History LoopholeAbuse / RealLife

18th Jul '16 7:41:26 PM Phys101
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*** There is one variant that instead makes it the last question to a long exam, specifying that the student answered every other question perfectly as proof that they most likely could answer the courage question conventionally but chose not to.

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*** There is one variant that instead makes it the last question to a long exam, specifying that the student answered every other question perfectly as proof that they most likely could answer the courage question conventionally but chose not to. FridgeLogic: this doesn't require courage, the way the other version does, since he has already virtually guaranteed himself an A for the test.
16th Jul '16 11:00:04 AM Lirodon
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** However, the restrictions on advertising during children's programming only apply if the program is primarily aimed towards viewers aged 12 and younger. By TheNewTens, networks began to realize that if they declare their [=E/I=] programming to be aimed towards viewers 13 to 16 years old, they can air more advertising per-hour during them, and are no longer subject to the "host-selling" ban. The resulting wave of live-action, documentary and reality-style [=E/I=] programs that flooded the major networks to replace traditional kids shows was a result of this demographic shift; since they can attract a more generalized audience than preschool-oriented programs, the distributors can rally actual advertisers (i.e. not the toy and fast food concerns) to buy time. Litton Entertainment, who produces these programs ''en masse'' for almost every major network, has embraced this extensively; every other "educational" programs they produce are [[http://deadline.com/2016/06/kids-tv-shows-saturday-mornings-fcc-loophole-advertising-1201774658/ thinly-veiled advertisements]] for corporate "underwriters" such as [[Main/ElectronicArts EA Sports]], Norwegian Cruise Line, and [=SeaWorld=].

to:

** However, the restrictions on advertising during children's programming only apply if the program is primarily aimed towards viewers aged 12 and younger. By TheNewTens, networks began to realize that if they declare their [=E/I=] programming to be aimed towards viewers 13 to 16 years old, they can air more advertising per-hour during them, and are no longer subject to the "host-selling" ban. The resulting wave of live-action, documentary and reality-style [=E/I=] programs that flooded the major networks to replace traditional kids shows was a result of this demographic shift; since they can attract a more generalized audience than preschool-oriented programs, the distributors can rally actual they are more attractive to "conventional" advertisers (i.e. not the (as opposed to toy and fast food concerns) to buy time.concerns). Litton Entertainment, who produces these programs ''en masse'' for almost every major network, has embraced this extensively; every other "educational" programs they produce are [[http://deadline.com/2016/06/kids-tv-shows-saturday-mornings-fcc-loophole-advertising-1201774658/ thinly-veiled advertisements]] for corporate "underwriters" such as [[Main/ElectronicArts EA Sports]], Norwegian Cruise Line, and [=SeaWorld=].
4th Jul '16 6:37:47 AM Ramidel
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* A high school version of the above event: using only the items provided to you, make a device that can insulate an egg from a fall of any height. Among other things, each team had a pair of scissors (for cutting tape with), but the winning team actually [[MacGyvering taped the open scissors to the bottom of their cup cushion to work as a weight and a shock absorber]].

to:

* A high school version of the above event: using only the items provided to you, make a device that can insulate an egg from a fall of any height. Among other things, each team had a pair of scissors (for cutting tape with), but the winning team actually [[MacGyvering taped the open scissors to the bottom of their a styrofoam cup cushion to work as a weight and a shock absorber]].
4th Jul '16 6:36:40 AM Ramidel
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Added DiffLines:

* A high school version of the above event: using only the items provided to you, make a device that can insulate an egg from a fall of any height. Among other things, each team had a pair of scissors (for cutting tape with), but the winning team actually [[MacGyvering taped the open scissors to the bottom of their cup cushion to work as a weight and a shock absorber]].
2nd Jul '16 10:33:00 AM Lirodon
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* Sweden has strict advertising laws; among other things, banning advertising directly to children, and for a while, only allowing commercial breaks between programs, and not during them. However, this only really affected the lone commercial OTA network at the time, [=TV4=]; most pay TV channels actually broadcast out of neighbouring companies with looser laws, such as Denmark, Norway, and the United Kingdom with feeds meant to serve the entire Nordic region by using a different audio track for each region.

to:

* Sweden has strict advertising laws; among other things, banning advertising directly to children, and for a while, only allowing commercial breaks between programs, and not during them. However, this only really affected the lone commercial OTA network at the time, [=TV4=]; most pay TV channels actually broadcast out of neighbouring companies with looser laws, such as Denmark, Norway, and the United Kingdom with feeds meant to serve the entire Nordic region by using a different audio track for each region.country -- a loophole in its own right.
26th Jun '16 8:43:40 AM Lirodon
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** However, the restrictions on advertising during children's programming only apply if the program is primarily aimed towards viewers aged 12 and younger. By TheNewTens, networks began to realize that if they declare their [=E/I=] programming to be aimed towards viewers 13 to 16 years old, they can air more advertising per-hour during them, and are no longer subject to the "host-selling" ban. The resulting wave of live-action, documentary and reality-style [=E/I=] programs that flooded the major networks to replace traditional kids shows was a result of this demographic shift; since they can attract a more generalized audience than preschool-oriented programs, meaning that the distributors can rally actual advertisers (i.e. not the toy and fast food concerns) to buy time. Litton Entertainment, who produces these programs ''en masse'' for almost every major network, has embraced this extensively; every other "educational" programs they produce are [[http://deadline.com/2016/06/kids-tv-shows-saturday-mornings-fcc-loophole-advertising-1201774658/ thinly-veiled advertisements]] for corporate "underwriters" such as [[Main/ElectronicArts EA Sports]], Norwegian Cruise Line, and [=SeaWorld=].

to:

** However, the restrictions on advertising during children's programming only apply if the program is primarily aimed towards viewers aged 12 and younger. By TheNewTens, networks began to realize that if they declare their [=E/I=] programming to be aimed towards viewers 13 to 16 years old, they can air more advertising per-hour during them, and are no longer subject to the "host-selling" ban. The resulting wave of live-action, documentary and reality-style [=E/I=] programs that flooded the major networks to replace traditional kids shows was a result of this demographic shift; since they can attract a more generalized audience than preschool-oriented programs, meaning that the distributors can rally actual advertisers (i.e. not the toy and fast food concerns) to buy time. Litton Entertainment, who produces these programs ''en masse'' for almost every major network, has embraced this extensively; every other "educational" programs they produce are [[http://deadline.com/2016/06/kids-tv-shows-saturday-mornings-fcc-loophole-advertising-1201774658/ thinly-veiled advertisements]] for corporate "underwriters" such as [[Main/ElectronicArts EA Sports]], Norwegian Cruise Line, and [=SeaWorld=].
26th Jun '16 8:42:42 AM Lirodon
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* In 1996, the FCC implemented rules requiring all full-power TV stations to air three hours of programming per-week which "[[EdutainmentShow serves the "educational and informational needs of children"]]. The "E/I" rule has been looped around by broadcasters for decades; at first, broadcasters elected to air these educational programs during the hours when their target demographic was at school--a ''de facto'' [[FridayNightDeathSlot death slot]] for children's television. The act only stated that [=E/I=] programs had to be regularly-scheduled and air between 7:00 a.m. and 10 p.m. Some stations have attempted to justify non-edutainment programs as complying with this requirement, such as ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'', and more recently Creator/{{Univision}} with youth-oriented telenovelas (they actually got fined ''mucho grande'' for it too), but only Green Bay's WLUK was truly successful--having aired reruns of ''Series/LittleHouseOnThePrairie'' as E/I credit because it was a historical series based on children's novels (plus the author, Laura Ingalls Wilder, was born in Wisconsin).[[note]](it has since been replaced by more conventional E/I programming on weekends, with ''Little House'' giving away to Kelly Ripa)[[/note]]
* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children%27s_Television_Act Children's Television Act]] contains restrictions on advertising during programs aimed at children, including a limit of 10.5 minutes of commercials per-hour on weekends, and the prohibition of ''any'' ads for a product or service related to the show that it airs during, as it will turn the entire show into a commercial (thus violating the limit). The FCC claims no jurisdiction over cable channels when it comes to these sorts of content rules. That meant that the practical effect of the Children's Television Act was to basically slowly kill kids' shows on broadcast television, while the practical effect of restrictions on content in shows for adults is to cripple broadcasters' ability to show the sort of edgy programming cable has become known for. E/I programs have largely moved to the graveyard slot of weekends. National sports broadcasts shuffle things further, especially on the west coast.
** The CTA states that the restrictions on advertising during children's and [=E/I=] programs only apply if the program is primarily aimed towards viewers aged 12 and younger. The networks then realized that if they declare that their [=E/I=] programming is being aimed towards viewers 13 to 16 years of age, they are no longer subject to the advertising rules. The resulting wave of live-action, documentary and reality-style [=E/I=] programs that flooded the major networks embraced this heavily; ''especially'' those produced by Litton Entertainment, which includes "educational" programs that are [[http://deadline.com/2016/06/kids-tv-shows-saturday-mornings-fcc-loophole-advertising-1201774658/ thinly-veiled advertisements for SeaWorld and EA Sports]] among others.

to:

* In 1996, 1990, the FCC implemented rules requiring the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children%27s_Television_Act Children's Television Act]] to address concerns over the lack of educational programming for children on television, and how advertisers are marketing to the demographic. These rules, made more rigid in 1996, require all full-power TV stations to air three hours of programming "core educational programming" per-week which "[[EdutainmentShow serves the "educational and informational needs of children"]]. The "E/I" rule has been looped around by broadcasters for decades; at first, broadcasters elected to air these educational programs during the hours when their target demographic was at school--a ''de facto'' [[FridayNightDeathSlot death slot]] for children's television. The act only stated that [=E/I=] programs had to be regularly-scheduled and air between 7:00 a.m. and 10 p.m. Some stations have attempted to justify non-edutainment programs as complying with this requirement, such as ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'', and more recently Creator/{{Univision}} with youth-oriented telenovelas (they actually got fined ''mucho grande'' for it too), but only Green Bay's WLUK was truly successful--having aired reruns of ''Series/LittleHouseOnThePrairie'' as E/I credit because it was a historical series based on children's novels (plus the author, Laura Ingalls Wilder, was born in Wisconsin).[[note]](it has since been replaced by more conventional E/I programming on weekends, with ''Little House'' giving away to Kelly Ripa)[[/note]]
* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children%27s_Television_Act Children's Television Act]] CTA contains restrictions on advertising during programs aimed at children, including a limit of 10.5 minutes of commercials per-hour on weekends, and the prohibition of ''any'' ads for a product or service related to the show that it airs during, during ("host-selling"), as it will turn the entire show into a commercial (thus commercial, thus violating a limit on the limit).amount of commercials that can be broadcast during such a program. The FCC claims no jurisdiction over cable channels when it comes to these sorts of content rules. That meant that the practical effect of the Children's Television Act was to basically slowly kill kids' shows on broadcast television, while the practical effect of restrictions on content in shows for adults is to cripple broadcasters' ability to show the sort of edgy programming cable has become known for. E/I programs have largely moved to the graveyard slot of weekends. National sports broadcasts shuffle things further, especially on the west coast.
** The CTA states that However, the restrictions on advertising during children's and [=E/I=] programs programming only apply if the program is primarily aimed towards viewers aged 12 and younger. The By TheNewTens, networks then realized began to realize that if they declare that their [=E/I=] programming is being to be aimed towards viewers 13 to 16 years of age, old, they can air more advertising per-hour during them, and are no longer subject to the advertising rules. "host-selling" ban. The resulting wave of live-action, documentary and reality-style [=E/I=] programs that flooded the major networks embraced to replace traditional kids shows was a result of this heavily; ''especially'' those produced by demographic shift; since they can attract a more generalized audience than preschool-oriented programs, meaning that the distributors can rally actual advertisers (i.e. not the toy and fast food concerns) to buy time. Litton Entertainment, which includes who produces these programs ''en masse'' for almost every major network, has embraced this extensively; every other "educational" programs that they produce are [[http://deadline.com/2016/06/kids-tv-shows-saturday-mornings-fcc-loophole-advertising-1201774658/ thinly-veiled advertisements advertisements]] for SeaWorld corporate "underwriters" such as [[Main/ElectronicArts EA Sports]], Norwegian Cruise Line, and EA Sports]] among others.[=SeaWorld=].
26th Jun '16 12:14:00 AM Lirodon
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* In 1996, the Federal Communications Commission required [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children%27s_Television_Act TV stations]] to air three hours per-week of "[[EdutainmentShow core educational programming]]", serving the "educational and informational needs of children". The "E/I" law has been looped around by broadcasters for decades: the law requires that these programs must be regularly scheduled between 7:00 a.m. and 10 p.m.. At first, broadcasters decided to air these programs during the ''de facto'' FridayNightDeathSlot of when the target demographic were usually in school. Some stations tried to pass off non-educational shows as E/I, but only Green Bay's WLUK was truly successful, having historically aired reruns of ''Series/LittleHouseOnThePrairie'' as E/I credit, because it was a historical series based on children's novels (plus the author, Laura Ingalls Wilder, was born in Wisconsin).[[note]](it has since been replaced by more conventional E/I programming on weekends, with ''Little House'' giving away to Kelly Ripa)[[/note]]
* Another part of the Act bans "host-selling" (showing an ad for a product related to the show that it airs during), as it will turn the whole show into a commercial. The FCC claims no jurisdiction over cable channels when it comes to these sorts of content rules. That meant that the practical effect of the Children's Television Act was to basically slowly kill kids' shows on broadcast television, while the practical effect of restrictions on content in shows for adults is to cripple broadcasters' ability to show the sort of edgy programming cable has become known for. E/I programs have largely moved to the graveyard slot of weekends. National sports broadcasts shuffle things further, especially on the west coast.
** Even without FCC intervention, the MoralGuardians seem to look at broadcast with a more critical eye, though how much of that is because they have more hope of getting the FCC to do something about their complaints isn't clear. That didn't stop them from complaining about ''WesternAnimation/{{Zevo3}}'', [[http://www.commercialfreechildhood.org/link/fcc-decide-if-nicktoons-zevo-3-kids-program-or-advertisement a Nickelodeon cartoon made to promote Sketchers shoes]]. [[Creator/DiscoveryFamily The Hub]] also aired ''[[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirls Equestria Girls]]'' toy ads during episodes of ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' and My Little Pony ads during the Equestria Girls films.

to:

* In 1996, the Federal Communications Commission required [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children%27s_Television_Act FCC implemented rules requiring all full-power TV stations]] stations to air three hours of programming per-week of which "[[EdutainmentShow core educational programming]]", serving serves the "educational and informational needs of children". children"]]. The "E/I" law rule has been looped around by broadcasters for decades: the law requires that decades; at first, broadcasters elected to air these educational programs must during the hours when their target demographic was at school--a ''de facto'' [[FridayNightDeathSlot death slot]] for children's television. The act only stated that [=E/I=] programs had to be regularly scheduled between regularly-scheduled and air between 7:00 a.m. and 10 p.m.. At first, broadcasters decided to air these programs during the ''de facto'' FridayNightDeathSlot of when the target demographic were usually in school. m. Some stations tried have attempted to pass off non-educational shows justify non-edutainment programs as E/I, complying with this requirement, such as ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'', and more recently Creator/{{Univision}} with youth-oriented telenovelas (they actually got fined ''mucho grande'' for it too), but only Green Bay's WLUK was truly successful, having historically successful--having aired reruns of ''Series/LittleHouseOnThePrairie'' as E/I credit, credit because it was a historical series based on children's novels (plus the author, Laura Ingalls Wilder, was born in Wisconsin).[[note]](it has since been replaced by more conventional E/I programming on weekends, with ''Little House'' giving away to Kelly Ripa)[[/note]]
Ripa)[[/note]]
* Another part The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children%27s_Television_Act Children's Television Act]] contains restrictions on advertising during programs aimed at children, including a limit of 10.5 minutes of commercials per-hour on weekends, and the Act bans "host-selling" (showing an ad prohibition of ''any'' ads for a product or service related to the show that it airs during), during, as it will turn the whole entire show into a commercial.commercial (thus violating the limit). The FCC claims no jurisdiction over cable channels when it comes to these sorts of content rules. That meant that the practical effect of the Children's Television Act was to basically slowly kill kids' shows on broadcast television, while the practical effect of restrictions on content in shows for adults is to cripple broadcasters' ability to show the sort of edgy programming cable has become known for. E/I programs have largely moved to the graveyard slot of weekends. National sports broadcasts shuffle things further, especially on the west coast.
** The CTA states that the restrictions on advertising during children's and [=E/I=] programs only apply if the program is primarily aimed towards viewers aged 12 and younger. The networks then realized that if they declare that their [=E/I=] programming is being aimed towards viewers 13 to 16 years of age, they are no longer subject to the advertising rules. The resulting wave of live-action, documentary and reality-style [=E/I=] programs that flooded the major networks embraced this heavily; ''especially'' those produced by Litton Entertainment, which includes "educational" programs that are [[http://deadline.com/2016/06/kids-tv-shows-saturday-mornings-fcc-loophole-advertising-1201774658/ thinly-veiled advertisements for SeaWorld and EA Sports]] among others.
** Even without FCC intervention, the MoralGuardians seem to look at broadcast with a more critical eye, though how much of that is because they have more hope of getting the FCC to do something about their complaints isn't clear. That didn't stop them from complaining about ''WesternAnimation/{{Zevo3}}'', [[http://www.commercialfreechildhood.org/link/fcc-decide-if-nicktoons-zevo-3-kids-program-or-advertisement a Nickelodeon cartoon made to promote Sketchers shoes]]. [[Creator/DiscoveryFamily The Hub]] also aired ''[[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirls Equestria Girls]]'' toy ads during episodes of ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' and My Little Pony ads during the Equestria Girls films.



