History Literature / TheDivineComedy

21st Sep '17 1:41:28 PM DustSnitch
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* BrownNote: By the seventh sphere of Heaven, Beatrice claims that the sight of her smile would be so brilliant that Dante would be set ablaze as if hit by lightning. This isn't to aggrandize Beatrice herself, but to show how far beyond our understanding the joy of being with God in Heaven is. In clarifying the divine nature of her incendiary happiness, Beatrice compares the scenario to an older example of this trope in [[Myth/ClassicalMythology the death of Dionysus's mother]].
19th Sep '17 1:20:43 PM DustSnitch
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* TheAnnotatedEdition: Most good editions of ''The Divine Comedy'' are heavily annotated: at the remove of 700 years or so, and given that Dante went on {{Author Tract}}s and {{Author Filibuster}}s in long stretches of the work about now-forgotten Florentine politicians or abstruse theological issues, it's often very difficult to tell who's who or what Dante is on about now without extensive footnotes. Mind, not all of this is the passage of time; several writers ''in Dante's time'' or shortly thereafter, including Boccaccio, wrote annotations of the ''Comedy'', all or most of which occasionally pled ignorance as to Dante's meaning.

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* TheAnnotatedEdition: Most good editions of ''The Divine Comedy'' are heavily annotated: at the remove of 700 years or so, and given that Dante went on {{Author Tract}}s and {{Author Filibuster}}s in long stretches of the work about now-forgotten Florentine politicians or abstruse theological issues, it's often outdated scientific analogies, it can be very difficult to tell who's who or what Dante is on about now without extensive footnotes. Mind, not all of this is the passage of time; several writers ''in Dante's time'' or shortly thereafter, including Boccaccio, wrote annotations of the ''Comedy'', all or most of which occasionally pled ignorance as to Dante's meaning.
19th Sep '17 7:39:47 AM DustSnitch
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* RhymingWithItself: Done intentionally. To prevent any sense of blasphemy, Dante only rhymed the word "Christ" with "Christ." [[note]]Mind you, it is much easier to find words rhyming with Christ ("Christo") in Italian than English.[[/note]] Notable in that he had to do it only three times due to the rhyming system of the Comedy (ABA BCB CDC ... YZY Z).

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* RhymingWithItself: Done intentionally. To prevent any sense of blasphemy, Dante only rhymed the word "Christ" "[[UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} Cristo]]" with "Christ." [[note]]Mind you, it is much easier to find words rhyming with Christ ("Christo") in Italian than English.[[/note]] "Cristo." Notable in that he had to do it only three times (in ''Paradiso'' Cantos XII, XIV, and XIX) due to the rhyming system of the Comedy (ABA BCB CDC ... YZY Z).



* {{Satan}}: The final character Dante meets in ''Inferno'' is the emperor of Hell himself, Satan. Although he's rather weak and pitiful, despite being the largest creature Dante's ever seen. He's stuck in a torturously cold put of ice that's being sustained from a cold wind created by his own wings, which he flaps desperately in his attempts at escape. He doesn't even put up a fight when Dante and Virgil climb down his body, since he's too preoccupied crying in pain and chewing apart the bodies of Judas, Brutus, and Cassius with the three heads he has to mock the Trinity. Even his wings are ugly and molten, looking more like bat wings than the majestic span one would expect from the greatest of angels.

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* {{Satan}}: The final character Dante meets in ''Inferno'' is the emperor of Hell himself, Satan.the Devil. Although he's rather weak and pitiful, despite being the largest creature Dante's ever seen. He's stuck in a torturously cold put of ice that's being sustained from a cold wind created by his own wings, which he flaps desperately in his attempts at escape. He doesn't even put up a fight when Dante and Virgil climb down his body, since he's too preoccupied crying in pain and chewing apart the bodies of Judas, Brutus, and Cassius with the three heads he has to mock the Trinity. Even his wings are ugly and molten, looking more like bat wings than the majestic span one would expect from the greatest of angels.
17th Sep '17 12:42:27 PM DustSnitch
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* ConfirmationBias: InUniverse, Francis of Assisi warns Dante against believing that he sees the world as God or his perfect creations see it, for his perception passes on truth "like an artist who knows his craft but has a hand that trembles." If he fails to recognize the faults of his opinions, Dante will fall into the ranks of idiot philosophers and heretics, since "affection for one’s own opinion binds, confines the mind."

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* ConfirmationBias: InUniverse, Francis of Assisi Saint-Doctor Thomas Aquinas warns Dante against believing that he sees the world as God or his perfect creations see it, for his perception passes on truth "like an artist who knows his craft but has a hand that trembles." If he fails to recognize the faults of his opinions, Dante will fall into the ranks of idiot philosophers and heretics, since "affection for one’s own opinion binds, confines the mind."



