History Literature / TheShining

16th Mar '16 11:16:56 AM eroock
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A 1977 novel by Creator/StephenKing. King's third published novel, '''''The Shining''''' became a bestseller, and established King as a preeminent author in the horror genre.

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A 1977 novel by Creator/StephenKing. King's third published novel, '''''The Shining''''' ''The Shining'' became a bestseller, and established King as a preeminent author in the horror genre.
29th Jan '16 5:20:21 AM Aquila89
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* HiddenDepths: Because his parents are either fearful or disbelieving of his talents, he doesn't let on how strong his powers are, or how he can use them. He is also quite a bit more intelligent and mature than he lets on.

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* HiddenDepths: Because his Danny's parents are either fearful or disbelieving of his talents, he doesn't let on how strong his powers are, or how he can use them. He is also quite a bit more intelligent and mature than he lets on.
29th Jan '16 4:42:08 AM Aquila89
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* GoingColdTurkey: Jack and his friend Al Shockley both quit drinking instantly after hitting a bike parked in the middle of the road one night while both of them were very drunk.
28th Jan '16 7:52:40 PM rtan
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* BenevolentBoss: Jack Torrance gives Al Shockley every reason to fire him after Jack calls Stuart Ullman threatening to write what amounts to a smear job on his hotel. It is not just a danger to Shockley's investment, but a personal betrayal from a dear friend that he'd bent over backwards to help. He does not fire Jack, knowing the effect it will have on the Torrance family.


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* CantGetAwayWithNuthin: Astonishingly, this is how Jack feels after being allowed to keep his job, in spite of his behavior absolutely justifying his termination as caretaker. Instead of being grateful for avoiding a devasting and self-inflicted disaster, he stews in resentment of Al Shockley for requiring, as a condition of his continued employment, that Jack not write a potentially damaging exposè on the Overlook Hotel.


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* FanDisservice: There are a pair of instances of undead people in bathtubs, and the way their nudity is described is particularly unappealing.


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* HiddenDepths: Because his parents are either fearful or disbelieving of his talents, he doesn't let on how strong his powers are, or how he can use them. He is also quite a bit more intelligent and mature than he lets on.


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* InfoDump: The scrapbook found in the basement is a rather enjoyable example.
28th Jan '16 7:23:42 PM rtan
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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: The narrative tone of this book is quite a bit more tight and literary than most of Stephen King's later stories. Compare its prose to the much looser and more casual prose in the sequel, ''Literature/DoctorSleep''.
14th Jan '16 6:58:18 PM rtan
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* HopeSpot: The first few months at the hotel seems like a new beginning for the Torranc's. Jack's play is coming along, the rift between Jack and Wendy is mending, and the difficulties of the past three years seem to be fading. Then the snow comes...

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* HopeSpot: The first few months at the hotel seems like a new beginning for the Torranc's.Torrances. Jack's play is coming along, the rift between Jack and Wendy is mending, and the difficulties of the past three years seem to be fading. Then the snow comes...comes...
** A darker example occurs while Jack is in the equipment shed. [[spoiler: Tasked with getting his family away from the hotel, he has to find the snowmobile's battery in order for it to function. He really does not want to do it, and he starts to feel relief when he doesn't see it... and then, he does. This upsets him so badly that he intentionally sabotages the vehicle.]]



* TheNapoleon: Overlook manager Stuart Ullman, a short man who acts like a smarmy bully with Jack and lords over his employees with an iron fist. Very much subverted, in that he is actually a decent enough man who deeply loves the Overlook Hotel and wants to do what is best for it. Ullman knows that his employees don't like him, and doesn't care, because he feels that "one has to be a bit of a bastard" in order to effectively manage a world-class resort hotel. Considering that he is the only manager in the ''70-year history of the hotel'' to run the hotel profitably, he's probably right.

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* TheNapoleon: Very much subverted. Overlook manager Stuart Ullman, Ullman is a short man who acts like a smarmy bully with Jack and lords over his employees with an iron fist. Very much subverted, in that he He is actually a decent enough man who deeply loves the Overlook Hotel and wants to do what is best for it. Ullman knows that his employees don't like him, and doesn't care, because he feels that "one has to be a bit of a bastard" in order to effectively manage a world-class resort hotel. Considering that he is the only manager in the ''70-year history of the hotel'' to run the hotel profitably, he's probably right.



