History LoopholeAbuse / RealLife

16th Jan '17 10:12:28 PM Deathhacker
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The concept of "lend lease" was this to allow the US to covertly assist the Allies without officially joining them. When this was instituted, at the time the various allied nations were pretty much bankrupt; they couldn't afford to pay for the material needed for their war effort from the US. But if the US had given them the supplies, this would mean they took sides and would no longer be neutral in the conflict. To get around this, the US implimented the Lend-Lease program, which is essentially "loaning" the supplies to the afflicted nations on the promise that they would be returned after the conflict was over. The key was that the US never specified that the items had to be returned in the same condition, indeed they fully expected that none of this would ever be returned (just try and imagine someone trying to return a US army ration or bullets). But since the items still technically belonged to the US, just borrowed, this meant that the US wasn't legally allied with any of the nations.
16th Jan '17 8:03:27 PM PsychoGecko
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* How can those who follow the Ten Commandments(whether Jewish or Christian) justify being soldiers or the death penalty despite the Commandment against killing? As they'll tell you, the exact wording is more akin to "Thou shalt not murder," and murder is defined as wrongful killing.
16th Dec '16 11:13:26 AM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* While neither the Pentateuch nor the Talmud mention electricity or anything to do with it, there are now rabbinical opinions on whether electricity may be used on the Sabbath. A common consensus is that you are not allowed to switch on an electronic device, but something that was already one before the Sabbath began can be kept running (this is how a lot of sabbath cuisine works - just keep the food stewing in the pre-heated oven). So naturally someone developed a light switch that unlike a normal light switch does not close a circuit but technically never breaks the circuit, so switching the light on is not actually switching the light on. Other opinions say that the problem is not so much turning on or off something but whether "fire" is created. A light bulb is therefore right out because it produces heat and conventional switches (that may produce a spark) are also taboo, but what is there to say against a pre-programed LED?

to:

* While neither the Pentateuch nor the Talmud mention electricity or anything to do with it, there are now rabbinical opinions on whether electricity may be used on the Sabbath. A common consensus is that you are not allowed to switch on an electronic device, but something that was already one on before the Sabbath began can be kept running (this is how a lot of sabbath cuisine works - just keep the food stewing in the pre-heated oven). So naturally someone developed a light switch that unlike a normal light switch does not close a circuit but technically never breaks the circuit, so switching the light on is not actually switching the light on. Other opinions say that the problem is not so much turning on or off something but whether "fire" is created. A light bulb is therefore right out because it produces heat and conventional switches (that may produce a spark) are also taboo, but what is there to say against a pre-programed LED?
15th Dec '16 8:52:28 PM Lloigor
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* There is an urban legend that says that at a time, people circumvented a law forbidding to raise pigs "on the land of Israel" by raising them on platforms, and that the law had to be changed to ban this as well. Nowadays, it is illegal to raise pigs in Israel except for a small area in the north inhabited by Christian Arabs and in scientific institutions. Even the Jerusalem Biblical Zoo, who prides itself in holding all animal species mentioned in the Bible, has to use non-native American peccaries as stand-in for pigs, and there have been [[TheFundamentalist overzealous visitors]] who tried to harm them by throwing plastic knives in their pen.

to:

* There is an urban legend that says that at a time, people circumvented a law forbidding to raise pigs "on the land of Israel" by raising them on platforms, and that the law had to be changed to ban this as well. Nowadays, it is illegal to raise pigs in Israel except for a small area in the north inhabited by Christian Arabs and in scientific institutions. Even the Jerusalem Biblical Zoo, who which prides itself in holding all animal species mentioned in the Bible, has to use non-native American peccaries as stand-in for pigs, and there have been [[TheFundamentalist overzealous visitors]] who tried to harm them by throwing plastic knives in their pen.
13th Dec '16 9:26:04 PM Katsuhagi
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The Mongols also believed that shedding noble blood would bring curses upon them, so their preferred methods of executions were carefully designed to avoid spilling any blood, and included things like drowning a former Empress regent who attempted a coup on Genghis' grandson Mongke at his coronation in a felt sack thrown into the river, and Temujin himself was said to have dealt with his rival Jamuka by either having his men roll him up in a rug and beat him until he died, strangle him to death, or break Jamuka's spine over his knee. They had no problem, however, with spilling the blood of common soldiers; the Mongols' primary weapons were after all [[ArcherArchetype bows and arrows]].

to:

** The Mongols also believed that shedding noble blood would bring curses upon them, so their preferred methods of executions for those of noble birth were carefully designed to avoid spilling any blood, any, and included things like drowning a former Empress regent who attempted a coup on Genghis' grandson Mongke at his coronation in a felt sack thrown into the river, and river. Temujin himself was said to have dealt with his rival Jamuka by either having his men roll him up in a rug and beat him until he died, strangle him to death, or break Jamuka's spine over his knee. They had no problem, however, with spilling the blood of common soldiers; the Mongols' primary weapons were after all [[ArcherArchetype bows and arrows]].
13th Dec '16 9:24:43 PM Katsuhagi
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The Mongols also believed that shedding blood would bring curses upon them, so their preferred methods of executions were carefully designed to avoid spilling any blood, and included things like drowning a former Empress regent who attempted a coup on Genghis' grandson Mongke at his coronation in a felt sack thrown into the river, and Temujin himself was said to have dealt with his rival Jamuka by either having his men roll him up in a rug and beat him until he died, strangled him to death or broke his spine over his knee. They had no problem, however, with spilling the blood of common soldiers; the Mongols' primary weapons were after all [[ArcherArchetype bows and arrows]].

to:

** The Mongols also believed that shedding noble blood would bring curses upon them, so their preferred methods of executions were carefully designed to avoid spilling any blood, and included things like drowning a former Empress regent who attempted a coup on Genghis' grandson Mongke at his coronation in a felt sack thrown into the river, and Temujin himself was said to have dealt with his rival Jamuka by either having his men roll him up in a rug and beat him until he died, strangled strangle him to death death, or broke his break Jamuka's spine over his knee. They had no problem, however, with spilling the blood of common soldiers; the Mongols' primary weapons were after all [[ArcherArchetype bows and arrows]].
29th Nov '16 2:59:59 PM Nicoaln
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** One math word problem gave the situation that they were putting up a tile pattern with two different lengths (one a perfect square, one a rectangle) and given their formula, how many tiles would they need to order. Naturally, one kid rounded up to the nearest five, got it marked wrong, and after talking with the teacher, got the points back. The reason? Because [[RealityEnsues in reality]], you ''always'' make sure you have ''more'' tiles than you need just in case, and that tiles may come in prepackaged amounts.
*** Another variant happens with the classic "Perimeter/Area" problem wherein a student is asked how many feet/meters of fencing they need, and they put down ''more'' than needed to keep in reserve for future repairs.

to:

** One math word problem gave the situation that they were putting up a tile pattern with two different lengths (one a perfect square, one a rectangle) and given their formula, how many tiles would they need to order. Naturally, one kid rounded up to the nearest five, got it marked wrong, and after talking with the teacher, got the points back. The reason? Because The question wasn't asking how many of each tile were ''on'' the pattern, just asking how many you would ''need'' - because [[RealityEnsues in reality]], reality, you ''always'' make sure would know that you have ''more'' either got tiles than you need just in case, and that tiles may come in prepackaged amounts.amounts or would intentionally go a little over what you need]] in the event you need to replace them, a tile falls and breaks, or you underestimated how many you need for the job.
*** Another variant happens with the classic "Perimeter/Area" problem wherein a student is asked how many feet/meters of fencing they need, and they put down ''more'' than needed to keep in reserve for future repairs. Some teachers [[SubvertedTrope subvert this]] by either asking specifically how many units of fencing are needed for that particular area or asking them not to include any spares to keep in reserve. (Or, even asking them how many they would keep in reserve and ''then'' asking how much it would cost overall)
*** One also happened with the "money rule". The "Money Rule" in rounding is that you don't round ''down'', you always round ''up''. One smart-aleck added onto the rule saying "If it's money you ''have'', then you round ''down'', but if it's money you ''owe'' you round ''up''." The teacher [[ActuallyPrettyFunny gave them points for creativity and reality]].
29th Nov '16 9:10:07 AM Nicoaln
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** One math word problem gave the situation that they were putting up a tile pattern with two different lengths (one a perfect square, one a rectangle) and given their formula, how many tiles would they need to order. Naturally, one kid rounded up to the nearest five, got it marked wrong, and after talking with the teacher, got the points back. The reason? Because [[RealityEnsues in reality]], you ''always'' make sure you have ''more'' tiles than you need just in case, and that tiles may come in prepackaged amounts.
*** Another variant happens with the classic "Perimeter/Area" problem wherein a student is asked how many feet/meters of fencing they need, and they put down ''more'' than needed to keep in reserve for future repairs.
25th Nov '16 12:06:06 PM Lirodon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Sweden has strict advertising laws; among other things, banning advertising directly to children, and for a while, only allowing commercial breaks between programs, and not during them. However, this only really affected the lone commercial OTA network at the time, [=TV4=]; most pay TV channels actually broadcast out of neighbouring companies with looser laws, such as Denmark, Norway, and the United Kingdom with feeds meant to serve the entire Nordic region by using a different audio track for each country -- a loophole in its own right.

to:

* Sweden has strict advertising laws; among other things, banning advertising directly to children, and for a while, only allowing commercial breaks between programs, and not during them. However, this only really affected the lone commercial OTA network at the time, [=TV4=]; most pay TV channels actually broadcast out of neighbouring companies countries with looser laws, such as Denmark, Norway, and the United Kingdom with feeds meant to serve the entire Nordic region by using a different audio track for each country -- a loophole in its own right.
16th Nov '16 1:09:44 PM twilicorn
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** It happened ''again'' in the 2016 nominations, where the then-recently-deceased Music/{{Prince}}'s ''Film/PurpleRain'' soundtrack, released in '''1984''', was one of the three nominees for Best Soundtrack (the other two being ''Film/TheForceAwakens'' and ''Film/SuicideSquad'', both films that were actually released during the eligibility period). Unlike the Jackson case, the backlash wasn't as severe, at least when the nomination was announced.
This list shows the last 10 events of 653. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=LoopholeAbuse.RealLife