* HorribleJudgeOfCharacter: Knowing without a doubt that a [[GodIsGood Perfectly Good]] and [[TheOmniscient All-Knowing]] God had damned them, Dante still falls for the excuses of several characters being punished in Hell.
** First, he faints with despair after an adulterous couple submit to him that they had no choice but to abandon their marriages because they were corrupted by the horrible, seductive tales of [[Myth/KingArthur Sir Lancelot]].
** Second, Dante can't help but feel pity when he meets his former master, Brunetto Latini, punished for violence against God and nature. Dante thanks him for teaching him everything about writing and poetry and remembers how Latini taught him that the secret to immortality was to [[GlorySeeker write brilliantly]]. Lattini reaffirms everything Dante says of him, even when Dante says he wouldn't have put Lattini in Hell, apparently not realizing that in life and now in death he lead Dante away from the true secret to immortality: living in Christ's Love. So in perpetuating Dante's error and leading him away from the Paradise the Poet will see much later, Lattini continues in death to do Violence against God.

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* HorribleJudgeOfCharacter: HorribleJudgeOfCharacter:
**
Knowing without a doubt that a [[GodIsGood Perfectly Good]] and [[TheOmniscient All-Knowing]] God had damned them, Dante still falls for the excuses of several characters being punished in Hell.
** *** First, he faints with despair after an adulterous couple submit to him that explain why they had no choice but to abandon their marriages because they were corrupted by the horrible, seductive tales of fall into sin. Their excuse? They heard [[Myth/KingArthur Sir Lancelot]].
**
a love poem about Lancelot's affair]] and thought it sounded pretty cool.
***
Second, Dante can't help but feel pity when he meets his former master, Brunetto Latini, punished for violence against God and nature.some type of violence. Dante thanks him for teaching him everything about writing and poetry and remembers how Latini taught him that the secret to immortality was to [[GlorySeeker write brilliantly]]. Lattini reaffirms everything Dante says of him, even when Dante says he wouldn't have put Lattini in Hell, apparently not realizing that in life and now in death he lead Dante away from the true secret to immortality: living in Christ's Love. So in perpetuating Dante's error and leading him away from the Paradise the Poet will see much later, Lattini continues in death to do Violence against God.God.
** Thomas Aquinas concludes a dialogue about human wisdom by observing that men are foolish when they casually judge whether another is damned or blessed, because to do so would be to "count ears before the corn is ripe." Since that's foolish, Aquinas reminds the ordinary man that he should not assume to be the Mind of God, for even one who appears to be a robber can be saved while the charitable giver may suffer in Inferno.
16th Sep '17 4:31:16 PM DustSnitch
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''The Divine Comedy'' (''Divina Commedia'') is a [[NarrativePoem three-part epic]] by Florentine poet Durante degli Alighieri ([[Creator/DanteAlighieri Dante]]), written some time between 1308 and 1321. It describes one man's journey into the depths of {{Hell}}, up the staircase-like mountain of Purgatory, and into the spheres of {{Heaven}} while guided by the poet Creator/{{Virgil}} and Dante's deceased lover, Beatrice. On his journey, Dante meets the most notable local politicians, historical figures, and biblical characters all across the afterlife in order to better understand the spiritual journey we take in life.

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''The Divine Comedy'' (''Divina Commedia'') is a [[NarrativePoem three-part epic]] by Florentine poet Durante degli Alighieri ([[Creator/DanteAlighieri Dante]]), Creator/DanteAlighieri, written some time between 1308 and 1321. It describes one man's the author's journey into the depths of {{Hell}}, up the staircase-like mountain of Purgatory, and into the spheres of {{Heaven}} while guided by the poet Creator/{{Virgil}} and Dante's deceased lover, Beatrice. On his journey, Dante meets the most notable local politicians, historical figures, and biblical characters all across the afterlife in order to better understand the spiritual journey we take in life.
16th Sep '17 4:27:01 PM DustSnitch
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* AndThatsTerrible: Dante ''really'' hated corrupt priests, and pointed it out frequently. He even had a special bolgia specifically for those who sold church offices, where sinners were put upside-down into holes in the rock, with flames burning at their feet.

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* AndThatsTerrible: Dante ''really'' hated corrupt priests, and pointed it out frequently. He even had %%And That's Terrible is a special bolgia specifically for those who sold church offices, where sinners were put upside-down into holes in the rock, with flames burning at heavy-handed description of a villain's evil that is presented as if their feet.on-screen actions weren't enough to earn the condemnation of the audience. It is not merely the presence of a villain that the characters hate.



** And then there's the Sphere of the Sun, which can be summed up as "St. Francis was a great man, [[TakeThat unlike those corrupt Franciscan friars]]." "St. Dominic was also a great man, [[TakeThat unlike those corrupt Dominican friars]]."



** And then there's the Sphere of the Sun, which can be summed up as "St. Francis was a great man, [[TakeThat unlike those corrupt Franciscan friars]]." "St. Dominic was also a great man, [[TakeThat unlike those corrupt Dominican friars]]."


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* SinisterMinister: Dante ''really'' hated corrupt priests, and pointed it out frequently. He even had a special bolgia specifically for those who sold church offices, where sinners were put upside-down into holes in the rock, with flames burning at their feet.
16th Sep '17 11:34:02 AM DustSnitch
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Added DiffLines:

* HorribleJudgeOfCharacter: Knowing without a doubt that a [[GodIsGood Perfectly Good]] and [[TheOmniscient All-Knowing]] God had damned them, Dante still falls for the excuses of several characters being punished in Hell.
** First, he faints with despair after an adulterous couple submit to him that they had no choice but to abandon their marriages because they were corrupted by the horrible, seductive tales of [[Myth/KingArthur Sir Lancelot]].
** Second, Dante can't help but feel pity when he meets his former master, Brunetto Latini, punished for violence against God and nature. Dante thanks him for teaching him everything about writing and poetry and remembers how Latini taught him that the secret to immortality was to [[GlorySeeker write brilliantly]]. Lattini reaffirms everything Dante says of him, even when Dante says he wouldn't have put Lattini in Hell, apparently not realizing that in life and now in death he lead Dante away from the true secret to immortality: living in Christ's Love. So in perpetuating Dante's error and leading him away from the Paradise the Poet will see much later, Lattini continues in death to do Violence against God.
16th Sep '17 11:12:11 AM DustSnitch
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* ConfirmationBias: InUniverse, Francis of Assisi warns Dante against believing that he sees the world as God or his perfect creations see it, for his perception passes on truth "like an artist who knows his craft but has a hand that trembles." If he fails to recognize the faults of his opinions, Dante will fall into the ranks of idiot philosophers and heretics, since "affection for one’s own opinion binds, confines the mind."



*** And then there's the Sphere of the Sun, which can be summed up as "St. Francis was a great man, [[TakeThat unlike those corrupt Franciscan friars]]." "St. Dominic was also a great man, [[TakeThat unlike those corrupt Dominican friars]]."

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*** ** And then there's the Sphere of the Sun, which can be summed up as "St. Francis was a great man, [[TakeThat unlike those corrupt Franciscan friars]]." "St. Dominic was also a great man, [[TakeThat unlike those corrupt Dominican friars]]."
16th Sep '17 10:23:27 AM DustSnitch
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* ShoutOut: Hundreds of historical, religious, and mythological figures appear throughout the poem to help the audience have a better idea of what sin, penance, and glory look like in a person. There's generally one or two of these references per Canto/Chapter, but in the twelfth canto of ''Paradiso'', Dante [[ExaggeratedTrope goes to the extreme]] of having a saint list off all the great monks and scholars that dwell within his sphere of Heaven, ranging from a commentator of Dante's favorite poet to the great theologian Thomas Aquinas.
1st Sep '17 4:15:09 PM DustSnitch
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* CirclesOfHell: The {{Trope Namer|s}}, if not the {{Trope Maker|s}}. Dante traverses all of them in the ''Inferno.''

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* CirclesOfHell: CirclesOfHell:
**
The {{Trope Namer|s}}, if not the {{Trope Maker|s}}. Maker|s}}, are the nine circles Dante traverses all in Inferno, which start from the top with the offenses that least distance man from God, and gradually get graver and graver until the very bottom of them all, which is reserved for direct traitors to God like Satan and Judas.
** The Seven Terraces of Purgatory each serve to reconcile people that committed one of the Seven Deadly Sins. Since Purgatory is a mountain with the entrance to Paradise at the top, the worst of the Sins (pride) has its terrace at the bottom, and sinners must then climb through the other terraces until they reach the least offensive sin (lust) and do penance for that.
** The Spheres of Paradise appear to follow the same formula as Hell and Purgatory, where Dante first encounters the least exemplary of the place's inhabitants and rises to the most perfect example of those that dwell in this domain. Dante is disturbed by this, since it seems unjust that God would segregate different Saints after they had already reached Paradise, but his guide, Beatrice, handily answers his worries. She explains that Heaven [[SubvertedTrope isn't actually divided into different sections]], it's just that God wanted to show Dante the different aspects of Heaven in a way he could understand. It's made very clear that everyone is equally and perfectly happy in Paradise, with the nun Dante meets
in the ''Inferno.''lowest sphere shrugging off Dante's worries before going back to sing God's praises.



** Sorcerors and fortunetellers, who attempted to use fraudulent means to see the future, have their heads turned backwards so they ''cannot'' see what's in front of them.

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** Sorcerors Sorcerers and fortunetellers, who attempted to use fraudulent means to see the future, have their heads turned backwards so they ''cannot'' see what's in front of them.


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* LightIsGood:
** As Dante explains, "On high, joy is made manifest by brightness, as, here on earth, by smile." What that that means is that the saints living in Paradiso are encased in light, to the point that by the time Dante has reached the third sphere, they're too bright for Dante to recognize his old friends.
** Each part of Heaven corresponds with a sphere in the Ptolemic universe, so the final sphere is the Sun, where Dante fully encounters God. The light and intensity of the sun are used to describe the sheer force of God's perfection and love for his universe.
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