History Literature / TheShipWho

21st Dec '17 10:37:54 AM TheGreatConversation
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* MajorityShareDictator: A benign version takes place over the course of ''The Ship Who Searched.'' Hypatia Cade is seen telling her stockbroker to invest some of her earnings into a cybernetics company that is apparently not very profitable. Later, now owning a majority stake, she introduces herself as their new owner. She didn't want to do anything untoward, she just [[spoiler:wanted them to build her a robot body so she could have a physical relationship with Alex]].
25th Aug '17 12:47:28 AM PaulA
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* EverybodyLives: Brainship Tia and her Brawn Alex investigate a sudden loss of communication with an archaeological expedition to find the personnel reduced to an animal-like mental condition, cause unknown. They are forced to trap and confine the victims in order to transport them to help, which is more than a little distressing. But fortunately their condition proves to be reversible.
** Although it's slight averted in that [[spoiler:one of the survivors dies in transit due to a combination of panic and a bad reaction to the anesthetic. Tia has to keep Alex from rushing in to help because the only way he could do it was without a suit]].
24th Aug '17 11:28:23 AM FuzzyBoots
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** Although it's slight averted in that [[spoiler:one of the survivors dies in transit due to a combination of panic and a bad reaction to the anesthetic. Tia has to keep Alex from rushing in to help because the only way he could do it was without a suit]].
23rd Aug '17 11:13:21 PM PaulA
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* TheBartender: ''The Ship Who Searched'' has a scene where the male lead pours out his woes to a bartender and receives some good advice -- along with a LampshadeHanging, as it's revealed that a lot of bartenders in this setting have received formal training in psychological and relationship counseling because of how often they're in scenes like this.



* CustomUniform: In ''The Ship Who Searched'', Chria Chance wears an identical uniform to everyone else in the Academy -- except it's personally tailored and made of genuine animal leather. It's implied that she's allowed to get away with it for the same reason they ignore her patently fake name; she's almost certainly a BlackSheep daughter of a High Family who wants to make her own way.



* DepartmentOfChildDisservices: The social worker assigned to the orphan Joat in ''The City Who Fought''.

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* DepartmentOfChildDisservices: The social worker assigned to the orphan Joat in ''The City Who Fought''.Fought'' proves to be an outright bigot, and denies Simeon's application to adopt Joat on the grounds that "a shellperson can't possibly raise a child," apparently in complete ignorance of the Federation's anti-discrimination laws.



* FantasticDrug: In "The Ship Who Dissembled", the hijacked ships are carrying tightly-controlled drugs that have important medical uses but also other less reputable applications.

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* FantasticDrug: FantasticDrug:
**
In "The Ship Who Dissembled", the hijacked ships are carrying tightly-controlled drugs that have important medical uses but also other less reputable applications.applications.
** ''[=PartnerShip=]'' has several designer drugs, including Blissto and Seductron.



* NoConservationOfEnergy: Played with in ''The Ship Who Won''.

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* NoConservationOfEnergy: Played with in ''The Ship Who Won''. [[spoiler:A brainship finds a world where magic actually works, complete with all the standard no conservation of energy tropes. Then they discover that there's actually a huge generator complex powering all this, which the magicians have completely wrecked by using it for stupid things like fireballs and levitation.]]



* NumberedHomeworld: In "Dramatic Mission", the homeworld of the methane-breathing StarfishAliens is Beta Corvi IV.



* SamusIsAGirl: In ''The City Who Fought'', Simeon is surprised to learn that the street urchin Joat is a girl.
* SandWorm: In ''The City Who Fought'', Simeon's computer systems are attacked by a "worm" program, which manifests in cyberspace as a literal worm, two metres thick with rows of rotating concentric teeth -- apparently based on a real creature.
* SapientShip



* ShamefulSourceOfKnowledge: In ''[=PartnerShip=]'', the five {{Royal Brats}} that [[LivingShip Nancia]] ferried to their [[ReassignedToAntarctica remote postings in the Nyota system]] are all planning to use their positions for various kinds of corrupt practices (they even have a bet going; the one who makes the most shady money in five years gets a cut of the others' operations). However, Nancia can't tell anyone about it because she got the information by refusing to introduce herself and letting them think they were aboard a mindless drone, which is considered tantamount to spying.

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* ShamefulSourceOfKnowledge: In ''[=PartnerShip=]'', the five {{Royal Brats}} Brat}}s that [[LivingShip Nancia]] ferried to their [[ReassignedToAntarctica remote postings in the Nyota system]] are all planning to use their positions for various kinds of corrupt practices (they even have a bet going; the one who makes the most shady money in five years gets a cut of the others' operations). However, Nancia can't tell anyone about it because she got the information by refusing to introduce herself and letting them think they were aboard a mindless drone, which is considered tantamount to spying.
23rd Aug '17 10:09:21 PM PaulA
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[=McCaffrey=] also wrote two more short stories in the "ship who sang" sequence after long gaps ("Honeymoon", 1977, and "The Ship That Returned", 1999), and "brainships" have made occasional cameos in her other science fiction series, including the ''Crystal Singer'' series.

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[=McCaffrey=] also wrote two more short stories in the "ship who sang" sequence after long gaps ("Honeymoon", 1977, and "The Ship That Returned", 1999), and "brainships" have made occasional cameos in her other science fiction series, including the ''Crystal Singer'' ''Literature/CrystalSinger'' series.
30th Mar '17 5:36:25 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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* DeathSeeker: Kira, Helva's brawn in "The Ship Who Killed", is this due to the death of her husband...causing Helva enormous panic when they unknowingly wind up on a planet where the religion is such that ''everyone'' is one of these.

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* DeathSeeker: Kira, Helva's brawn in "The Ship Who Killed", is this due to the death of her husband... causing Helva enormous panic when they unknowingly wind up on a planet where the religion is such that ''everyone'' is one of these.
30th Dec '16 10:39:02 PM PaulA
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* LongLived: Several characters in ''The Ship Who Sang'' are casually mentioned to be over a hundred years old and still in their productive years, including Theoda in "The Ship Who Mourned" and Nia in "Dramatic Mission", with the possible implication that a longer lifespan is the norm. Shellpeople are explicitly stated to have a life span of centuries.

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* LongLived: LongLived:
** Shellpeople are explicitly stated to have a life span of centuries.
**
Several other characters in ''The Ship Who Sang'' are casually mentioned to be over a hundred years old and still in their productive years, including Theoda in "The Ship Who Mourned" and Nia in "Dramatic Mission", with the possible implication that a longer lifespan is the norm. Shellpeople are explicitly stated to have a life span of centuries.norm.
30th Dec '16 10:06:41 AM Freezer
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* LongLived: Several characters in ''The Ship Who Sang'' are casually mentioned to be over a hundred years old and still in their productive years, including Theoda in "The Ship Who Mourned" and Nia in "Dramatic Mission", with the possible implication that a longer lifespan is the norm.

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* LongLived: Several characters in ''The Ship Who Sang'' are casually mentioned to be over a hundred years old and still in their productive years, including Theoda in "The Ship Who Mourned" and Nia in "Dramatic Mission", with the possible implication that a longer lifespan is the norm. Shellpeople are explicitly stated to have a life span of centuries.
29th Dec '16 1:58:24 PM PaulA
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* LongLived: Several characters in ''The Ship Who Sang'' are casually mentioned to be over a hundred years old and still in their productive years, including Theoda in "The Ship Who Mourned" and Nia in "Dramatic Mission", with the possible implication that a longer lifespan is the norm.
29th Dec '16 7:02:10 AM PaulA
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* ForeignLanguageTirade: Played with in "The Ship Who Mourned". Helva's brawn curses a hapless functionary off the ship by reciting a particularly vituperative string of syllables; when Helva asks what she was saying, she explains that she was reciting her grandmother's recipe for paprikash, which she then proceeds to cook and eat.

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* ForeignLanguageTirade: Played with in "The Ship Who Mourned".Killed". Helva's brawn curses a hapless functionary off the ship by reciting a particularly vituperative string of syllables; when Helva asks what she was saying, she explains that she was reciting her grandmother's recipe for paprikash, which she then proceeds to cook and eat.
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