History Literature / TheGreatDivorce

17th Aug '17 8:00:03 AM Jeduthun
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* BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor: Nobody stays in Hell unless they choose to be there. [=MacDonald=] warns of "...the people to whom {{God}} says, in the end, '''Thy'' will be done.'" Why anybody would wish such a fate on themselves is the question that's explored through the story.



* LiteraryAllusionTitle: To William Blake's ''The Marriage of Heaven and Hell''.



* MilkingTheGiantCow: The Tragedian's attempts at exploiting pity come across as shabby ham-handed melodrama.



* This one is also a fairly obvious SpiritualSuccessor to ''Literature/DivineComedy''. It's a dream-vision of a journey from Hell to Heaven via something not unlike Purgatory; Lewis appears as the everyman narrator of his own book; and he has a SpiritAdvisor: Creator/GeorgeMacDonald represents a combination of both Virgil in Inferno and Purgatorio, and Beatrice in Paradiso (when Lewis first meets Creator/GeorgeMacDonald, he claims that reading Creator/GeorgeMacDonald's books as a teenager was for him 'like Dante's first sight of Beatrice'. Sarah Smith is always portrayed in very Beatrice-like terms, and her failed reunion with her husband is a portrayal of how Beatrice's reunion with Dante could have gone horribly wrong if Dante hadn't had the humility to accept her rebukes, and accept happiness without needing to be right.

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* ** This one is also a fairly obvious SpiritualSuccessor to ''Literature/DivineComedy''. It's a dream-vision of a journey from Hell to Heaven via something not unlike Purgatory; Lewis appears as the everyman narrator of his own book; and he has a SpiritAdvisor: Creator/GeorgeMacDonald represents a combination of both Virgil in Inferno and Purgatorio, and Beatrice in Paradiso (when Lewis first meets Creator/GeorgeMacDonald, he claims that reading Creator/GeorgeMacDonald's books as a teenager was for him 'like Dante's first sight of Beatrice'. Sarah Smith is always portrayed in very Beatrice-like terms, and her failed reunion with her husband is a portrayal of how Beatrice's reunion with Dante could have gone horribly wrong if Dante hadn't had the humility to accept her rebukes, and accept happiness without needing to be right.
29th Jun '17 1:29:23 PM Fliegenbein400
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Added DiffLines:

*This one is also a fairly obvious SpiritualSuccessor to ''Literature/DivineComedy''. It's a dream-vision of a journey from Hell to Heaven via something not unlike Purgatory; Lewis appears as the everyman narrator of his own book; and he has a SpiritAdvisor: Creator/GeorgeMacDonald represents a combination of both Virgil in Inferno and Purgatorio, and Beatrice in Paradiso (when Lewis first meets Creator/GeorgeMacDonald, he claims that reading Creator/GeorgeMacDonald's books as a teenager was for him 'like Dante's first sight of Beatrice'. Sarah Smith is always portrayed in very Beatrice-like terms, and her failed reunion with her husband is a portrayal of how Beatrice's reunion with Dante could have gone horribly wrong if Dante hadn't had the humility to accept her rebukes, and accept happiness without needing to be right.
23rd Jun '17 11:42:57 PM DustSnitch
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* AHellOfATime: DownplayedTrope. The Grey Town doesn't contain the expected sights associated with Hell: devils with pitchforks, sinners being tortured on flaming racks, etc. It's just a depressing, rainy place where constant squabbling causes residents to spread out from everyone else and become TheAloner. However, it's hinted that this is just the antechamber to Hell -- things are about to get much worse once full darkness sets in.

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* AHellOfATime: DownplayedTrope. The Grey Town doesn't contain the expected sights associated with Hell: devils with pitchforks, sinners being tortured on flaming racks, etc. It's just a depressing, rainy place where constant squabbling causes residents to spread out from everyone else and become TheAloner. However, it's hinted that this is just the antechamber to Hell -- things are about to get much worse once the sun sets and the full darkness sets in.in for the rest of time.
23rd Jun '17 11:41:35 PM DustSnitch
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->''"There are only two kinds of people in the end: those who say to God, 'Thy will be done,' and those to whom God says, in the end, ''''Thy '''will be done.'"''

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->''"There are only two kinds of people in the end: those who say to God, 'Thy will be done,' and those to whom God says, in the end, ''''Thy [='=]'''Thy '''will be done.'"''
23rd Jun '17 11:41:18 PM DustSnitch
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->''"There are only two kinds of people in the end: those who say to God, 'Thy will be done,' and those to whom God says, in the end, '''Thy '''will be done.'"''

to:

->''"There are only two kinds of people in the end: those who say to God, 'Thy will be done,' and those to whom God says, in the end, '''Thy ''''Thy '''will be done.'"''
16th Jun '17 12:11:21 PM DustSnitch
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''The Great Divorce'' is an allegorical book by Creator/CSLewis about how people choose {{Hell}} over the paradise of {{Heaven.}}

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''The Great Divorce'' is an allegorical book by Creator/CSLewis about how people choose {{Hell}} over the paradise of {{Heaven.}}
{{Heaven}}.
16th Jun '17 12:03:19 PM DustSnitch
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''The Great Divorce'' is an allegorical book by Creator/CSLewis about people choosing Hell over the paradise of Heaven.

to:

''The Great Divorce'' is an allegorical book by Creator/CSLewis about how people choosing Hell choose {{Hell}} over the paradise of Heaven.
{{Heaven.}}
19th Mar '17 2:32:38 PM DustSnitch
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''The Great Divorce'' is an allegorical book by Creator/CSLewis.

