History Literature / TheDivineComedy

16th Jun '16 1:40:56 AM eroock
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The Divine Comedy (''Divina Commedia'') is a [[NarrativePoem three-part epic]] by Florentine poet Durante degli Alighieri (Dante), written some time between 1308 and 1321. It describes one man's journey into the depths of {{Hell}}, up the staircase-like mountain of Purgatory, and into the spheres of {{Heaven}}. The first part, [[FireAndBrimstoneHell the Inferno]], is the best known and most often retold and alluded to in modern media. Essentially, every portrayal of Hell comes either [[WordOfDante from Dante]], its English Protestant SpiritualSuccessor ''Literature/ParadiseLost'', or a combination of the two.

to:

The ''The Divine Comedy Comedy'' (''Divina Commedia'') is a [[NarrativePoem three-part epic]] by Florentine poet Durante degli Alighieri (Dante), written some time between 1308 and 1321. It describes one man's journey into the depths of {{Hell}}, up the staircase-like mountain of Purgatory, and into the spheres of {{Heaven}}. The first part, [[FireAndBrimstoneHell the Inferno]], is the best known and most often retold and alluded to in modern media. Essentially, every portrayal of Hell comes either [[WordOfDante from Dante]], its English Protestant SpiritualSuccessor ''Literature/ParadiseLost'', or a combination of the two.
5th Jun '16 11:50:22 AM Gideoncrawle
Is there an issue? Send a Message


->''"[[HellGate Abandon all hope, ye who enter here.]]"''

to:

->''"[[HellGate Abandon ->''"Abandon all hope, ye who enter here.]]"''
"''
1st May '16 3:53:40 AM Fluid
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* EldritchAbomination: Insofar as God is depicted at all, it's in an [[YouCannotGraspTheTrueForm extremely abstract]] fashion.
23rd Apr '16 2:36:18 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Not to be confused with the band ''Music/TheDivineComedy'', a rather fine Northern Irish band responsible for, among other things, the ''FatherTed ''theme tune.

to:

Not to be confused with the band ''Music/TheDivineComedy'', a rather fine Northern Irish band responsible for, among other things, the ''FatherTed ''Series/FatherTed ''theme tune.
12th Apr '16 10:45:17 AM Willbyr
Is there an issue? Send a Message





** Mohammed's torso is spliced in half and his stomach drops out. Its [[SarcasmMode lovely]] description traslates to "the foul sack that makes shit of what is eaten".

to:

** Mohammed's torso is spliced split in half and his stomach drops out. Its [[SarcasmMode lovely]] description traslates translates to "the foul sack that makes shit of what is eaten".



* WishFulfillment: Seeing as he gets to beat up people he doesn't like in Hell, confronts Satan, meets the woman he fell in love with during her life and be saved by her, sees ''God Himself'', and transcends the mortal realm forever. The real kicker is that it's actually pulled off fairly well as far as self-inserts go. See AuthorAvatar above.
** He does not transcend the mortal realm forever, actually. Since the Comedy is set in 1300, after his voyage Dante (the character) returns to Florence, knowing full well about his exile and writing the Comedy to redeem mankind.
* WorthyOpponent: Saladin, the Muslim opponent of Richard the Lionhearted during UsefulNotes/TheCrusades, is in the circle with virtuous pagans rather than further down among heretics, probably because of this trope.

to:

* WishFulfillment: Seeing as he gets to beat up people he doesn't like in Hell, confronts Satan, meets the woman he fell in love with during her life and be saved by her, and sees ''God Himself'', and transcends the mortal realm forever. The real kicker is that it's actually pulled off fairly well as far as self-inserts go. See AuthorAvatar above.
Himself''.
* WorthyOpponent:
** He does not transcend the mortal realm forever, actually. Since the Comedy is set in 1300, after his voyage Dante (the character) returns to Florence, knowing full well about his exile and writing the Comedy to redeem mankind.
* WorthyOpponent:
Saladin, the Muslim opponent of Richard the Lionhearted during UsefulNotes/TheCrusades, is in the circle with virtuous pagans rather than further down among heretics, probably because of this trope.



