History Literature / TheGreatDivorce

9th May '16 10:37:20 AM AnonFangeekGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* MrExposition: One of the ghosts that Lewis meets on the bus tells him how Hell works and why it's so empty (Everyone arrives at the same place, but since nobody can get along with anyone else, they quickly move away, and spread through the town), as lead-up to his point about why he's going up (most things in Hell can be gotten simply by imagining them, so he wants to go to Heaven to get ahold of something that can be called a commodity and use economics to force people to stay together).
9th May '16 9:31:02 AM AnonFangeekGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HellOfAHeaven: After comparing heaven and hell, most of the damned choose hell, although this is less because Heaven's a bad place and more because going there means that they have to give up their sins, which most are unwilling to do. In several cases these "sins" are straight-up ValuesDissonance things like "maintaining a work ethic by insisting on earning your keep" and "having literally any sense of self-worth". It also coincidentally matches the punchline of an old Islamic ThisIsntHeaven joke, that constant effortless pleasure with no work allowed is actually a form of hell.

to:

* HellOfAHeaven: After comparing heaven and hell, most of the damned choose hell, although this is less because Heaven's a bad place and more because going there means that they have to give up their sins, which most are unwilling to do. In several cases these "sins" are straight-up ValuesDissonance things like "maintaining a work ethic by insisting on earning your keep" and "having literally any sense of self-worth". It also coincidentally matches the punchline of an old Islamic ThisIsntHeaven joke, that constant effortless pleasure with no work allowed is actually a form of hell.
6th May '16 2:14:39 PM dotchan
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* GrayRainOfDepression: In Hell

to:

* GrayRainOfDepression: In HellA constant issue in Hell, especially since everything else there is insubstantial.
24th Apr '16 10:11:07 PM ImpudentInfidel
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HellOfAHeaven: After comparing heaven and hell, most of the damned choose hell, although this is less because Heaven's a bad place and more because going there means that they have to give up their sins, which most are unwilling to do.

to:

* HellOfAHeaven: After comparing heaven and hell, most of the damned choose hell, although this is less because Heaven's a bad place and more because going there means that they have to give up their sins, which most are unwilling to do. In several cases these "sins" are straight-up ValuesDissonance things like "maintaining a work ethic by insisting on earning your keep" and "having literally any sense of self-worth". It also coincidentally matches the punchline of an old Islamic ThisIsntHeaven joke, that constant effortless pleasure with no work allowed is actually a form of hell.
12th Mar '16 1:21:30 PM AnonFangeekGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* WoundedGazelleGambit: Sarah Smith's husband Frank's sin was using other peoples' pity to manipulate them and make them miserable. This trait is represented by the Tragedian.
12th Mar '16 1:15:34 PM AnonFangeekGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* EveryoneCallsHimBarkeep: The only people (other than Lewis and [=MacDonald=]) whose names are given are Frank and Sarah Smith.

to:

* EveryoneCallsHimBarkeep: The only people (other than Not all the ghosts and heavenly beings are named, and Lewis usually gives them nicknames (like the Big Ghost, the Hard-Bitten Ghost, and [=MacDonald=]) so on). The ghosts and Bright Ones whose names we do learn are given usually learned in passing in conversation. There are Frank only two exceptions to this: [=MacDonald=], whom Lewis recognizes, and Sarah Smith.
2nd Mar '16 12:40:12 PM AnonFangeekGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HellOfAHeaven: After comparing heaven and hell, most of the damned choose hell.

to:

* HellOfAHeaven: After comparing heaven and hell, most of the damned choose hell.hell, although this is less because Heaven's a bad place and more because going there means that they have to give up their sins, which most are unwilling to do.
25th Feb '16 11:35:08 AM AnonFangeekGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


-->If a corpse already liquid with decay had risen from the grave, smeared lipstick on its gums, and attempted a flirtation, the result could not have been more appalling.


Added DiffLines:

* FanDisservice: There's one ghost who attempts to seduce the Bright One trying to talk to her. The narrator describes it thus:
-->If a corpse already liquid with decay had risen from the grave, smeared lipstick on its gums, and attempted a flirtation, the result could not have been more appalling.
9th Dec '15 12:53:04 PM Generality
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ItIsDehumanizing: After spending some time on the verge of Heaven, the author refers to the shades from Hell as "it" rather than "he" or "she".
* ItsAllAboutMe: The suffering of the ghosts in Hell ultimately stems from their profound self-absorption, such that many of them are unable to understand the guidance of the Bright Ones because they interpret the advice through their own prejudices, or refuse to venture up the slopes of Heaven because they are unwilling to give up some minor character flaw.


Added DiffLines:

* TheKnightsWhoSaySquee: The narrator begins to gush with admiration when he realizes he's met Creator/GeorgeMacDonald, until the latter stops him, pointing out he's familiar with his own biography.
25th Nov '15 9:09:41 PM ImpudentInfidel
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* HellOfAHeaven: After comparing heaven and hell, most of the damned choose hell.
This list shows the last 10 events of 48. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheGreatDivorce