History Literature / TheCountOfMonteCristo

9th Jun '18 5:21:38 PM PaulA
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* HyperCompetentSidekick: A trademark of all the Count's servants and agents is that they're ridiculously good at their jobs.
9th Jun '18 1:15:21 PM AzureOwl
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Added DiffLines:

* HyperCompetentSidekick: A trademark of all the Count's servants and agents is that they're ridiculously good at their jobs.
5th Jun '18 6:13:46 PM AzureOwl
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Edmond Dantes is a guileless sailor experiencing a run of good luck: he has just been made captain of his ship, and is newly engaged to the beautiful Mercedes. On his wedding day, Fernand (Mercedes's cousin and Dantes's rival for her affections) and Danglars (Dantes' co-worker, who is jealous of the former's rise to captain) decide to frame Dantes by sending an anonymous letter fingering him as a Napoleonic spy. Dantes is arrested and brought to crown prosecutor Villefort, who is initially sympathetic to Dantes until he finds a letter in his possession that would expose Villefort's father as a leader in a Neo-Bonapartist conspiracy. Taking no chances, he destroys the evidence of Dantes' innocence and fast-tracks him to the Chateau d'If, a {{hellhole prison}} for enemies of the state.

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Edmond Dantes Dantès is a guileless sailor experiencing a run of good luck: he has just been made captain of his ship, and is newly engaged to the beautiful Mercedes. On his wedding day, Fernand (Mercedes's cousin and Dantes's Dantès's rival for her affections) and Danglars (Dantes' (Dantès' co-worker, who is jealous of the former's rise to captain) decide to frame Dantes by sending an anonymous letter fingering him as a Napoleonic spy. Dantes Dantès is arrested and brought to crown prosecutor Villefort, who is initially sympathetic to Dantes Dantès until he finds a letter in his possession that would expose Villefort's father as a leader in a Neo-Bonapartist conspiracy. Taking no chances, he destroys the evidence of Dantes' Dantès' innocence and fast-tracks him to the Chateau d'If, a {{hellhole prison}} for enemies of the state.



* AbsenceMakesTheHeartGoYonder: Edmond Dantes is gone for years, and Mercedes is told he is dead and marries his enemy and raises a son during that time. Dantes forgives her, specifically saying that the eighteen months she waited before moving on was all a lover could ask for.

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* AbsenceMakesTheHeartGoYonder: Edmond Dantes Dantès is gone for years, and Mercedes is told he is dead and marries his enemy and raises a son during that time. Dantes Dantès forgives her, specifically saying that the eighteen months she waited before moving on was all a lover could ask for.



* AndIMustScream: Between Dantes's arrest and his return as the Count, Noirtier suffers a stroke that renders him incapable of moving anything other than his eyelids. He and his granddaughter-caretaker do manage to develop a suitable means of communication.

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* AndIMustScream: Between Dantes's Dantès 's arrest and his return as the Count, Noirtier suffers a stroke that renders him incapable of moving anything other than his eyelids. He and his granddaughter-caretaker do manage to develop a suitable means of communication.



* ArbitrarilyLargeBankAccount: Dantes has unlimited credit with Danglars's bank, and keeps withdrawing enormous amounts of money at the worst possible times (for Danglars).

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* ArbitrarilyLargeBankAccount: Dantes Dantès has unlimited credit with Danglars's bank, and keeps withdrawing enormous amounts of money at the worst possible times (for Danglars).



* AristocratsAreEvil: Three of the four individuals responsible for Edmond's imprisonment become members of the nobility, and the most noble characters in the book, the Morrel family, are the only ones without some title. And of course, while Edmond Dantes was a nice happy-go-lucky guy, the Count of Monte Cristo is a sinister and vengeful man.

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* AristocratsAreEvil: Three of the four individuals responsible for Edmond's imprisonment become members of the nobility, and the most noble characters in the book, the Morrel family, are the only ones without some title. And of course, while Edmond Dantes Dantès was a nice happy-go-lucky guy, the Count of Monte Cristo is a sinister and vengeful man.