** It boils down to whether you think she was abducted by Paris or gave in to lust and ran off with him willingly.

to:

** It boils down to whether you think she was abducted by Paris or gave in to lust and ran off with him willingly.
7th Feb '16 12:04:38 PM GrammarNavi
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* WorthyOpponent: Saladin, the Muslim opponent of Richard the Lionhearted during TheCrusades, is in the circle with virtuous pagans rather than further down among heretics, probably because of this trope.

to:

* WorthyOpponent: Saladin, the Muslim opponent of Richard the Lionhearted during TheCrusades, UsefulNotes/TheCrusades, is in the circle with virtuous pagans rather than further down among heretics, probably because of this trope.
20th Dec '15 1:10:55 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TheAnnotatedEdition: Most good editions of ''The Divine Comedy'' are heavily annotated: at the remove of 700 years or so, and given that Dante went on {{Author Tract}}s and {{Author Filibuster}}s in long stretches of the work about now-forgotten Florentine politicians or abstruse theological issues, it's often very difficult to tell who's who or what Dante is on about now without extensive footnotes.

to:

* TheAnnotatedEdition: Most good editions of ''The Divine Comedy'' are heavily annotated: at the remove of 700 years or so, and given that Dante went on {{Author Tract}}s and {{Author Filibuster}}s in long stretches of the work about now-forgotten Florentine politicians or abstruse theological issues, it's often very difficult to tell who's who or what Dante is on about now without extensive footnotes. Mind, not all of this is the passage of time; several writers ''in Dante's time'' or shortly thereafter, including Boccaccio, wrote annotations of the ''Comedy'', all or most of which occasionally pled ignorance as to Dante's meaning.
29th Oct '15 10:46:31 AM Gideoncrawle
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AndIMustScream: The Inferno is made of these.
** In particular, suicides are turned into trees. They can scream, but only when someone (or something, as Dante sees later) breaks off a branch.
** The souls of traitors are frozen in the icy lake of Cocytus, at depths corresponding to the depth of their betrayal. Those at the very bottom are completely encased and in grotesque positions.
** There's also the penance for the sin of {{Pride}} in the ''Purgatorio'': the sinners are made to carry boulders, the weight of which is proportional to the sin's weight. Dante even remarks that the punishment is the simplest, and yet quite terrible.
*** We should note that Dante considered himself to be guilty of pride. Read that how you will.

to:

* AndIMustScream: The Inferno is made of these.
AndIMustScream:
** In particular, the ''Inferno'', suicides are turned into trees. They can scream, but only when someone (or something, as Dante sees later) breaks off a branch.
** The Also in the ''Inferno'', the souls of traitors are frozen in the icy lake of Cocytus, at depths corresponding to the depth of their betrayal. Those at the very bottom are completely encased and in grotesque positions.
** There's also In the ''Purgatorio'', the penance for the sin of {{Pride}} in the ''Purgatorio'': the sinners are made is to carry boulders, the weight of which is proportional to the sin's weight. Dante even Dante, via [[AuthorAvatar the Pilgrim]], remarks that the this punishment is the simplest, and yet quite terrible.
*** We should note
terrible, and also admit that Dante considered himself the Pride circle is where he expects to be guilty spend the largest part of pride. Read that how you will.his own penance.



* AuthorAvatar: Purgatory has seven levels corresponding to the SevenDeadlySins. Dante experiences the penances for only three: Pride, Anger, and Lust. Translator Creator/DorothyLSayers commented that these were ''precisely'' the three faults people tend to accuse Dante of, so sharing these penances was probably a deliberate confession on the poet's part.

to:

* AuthorAvatar: The Pilgrim, protagonist of the story. Purgatory has seven levels corresponding to the SevenDeadlySins. Dante The Pilgrim experiences the penances for only three: Pride, Anger, and Lust. Translator Creator/DorothyLSayers commented that these were ''precisely'' the three faults people tend to accuse Dante of, so sharing these subjecting the Pilgrim to their penances was probably a deliberate confession on the poet's part.



* BuryYourGays: Homosexuals and usurers get the same level in Hell. (Usury is charging excessive, unreasonably high, and often illegal interest rates on loans; it used to mean charging any interest on debt.)
** By placing both homosexuals and usurers in the circle of the violent, and in a setting that so strongly symbolizes sterility (the burning desert), Dante establishes each sin as the opposite of each other: the homosexuals make sterile that which should be fertile (their sexuality-- according to medieval theology, all sex should have procreation as its final purpose), while usurers make fertile that which should be sterile (wealth should be generated by nature or art, not by interest accumulated by existing wealth.)
** It should be noted that Dante sees his mentor in the burning desert, as he was gay. Also, that part took place in the middle of Inferno, which has a special place in the other books as well. Thirdly, he depicts homosexuals as constantly running from being burned, which might be symbolic for how gay people had to run from being marked during their lives (more likely it has to do with the rain of fire that destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah).
*** There is an actual critical debate if the group in which Dante places his mentor (Brunetto Latini) is where homosexuals are punished or if it's for pedophiles. Sodomy was in fact a common "contracepting technique" in the middle ages (it is noted by famous Dante scholar Vittorio Sermonti), and it would be unlikely that Dante punishes the act of sodomy in that circle. Moreover, when Dante asks his mentor to name some other fellow sinners, he enumerates only clergymen and literates, indicating a sort of "master-student" relationship issue.
*** It has also been argued that the reason they're there is not necessarily that they are gay, but because of extreme self-hatred of being so. This becomes more obvious when you learn more about Brunetto Latini's writings.