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''The Great Divorce'' is an allegorical book by Creator/CSLewis.
Creator/CSLewis about people choosing Hell over the paradise of Heaven.
29th Jan '17 4:46:31 PM AnonFangeekGirl
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* FlatEarthAtheist: The Apostate Bishop persists in his atheism despite currently being on the outskirts of Heaven.

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* FlatEarthAtheist: The Apostate Bishop persists in his atheism Lewis mentions 'materialist ghosts' who, despite currently being on dead and in the outskirts of Heaven.Christian afterlife, persist in saying that there's no life after death and that everything there is just an elaborate hallucination.
26th Jan '17 12:12:37 PM AnonFangeekGirl
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* TheAloner: Pretty much every resident of Hell, because they can't stop quarreling with their neighbors. Every time someone settles near another person, within a week they've fought so badly that someone decides to move farther out, eventually moving to the outskirts and building a new house.



* TheDeterminator: One Ghost has gone up to heaven to get a 'commodity' to force the damned to stay together. He manages, through a little luck and a lot of pain, to grab hold of a small apple, despite the apples being of Heaven and therefore much more real than he is.



* MundaneAfterlife: Hell is just a rainy twilit town that gives new meaning to "urban sprawl". This is even [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by some who remark that the one draw of Hell -- the chance to talk to the great sinners of history -- is more or less impossible because of the distance.
* MyBelovedSmother: One of the more heart-wrenching conversations is on this theme. The mother in question mourned her son to the point where she ignored her other children, her husband and God. [=MacDonald=] suspects if the narrator listened to her conversation further, she would try and force her son to come to Hell so she could have him.
* NoSell: None of the arguments used by the Ghosts are effective at convincing the Bright Ones.

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* MundaneAfterlife: Hell is just Hell. It's a rainy twilit town that gives new meaning to "urban sprawl". This is even [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] by some who remark that in constant twilight (some lights are on but not yet welcoming) where it's always raining (and nothing can keep the one draw rain out). There are no 'better parts of Hell -- the chance to talk to the great sinners of history -- is more or less impossible because town'- it's all dingy lodging houses, mean shops, and "bookstores of the distance.
sort that sell ''The Works of Aristotle''." It's also mostly empty since no one can stand anyone else enough to live nearby for long (one ghost says that most people decide to move within a week of settling in one place).
* MyBelovedSmother: One of the more heart-wrenching conversations is on this theme. The mother in question mourned her son to the point where she ignored her other children, her husband and God. [=MacDonald=] suspects if the narrator listened to her conversation further, she would try and force demand that her son to come to Hell hell so that she could have him.
* NoSell: None of the arguments used by Nothing the Ghosts are effective at convincing do can really affect the Bright Ones.Ones. Their arguments don't convince anyone, and any attempts at manipulation (like Frank Smith's attempt to make Sarah pity him) fall flat and end up looking ridiculous.



* TimeStandsStill: Lewis had the idea for the story from a half-remembered story about a time traveller. Nothing the spirits do can effect any real change [[note]]just as nothing the time traveller could do made any difference to the past -- right down to being able to bend a blade of grass or bite into a sandwich[[/note]] -- Hell is always damp and miserable and Heaven is so much 'realer' than the spirits that the grass cuts into their feet instead of bending to them.

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* TimeStandsStill: TimeStandsStill:
**
Lewis had the idea for the story from a half-remembered story about a time traveller. Nothing the spirits do can effect any real change [[note]]just as nothing the time traveller could do made any difference to the past -- right down to being able to bend a blade of grass or bite into a sandwich[[/note]] -- Hell is always damp and miserable and Heaven is so much 'realer' than the spirits that the grass cuts into their feet instead of bending to them.them.
** InUniverse, the narrator notes that time in Hell appears to be frozen at the most dismal point at dusk- there are some lights on, but it's not dark enough for them to be welcoming.



* WantingIsBetterThanHaving: One ghost argues this: It's better to travel hopefully than to arrive. The Bright One returns that if you knew that to be true, you could not travel in hope, because how can you hope to reach an inferior destination?

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* WantingIsBetterThanHaving: One ghost The Apostate Bishop argues this: this. It's better to travel hopefully than to arrive. The Bright One returns that if you knew that to be true, you could not travel in hope, because how can you hope to reach an inferior destination?



* {{Yandere}}: The possessive mother; [=MacDonald=] explains that LoveMakesYouCrazy in Hell, whereas LoveRedeems in Heaven.

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* {{Yandere}}: The possessive mother; Pam is a maternal (rather than romantic) example. She exalts her 'mother-love' for her son Michael and keeps demanding to see him, even as her guide explains that he was taken away for her own good (since her obsession over him caused her to neglect the rest of her family) and that as long as she keeps focusing on how much she wants to be with him, she has no chance of going to Heaven. [=MacDonald=] guesses that she will eventually demand to take him with her to Hell just so she could have him, and explains that LoveMakesYouCrazy in Hell, whereas LoveRedeems in Heaven.Heaven.
* YearOutsideHourInside: Time in Hell works differently than time on Earth, as noted by the bowler-hatted ghost the narrator meets on the bus.
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