* NostalgiaHeaven: This is the plot. Dead people stay in the hotel forever as ghosts at a 1945 party.
14th Jan '16 6:25:15 PM rtan
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* HairTriggerTemper: Jack Torrance has one and it causes endless grief to everyone around him. His dad was even worse, because he'd lose his temper for ''no reason at all.''
14th Jan '16 4:08:28 PM rtan
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* TheNapoleon: Overlook manager Stuart Ullman, a short man who acts like a smarmy bully with Jack and lords over his employees with an iron fist.

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* TheNapoleon: Overlook manager Stuart Ullman, a short man who acts like a smarmy bully with Jack and lords over his employees with an iron fist. Very much subverted, in that he is actually a decent enough man who deeply loves the Overlook Hotel and wants to do what is best for it. Ullman knows that his employees don't like him, and doesn't care, because he feels that "one has to be a bit of a bastard" in order to effectively manage a world-class resort hotel. Considering that he is the only manager in the ''70-year history of the hotel'' to run the hotel profitably, he's probably right.
14th Jan '16 3:47:40 PM rtan
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* MagicalNegro: Hallorann could count as one.
** Lampshaded when Hallorann briefly wonders why he should risk his life to help three white people who he barely knows. (The answer is that because of their telepathic abilities, he and Danny formed a very close bond, despite meeting only once).



* MaybeMagicMaybeMundane: It's possible to explain away just about every single weird, terrifying and freakish event in the story as the delusions of people who are in highly-excited states of mind, though some examples are easier to justify this way than others. The only thing that happens which appears to be unequivocally supernatural is when [[spoiler: Jack is freed by Grady from the pantry.]]
* TheMillstone: Jack Torrance is one of literature's most tragic examples. He is the architect of every single disaster he and his family suffers, because he can't control his temper and he can't (easily) control his drinking. Over the course of events, Jack manages to destroy his marriage, his career, his friendships, his literary ambitions, and ultimately, his family. If given second or third chances, he will just screw up again. At one point, he almost gets himself fired from his caretaker job because he calls the hotel manager and viciously taunts him about the secret history of the Overlook Hotel (history which mostly predates the manager and doesn't directly involve him). Why? He has no self-control. ''He literally can't stop himself from doing shit like that.''
* MostWritersAreWriters: Jack wrote several short stories, and he's working on a play.



* MagicalNegro: Hallorann could count as one.
** Lampshaded when Hallorann briefly wonders why he should risk his life to help three white people who he barely knows. (The answer is that because of their telepathic abilities, he and Danny formed a very close bond, despite meeting only once).
* MostWritersAreWriters: Jack wrote several short stories, and he's working on a play.



* SoulSuckingRetailJob: Because Jack's drinking and temper have burned so many bridges, he lives in silent terror that he may be reduced to working hard, dead-end jobs just to get by. It is, in large part, why he refuses to abandon the hotel even after he's certain that his family is in danger there.



* TrueCompanions: Jack and Al Shockley, at least while they are both drunks. Sober, Jack rather resents his much wealthier friend, even though Al is extremely accommodating and helpful.



* YouAreWhatYouHate: Both Wendy and Jack carry traits that their abusive parents had; Wendy shares some of the resentment and jealousy her mother had toward her father for their child favoring him, Jack has his father's drinking problem and violent mood swings. Neither is happy to realize this.


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* YouAreWhatYouHate: Both Wendy and Jack carry traits that their abusive parents had; Wendy shares some of the resentment and jealousy her mother had toward her father for their child favoring him, Jack has his father's drinking problem and violent mood swings. Neither is happy to realize this.
24th Dec '15 1:29:54 PM Aquila89
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* UnreliableNarrator: While the story is told in third person, much of it is from Jack's point of view and interior monologues. Throughout the story, he insists that breaking Danny's arm was an accident and that George Hatfield, the student who slashed his tires, falsely accused him of unfavoritism. However, as Jack dips closer to madness, there are strong hints that these actions were in fact intentional and Jack has just desperately been trying to convince himself otherwise. Specifically, when he encounters a hallucination of George in room 217, he outright admits he deliberately set George up to fail the debate class.

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* UnreliableNarrator: While the story is told in third person, much of it is from Jack's point of view and interior monologues. Throughout the story, he insists that breaking Danny's arm was an accident and that George Hatfield, the student who slashed his tires, falsely accused him of unfavoritism. However, as Jack dips closer to madness, there are strong hints that these actions were in fact intentional and Jack has just desperately been trying to convince himself otherwise. Specifically, when he encounters has a hallucination of dream about meeting George in room 217, he outright admits he deliberately set George up to fail the debate class.
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