* BadassPreacher: Dantes in his Busoni disguise, effortlessly disarms a would-be thief.

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* BadassPreacher: Dantes Dantès in his Busoni disguise, effortlessly disarms a would-be thief.



** Monsieur Morrel to the young Edmond Dantes. When Edmond was framed for Bonapartist collaboration and imprisoned in the hellish Chateau D'If, Morrel was the only person who tried to save him, though it was extremely politically dangerous to do so. Edmond rewards this compassion with UndyingLoyalty to Morrel's family when his fortunes change.

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** Monsieur Morrel to the young Edmond Dantes.Dantès. When Edmond was framed for Bonapartist collaboration and imprisoned in the hellish Chateau D'If, Morrel was the only person who tried to save him, though it was extremely politically dangerous to do so. Edmond rewards this compassion with UndyingLoyalty to Morrel's family when his fortunes change.



* BestServedCold: Dantes has to wait fourteen years in prison before he escapes, and spends another nine years preparing before he sets his plans for revenge in motion. The Count is even generous enough to bring other people screwed over by his enemies almost as many years before (namely Haydee by Fernand and Bertuccio by Villefort) so they can be the direct executors of the vengeance.

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* BestServedCold: Dantes Dantès has to wait fourteen years in prison before he escapes, and spends another nine years preparing before he sets his plans for revenge in motion. The Count is even generous enough to bring other people screwed over by his enemies almost as many years before (namely Haydee by Fernand and Bertuccio by Villefort) so they can be the direct executors of the vengeance.



* BodybagTrick: Used in the prison escape. And (partly) averted: Dantes expects to merely be buried, at which point he can dig himself free and escape. However, he learns the hard way that the Chateau d'If buries its dead at sea -- and still manages to escape, even though it's much harder going.

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* BodybagTrick: Used in the prison escape. And (partly) averted: Dantes Dantès expects to merely be buried, at which point he can dig himself free and escape. However, he learns the hard way that the Chateau d'If buries its dead at sea -- and still manages to escape, even though it's much harder going.



* CharacterWitness: After Edmond Dantes is arrested, Monsieur Morrel makes a valiant effort to try and get him released, as he was convinced of Dantes' innocence. Morrel is taking a dreadful political risk in doing so, due to the struggles between royalist and Bonapartist groups that are convulsing France at the time and are in part what led to Dantes' imprisonment. By the time Dantes escapes and becomes the Count, Morrel's shipping company is on the verge of bankruptcy and his family's honor is ruined because of his inability to pay his debts. Using the alias of "Sinbad the Sailor", the Count repays his old employer by buying out and paying off the company's debts, giving them a brand-spanking new merchant ship to replace the one that had recently been destroyed in a storm, and also providing a generous dowry for Morrel's daughter. Monsieur Morrel dies soon after, but his good name and family honor Are both fully restored.
* ChekhovsGun: After Dantes is imprisoned, it's mentioned Fernand had a plan in case he returned: shoot him then kill himself. The narration tells us he wouldn't have gone through with it because he still hoped Mercedes would fall for him. [[spoiler:Thus he only shoots himself at the end when Mercedes and their son have abandoned him, fully aware of his part in Dantes' fate.]]

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* CharacterWitness: After Edmond Dantes Dantès is arrested, Monsieur Morrel makes a valiant effort to try and get him released, as he was convinced of Dantes' Dantès' innocence. Morrel is taking a dreadful political risk in doing so, due to the struggles between royalist and Bonapartist groups that are convulsing France at the time and are in part what led to Dantes' Dantès' imprisonment. By the time Dantes Dantès escapes and becomes the Count, Morrel's shipping company is on the verge of bankruptcy and his family's honor is ruined because of his inability to pay his debts. Using the alias of "Sinbad the Sailor", the Count repays his old employer by buying out and paying off the company's debts, giving them a brand-spanking new merchant ship to replace the one that had recently been destroyed in a storm, and also providing a generous dowry for Morrel's daughter. Monsieur Morrel dies soon after, but his good name and family honor Are both fully restored.
* ChekhovsGun: After Dantes Dantès is imprisoned, it's mentioned Fernand had a plan in case he returned: shoot him then kill himself. The narration tells us he wouldn't have gone through with it because he still hoped Mercedes would fall for him. [[spoiler:Thus he only shoots himself at the end when Mercedes and their son have abandoned him, fully aware of his part in Dantes' Dantès' fate.]]



