History LoopholeAbuse / RealLife

23rd Sep '17 8:45:32 AM SovereignGFC
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* Allegedly, [[https://imgur.com/d0R9aQ5 this student]] who, upon hearing a "3x5" card would be allowed for the upcoming exam, showed up with a 3x5 card...measured in ''feet.'' Since the syllabus never specified inches, the professor apparently let this go (just this once, after which [[ObviousRulePatch the syllabus was updated]]) partially because it was technically correct and partially [[RefugeInAudacity for the sheer ridiculousness of it]].
20th Sep '17 9:52:02 AM Lirodon
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* In 1990, the FCC implemented the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children%27s_Television_Act Children's Television Act]] to address concerns over the lack of educational programming for children on television, and how advertisers are marketing to the demographic. These rules, made more rigid in 1996, require all full-power TV stations to air three hours of "core educational programming" per-week which "[[EdutainmentShow serves the "educational and informational needs of children"]]. The "E/I" rules have been looped around by broadcasters for decades; the act only stated that [=E/I=] programs had to be regularly-scheduled and air between 7:00 a.m. and 10 p.m., so at first broadcasters scheduled them [[FridayNightDeathSlot during the hours when their target demographic was at school]].[[note]](The idea of scheduling educational programs like this was not as far-fetched as it seemed. In the 1970's and 1980's, educational programs intended to be viewed live at school were actually a major fixture of daytime television in the United Kingdom, typically for public service remits, and laws that restricted Creator/{{ITV}} from airing commercial-supported programming until later in the day. Not to mention that [=VCRs=] were not as ubiquitous yet. Most of these programs were phased out, or relegated to off-peak hours so teachers could set their VCR for them, and networks could add more ''actual'' daytime programs.)[[/note]] Some stations attempted to justify non-edutainment programs as complying with this requirement, such as ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'', ABC's former ABC Kids block (which aired older reruns of Creator/DisneyChannel programs such as ''Series/HannahMontana'' and ''Series/ThatsSoRaven'') and more recently Creator/{{Univision}} with youth-oriented telenovelas (they actually got fined ''mucho grande'' for it too), but only Green Bay's WLUK was truly successful--having aired reruns of ''Series/LittleHouseOnThePrairie'' as E/I credit because it was a historical series based on children's novels (plus the author, Laura Ingalls Wilder, was born in Wisconsin).[[note]](it has since been replaced by more conventional E/I programming on weekends, with ''Little House'' giving away to Kelly Ripa)[[/note]]

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* In 1990, the FCC implemented the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children%27s_Television_Act Children's Television Act]] to address concerns over the lack of educational programming for children on television, and how advertisers are marketing to the demographic. These rules, made more rigid in 1996, require all full-power TV stations to air three hours of "core educational programming" per-week which "[[EdutainmentShow serves the "educational and informational needs of children"]]. The "E/I" rules have been looped around by broadcasters for decades; the act only stated that [=E/I=] programs had to be regularly-scheduled and air between 7:00 a.m. and 10 p.m., so at first broadcasters scheduled them [[FridayNightDeathSlot during the hours when their target demographic was at school]].[[note]](The idea of scheduling educational programs like this was not as far-fetched as it seemed. In the 1970's and 1980's, 80's, before [=VCRs=] were ubiquitous, the BBC and Creator/{{ITV}} devoted their morning schedules to airing educational programs intended to be viewed live at school were actually a major fixture of daytime television in the United Kingdom, typically for school, to fulfill public service remits, obligations and laws that restricted restricting Creator/{{ITV}} from airing commercial-supported programming until later in the day. Not to mention that [=VCRs=] were not as ubiquitous yet. Most of By the 1990's, these programs were phased out, out or relegated to off-peak hours so teachers could set their VCR for them, and networks could add more ''actual'' daytime programs.just tape them instead.)[[/note]] Some stations attempted to justify non-edutainment programs as complying with this requirement, such as ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'', ABC's former ABC Kids block (which aired older reruns of Creator/DisneyChannel programs such as ''Series/HannahMontana'' and ''Series/ThatsSoRaven'') and more recently Creator/{{Univision}} with youth-oriented telenovelas (they actually got fined ''mucho grande'' for it too), but only Green Bay's WLUK was truly successful--having aired reruns of ''Series/LittleHouseOnThePrairie'' as E/I credit because it was a historical series based on children's novels (plus the author, Laura Ingalls Wilder, was born in Wisconsin).[[note]](it has since been replaced by more conventional E/I programming on weekends, with ''Little House'' giving away to Kelly Ripa)[[/note]]
19th Sep '17 10:46:25 AM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* Jewish law states that married women must keep their hair covered from any man other than their husband. Ain't no rule that this cover can't be a wig made of human hair that makes them look like they are wearing nothing at all.

