History Literature / TheGreatDivorce

14th Nov '17 8:56:28 AM DustSnitch
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* MadnessMantra / NeverMyFault: "It was Soult's fault. It was Ney's fault. It was Josephine's fault. It was the fault of the English. It was the fault of the Russians."

to:

* MadnessMantra / NeverMyFault: "It MadnessMantra: According to one of the Ghosts, Napoleon was last seen muttering about fault to himself over and over seemingly unable to stop. He seemed tired, but he kept walking on into the outer darkness of {{Hell}}.
-->''"It
was Soult's fault. It was Ney's fault. It was Josephine's fault. It was the fault of the English. It was the fault of the Russians.""''



* PointOfNoReturn: Any sin, unremedied, leads to this. Interestingly, this is usually symbolized as someone [[PutOnABus returning to the bus.]]

to:

* PointOfNoReturn: Any sin, unremedied, leads cannot be atoned for once the Ghosts leave Heaven to this.return to the grey town. Interestingly, this is usually symbolized as someone [[PutOnABus returning to the bus.]]
13th Nov '17 6:28:33 PM DustSnitch
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* LiteraryAllusionTitle: The titular divorce is that of Heaven and Hell, introducing the book in part as a rebuttal to William Blake's
heretical ''The Marriage of Heaven and Hell''.

to:

* LiteraryAllusionTitle: The titular divorce is that of Heaven and Hell, introducing the book in part as a rebuttal to William Blake's
Blake's heretical ''The Marriage of Heaven and Hell''.
13th Nov '17 6:28:05 PM DustSnitch
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* IdiotPlot: The plot centers around a busload of idiots so self-centered that they are completely unable to accept a Paradise where they have to care about others.

to:

* IdiotPlot: IdiotBall: The plot centers around a busload of idiots so self-centered that they are completely unable to accept a Paradise where they have to care about others.
13th Nov '17 6:27:42 PM DustSnitch
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* IdiotBall: Most of the Ghosts.

to:

* IdiotBall: Most IdiotPlot: The plot centers around a busload of the Ghosts.idiots so self-centered that they are completely unable to accept a Paradise where they have to care about others.



* KarmicDeath: We see a couple of these.

to:

* %%* KarmicDeath: We see a couple of these.



* Just before the Sun impales him with light, the narrator of ''Literature/TheGreatDivorce'' is reminded of the errors that could arise from assuming his vision of Heaven encompasses the entire unending super-nature of {{God}} and says "God forbid." The narrator's guide says, "He has forbidden it. That's what I'm telling ye."
* LiteraryAllusionTitle: The titlular divorce is that of Heaven and Hell, introducing the book in part as a rebuttal to William Blake's

to:

* LiteralMetaphor: Just before the Sun impales him with light, the narrator of ''Literature/TheGreatDivorce'' is reminded of the errors that could arise from assuming his vision of Heaven encompasses the entire unending super-nature of {{God}} and says "God forbid." The narrator's guide says, "He has forbidden it. That's what I'm telling ye."
* LiteraryAllusionTitle: The titlular titular divorce is that of Heaven and Hell, introducing the book in part as a rebuttal to William Blake's
13th Nov '17 12:01:01 PM DustSnitch
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* LiteraryAllusionTitle: To William Blake's ''The Marriage of Heaven and Hell''.

to:

* Just before the Sun impales him with light, the narrator of ''Literature/TheGreatDivorce'' is reminded of the errors that could arise from assuming his vision of Heaven encompasses the entire unending super-nature of {{God}} and says "God forbid." The narrator's guide says, "He has forbidden it. That's what I'm telling ye."
* LiteraryAllusionTitle: To The titlular divorce is that of Heaven and Hell, introducing the book in part as a rebuttal to William Blake's Blake's
heretical
''The Marriage of Heaven and Hell''.
26th Oct '17 9:00:30 AM Orome
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Added DiffLines:

* AfterlifeExpress: The bus that the inhabitants of Hell can board and ride to Heaven. They can stay there if they choose to (most don't).
21st Sep '17 1:31:25 PM Izzkradiin
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* TheDeterminator: One Ghost has gone up to heaven to get a 'commodity' to force the damned to stay together. He manages, through a little luck and a lot of pain, to grab hold of a small apple, despite the apples being of Heaven and therefore much more real than he is.

to:

* TheDeterminator: One Ghost has gone up to heaven to get a 'commodity' to force the damned to stay together. He manages, through a little luck and a lot of pain, to grab hold of a small apple, despite apple. This is in spite of the apples being fact that the apple is of Heaven Heaven, and therefore much more real than he is.is, which results in the apple being very heavy.
17th Sep '17 3:15:17 AM Doug86
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** Also, this being C. S. Lewis, to lots of literary and philosophical authors including Creator/WilliamBlake, Prudentius, Jeremy Taylor, [[Literature/DivineComedy Dante]], Creator/JohnMilton, and of course Creator/GeorgeMacDonald.

to:

** Also, this being C. S. Lewis, to lots of literary and philosophical authors including Creator/WilliamBlake, Prudentius, Jeremy Taylor, [[Literature/DivineComedy [[Literature/TheDivineComedy Dante]], Creator/JohnMilton, and of course Creator/GeorgeMacDonald.



