History Literature / TheSpaceTrilogy

17th Aug '16 7:58:25 AM SpectralTime
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** ''Out Of The Silent Planet'' is a fictionalized version of Lewis' essay "Religion and Rocketry", describing how extraterrestrial life could be reconciled with Christian theology. It is also a deconstruction of the colonial ideals often found in sci-fi of the time.

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** ''Out Of The Silent Planet'' is a fictionalized version of Lewis' essay "Religion and Rocketry", describing how extraterrestrial life could be reconciled with Christian theology. It is also a deconstruction of the colonial ideals often found in sci-fi of the time.time through the "judgement scene," where Weston has to attempt to justify his worldview to an angel that doesn't speak his language. He needs to resort to the interpretive services of Ransom, who can only convey his speech very simplistically, and who is not necessarily sympathetic to many of his opinions. The obvious point is that, stripped of rhetorical flourish, many of Weston's seemingly high-minded ideals start to sound almost barbaric.
16th Aug '16 9:00:34 PM LBHills
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* AlienNonInterferenceClause

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* AlienNonInterferenceClauseAlienNonInterferenceClause: The celestial hosts stay outside Earth's atmosphere, because it's the claimed and conquered property of a darker kind of angel.
10th Aug '16 4:17:30 PM Orome
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Added DiffLines:

* OmnidisciplinaryScientist: Done deliberately with Weston in ''Out of the Silent Planet''. In his essay "Reply to Professor Haldane", Lewis himself notes the weak point that although "Weston, for the sake of the plot, has to be a physicist, his interests seem to be exclusively biological," and he points out that he was intending the story to be [[MohsScaleOfScienceFictionHardness more fantastical than hard sci-fi]].
6th Aug '16 3:28:51 PM nombretomado
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* {{Homage}}: Over in the DCUniverse, the Martian word for "Mars" is "Ma'aleca'andra" as an homage to this trilogy.

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* {{Homage}}: Over in the DCUniverse, Franchise/DCUniverse, the Martian word for "Mars" is "Ma'aleca'andra" as an homage to this trilogy.
16th Jun '16 4:00:42 AM Doug86
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* SharedUniverse: ''That Hideous Strength'' suggests that the series is set in the same continuity as ''LordOfTheRings'' -- Numinor/Númenor is part of the mythology, and at one point the world is referred to as "Middle Earth".
* ShoutOut: [[LordOfTheRings Númenor]] gets mentioned several times in ''That Hideous Strength'', based apparently on some discussions that Lewis had with Tolkien (Lewis apparently never saw a manuscript, since he invariably spells it "Numinor").

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* SharedUniverse: ''That Hideous Strength'' suggests that the series is set in the same continuity as ''LordOfTheRings'' ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' -- Numinor/Númenor is part of the mythology, and at one point the world is referred to as "Middle Earth".
* ShoutOut: [[LordOfTheRings [[Literature/TheLordOfTheRings Númenor]] gets mentioned several times in ''That Hideous Strength'', based apparently on some discussions that Lewis had with Tolkien (Lewis apparently never saw a manuscript, since he invariably spells it "Numinor").
6th Jun '16 10:14:38 AM Veanne
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** Also possible she doesn't really believe in any ideology and joins any group she thinks likely to gain power.



* TheCorrupter: the Un-man again, whose explicit mission is to recreate the Fall of Man with the Perelandrans.

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* TheCorrupter: the The Un-man again, whose explicit mission is to recreate the Fall of Man with the Perelandrans.



** Also {{Averted}} in an interesting way in the dress-up scene. The dressing room contains no mirrors, and none of the women can see why the dress ''they're'' wearing is so incredibly beautiful on them, though they can all see it on each other.

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** Also {{Averted}} in an interesting way in the dress-up scene. The dressing room contains no mirrors, and none of the women can see why the dress ''they're'' wearing is so incredibly beautiful on them, though they can all see it on each other.other - which illustrates the point (on humility - think of others, not of yourself).



** Aliens simply exist, and the protagonist meets them on social ground - he knows aliens exists and doesn't need to "believe" in them.



* MulticulturalAlienPlanet: In ''Literature/OutOfTheSilentPlanet'', the inhabitants of Malacandra come in three different species (not counting the energy beings), each with its own language. Furthermore, the sorns (giant feathered humanoids) come in at least two varieties -- white (in the mountains) and red (in the deserts), and the hrossa (otter-people) come in at least three races -- black, silver, and crested. There might be more, but the viewpoint character wasn't on the planet long enough to tell, as he was vividly aware.