** Between Albert and the Count. Averted at the last minute--[[spoiler:Mercedes intervenes with both and stops the duel by getting Dantes to promise to spare her son, and by explaining to Albert why the Count wants to take down Morcerf]].

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** Between Albert and the Count. Averted at the last minute--[[spoiler:Mercedes intervenes with both and stops the duel by getting Dantes Dantès to promise to spare her son, and by explaining to Albert why the Count wants to take down Morcerf]].



** Exploited by Fernand, when he comes to challenge the Count to a duel in full general's garb. Subverted, since he himself is far from badass, and [[spoiler:Edmond Dantes knows exactly who he is.]]

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** Exploited by Fernand, when he comes to challenge the Count to a duel in full general's garb. Subverted, since he himself is far from badass, and [[spoiler:Edmond Dantes Dantès knows exactly who he is.]]



* GambitRoulette: One must imagine how long Dantes had to plan out his revenge, but the final plot is unspeakably convoluted. That he is able to make any of it work speaks volumes about his control.
* GentlemanAndAScholar: The novel opens with Edmond Dantes as a young, naive sailor; his transformation into the suave, educated, and urbane Count began with his meeting the Abbe Faria, who educates him and reveals to him the location of a great treasure. Edmond made the most of both.

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* GambitRoulette: One must imagine how long Dantes Dantès had to plan out his revenge, but the final plot is unspeakably convoluted. That he is able to make any of it work speaks volumes about his control.
* GentlemanAndAScholar: The novel opens with Edmond Dantes Dantès as a young, naive sailor; his transformation into the suave, educated, and urbane Count began with his meeting the Abbe Faria, who educates him and reveals to him the location of a great treasure. Edmond made the most of both.



* GreatEscape: Dantes escapes by hiding in the bodybag of his late mentor, which is thrown into the sea.

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* GreatEscape: Dantes Dantès escapes by hiding in the bodybag of his late mentor, which is thrown into the sea.



* KangarooCourt: Dantes has just been framed for treasonous activities and goes before Villefort the Crown Prosecutor (a judge) in his chambers. Villefort is touched by Dantes's integrity and about to let him go, when he sees that a letter which was part of the evidence against Dantes, implicates his own father in treason and would ruin his career. At this point of course, the KangarooCourt element kicks in as Villefort applies powers actually given to him under the law to have Dantes imprisoned indefinitely without a trial.

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* KangarooCourt: Dantes Dantès has just been framed for treasonous activities and goes before Villefort the Crown Prosecutor (a judge) in his chambers. Villefort is touched by Dantes's Dantès's integrity and about to let him go, when he sees that a letter which was part of the evidence against Dantes, Dantès, implicates his own father in treason and would ruin his career. At this point of course, the KangarooCourt element kicks in as Villefort applies powers actually given to him under the law to have Dantes Dantès imprisoned indefinitely without a trial.



** Downplayed with [[spoiler:Danglars. As the instigator of Dantes' downfall, he was going to starve to death as Dantes' father had, but the Count had a MyGodWhatHaveIDone moment after the Villefort mess and let him off after a few days, reputation and fortune both ruined but alive]].

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** Downplayed with [[spoiler:Danglars. As the instigator of Dantes' Dantès' downfall, he was going to starve to death as Dantes' Dantès' father had, but the Count had a MyGodWhatHaveIDone moment after the Villefort mess and let him off after a few days, reputation and fortune both ruined but alive]].



* KarmicJackpot: Most of the novel is about revenge, but the Count also repays the effort of those who tried to help him. Monsieur Morrel, Edmond Dantes's employer at the time of his arrest, tried to get Dantes released despite the dangerous political risks he was taking. By the time Dantes escapes, Morrel's shipping company is on the verge of bankruptcy and his family honor is ruined. The Count rewards Morrel's efforts to save him by paying off his debts, buying him a new merchant ship, and providing a dowry for his daughter.

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* KarmicJackpot: Most of the novel is about revenge, but the Count also repays the effort of those who tried to help him. Monsieur Morrel, Edmond Dantes's Dantès's employer at the time of his arrest, tried to get Dantes Dantès released despite the dangerous political risks he was taking. By the time Dantes Dantès escapes, Morrel's shipping company is on the verge of bankruptcy and his family honor is ruined. The Count rewards Morrel's efforts to save him by paying off his debts, buying him a new merchant ship, and providing a dowry for his daughter.



** After being robbed of his beautiful fiancée and a promising job and spending 14 years in prison, Dantes gets filthy rich and becomes acquainted with an even more beautiful woman.
** Dantes himself tries to [[InvokedTrope enforce]] this trope during his time as the Count of Monte Cristo, with mixed success. He rewards Monsieur Morrel, the one person who always believed in Dantes and actually put himself at risk to lobby for Dantes' release from his unjust imprisonment, but then [[spoiler:nearly ruins the life of Morrel's son Maximilien by inadvertently using the woman Maximilien loves as a pawn in one of his schemes]]. He destroys the lives of the men who destroyed his, but with considerable collateral damage, [[spoiler:particularly among their innocent children: Edouard de Villefort is murdered, Valentine de Villefort would have suffered the same fate if Maximilien had not interceded for her, and Albert Morcerf would have been killed too if Mercedes had not interceded for him, and at the end he joins the army as a DeathSeeker. Mercedes herself is his big failure: all his cleverness is insufficient to provide her with the happiness she deserves]].

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** After being robbed of his beautiful fiancée and a promising job and spending 14 years in prison, Dantes Dantès gets filthy rich and becomes acquainted with an even more beautiful woman.
** Dantes Dantès himself tries to [[InvokedTrope enforce]] this trope during his time as the Count of Monte Cristo, with mixed success. He rewards Monsieur Morrel, the one person who always believed in Dantes Dantès and actually put himself at risk to lobby for Dantes' Dantès' release from his unjust imprisonment, but then [[spoiler:nearly ruins the life of Morrel's son Maximilien by inadvertently using the woman Maximilien loves as a pawn in one of his schemes]]. He destroys the lives of the men who destroyed his, but with considerable collateral damage, [[spoiler:particularly among their innocent children: Edouard de Villefort is murdered, Valentine de Villefort would have suffered the same fate if Maximilien had not interceded for her, and Albert Morcerf would have been killed too if Mercedes had not interceded for him, and at the end he joins the army as a DeathSeeker. Mercedes herself is his big failure: all his cleverness is insufficient to provide her with the happiness she deserves]].



* MentorOccupationalHazard: Abbe Faria spends years tutoring his fellow prisoner Edmond Dantes, and planning an escape from prison. Then, just as their escape plan is coming to fruition, he dies. But not before telling Dantes how to find some long lost treasure.

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* MentorOccupationalHazard: Abbe Faria spends years tutoring his fellow prisoner Edmond Dantes, Dantès, and planning an escape from prison. Then, just as their escape plan is coming to fruition, he dies. But not before telling Dantes Dantès how to find some long lost treasure.



** Subverted by Villefort, who has his moment at the very ''beginning'' of the book. He initially feels a terrible remorse at sending the innocent Dantes to prison, but later represses it and goes through with the deed. It's implied, however, that the guilt he feels does not go away so easily. In fact, it is implied that Villefort became the hanging judge that he is ''because'' of the repressed guilt.

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** Subverted by Villefort, who has his moment at the very ''beginning'' of the book. He initially feels a terrible remorse at sending the innocent Dantes Dantès to prison, but later represses it and goes through with the deed. It's implied, however, that the guilt he feels does not go away so easily. In fact, it is implied that Villefort became the hanging judge that he is ''because'' of the repressed guilt.



* NoDoubtTheYearsHaveChangedMe: Dantes does this type of reveal to each of his enemies.

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* NoDoubtTheYearsHaveChangedMe: Dantes Dantès does this type of reveal to each of his enemies.



* ObviouslyEvil: [[spoiler:Mme Villefort]] is repeatedly shown to be stalling for time or generally being unhelpful. Baron Danglars is also very much this trope, having absolutely no remorse about sending Dantes to fourteen years of prison for his own ambition, and [[spoiler:having no regrets at all losing both his daughter and his wife, then running away, simply to save his money.]]

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* ObviouslyEvil: [[spoiler:Mme Villefort]] is repeatedly shown to be stalling for time or generally being unhelpful. Baron Danglars is also very much this trope, having absolutely no remorse about sending Dantes Dantès to fourteen years of prison for his own ambition, and [[spoiler:having no regrets at all losing both his daughter and his wife, then running away, simply to save his money.]]



* OhCrap: The moment [[spoiler:Morcerf]] realises the Count is really Edmond Dantes.
* TheOldConvict: Abbe Faria. He teaches Dantes everything he will need to know for his new life on the outside, tells him where a fortune is hidden, and his death provides Dantes with his means of escape.

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* OhCrap: The moment [[spoiler:Morcerf]] realises the Count is really Edmond Dantes.Dantès.
* TheOldConvict: Abbe Faria. He teaches Dantes Dantès everything he will need to know for his new life on the outside, tells him where a fortune is hidden, and his death provides Dantes Dantès with his means of escape.



* PaidForFamily: Dantes creates the Cavalcanti line from whole cloth, providing the ruined major Cavalcanti with a fortune to act as the father of Benedetto, so as to let him move into society and from there, ruin Villefort. [[spoiler:Benedetto is Villefort's illegitimate child, who was thought dead by both parents.]] He also uses him to humiliate Morcerf and Danglars: Danglars, being informed of Cavalcanti's considerable wealth, breaks off Eugenie's engagement to Albert (using the pretext of the Janina scandal). Then Andrea is revealed to be Benedetto at their contract signing, and Eugenie runs away with her girlfriend...

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* PaidForFamily: Dantes Dantès creates the Cavalcanti line from whole cloth, providing the ruined major Cavalcanti with a fortune to act as the father of Benedetto, so as to let him move into society and from there, ruin Villefort. [[spoiler:Benedetto is Villefort's illegitimate child, who was thought dead by both parents.]] He also uses him to humiliate Morcerf and Danglars: Danglars, being informed of Cavalcanti's considerable wealth, breaks off Eugenie's engagement to Albert (using the pretext of the Janina scandal). Then Andrea is revealed to be Benedetto at their contract signing, and Eugenie runs away with her girlfriend...



* PickOnSomeoneYourOwnSize: Dantes includes the innocent children of his enemies in his plan for revenge. [[spoiler:Most of them survive, and some of them end up better off, but that's more through luck than from any sentiment on the Count's part.]]

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* PickOnSomeoneYourOwnSize: Dantes Dantès includes the innocent children of his enemies in his plan for revenge. [[spoiler:Most of them survive, and some of them end up better off, but that's more through luck than from any sentiment on the Count's part.]]



* RagsToRiches: Dantes goes from humble sailor and convict to one of the richest men in the world, thanks to him finding the treasure of Spada. Fernand and Danglars respectively start out as a fisherman and a clerk and become two of the richest and most prominent men in France.

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* RagsToRiches: Dantes Dantès goes from humble sailor and convict to one of the richest men in the world, thanks to him finding the treasure of Spada. Fernand and Danglars respectively start out as a fisherman and a clerk and become two of the richest and most prominent men in France.



* RemoveTheRival: What Mondego did to Dantes and kick start the plot.
* {{Revenge}}: Forms the motivation and the plot for this novel once Dantes gets out of prison.

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* RemoveTheRival: What Mondego did to Dantes Dantès and kick start the plot.
* {{Revenge}}: Forms the motivation and the plot for this novel once Dantes Dantès gets out of prison.



* ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney: Edmond Dantes, Determinator or not, wouldn't have gotten far into his elaborate schemes for revenge without his eleventy billion francs.
* SecretIdentity: Dantes uses the titular Count persona to mask his true identity. He has other identities as well, such as a British nobleman, Lord Wilmore, and an Italian abbot, Abbe Busoni. He even builds a network of relationships between his alter egos, which he uses to throw off suspicions: Wilmore and Monte Cristo are supposed to be bitter enemies, while Busoni is a friend of both and is greatly perplexed by their rivalry. Then there is Sindbad The Sailor, and presumably many others.
* SecretIdentityIdentity: Edmond Dantes was so changed by prison that as the Count, he doesn't look at all like the idealistic NiceGuy he used to be and has some ThatManIsDead toward his earlier self. Also odd is that Dantes creates other personas: Busoni, an intellectual and pious Italian priest who seems to be modeled after Faria who tutored him in prison, and Lord Wilmore, an eccentric British philanthropist who is an enemy of the Count. Thus, Dantes essentially divided the different parts of his personality into different identities, and his main identity as the Count represents his darker side. He ultimately ends up showing some kindness and mercy (after one of his revenges went too far), and at the end of the novel signs a friendly letter as "Edmond Dantes, Count of Monte Cristo", thus reconciling the identities.

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* ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney: Edmond Dantes, Dantès, Determinator or not, wouldn't have gotten far into his elaborate schemes for revenge without his eleventy billion francs.
* SecretIdentity: Dantes Dantès uses the titular Count persona to mask his true identity. He has other identities as well, such as a British nobleman, Lord Wilmore, and an Italian abbot, Abbe Busoni. He even builds a network of relationships between his alter egos, which he uses to throw off suspicions: Wilmore and Monte Cristo are supposed to be bitter enemies, while Busoni is a friend of both and is greatly perplexed by their rivalry. Then there is Sindbad The Sailor, and presumably many others.
* SecretIdentityIdentity: Edmond Dantes Dantès was so changed by prison that as the Count, he doesn't look at all like the idealistic NiceGuy he used to be and has some ThatManIsDead toward his earlier self. Also odd is that Dantes Dantès creates other personas: Busoni, an intellectual and pious Italian priest who seems to be modeled after Faria who tutored him in prison, and Lord Wilmore, an eccentric British philanthropist who is an enemy of the Count. Thus, Dantes Dantès essentially divided the different parts of his personality into different identities, and his main identity as the Count represents his darker side. He ultimately ends up showing some kindness and mercy (after one of his revenges went too far), and at the end of the novel signs a friendly letter as "Edmond Dantes, Dantès, Count of Monte Cristo", thus reconciling the identities.



* SeriesContinuityError: In the chapters set in 1815 and during Dantes' imprisonment, Monsieur Noirtier is always referred as a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Girondins Girondin]]. Later on, in the chapters set in 1838, all characters refer to him instead as a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacobin_(politics) Jacobin]].

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* SeriesContinuityError: In the chapters set in 1815 and during Dantes' Dantès' imprisonment, Monsieur Noirtier is always referred as a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Girondins Girondin]]. Later on, in the chapters set in 1838, all characters refer to him instead as a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacobin_(politics) Jacobin]].



* SoftWater: {{Discussed}}. During his prison escape, [[BodybagTrick Dantes hides in a bodybag]] that is thrown into the sea from a high cliff. He is briefly "stunned", but more by the surprise of the cold water than the impact, and suffers no injury. This is because a cannon ball is sewn into the bottom of the bodybag, ensuring he hits the water feet-first. This is a lot more survivable than if he landed flat.

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* SoftWater: {{Discussed}}. During his prison escape, [[BodybagTrick Dantes Dantès hides in a bodybag]] that is thrown into the sea from a high cliff. He is briefly "stunned", but more by the surprise of the cold water than the impact, and suffers no injury. This is because a cannon ball is sewn into the bottom of the bodybag, ensuring he hits the water feet-first. This is a lot more survivable than if he landed flat.



* TimeSkip: The period of several years between Dantes' escape from prison and his introduction into French society. We know from later narration that many things happened in it; Dantes TookALevelInBadass both physically and intellectually, he travelled to the East (and bought Haydee), [[ItMakesSenseInContext gave an emerald to the Pope]], saved Ali from execution, and generally became the RenaissanceMan we see after the TimeSkip. Yet these events, while important, would only slow down the plot if they were shown- so we get this trope.

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* TimeSkip: The period of several years between Dantes' Dantès' escape from prison and his introduction into French society. We know from later narration that many things happened in it; Dantes Dantès TookALevelInBadass both physically and intellectually, he travelled to the East (and bought Haydee), [[ItMakesSenseInContext gave an emerald to the Pope]], saved Ali from execution, and generally became the RenaissanceMan we see after the TimeSkip. Yet these events, while important, would only slow down the plot if they were shown- so we get this trope.



* TookALevelInBadass: Edmond Dantes becomes The Count of Monte Cristo and spends several years preparing to get revenge on his enemies. At one point, the narration asserts that Dantes' time spent languishing in a tiny cell has given him unusual strength.

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* TookALevelInBadass: Edmond Dantes Dantès becomes The Count of Monte Cristo and spends several years preparing to get revenge on his enemies. At one point, the narration asserts that Dantes' Dantès' time spent languishing in a tiny cell has given him unusual strength.



* UndisclosedFunds: The amount of money Dantes finds at Monte Cristo is never stated. Although the Cardinal Spada wrote in his will that the treasure amounted to nearly 2 million Roman crowns when it was buried in the late 1400s, and it is later mentioned each of those Roman crowns would be worth around 80 francs at the time of the novel, a significant part of the treasure is made up of jewelry and precious stones, whose value might have wildly fluctuated. After many years of purchases and investments, the Count says he has about one hundred million francs at the end of the book.[[note]]Adjusted for inflation, this is equivalent to ''over $400 million USD'' in 2010 money. Not quite enough to make the 20 Richest Men in the World list, but still nothing to scoff at.[[/note]]

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* UndisclosedFunds: The amount of money Dantes Dantès finds at Monte Cristo is never stated. Although the Cardinal Spada wrote in his will that the treasure amounted to nearly 2 million Roman crowns when it was buried in the late 1400s, and it is later mentioned each of those Roman crowns would be worth around 80 francs at the time of the novel, a significant part of the treasure is made up of jewelry and precious stones, whose value might have wildly fluctuated. After many years of purchases and investments, the Count says he has about one hundred million francs at the end of the book.[[note]]Adjusted for inflation, this is equivalent to ''over $400 million USD'' in 2010 money. Not quite enough to make the 20 Richest Men in the World list, but still nothing to scoff at.[[/note]]



* WigDressAccent: Most likely, Dantes's different personas are this kind of disguise (the Lord Wilmore disguise involves false BritishTeeth).

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* WigDressAccent: Most likely, Dantes's Dantès's different personas are this kind of disguise (the Lord Wilmore disguise involves false BritishTeeth).



* XanatosSpeedChess: Dantes has to rewrite a rather major part of his plans when he learns that Maximilien is truly and deeply in love with Valentine. Before that, [[spoiler:her death]] was just another step towards Villefort's planned DespairEventHorizon, forcing him to [[spoiler:give her a substance that fakes death long enough that he can get her sent to safety]]. This, combined with the unintentional death of [[spoiler:Edouard]], makes him realize he's not as omnisciently good as he thinks he is, and he [[spoiler:resolves to let Danglars live instead.]]

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* XanatosSpeedChess: Dantes Dantès has to rewrite a rather major part of his plans when he learns that Maximilien is truly and deeply in love with Valentine. Before that, [[spoiler:her death]] was just another step towards Villefort's planned DespairEventHorizon, forcing him to [[spoiler:give her a substance that fakes death long enough that he can get her sent to safety]]. This, combined with the unintentional death of [[spoiler:Edouard]], makes him realize he's not as omnisciently good as he thinks he is, and he [[spoiler:resolves to let Danglars live instead.]]