** This one is also a fairly obvious SpiritualSuccessor to ''Literature/DivineComedy''. It's a dream-vision of a journey from Hell to Heaven via something not unlike Purgatory; Lewis appears as the everyman narrator of his own book; and he has a SpiritAdvisor: Creator/GeorgeMacDonald represents a combination of both Virgil in Inferno and Purgatorio, and Beatrice in Paradiso (when Lewis first meets Creator/GeorgeMacDonald, he claims that reading Creator/GeorgeMacDonald's books as a teenager was for him 'like Dante's first sight of Beatrice'. Sarah Smith is always portrayed in very Beatrice-like terms, and her failed reunion with her husband is a portrayal of how Beatrice's reunion with Dante could have gone horribly wrong if Dante hadn't had the humility to accept her rebukes, and accept happiness without needing to be right.

to:

** This one is also a fairly obvious SpiritualSuccessor to ''Literature/DivineComedy''.''Literature/TheDivineComedy''. It's a dream-vision of a journey from Hell to Heaven via something not unlike Purgatory; Lewis appears as the everyman narrator of his own book; and he has a SpiritAdvisor: Creator/GeorgeMacDonald represents a combination of both Virgil in Inferno and Purgatorio, and Beatrice in Paradiso (when Lewis first meets Creator/GeorgeMacDonald, he claims that reading Creator/GeorgeMacDonald's books as a teenager was for him 'like Dante's first sight of Beatrice'. Sarah Smith is always portrayed in very Beatrice-like terms, and her failed reunion with her husband is a portrayal of how Beatrice's reunion with Dante could have gone horribly wrong if Dante hadn't had the humility to accept her rebukes, and accept happiness without needing to be right.
17th Aug '17 8:00:03 AM Jeduthun
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* BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor: Nobody stays in Hell unless they choose to be there. [=MacDonald=] warns of "...the people to whom {{God}} says, in the end, '''Thy'' will be done.'" Why anybody would wish such a fate on themselves is the question that's explored through the story.



* LiteraryAllusionTitle: To William Blake's ''The Marriage of Heaven and Hell''.



* MilkingTheGiantCow: The Tragedian's attempts at exploiting pity come across as shabby ham-handed melodrama.



* This one is also a fairly obvious SpiritualSuccessor to ''Literature/DivineComedy''. It's a dream-vision of a journey from Hell to Heaven via something not unlike Purgatory; Lewis appears as the everyman narrator of his own book; and he has a SpiritAdvisor: Creator/GeorgeMacDonald represents a combination of both Virgil in Inferno and Purgatorio, and Beatrice in Paradiso (when Lewis first meets Creator/GeorgeMacDonald, he claims that reading Creator/GeorgeMacDonald's books as a teenager was for him 'like Dante's first sight of Beatrice'. Sarah Smith is always portrayed in very Beatrice-like terms, and her failed reunion with her husband is a portrayal of how Beatrice's reunion with Dante could have gone horribly wrong if Dante hadn't had the humility to accept her rebukes, and accept happiness without needing to be right.

to:

* ** This one is also a fairly obvious SpiritualSuccessor to ''Literature/DivineComedy''. It's a dream-vision of a journey from Hell to Heaven via something not unlike Purgatory; Lewis appears as the everyman narrator of his own book; and he has a SpiritAdvisor: Creator/GeorgeMacDonald represents a combination of both Virgil in Inferno and Purgatorio, and Beatrice in Paradiso (when Lewis first meets Creator/GeorgeMacDonald, he claims that reading Creator/GeorgeMacDonald's books as a teenager was for him 'like Dante's first sight of Beatrice'. Sarah Smith is always portrayed in very Beatrice-like terms, and her failed reunion with her husband is a portrayal of how Beatrice's reunion with Dante could have gone horribly wrong if Dante hadn't had the humility to accept her rebukes, and accept happiness without needing to be right.
29th Jun '17 1:29:23 PM Fliegenbein400
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Added DiffLines:

*This one is also a fairly obvious SpiritualSuccessor to ''Literature/DivineComedy''. It's a dream-vision of a journey from Hell to Heaven via something not unlike Purgatory; Lewis appears as the everyman narrator of his own book; and he has a SpiritAdvisor: Creator/GeorgeMacDonald represents a combination of both Virgil in Inferno and Purgatorio, and Beatrice in Paradiso (when Lewis first meets Creator/GeorgeMacDonald, he claims that reading Creator/GeorgeMacDonald's books as a teenager was for him 'like Dante's first sight of Beatrice'. Sarah Smith is always portrayed in very Beatrice-like terms, and her failed reunion with her husband is a portrayal of how Beatrice's reunion with Dante could have gone horribly wrong if Dante hadn't had the humility to accept her rebukes, and accept happiness without needing to be right.
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