to:

* BuryYourGays: BuryYourGays:
**
Homosexuals and usurers get the same level in Hell. (Usury [[note]]Usury is charging excessive, unreasonably high, and often illegal interest rates on loans; it used to mean charging any interest on debt.)[[/note]] By placing both homosexuals and usurers in the circle of the violent, and in a setting that so strongly symbolizes sterility (the burning desert), Dante establishes each sin as the opposite of each other: the homosexuals make sterile that which should be fertile (their sexuality-- according to medieval theology, all sex should have procreation as its final purpose), while usurers make fertile that which should be sterile (wealth should be generated by nature or art, not by interest accumulated by existing wealth.)
** By placing both homosexuals and usurers in the circle of the violent, and in a setting that so strongly symbolizes sterility (the burning desert), Dante establishes each sin as the opposite of each other: the homosexuals make sterile that which should be fertile (their sexuality-- according to medieval theology, all sex should have procreation as its final purpose), while usurers make fertile that which should be sterile (wealth should be generated by nature or art, not by interest accumulated by existing wealth.)
** It should be noted that
Dante sees his gay mentor in the burning desert, as he was gay. Also, that part took place in but the middle of Inferno, which has a special place in the other books as well. Thirdly, he depicts homosexuals as constantly running from being burned, which might be symbolic for how gay people had to run from being marked during their lives (more likely it has to do with the rain of fire that destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah).
*** There
reason he's there is an actual ambiguous. [[note]]There is a critical debate if the group in which on whether Dante places finds his mentor (Brunetto Latini) is where homosexuals are punished in the place of punishment for homosexuals, or if it's for pedophiles. Sodomy was in fact a common "contracepting technique" in the middle ages (it is noted by famous Dante scholar Vittorio Sermonti), and it would be unlikely that Dante punishes the act of sodomy in that circle. Moreover, when Dante asks his mentor to name some other fellow sinners, he enumerates only clergymen and literates, indicating a sort of "master-student" relationship issue.
*** It
issue.[[/note]] Also, that part took place in the middle of Inferno, which has a special place in the other books as well. Thirdly, he depicts homosexuals as constantly running from being burned, which might be symbolic for how gay people had to run from being marked during their lives (more likely it has to do with the rain of fire that destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah). [[note]]It has also been argued that the reason they're there is not necessarily that they are gay, but because of extreme self-hatred of being so. This becomes more obvious when you learn more about Brunetto Latini's writings.[[/note]]


Added DiffLines:

* CastsNoShadow: Inverted when the souls being rehabilitated on Mount Purgatory recognize the Pilgrim as a living man because he casts a shadow, and marvel at his presence.
3rd Oct '15 9:40:05 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The Divine Comedy (''Divina Commedia'') is a [[NarrativePoem three-part epic]] by Florentine poet Durante degli Alighieri (Dante), written some time between 1308 and 1321. It describes one man's journey into the depths of {{Hell}}, up the staircase-like mountain of Purgatory, and into the spheres of {{Heaven}}. The first part, [[FireAndBrimstoneHell the Inferno]], is the best known and most often retold and alluded to in modern media. Essentially, every portrayal of Hell comes either [[WordOfDante from Dante]], its English Protestant SpiritualSuccessor ''ParadiseLost'', or a combination of the two.

to:

The Divine Comedy (''Divina Commedia'') is a [[NarrativePoem three-part epic]] by Florentine poet Durante degli Alighieri (Dante), written some time between 1308 and 1321. It describes one man's journey into the depths of {{Hell}}, up the staircase-like mountain of Purgatory, and into the spheres of {{Heaven}}. The first part, [[FireAndBrimstoneHell the Inferno]], is the best known and most often retold and alluded to in modern media. Essentially, every portrayal of Hell comes either [[WordOfDante from Dante]], its English Protestant SpiritualSuccessor ''ParadiseLost'', ''Literature/ParadiseLost'', or a combination of the two.
24th Sep '15 7:01:55 AM Xythos
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** The Limbo is this when compared to the whole Hell. The souls that belong to this circle didn't commit sin but neither were baptized, thus aren't free from the original sin and are still condemned to eternal punishment... which consists of staying in a somber, foggy place where they can move and talk freely and don't suffer any pain except from being unable to see God.
This list shows the last 10 events of 136. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheDivineComedy