History Literature / TheTenantOfWildfellHall

7th Dec '17 6:10:52 AM UnnaturalPonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TheAlcoholic: Arthur Huntingdon. It eventually kills him.
* AllGirlsWantBadBoys: Invoked and savaged. Helen's marriage to Arthur Huntingdon turns out to be an absolute nightmare. Helen manages to convince Millicent's husband, Hattersley, to reform, but his bad behavior had never been part of the attraction for Millicent, and Helen's contribution is no greater than what a modern marriage counselor would do.

to:

* TheAlcoholic: Arthur Huntingdon. It [[spoiler:It eventually kills him.
him.]]
* AllGirlsWantBadBoys: Invoked and savaged. Helen's marriage to Arthur Huntingdon turns out to be an absolute nightmare. Helen manages to convince Millicent's husband, Ralph Hattersley, to reform, but his bad behavior had never been part of the attraction for Millicent, and Helen's contribution is no greater than what a modern marriage counselor would do.
17th Sep '17 11:43:00 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* SpeakNowOrForeverHoldYourPeace: Invoked but subverted (in the [[NotASubversion correct use of the term]]) when Gilbert instantly heads for Grassdale Manor, intending to resort to this trope if he must, when he hears [[spoiler:the now-truly-widowed Helen is getting married.]] Fortunately, [[spoiler:he was misinformed.]]

to:

* SpeakNowOrForeverHoldYourPeace: Invoked but subverted (in the [[NotASubversion [[Administrivia/NotASubversion correct use of the term]]) when Gilbert instantly heads for Grassdale Manor, intending to resort to this trope if he must, when he hears [[spoiler:the now-truly-widowed Helen is getting married.]] Fortunately, [[spoiler:he was misinformed.]]
1st Sep '17 8:25:42 AM Brontesaurus
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* FirstNameBasis

to:

* FirstNameBasisFirstNameBasis: It's a big deal when you call someone you're not related to by first name, as it presumes great friendship or intimacy. When the very proper Helen uses Gilbert's name and lets him use hers, it shows how much she trusts and cares for him.
** Conversely, Huntingdon started using Helen's name without her permission, an early hint of his lack of regard for her.
** Later as her marriage falls apart, Helen ''stops'' using Huntingdon's first name.



* ICanChangeMyBeloved: Helen enters into her marriage with Arthur looking forward to changing and redeeming him, only to end up thoroughly miserable. This is also played straight with her friend Millicent, who is miserable in her marriage, but whose husband is willing to change.

to:

* ICanChangeMyBeloved: Helen enters into her marriage with Arthur looking forward to changing and redeeming him, only to end up thoroughly miserable. This is also played straight straight, but realistically, with her friend Millicent, who is miserable in her marriage, but whose Millicent. Millicent's husband eventually reforms, however he has an intrinsic urge to be a better man. Huntingdon does not, which is willing to change.why Helen can't do anything.
24th Aug '17 6:40:28 PM Apocrypha
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* WhatTheHellHero: Gilbert, under the impression that [[spoiler: Frederick Lawrence]] is Helen's clandestine lover, cracks him over the head with the butt end of a horsewhip. Then, Gilbert has the nerve to wonder why [[spoiler: Frederick]] shows so little gratitude for Gilbert's attempt to "assist" him home. (He never does manage a wholehearted apology.)

to:

* WhatTheHellHero: Gilbert, under the impression that [[spoiler: Frederick Lawrence]] is Helen's clandestine lover, cracks him over the head with the butt end of a horsewhip. Then, Gilbert has the nerve to wonder why [[spoiler: Frederick]] shows so little gratitude for Gilbert's attempt to "assist" him home. (He never He does manage a wholehearted apology.)eventually apologize for it, though.
10th May '16 3:28:35 PM Furienna
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* WrongGenreSavvy: Mr. Hargrave thinks he's the selfless, gallant PrinceCharming who can rescue Helen from her misery, ignoring how miserable his own predatory persistence makes her.



