Gray's ruse and stated that it had to could continue operating WAGT. to operate WAGT (well, continue as in ''had'' to) through the end of the spectrum auction. Said low-power station continues continued to serve as a bottom-feeder running programming from the equally bottom-feeder Yootoo America.America for the time being, until the speculated signal switch occurred on May 31, 2017 after WAGT was cashed in for a nearly-$41 million payout.
14th Jun '17 10:13:11 AM Lirodon
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* When regional TV stations in Australia decided to stop making local news programs to save money, the public outcry led to the government requiring that all commercial stations air a half-hour of local news each weekday. Southern Cross Ten gladly obliged, by airing mostly useless, five-minute news segments throughout the day.

to:

* When regional TV stations in Australia decided to stop making local news programs to save money, the public outcry led to the government requiring that all commercial stations air a half-hour of local news each weekday. Southern Cross Ten gladly obliged, by airing mostly useless, five-minute news segments throughout the day. After they switched to Nine, they later sub-contracted Nine to produce hour-long broadcasts for its stations instead.
10th Jun '17 3:07:37 PM nombretomado
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* Finland pulled this on Germany late in WorldWarII. The Northern country was on the Axis side without a formal alliance, saw the writing on the wall, but needed aid from Germany to get out of the war without being steamrolled. The Soviets had launched a huge offensive and the Finns did not have enough weapons and ammo to fight. Germany was distrustful to give Finns their weapons, for obvious reasons. So President Ryti said "As long as I am in charge, Finland won't make peace with the Soviets". The Finns stopped the Soviet advance; then Ryti resigned, Mannerheim was elected and commented "Personal vows of my predecessor do not bind me". Technically, this is true, as long as it was simply a personal vow. Generally on the international system, nations don't act on personal vows.

to:

* Finland pulled this on Germany late in WorldWarII.UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. The Northern country was on the Axis side without a formal alliance, saw the writing on the wall, but needed aid from Germany to get out of the war without being steamrolled. The Soviets had launched a huge offensive and the Finns did not have enough weapons and ammo to fight. Germany was distrustful to give Finns their weapons, for obvious reasons. So President Ryti said "As long as I am in charge, Finland won't make peace with the Soviets". The Finns stopped the Soviet advance; then Ryti resigned, Mannerheim was elected and commented "Personal vows of my predecessor do not bind me". Technically, this is true, as long as it was simply a personal vow. Generally on the international system, nations don't act on personal vows.



* Ain't no rule that a cartoon character can't serve in the Marines (as WesternAnimation/BugsBunny did during WorldWarII).

to:

* Ain't no rule that a cartoon character can't serve in the Marines (as WesternAnimation/BugsBunny did during WorldWarII).UsefulNotes/WorldWarII).



* In a campaign in Northern Africa during WorldWarII, the Germans were upset to find a particular branch of SaltTheEarth strategy: every oasis they came to had a sign in English stating that the oasis had been poisoned by the British army. When they complained that poisoning water constitutes a war crime, the British pointed out that there was absolutely nothing forbidding ''putting up false signs.''
* In WorldWarOne preexisting treaties banned the use of poison gas shells, but did not ban the deployment from canisters, which had not been considered at the time of writing. The later blanket bans closed this loophole.
* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_Naval_Treaty Washington Naval Treaty]] of 1922 was negotiated in the wake of WorldWarOne by the remaining major naval powers (Britain, the United States, Japan, France and Italy) to prevent another naval ArmsRace like the one preceding the war (and believed by many to have contributed to it). It was extended with few changes by the London Naval Treaty of 1930, which closed some of the loopholes that had already been discovered. With few exceptions it entirely prohibited battleship and battlecruiser construction for 10 years, and carefully prevented aircraft carriers (which had yet to be developed into truly viable combatants) from being constructed as battleships in all but name. As a result, cruisers became the primary focus of the world's major navies. Much effort was put into avoiding loopholes, but a significant one was overlooked by the negotiators (but ''not'' by the naval designers): while both heavy cruisers (defined as being armed with 8-inch guns or smaller) and light cruisers (armed with 6.1-inch or smaller guns) were limited in size, only heavy cruisers were limited in number, and the size limit was the same for both types. As a result, the three largest navies (US, British and Japanese) all decided that, once they reached their limits on heavy cruisers, they would built very large "light" cruisers, using essentially (or in Japan's case, entirely) identical hulls to the heavy cruisers, that would make up for their smaller guns by carrying [[MoreDakka a lot more of them]]. While heavy cruisers of the era were armed with an average of 9 8-inch guns (and prior to this innovation, light cruisers were being built with either 6, 8 or 9 6-inch guns), the US and Japanese "light" cruisers were armed with ''15'' 6-inch or 6.1-inch guns. The British "light" cruisers were originally going to as well, but were cut to 12 6-inch guns late in the design process to save money.
** Japan even took it a step further, building several 8-inch guns and turrets as [[BlatantLies spare parts for their heavy cruisers]]. When Japan withdrew from the treaty shortly before WorldWarII, the 6.1-inch turrets were removed and replaced with the 8-inch ones, thus having 4 new heavy cruisers with 10 8-inch guns.
** The Treaty also encouraged loophole abuse of a different sort, with the USat least. The US had few aircraft carriers at the time of the treaty, and the limit on them was rather high. The limit was unofficially increased, since the US could pass off at least a few of these carriers as "experimental" vessels, on which there was no limit. As a result, the US began spamming carriers--a development only encouraged when (after the end of the treaty) many of the Navy's Pacific Fleet battleships were destroyed at [[WorldWarII Pearl Harbor]]. And that, indirectly, is why the United States has as many aircraft carriers as the rest of the world ''combined''. Japan attempted to exploit this loophole with the tiny 8,000 ton carrier ''Ryuujou'', but that particular loophole was closed by the London Naval Treaty while ''Ryuujou'' was still under construction.

to:

* In a campaign in Northern Africa during WorldWarII, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, the Germans were upset to find a particular branch of SaltTheEarth strategy: every oasis they came to had a sign in English stating that the oasis had been poisoned by the British army. When they complained that poisoning water constitutes a war crime, the British pointed out that there was absolutely nothing forbidding ''putting up false signs.''
* In WorldWarOne UsefulNotes/WorldWarI preexisting treaties banned the use of poison gas shells, but did not ban the deployment from canisters, which had not been considered at the time of writing. The later blanket bans closed this loophole.
* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_Naval_Treaty Washington Naval Treaty]] of 1922 was negotiated in the wake of WorldWarOne UsefulNotes/WorldWarI by the remaining major naval powers (Britain, the United States, Japan, France and Italy) to prevent another naval ArmsRace like the one preceding the war (and believed by many to have contributed to it). It was extended with few changes by the London Naval Treaty of 1930, which closed some of the loopholes that had already been discovered. With few exceptions it entirely prohibited battleship and battlecruiser construction for 10 years, and carefully prevented aircraft carriers (which had yet to be developed into truly viable combatants) from being constructed as battleships in all but name. As a result, cruisers became the primary focus of the world's major navies. Much effort was put into avoiding loopholes, but a significant one was overlooked by the negotiators (but ''not'' by the naval designers): while both heavy cruisers (defined as being armed with 8-inch guns or smaller) and light cruisers (armed with 6.1-inch or smaller guns) were limited in size, only heavy cruisers were limited in number, and the size limit was the same for both types. As a result, the three largest navies (US, British and Japanese) all decided that, once they reached their limits on heavy cruisers, they would built very large "light" cruisers, using essentially (or in Japan's case, entirely) identical hulls to the heavy cruisers, that would make up for their smaller guns by carrying [[MoreDakka a lot more of them]]. While heavy cruisers of the era were armed with an average of 9 8-inch guns (and prior to this innovation, light cruisers were being built with either 6, 8 or 9 6-inch guns), the US and Japanese "light" cruisers were armed with ''15'' 6-inch or 6.1-inch guns. The British "light" cruisers were originally going to as well, but were cut to 12 6-inch guns late in the design process to save money.
** Japan even took it a step further, building several 8-inch guns and turrets as [[BlatantLies spare parts for their heavy cruisers]]. When Japan withdrew from the treaty shortly before WorldWarII, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, the 6.1-inch turrets were removed and replaced with the 8-inch ones, thus having 4 new heavy cruisers with 10 8-inch guns.
** The Treaty also encouraged loophole abuse of a different sort, with the USat least. The US had few aircraft carriers at the time of the treaty, and the limit on them was rather high. The limit was unofficially increased, since the US could pass off at least a few of these carriers as "experimental" vessels, on which there was no limit. As a result, the US began spamming carriers--a development only encouraged when (after the end of the treaty) many of the Navy's Pacific Fleet battleships were destroyed at [[WorldWarII [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII Pearl Harbor]]. And that, indirectly, is why the United States has as many aircraft carriers as the rest of the world ''combined''. Japan attempted to exploit this loophole with the tiny 8,000 ton carrier ''Ryuujou'', but that particular loophole was closed by the London Naval Treaty while ''Ryuujou'' was still under construction.
8th Jun '17 6:21:58 AM rcmerod52
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Added DiffLines:

** Website/{{Netflix}} used this to the site's advantage: it detected when a user was using an adblocker and replaced that ad with an ad to one of Netflix's own original series.
6th Jun '17 7:38:34 PM Nicoaln
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to:

* One common thing kids do is touch something, causing their parents and/or siblings to say "Don't touch that". Cue them holding their finger very close to the object or person they were not allowed to touch, but not close enough to actually touch, and saying "I'm not touching it!" to annoy them.
6th Jun '17 2:14:36 PM xenol
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Added DiffLines:

*** Lots of radio stations that serve San Diego County broadcast from or near Tijuana, Mexico for similar reasons to get around FCC regulations.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=LoopholeAbuse.RealLife