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* MulticulturalAlienPlanet: In ''Literature/OutOfTheSilentPlanet'', the inhabitants of Malacandra come in three different species (not counting the energy beings), each with its own language. Furthermore, the sorns sorns[[note]]in-universe plural is seroni[[/note]] (giant feathered humanoids) come in at least two varieties -- white (in the mountains) and red (in the deserts), and the hrossa (otter-people) come in at least three races -- black, silver, and crested. There might be more, but the viewpoint character wasn't on the planet long enough to tell, as he was vividly aware.
24th May '16 7:44:13 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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* MyBrainIsBig: The Head of N.I.C.E. MacPhee speculates that they deliberately eased off the skullcap and applied stimulants, though he is doubtful of whether it would actually work. He's right, for a change: the Head's powers come not from its expanded brain matter but from its possession by a dark eldil.

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* MyBrainIsBig: The Head of N.I.C.E. MacPhee [=MacPhee=] speculates that they deliberately eased off the skullcap and applied stimulants, though he is doubtful of whether it would actually work. He's right, for a change: the Head's powers come not from its expanded brain matter but from its possession by a dark eldil.
4th May '16 11:59:48 PM JakesBrain
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The third novel, ''That Hideous Strength'', is a genre shift. (It's subtitled "A Modern Fairy-Tale For Grown-Ups" for a reason). In the quiet town of Edgestow, Jane Studdock finds herself haunted by strange dreams of a decapitated man and an undead mystic. Meanwhile, her husband Mark is strong-armed into joining the National Institute of Co-ordinated Experiments, a joint political-(quasi)scientific organization that is surreptitiously taking complete control of the town. The NICE is particularly interested in Bragdon Wood, where Merlin is rumored to be buried--not dead, just resting. With great reluctance, Jane falls in with the oddly inactive resistance led by Elwin Ransom--the only opposition to the NICE's (literally) diabolical plans.

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The third novel, ''That Hideous Strength'', is a genre shift. (It's subtitled "A Modern Fairy-Tale For Grown-Ups" for a reason). In the quiet college town of Edgestow, Jane Studdock finds herself haunted by strange dreams of a decapitated man and an undead mystic. Meanwhile, her husband Mark is strong-armed into joining the National Institute of Co-ordinated Experiments, a joint political-(quasi)scientific organization that is surreptitiously taking complete control of the town. The NICE is particularly interested in Bragdon Wood, where Merlin is rumored to be buried--not buried -- not dead, just resting. With great reluctance, Jane falls in with the oddly inactive resistance led by Elwin Ransom--the Ransom -- the only opposition to the NICE's (literally) diabolical plans.



* {{Deconstruction}}: In ''Out Of The Silent Planet'', Weston's motivation for the colonization of Mars is the survival of the human race, even if this means killing all the natives of Mars. Or killing any humans who stand in his way. The conversation with Oyarsa picks this philosophy to pieces. This aspect was most likely intended by Lewis as a rebuttal to Olaf Stapeldon's novel ''Last And First Men'', which (arguably) condoned the genocide of native Venusians as necessary for humanity's survival, though his clownish antics earlier poke fun at colonialism generally.

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* {{Deconstruction}}: In ''Out Of The Silent Planet'', Weston's motivation for the colonization of Mars is the survival of the human race, even if this means killing all the natives of Mars. Or killing any humans who stand in his way. The conversation with Oyarsa picks this philosophy to pieces. This aspect was most likely intended by Lewis as a rebuttal to Olaf Stapeldon's novel ''Last And First Men'', which (arguably) condoned the genocide of native Venusians as necessary for humanity's survival, though his Weston's clownish antics earlier poke fun at colonialism generally.



* TheDevilIsALoser: Or at least a disgusting sociopath. As in his earlier novel ''TheScrewtapeLetters'', Lewis was pretty intent on dissecting the idea of Satan as a suave MagnificentBastard and tried to portray him in ''Perelandra'' the way he thought a truly pure evil being would be like. Ransom comes to the realization that for demons, intelligence is a trait that they can put on or remove at will--it's like clothes they wear rather than an innate characteristic. And based on the Un-Man's petty behavior whenever he isn't "working", it's clear he would rather be intelligent as little as possible. At one point, Ransom even specifically thinks that he would much rather face a Mephistopheles-type of demon than the thing he has to put up with.

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* TheDevilIsALoser: Or at least a disgusting sociopath. As in his earlier novel ''TheScrewtapeLetters'', Lewis was pretty intent on dissecting the idea of Satan as a suave MagnificentBastard and tried to portray him in ''Perelandra'' the way he thought a truly pure evil being would be like. Ransom comes to the realization that for demons, intelligence is a trait that they can put on or remove at will--it's will -- it's like clothes they wear rather than an innate characteristic. And based on the Un-Man's petty behavior whenever he isn't "working", it's clear he would rather be intelligent as little as possible. At one point, Ransom even specifically thinks that he would much rather face a Mephistopheles-type of demon than the thing he has to put up with.



* EvilIsPetty: The un-man on Perelandra. Capable of making very eloquent arguments to tempt his subject towards evil; but when he's unable to do anything more profoundly evil, he spends his time torturing small animals and playing childish pranks on Ransom.

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* EvilIsPetty: The un-man Un-man on Perelandra. Capable of making very eloquent arguments to tempt his subject towards evil; but when he's unable to do anything more profoundly evil, he spends his time torturing small animals and playing childish pranks on Ransom.



** Oyarsa actually remarks in the first book that if it were up to him he would simply destroy Devine, as any humanity in him died a long time ago. Conversely, he would attempt to cure Weston.
* EvilutionaryBiologist: Professor Weston develops interplanetary travel so humanity and their descendants (whatever they evolve into) could go out into the stars and survive throughout the cosmos. However, Weston doesn't care that this plan may involve wiping out other intelligent life. (In the second book, he abandons this goal in favor of a New Age-y philosophy he dubs "Spiritual Evolution", which has nothing to do with this trope.) The trope is taken further in the third book, where the N.I.C.E. plans to improve organic life by mechanizing it to an unprecedented degree, removing all those annoying biological (and psychological) barriers to progress -- [[TheEvilsOfFreeWill like free will]].

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** Oyarsa actually remarks in the first book that if it were up to him he would honestly attempt to cure Weston, but would simply destroy Devine, as any humanity in him died a long time ago. Conversely, he would attempt to cure Weston.
ago.
* EvilutionaryBiologist: Professor Weston develops interplanetary travel so humanity and their descendants (whatever they evolve into) could go out into the stars and survive throughout the cosmos. However, Weston doesn't care that this plan may involve wiping out other intelligent life. (In the second book, he abandons this goal in favor of a New Age-y philosophy he dubs "Spiritual Evolution", which has nothing to do with this trope.) The trope is taken further in the third book, where the N.I.C.E. plans to improve organic life by mechanizing it to an unprecedented degree, removing all those annoying biological (and psychological) and psychological barriers to progress -- [[TheEvilsOfFreeWill like free will]].



* ForbiddenFruit: In this [[TheVerse 'verse]], every planet's sapient inhabitants are given a single rule that is not to be broken. Earth's rule was the TropeNamer. Perelandra's denizens are not allowed to sleep on solid ground, and must return to one of the floating islands in the ocean. Lewis' conclusion seems to be that most of [[Literature/TheBible Genesis 3]] is merely window-dressing. All that matters is the ''fact'' that Adam and Eve were ''tested'' (and failed); the ''form'' the test itself took (whether eating a literal fruit or sleeping on solid ground) is immaterial.

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* ForbiddenFruit: In this [[TheVerse 'verse]], every planet's sapient inhabitants are given a single rule that is not to be broken. Earth's rule was the TropeNamer. Perelandra's denizens are not allowed to sleep on solid ground, and must return to one of the floating islands in the ocean. Lewis' conclusion seems to be that most of [[Literature/TheBible Genesis 3]] is merely window-dressing. All that matters is the ''fact'' that Adam and Eve were ''tested'' (and failed); the ''form'' the test itself took (whether eating a literal fruit or sleeping on solid ground) is immaterial.



* HeroOfAnotherStory: Invoked, oddly enough, in regard to ''setting''. When Ransom finds himself in Venus' cave systems, he comes to the conclusion that the caves were certainly designed for some purpose... but that he has no place in them and that whatever the caves are made for, it has nothing to do with him.

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* HeroOfAnotherStory: Invoked, oddly enough, in regard to ''setting''. When Ransom finds himself in Venus' cave systems, he comes to the conclusion that the caves were certainly designed for some purpose... but that he has no place in them and that whatever the caves are made for, purpose that may be, it has nothing to do with him.him and he has no place there.



** The N.I.C.E. vivisects any animal it gets its hands on.

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** The N.I.C.E. vivisects any animal it gets its hands on.on, [[spoiler:as preparation for the day when they finally get to vivisect humans]].



* LossOfIdentity: The human leaders of N.I.C.E. have all experienced tremendous trauma to their personalities and, in the worst cases, their basic free will, as a direct result of their long-term exposure to the antithetical powers of the dark eldila.

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* LossOfIdentity: The human leaders of N.I.C.E. have all experienced tremendous trauma to their personalities and, in the worst cases, their basic free will, as a direct result of their long-term voluntary exposure to the antithetical powers of the dark eldila.



* MeaningfulName: Ransom, whom Maleldil compares to Himself, as He is "the ransom of the world". An interesting twist: Ransom, being a linguist, knows that his name isn't actually related to the word "ransom" -- but the evolution of his family name seems to be no accident.

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* MeaningfulName: Ransom, whom Maleldil compares to Himself, as He is "the ransom of the world". An interesting twist: Ransom, being a linguist, knows that his name isn't actually related to the word "ransom" -- but the evolution of his family name it still seems to be no accident.accident that it is ''his'' name.



** Also deconstructed, just a little.The hrossa, who live a Hunter-gatherer lifestyle, are very friendly to Ransom due to their nobility, but they do him more harm than anyone else by forgetting he can't breathe the thin air up on the high steppe. The sorn astronomer who saves his life bemoans that neither he nor the technically minded pfiffltriggi would have made such a mistake. The other two species are just as noble, being sinless, yet far more rational.

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** Also deconstructed, just a little. The hrossa, who live a Hunter-gatherer lifestyle, are very friendly to Ransom due to their nobility, but they do him more harm than anyone else by forgetting he can't breathe the thin air up on the high steppe. The sorn astronomer who saves his life bemoans that neither he nor the technically minded pfiffltriggi pfifltriggi would have made such a mistake. The other two species are just as noble, being sinless, yet far more rational.



** The pfiffltriggi are miners and artists; whose humour is described as "excelling in practical jokes and personal abuse". They are expert craftsmen and architects who delight in technology and the visual arts, though they prefer complicated things that are fun to make, and the sorns are long-since resigned to the fact that a pfiffltriggi won't make something useful if it's too easy and simple.

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** The pfiffltriggi pfifltriggi are miners and artists; whose humour is described as "excelling in practical jokes and personal abuse". They are expert craftsmen and architects who delight in technology and the visual arts, though they prefer complicated things that are fun to make, and the sorns are long-since resigned to the fact that a pfiffltriggi pfifltrigg won't make something useful if it's too easy and simple.



* ScaryShinyGlasses: Professor Frost was doing this way before [[Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion Gendo]] made it cool. Even in a book, it's still scary.

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* ScaryShinyGlasses: Professor Frost was doing this way before [[Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion Gendo]] Gendo Ikari]] made it cool. Even in a book, it's still scary.



* SharedUniverse: ''That Hideous Strength'' suggests that the series is set in the same continuity as ''LordOfTheRings'' - Numinor/Númenor is part of the mythology, and at one point the world is referred to as "Middle Earth".

to:

* SharedUniverse: ''That Hideous Strength'' suggests that the series is set in the same continuity as ''LordOfTheRings'' - -- Numinor/Númenor is part of the mythology, and at one point the world is referred to as "Middle Earth".



** Meta-example: ''Music/IronMaiden'' has a song called "Out of the Silent Planet". [[LiteraryAllusionTitle Though named after the book]], the song was influenced more by the movie ''Film/ForbiddenPlanet''. Still, both works features a planet with a cosmic horror causing great destruction ("The Monster from the ID" for Forbidden Planet, and the "Bent One" in the Space Trilogy).

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** Meta-example: ''Music/IronMaiden'' has a song called "Out of the Silent Planet". [[LiteraryAllusionTitle Though named after the book]], the song was influenced more by the movie ''Film/ForbiddenPlanet''. Still, both works features a planet with a cosmic horror causing great destruction ("The Monster from the ID" Id" for Forbidden Planet, and the "Bent One" in the Space Trilogy).


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** On their way home from Mars, Weston breaks down in fear and despair when he realizes that he's miscalculated and the ship is about to overshoot Earth's orbit.
4th May '16 11:29:37 PM JakesBrain
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* AgentScully: [=MacPhee=], a die-hard atheist scientist, remains implacably skeptical throughout all the supernatural events of ''That Hideous Strength,'' even though he's on the side of the supernaturalists.

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* AgentScully: [=MacPhee=], a die-hard atheist scientist, remains implacably skeptical throughout all the supernatural events of ''That Hideous Strength,'' even though he's on the side of the supernaturalists. If anything, he represents the value and virtue of rational thought.
19th Apr '16 11:17:15 AM Mabus101
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Added DiffLines:

**Also deconstructed, just a little.The hrossa, who live a Hunter-gatherer lifestyle, are very friendly to Ransom due to their nobility, but they do him more harm than anyone else by forgetting he can't breathe the thin air up on the high steppe. The sorn astronomer who saves his life bemoans that neither he nor the technically minded pfiffltriggi would have made such a mistake. The other two species are just as noble, being sinless, yet far more rational.
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