14th Jan '16 3:04:30 PM roxana
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Its plot and characters have often been taken as a sly TakeThat to both Creator/EmilyBronte's ''Literature/WutheringHeights'' and Creator/CharlotteBronte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' (the latter of which was written at the same time as ''Tenant''). Despite its early popularity, the novel slipped into relative obscurity following Charlotte refusing to allow the novel to be reprinted in 1850 alongside ''Wuthering Heights'' and Anne's own much less popular ''Literature/AgnesGrey'', deeming the work to be "[[CanonDiscontinuity an entire mistake.]]" Critics began to dismiss the book as well, believing it to be a mere manifestation of Anne's bitterness over her brother Branwell. However, evidence uncovered by Barker reveals that it's more likely to have been based on a local case of extreme domestic violence witnessed by the sisters in the context of their father's pastoral work. Notably the Reverend Mr. Bronte's advice to the beleaguered wife was to leave her husband for her own sake and her child's. She took his advice and it worked out for her. Its frank treatment of sexuality and marital decay earned it more attention in later years.

to:

Its plot and characters have often been taken as a sly TakeThat to both Creator/EmilyBronte's ''Literature/WutheringHeights'' and Creator/CharlotteBronte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' (the latter of which was written at the same time as ''Tenant''). Despite its early popularity, the novel slipped into relative obscurity following Charlotte refusing to allow the novel to be reprinted in 1850 alongside ''Wuthering Heights'' and Anne's own much less popular ''Literature/AgnesGrey'', deeming the work to be "[[CanonDiscontinuity an entire mistake.]]" Critics began to dismiss the book as well, believing it to be a mere manifestation of Anne's bitterness over her brother Branwell. However, evidence uncovered by Barker reveals that it's more likely to have been based on a local case of extreme domestic violence witnessed by the sisters in the context of their father's pastoral work. Notably the Reverend Mr. Bronte's advice to the beleaguered wife was to leave her husband for her own sake and her child's. She took his advice and it worked out for her. Its The novel's frank treatment of sexuality and marital decay earned it more attention in later years.
14th Jan '16 3:01:23 PM roxana
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Its plot and characters have often been taken as a sly TakeThat to both Creator/EmilyBronte's ''Literature/WutheringHeights'' and Creator/CharlotteBronte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' (the latter of which was written at the same time as ''Tenant''). Despite its early popularity, the novel slipped into relative obscurity following Charlotte refusing to allow the novel to be reprinted in 1850 alongside ''Wuthering Heights'' and Anne's own much less popular ''Literature/AgnesGrey'', deeming the work to be "[[CanonDiscontinuity an entire mistake.]]" Critics began to dismiss the book as well, believing it to be a mere manifestation of Anne's bitterness over her brother Branwell. However, evidence uncovered by Barker reveals that it's more likely to have been based on a local case of extreme domestic violence witnessed by the sisters in the context of their father's pastoral work. Its frank treatment of sexuality and marital decay earned it more attention in later years.

to:

Its plot and characters have often been taken as a sly TakeThat to both Creator/EmilyBronte's ''Literature/WutheringHeights'' and Creator/CharlotteBronte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' (the latter of which was written at the same time as ''Tenant''). Despite its early popularity, the novel slipped into relative obscurity following Charlotte refusing to allow the novel to be reprinted in 1850 alongside ''Wuthering Heights'' and Anne's own much less popular ''Literature/AgnesGrey'', deeming the work to be "[[CanonDiscontinuity an entire mistake.]]" Critics began to dismiss the book as well, believing it to be a mere manifestation of Anne's bitterness over her brother Branwell. However, evidence uncovered by Barker reveals that it's more likely to have been based on a local case of extreme domestic violence witnessed by the sisters in the context of their father's pastoral work. Notably the Reverend Mr. Bronte's advice to the beleaguered wife was to leave her husband for her own sake and her child's. She took his advice and it worked out for her. Its frank treatment of sexuality and marital decay earned it more attention in later years.
10th Jul '15 8:38:13 PM CaptEquinox
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The novel sold extremely well at first, a close second to ''Literature/JaneEyre'', but its bracing assault on both drunkenness and the sexual DoubleStandard earned it a scandalous reputation. Its plot and characters have often been taken as a sly TakeThat to both Creator/EmilyBronte's ''Literature/WutheringHeights'' and Creator/CharlotteBronte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' (the latter of which was written at the same time as ''Tenant''). Despite its early popularity, the novel slipped into relative obscurity following Charlotte refusing to allow the novel to be reprinted in 1850 alongside ''Wuthering Heights'' and Anne's own much less popular ''Literature/AgnesGrey'', deeming the work to be "[[CanonDiscontinuity an entire mistake.]]" Critics began to dismiss the book as well, believing it to be a mere manifestation of Anne's bitterness over her brother Branwell. However, evidence uncovered by Bronte biographer Juliet Barker reveals that it's more likely to have been based on a local case of extreme domestic violence witnessed by the sisters in the context of their father's pastoral work. Its frank treatment of sexuality and marital decay earned it more attention in later years.

to:

The novel sold extremely well at first, a close second to ''Literature/JaneEyre'', but its bracing assault on both drunkenness and the sexual DoubleStandard earned it a scandalous reputation. In fact, Bronte biographer Juliet Barker says it was "so profoundly disturbing to contemporary ideas of decency that it was to sink without trace for almost 150 years after its conception."

Its plot and characters have often been taken as a sly TakeThat to both Creator/EmilyBronte's ''Literature/WutheringHeights'' and Creator/CharlotteBronte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' (the latter of which was written at the same time as ''Tenant''). Despite its early popularity, the novel slipped into relative obscurity following Charlotte refusing to allow the novel to be reprinted in 1850 alongside ''Wuthering Heights'' and Anne's own much less popular ''Literature/AgnesGrey'', deeming the work to be "[[CanonDiscontinuity an entire mistake.]]" Critics began to dismiss the book as well, believing it to be a mere manifestation of Anne's bitterness over her brother Branwell. However, evidence uncovered by Bronte biographer Juliet Barker reveals that it's more likely to have been based on a local case of extreme domestic violence witnessed by the sisters in the context of their father's pastoral work. Its frank treatment of sexuality and marital decay earned it more attention in later years.
10th Jul '15 8:36:47 PM CaptEquinox
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In fact, it was BasedOnATrueStory; not Branwell's, but the wife of a local assistant pastor, who visited the parsonage and told Rev. Bronte exactly what her husband had been doing to her. Rev. Bronte (well known for his liberal views for the time) advised her to take her child and leave him. Eventually, she did.

to:

** In fact, it was BasedOnATrueStory; not Branwell's, but the wife of a local assistant pastor, who visited the Bronte parsonage and told Rev. Bronte exactly what her husband had been doing to her. Rev. Bronte (well known for his liberal views for the time) advised her to take her child children and leave him. Eventually, she did. Recovered, she came back to visit the parsonage a few years later -- just as Anne was starting on this, her second novel. Arthur resembles Branwell only in that he is not evil, just has weak moral character.
9th Jul '15 10:08:49 AM CaptEquinox
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The novel sold extremely well at first, a close second to ''Literature/JaneEyre'', but its bracing assault on both drunkenness and the sexual DoubleStandard earned it a scandalous reputation. Its plot and characters have often been taken as a sly TakeThat to both Creator/EmilyBronte's ''Literature/WutheringHeights'' and Creator/CharlotteBronte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' (the latter of which was written at the same time as ''Tenant''). Despite its early popularity, the novel slipped into relative obscurity following Charlotte refusing to allow the novel to be reprinted in 1850 alongside ''Wuthering Heights'' and Anne's own much less popular ''Literature/AgnesGrey'', deeming the work to be "[[CanonDiscontinuity an entire mistake.]]" Critics began to dismiss the book as well, believing it to be a mere manifestation of Anne's bitterness over her brother Branwell. Its frank treatment of sexuality and marital decay earned it more attention in later years.

to:

The novel sold extremely well at first, a close second to ''Literature/JaneEyre'', but its bracing assault on both drunkenness and the sexual DoubleStandard earned it a scandalous reputation. Its plot and characters have often been taken as a sly TakeThat to both Creator/EmilyBronte's ''Literature/WutheringHeights'' and Creator/CharlotteBronte's ''Literature/JaneEyre'' (the latter of which was written at the same time as ''Tenant''). Despite its early popularity, the novel slipped into relative obscurity following Charlotte refusing to allow the novel to be reprinted in 1850 alongside ''Wuthering Heights'' and Anne's own much less popular ''Literature/AgnesGrey'', deeming the work to be "[[CanonDiscontinuity an entire mistake.]]" Critics began to dismiss the book as well, believing it to be a mere manifestation of Anne's bitterness over her brother Branwell. However, evidence uncovered by Bronte biographer Juliet Barker reveals that it's more likely to have been based on a local case of extreme domestic violence witnessed by the sisters in the context of their father's pastoral work. Its frank treatment of sexuality and marital decay earned it more attention in later years.


Added DiffLines:

** In fact, it was BasedOnATrueStory; not Branwell's, but the wife of a local assistant pastor, who visited the parsonage and told Rev. Bronte exactly what her husband had been doing to her. Rev. Bronte (well known for his liberal views for the time) advised her to take her child and leave him. Eventually, she did.
This list shows the last 10 events of 44. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheTenantOfWildfellHall