History Literature / TheSpaceTrilogy

14th Mar '18 11:47:16 AM Jeduthun
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* YouCannotGraspTheTrueForm: Eldila, being angels, are like this to humans, although apparently Hrossa and Sorns can see them just fine. Most of the time they just look like a vague shimmer of light; other attempts have produced wheels rolling on distant hills, a painful impact of colors (described as being like the "true sensation" of being hit in the eye by a rock), and (most successfully) a pair of otherworldly humanoids.
5th Mar '18 9:09:43 AM Camassia
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* CaptainErsatz:
** Weston and Devine are a darker version of Cavor and Bradford from Creator/HGWells' ''Literature/TheFirstMenInTheMoon''. Lewis himself was a fan of the novel.

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* CaptainErsatz:
**
CaptainErsatz: Weston and Devine are a darker version of Cavor and Bradford from Creator/HGWells' ''Literature/TheFirstMenInTheMoon''. Lewis himself was a fan of the novel.
5th Mar '18 9:08:55 AM Camassia
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** Ransom himself is explicitly based on Creator/JRRTolkien -- he teaches the same subject at Cambridge that Tolkien taught at Oxford. (Although in the third book, he seems more like Creator/CharlesWilliams). Tolkien was on the record as saying that he didn't think it was a very close resemblance, although he did recognize some of his own ideas "Lewisified" in Ransom.
** Horace Jules, the nominal director of NICE in ''That Hideous Strength'', is a venomous caricature of H.G. Wells.
** [=MacPhee=], an Ulster rationalist and SarcasticDevotee from ''That Hideous Strength'', may have been a fictionalized version of Lewis' old tutor William Kirkpatrick. Or possibly an AuthorAvatar of Lewis himself, from his days as a skeptic.
*** The author says that [=MacPhee=] is pretty much Kirkpatrick; right down to his phrasing.



* {{Expy}}: Ransom is largely inspired by Lewis' close friend Creator/JRRTolkien.
** Also, [=MacPhee=] is inspired by Lewis' tutor and mentor, William Kirkpatrick, a.k.a. The Great Knock.



* NoBiologicalSex: In these books' universe, the Oyarsa of Perelanda (Venus) is feminine, but not female. The Oyarsu of Malacandra (Mars) and Viritrilbia (Mercury) are masculine, but not male. [[EldritchAbomination It's complicated.]]

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* NoBiologicalSex: In these books' universe, the Oyarsa of Perelanda Perelandra (Venus) is feminine, but not female. The Oyarsu of Malacandra (Mars) and Viritrilbia (Mercury) are masculine, but not male. [[EldritchAbomination It's complicated.]]]]
*NoCelebritiesWereHarmed: Horace Jules, the nominal director of NICE in ''That Hideous Strength'', is a venomous caricature of H.G. Wells.


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*NotQuiteDead: In ''Perelandra'', Ransom [[spoiler:delivers a NoHoldsBarredBeatdown to the Un-man and finally seems to kill him in a cave, sitting on him for at least twelve hours just to make sure that he's dead. He then climbs for some time up to a series of caves to find a way out, only to find that the Un-man has somehow followed him, despite dragging a broken leg the whole way.]]
28th Feb '18 9:51:46 AM Jeduthun
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* OnceGreenMars: In ''Out Of The Silent Planet,'' It turns out that Malacandra (Mars) was once lushly habitable before being attacked and ravaged by the bent Oyarsa of Earth, and now life there is mostly limited to a few geothermal oases.



* OtherworldlyAndSexuallyAmbiguous: The final book, That Hideous Strength, has spirits in it that have genders, but do not have sexes in the biological sense. A quote about the Oyarsa of Jupiter and the Oyarsa of Saturn:

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* OtherworldlyAndSexuallyAmbiguous: The final book, That ''That Hideous Strength, Strength'', has spirits in it that have genders, but do not have sexes in the biological sense. A quote about the Oyarsa of Jupiter and the Oyarsa of Saturn:
24th Jan '18 11:42:44 PM dotchan
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* LanguageEqualsThought: Sin is such an alien concept to the sinless non-Earth aliens that Ransom had considerable difficulty finding proper terms to translate it and related concepts.
26th Dec '17 4:25:46 PM nombretomado
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If you get the feeling that this one is a hackjob copy of ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'' or ''{{Fahrenheit 451}}'', [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny you actually have it backwards]]. This book came first: and right about the time of the atomic bomb. George Orwell actually wrote a snazzy review (titled "The Scientists Take Over") and sang the book's praises, with the caveat that he thought it was weakened by the book's supernatural premise, since of ''course'' good will beat evil if angels are involved. The book is also riddled with Christian allegory, although less overtly so than ''Perelandra'' was. Slightly. Perhaps it may be most generously summed up in the words of Lewis's friend and fellow Anglican apologist, Creator/DorothyLSayers: "less good but still full of good stuff." On the other hand, another friend, Creator/JRRTolkien, dubbed it "That Hideous Book".

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If you get the feeling that this one is a hackjob copy of ''[[Literature/NineteenEightyFour 1984]]'' or ''{{Fahrenheit 451}}'', ''Literature/Fahrenheit451'', [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny you actually have it backwards]]. This book came first: and right about the time of the atomic bomb. George Orwell actually wrote a snazzy review (titled "The Scientists Take Over") and sang the book's praises, with the caveat that he thought it was weakened by the book's supernatural premise, since of ''course'' good will beat evil if angels are involved. The book is also riddled with Christian allegory, although less overtly so than ''Perelandra'' was. Slightly. Perhaps it may be most generously summed up in the words of Lewis's friend and fellow Anglican apologist, Creator/DorothyLSayers: "less good but still full of good stuff." On the other hand, another friend, Creator/JRRTolkien, dubbed it "That Hideous Book".
1st Dec '17 8:12:28 PM TheDireFlamingohawkrobin
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* UnusualEuphemism: In ''Literature/ThatHideousStrength'', "bucking" is used as a stand-in for...

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* UnusualEuphemism: In ''Literature/ThatHideousStrength'', "bucking" is used as a [[RhymesOnADime stand-in for...for]]...
19th Nov '17 10:13:46 AM ReaderAt2046
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7th Nov '17 12:42:11 PM Gitman
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In the second novel, ''Perelandra'', also known as ''Voyage to Venus'', it is revealed that the ''eldila'' have kept in contact with Ransom since his trip to the Heavens, and now Ransom has been given a [[MissionFromGod Mission From Maleldil]] to visit [[UsefulNotes/{{Venus}} Perelandra]] (i.e. Venus). He finds the planet to be covered in oceans and floating islands, and its inhabitants living a literally Edenic existence. Ransom makes the acquaintance of the planet's Queen, and discovers that she and the King (who has been missing for the past few days) are the only intelligent inhabitants. The peace is shattered by the arrival of another space-ship, bearing Weston--and [[DemonicPossession with him]], an ''eldil'' of Thulcandra, bent on corrupting this young world. Ransom realizes that he was sent to Perelandra to prevent this from happening--by [[GoodAngelBadAngel words]], and if necessary, by [[DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu force]]. As a side-note, this was Lewis' personal favorite of everything he wrote.

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In the second novel, ''Perelandra'', also known as ''Voyage to Venus'', it is revealed that the ''eldila'' have kept in contact with Ransom since his trip to the Heavens, and now Ransom has been given a [[MissionFromGod Mission From Maleldil]] to visit [[UsefulNotes/{{Venus}} Perelandra]] (i.e. Venus). He finds the planet to be covered in oceans and floating islands, and its inhabitants living a literally Edenic existence. Ransom makes the acquaintance of the planet's Queen, and discovers that she and the King (who has been missing for the past few days) are the only intelligent inhabitants. The peace is shattered by the arrival of another space-ship, bearing Weston--and [[DemonicPossession with him]], an ''eldil'' of Thulcandra, bent on corrupting this young world. Ransom realizes that he was sent to Perelandra to prevent this from happening--by [[GoodAngelBadAngel words]], and if necessary, by [[DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu force]]. As a side-note, this was Lewis' [[CreatorsFavoriteEpisode personal favorite favorite]] of everything he wrote.
5th Nov '17 4:45:56 PM ReaderAt2046
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** At least until that darker angel sends two of his minions (and one hostage) outside the Moon's orbit, freeing the celestial hosts to react to this incursion.


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* BadGuysDoTheDirtyWork: Several different examples, in various ways.
** For a very long time, there was apparently a decree from God that the planetary angels were not to act within the Moon's orbit. Much of the Enemy's plan in ''That Hideous Strength'' revolved around the idea that mankind was cut off from direct celestial aid. Unfortunately for the Enemy, when he arranged for humans to leave the moon's orbit and interfere with Malacandra and Perelandra, the planetary angels were freed to interfere with Thulucandra in its turn.
** Ransom mentions that one advantage of fighting devils is that they hate their mortal minions as much as they do their foes, and happily "break their tools" when the mortals are of no further use to them.
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