** In October 2015, when ''WesternAnimation/ThePeanutsMovie'' was about to appear in cinemas, ABC pulled a triple-whammy of host-selling during a showing of ''WesternAnimation/ItsTheGreatPumpkinCharlieBrown''. They aired two consecutive tie-in commercials (for All detergent and Target stores) during one of the breaks, and an ad for ''The Peanuts Movie'' itself showed up later on during the program. Surprisingly, they got off scot-free.
25th Jun '16 10:30:02 PM Lirodon
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*** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Media_in_Jacksonville,_Florida Jacksonville, Florida]] is a textbook example as each of the Big Four affiliates are involved in a duopoly (NBC affiliate [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WTLV WTLV]] and ABC affiliate [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WJXX WJXX]]) or virtual duopoly (Fox affiliate [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WFOX-TV WFOX]] and CBS affiliate [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WJAX-TV WJAX]], though the latter has gone back and forth from being a legal duopoly to a virtual duopoly. The two other commercial stations in that market are independently owned as of May 2016 (Graham Media Holdings-owned ex-CBS affiliate turned independent WJXT and Nexstar Broadcasting CW affiliate WCWJ), though Nexstar has elected to sell [[http://www.tvnewscheck.com/article/95091/nexstar-selling-five-stations-in-four-markets WCWJ]] to WJXT owner Graham Media Holdings pending FCC approval.

to:

*** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Media_in_Jacksonville,_Florida Jacksonville, Florida]] is a textbook example as each of the Big Four affiliates are involved in a duopoly (NBC affiliate [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WTLV WTLV]] and ABC affiliate [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WJXX WJXX]]) or virtual duopoly (Fox affiliate [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WFOX-TV WFOX]] and CBS affiliate [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WJAX-TV WJAX]], though the latter has gone back and forth from being a legal duopoly to a virtual duopoly. The two other commercial stations in that market are independently owned as of May 2016 (Graham Media Holdings-owned ex-CBS affiliate turned independent WJXT and Nexstar Broadcasting CW affiliate WCWJ), WCWJ, though Nexstar has elected since reached a deal to sell [[http://www.tvnewscheck.com/article/95091/nexstar-selling-five-stations-in-four-markets WCWJ]] sell WCWJ to WJXT owner Graham Graham]] as part of its attempt to acquire Media Holdings pending FCC approval.General)
25th Jun '16 10:25:55 PM Lirodon
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* Despite the critical acclaim of ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'', WB Network head Jamie Kellner wanted a show set with Batman in High School that the network could market towards younger viewers and sell toys. However, he didn't say that [[WesternAnimation/BatmanBeyond Batman had to be Bruce Wayne.]]
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