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* Orthodox Jewish law states that married women must keep their hair covered from any man other than their husband. Ain't no rule that this cover can't be a wig made of human hair that makes them look like they are wearing nothing at all.
18th Sep '17 8:44:07 AM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* According the Myth/{{Norse|Mythology}} faith, dying outside of battle wouldn't get you into WarriorHeaven. Thus, records exist of HornyVikings asking their friends to MercyKill them [[ICannotSelfTerminate on their deathbeds]], so they'd have ''technically'' "died by the sword."

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* According the Myth/{{Norse|Mythology}} faith, to Myth/NorseMythology, dying outside of battle wouldn't get you into WarriorHeaven. Thus, records exist of HornyVikings asking their friends to MercyKill them [[ICannotSelfTerminate on their deathbeds]], so they'd have ''technically'' "died by the sword."
17th Sep '17 8:38:57 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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Added DiffLines:

* According the Myth/{{Norse|Mythology}} faith, dying outside of battle wouldn't get you into WarriorHeaven. Thus, records exist of HornyVikings asking their friends to MercyKill them [[ICannotSelfTerminate on their deathbeds]], so they'd have ''technically'' "died by the sword."
12th Sep '17 8:40:57 PM Berrenta
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[[quoteright:350:[[Creator/{{Konami}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/konami_bypass_nintendos_rule.PNG]]]]
[[caption-width-right:350:[[MemeticMutation You can't get restricted from publishing more games if you use a different name.]]]]


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[[quoteright:350:[[Creator/{{Konami}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/konami_bypass_nintendos_rule.PNG]]]]
[[caption-width-right:350:[[MemeticMutation You can't get restricted from publishing more games if you use
%% Image removed per Image Pickin' thread: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=1505234191052143000
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a different name.]]]]

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12th Sep '17 9:56:39 AM wingedcatgirl
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* [[TheSpartanWay Spartan boys]] were purposely underfed and kept hungry, and could expect vicious beatings if they were ever caught stealing food. The correct solution was not to tough out the pain and weakness of constant starvation, but to develop the skill and cunning to steal food without getting caught.

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* [[TheSpartanWay Spartan boys]] were purposely underfed and kept hungry, and could expect vicious beatings if they were ever caught stealing food. The correct solution was not to tough out the pain and weakness of constant starvation, but to develop the skill and cunning to steal food [[OnlyCheatingIfYouGetCaught without getting caught.caught]].



* Another story tells of a student who was asked in a final examination to describe how to measure a skyscraper's height via barometer. His original answer: tie a string to the barometer, lower it from the top to the ground, measure the string, add the length of the barometer. The instructor objected, he counter-objected, and an arbiter was called in. The student proceeded to suggest:

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* Another story tells of a student ([[http://www.snopes.com/college/exam/barometer.asp not]] Niels Bohr) who was asked in a final examination to describe how to measure a skyscraper's height via barometer. His original answer: tie a string to the barometer, lower it from the top to the ground, measure the string, add the length of the barometer. The instructor objected, he counter-objected, and an arbiter was called in. The student proceeded to suggest:



*** The expected answer is to measure the difference in air pressure (which is how aircraft altimeters work). Unlike the more "creative" methods, this one will provide an answer in meters using ''only'' the barometer.
*** It's also the only one that actually requires a barometer; with the others, any object of similar size and weight would work.
*** The story is often told with Danish Nobel Prize-winner Niels Bohr as the student, but this is an urban legend. ''{{Website/Snopes}}'' has a [[http://www.snopes.com/college/exam/barometer.asp page about it]].
** Terry Pratchett told this as an alien fairy tale in Strata. All the princes trying to win the princesses hand tried the 'difference in air pressure method', but weren't accurate enough and were killed. The winner offered the architect the barometer in return for telling him the height of the tower.

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*** The expected answer is to ** And finally, just for good measure, the "correct" answer: measure the difference in air pressure (which is how aircraft altimeters work). Unlike the more "creative" methods, this one actually requires a barometer, and will provide an answer in meters using ''only'' the barometer.
*** It's also the only one that actually requires a barometer; with the others, any object of similar size and weight would work.
*** The story is often told with Danish Nobel Prize-winner Niels Bohr as the student, but this is an urban legend. ''{{Website/Snopes}}'' has a [[http://www.snopes.com/college/exam/barometer.asp page about it]].
** Terry Pratchett told this as an alien fairy tale in Strata. All the princes trying to win the princesses hand tried the 'difference in air pressure method', but weren't accurate enough and were killed. The winner offered the architect the barometer in return for telling him the height of the tower.
barometer.
12th Sep '17 9:36:43 AM wingedcatgirl
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[[quoteright:370:[[Creator/{{Konami}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/konami_bypass_nintendos_rule.PNG]]]]
[[caption-width-right:370:[[MemeticMutation You can't get restricted from publishing more games if you use a different name.]]]]


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[[quoteright:370:[[Creator/{{Konami}} [[quoteright:350:[[Creator/{{Konami}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/konami_bypass_nintendos_rule.PNG]]]]
[[caption-width-right:370:[[MemeticMutation [[caption-width-right:350:[[MemeticMutation You can't get restricted from publishing more games if you use a different name.]]]]

30th Aug '17 3:02:46 AM HalcyonDayz
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* In 1984, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Larson Michael Larson]] was a contestant on ''Series/PressYourLuck''. He won an astonishing $110,237, at the time a record, and the episode where he competed was so long that it had to be split into two parts in order to air. It turned out he had recorded previous episodes and memorized the patterns the game board used, which despite apperances were NOT random. He found a pattern that would give him cash and an additional spin every time. CBS eventually admitted that he wasn't actually breaking any rules so they couldn't do anything - except change the board patterns for future shows.

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* In 1984, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Larson Michael Larson]] was a contestant on ''Series/PressYourLuck''. He won an astonishing $110,237, at the time a record, and the episode where he competed was so long that it had to be split into two parts in order to air. It turned out he had recorded previous episodes and memorized the patterns the game board used, which despite apperances appearances were NOT random. He found a pattern that would give him cash and an additional spin every time. CBS eventually admitted that he wasn't actually breaking any rules so they couldn't do anything - except change the board patterns for future shows.



* Streaming music services originally came from Loophole Abuse of the rules for radio stations, which could license songs in bulk for play by DJs on the basis that they were used as part of continuous shows, so listeners wouldn't have that much control over what songs they heard and would still have reason to buy CDs and records. When internet radio came along and there was no need to license physical radio bands, companies quickly worked out that there was nothing to stop them running several thousand "radio stations" all at once, which together would enable a listener to listen to any song on demand simply by selecting the station that was playing it at that moment.

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* Streaming music services originally came from Loophole Abuse of the rules for radio stations, which could license songs in bulk for play by DJs [=DJs=] on the basis that they were used as part of continuous shows, so listeners wouldn't have that much control over what songs they heard and would still have reason to buy CDs [=CDs=] and records. When internet radio came along and there was no need to license physical radio bands, companies quickly worked out that there was nothing to stop them running several thousand "radio stations" all at once, which together would enable a listener to listen to any song on demand simply by selecting the station that was playing it at that moment.
24th Aug '17 2:10:21 PM bwburke94
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** Actually, while this case was ongoing, the Department of Defense had a couple of loopholes they intended to use in the ''very unlikely'' event the judge actually ordered Pepsi to go through with their ''implied'' promise and provide the winner with a Harrier jet. One was to simply tell Pepsi to pound sand (the Department of Defense had nothing to do with the promotion and had never entered into an agreement to give them a jet for the winner, so good luck winning ''that'' case in federal court, Pepsi). Second was to make Pepsi pay for a jet, and then pull out the engines, avionics, weapons systems, fuel tanks, etc., basically turning the plane into an empty shell. Hey, the promotion didn't say anything about having to provide a ''working'' Harrier jet.

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** Actually, while this case was ongoing, the Department of Defense had a couple of loopholes they intended to use in the ''very unlikely'' event the judge actually ordered Pepsi to go through with their ''implied'' promise and provide the winner with a Harrier jet. One was to simply tell Pepsi to pound sand (the Department of Defense had nothing to do with the promotion and had never entered into an agreement to give them a jet for the winner, so good luck winning ''that'' case in federal court, Pepsi).court). Second was to make Pepsi pay for a jet, and then pull out the engines, avionics, weapons systems, fuel tanks, etc., basically turning the plane into an empty shell. Hey, the promotion didn't say anything about having to provide a ''working'' Harrier jet.



** Though ironically, most [=EULA=]s are often unenforceable; if the EULA isn't on the outside of the box, it isn't necessarily enforceable by law. This is why, for instance, OM versions of Windows have the EULA on the outside of the packaging. Also, many open-ended contractual things of this nature can be difficult to enforce in court. Also not every copyright law allows to enforce fully EULA. For example in some countries you are allowed to disassemble code in certain cases (for example, to make cooperation between programs better) - even if EULA explicitly forbids disassembling.

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** Though ironically, most [=EULA=]s are often unenforceable; if the EULA isn't on the outside of the box, it isn't necessarily enforceable by law. This is why, for instance, OM OEM versions of Windows have the EULA on the outside of the packaging. Also, many open-ended contractual things of this nature can be difficult to enforce in court. Also not every copyright law allows to enforce fully EULA. For example in some countries you are allowed to disassemble code in certain cases (for example, to make cooperation between programs better) - even if EULA explicitly forbids disassembling.



** Blip has adapted to this by running a 90 second (now 60) grey screen for users who block ads, the screen points out that the ads are only 30 seconds. Of course, if you prefer 90 seconds of silence to an annoying ad, this could still work in your favor.

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** Blip has adapted to this by running a 90 second (now 60) (later 60 seconds) grey screen for users who block ads, the screen points out that the ads are only 30 seconds. Of course, if you prefer 90 seconds of silence to an annoying ad, this could still work in your favor.



* A Chinese airport offered free meals at the place's restaurant for anyone carrying a ticket for a flight scheduled for that day. A man bought a first class ticket, ate his meal, and re-scheduled his flight for the next day, free of charge. He repeated the stunt for nearly a year before the airport noticed and told him to stop, but legally they could do nothing against him. [[http://mentalfloss.com/article/61693/man-uses-first-class-ticket-eat-free-airport-year The man then cancelled his ticket, which was fully reimbursed, and left without ever getting on an airplane]].
* Airline pricing in general is arcane and invites this type of behavior. Very often a ticket A to C with a layover in B is cheaper than a ticket A to B. Of course buying a ticket A to C and never getting on the flight B to C can get you anything from a shrug to being banned from ever flying with them ever again from the airline. Another frequently abused loophole is Lufthansa's [=AIRail=], which sells you train tickets to the airport (for example from Stuttgart to Frankfurt Airport a distance too short for any type of flights to make economic sense) and gives you miles on said tickets. Sometimes the train does not cost extra but still brings miles. As there is no "checking in" on German trains nobody can verify whether you actually ever boarded the train. But you get the miles regardless.

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* A Chinese airport offered free meals at the place's restaurant for anyone carrying a ticket for a flight scheduled for that day. A man bought a first class ticket, ate his meal, and re-scheduled his flight for the next day, free of charge. He repeated the stunt for nearly a year before the airport noticed and told him to stop, but legally they could do nothing against him.stop. [[http://mentalfloss.com/article/61693/man-uses-first-class-ticket-eat-free-airport-year The man then cancelled his ticket, which was fully reimbursed, and left without ever getting on an airplane]].
* Airline pricing in general is arcane and invites this type of behavior. Very often a ticket A to C with a layover in B is cheaper than a ticket A to B. Of course course, buying a ticket A to C and never getting on the flight B to C can get you anything from a shrug to being banned from ever flying with them ever again from the airline. Another frequently abused loophole is Lufthansa's [=AIRail=], which sells you train tickets to the airport (for example from Stuttgart to Frankfurt Airport a distance too short for any type of flights to make economic sense) and gives you miles on said tickets. Sometimes the train does not cost extra but still brings miles. As there is no "checking in" on German trains nobody can verify whether you actually ever boarded the train. But you get the miles regardless.



* It's believed that part of the reason for the suicide of former NFL player Aaron Hernandez was motivated by a quirk in Massachusetts law that states the conviction of anyone who dies during the appeal process is automatically vacated, therefore the deceased is considered legally not guilty of the crime they were appealing. By dying during the appeal of his 2015 murder conviction, Hernandez's family could be able to sue for the salary and other benefits that the Patriots owed Hernandez under his contract that were cut off due to his conviction. It's known that Hernandez was aware of the law, and that he'd told his fiancée that she'd be rich when his appeal was allowed.

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* It's believed that part of the reason for the suicide of former NFL UsefulNotes/NationalFootballLeague player Aaron Hernandez was motivated by a quirk in Massachusetts law that states the conviction of anyone who dies during the appeal process is automatically vacated, therefore the deceased is considered legally not guilty of the crime they were appealing. By dying during the appeal of his 2015 murder conviction, Hernandez's family could be able to sue for the salary and other benefits that the Patriots owed Hernandez under his contract that were cut off due to his conviction. It's known that Hernandez was aware of the law, and that he'd told his fiancée that she'd be rich when his appeal was allowed.
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