* YouAreNumberSix: While Edmond Dantès is imprisoned in the Château d'If, a new governor is put in charge. He doesn't want to bother learning the names of the prisoners, so he refers to them by the numbers of their cells. Abbe Faria is prisoner number 27; Dantes is number 34.

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* YouAreNumberSix: While Edmond Dantès is imprisoned in the Château d'If, a new governor is put in charge. He doesn't want to bother learning the names of the prisoners, so he refers to them by the numbers of their cells. Abbe Faria is prisoner number 27; Dantes Dantès is number 34.



** The Argentinian SoapOpera ''Montecristo'' also gives the book a SettingUpdate, with the lawyer Santiago going through similar ordeals to Dantes, becoming [[ShoutOut Alejandro Dumas]] as a result.

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** The Argentinian SoapOpera ''Montecristo'' also gives the book a SettingUpdate, with the lawyer Santiago going through similar ordeals to Dantes, Dantès, becoming [[ShoutOut Alejandro Dumas]] as a result.
5th Jun '18 6:07:15 PM AzureOwl
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* NewJobAsThePlotDemands: M. de Boville, who over the course of the novel goes from being the inspector of prisons for the south of France, to a high office in the police and finally to Receiver-General of the charities.

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* NewJobAsThePlotDemands: M. de Monsieur De Boville, who over the course of the novel goes from being the inspector of prisons for the south of France, to a high office in the police and finally to Receiver-General of the charities.
5th Jun '18 6:01:16 PM AzureOwl
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Added DiffLines:

* NewJobAsThePlotDemands: M. de Boville, who over the course of the novel goes from being the inspector of prisons for the south of France, to a high office in the police and finally to Receiver-General of the charities.
23rd May '18 11:44:06 PM PaulA
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* ''Film/TheCountOfMonteCristo'' (2002 film)

to:

* ''Film/TheCountOfMonteCristo'' ''Film/{{The Count of Monte Cristo|2002}}'' (2002 film)
23rd May '18 6:39:22 PM AzureOwl
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* UndisclosedFunds: The amount of money Dantes finds at Monte Cristo is never stated. After many years of purchases and investments, the Count says he has about one hundred million francs at the end of the book.[[note]]Adjusted for inflation, this is equivalent to ''over $400 million USD'' in 2010 money. Not quite enough to make the 20 Richest Men in the World list, but still nothing to scoff at.[[/note]]

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* UndisclosedFunds: The amount of money Dantes finds at Monte Cristo is never stated. Although the Cardinal Spada wrote in his will that the treasure amounted to nearly 2 million Roman crowns when it was buried in the late 1400s, and it is later mentioned each of those Roman crowns would be worth around 80 francs at the time of the novel, a significant part of the treasure is made up of jewelry and precious stones, whose value might have wildly fluctuated. After many years of purchases and investments, the Count says he has about one hundred million francs at the end of the book.[[note]]Adjusted for inflation, this is equivalent to ''over $400 million USD'' in 2010 money. Not quite enough to make the 20 Richest Men in the World list, but still nothing to scoff at.[[/note]]
23rd May '18 4:53:06 PM AzureOwl
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* EntertaininglyWrong: Doctor d'Avrigny's reasoning to conclude that [[spoiler: Valentine]] is a poisoner is entirely sound: He correctly deduces that three sudden deaths in the same household with the same symptoms are the result of poison, he correctly identifies the exact poison that was used, and he correctly identifies the financial motivation for the crimes as all benefiting a single person who also had ample access and opportunity to deliver the poison to the victims. He just happens to be wrong because he fails to consider that [[spoiler:Valentine herself also had heir and her death would benefit the real poisoner]]. The readers on the other hand, know beforehand that his deduction is wrong because they’ve seen the real culprit spend an entire chapter discussing poisons with Monte Cristo earlier in the book.

to:

* EntertaininglyWrong: Doctor d'Avrigny's reasoning to conclude that [[spoiler: Valentine]] is a poisoner is entirely sound: He correctly deduces that three sudden deaths in the same household with the same symptoms are the result of poison, he correctly identifies the exact poison that was used, and he correctly identifies the financial motivation for the crimes as all benefiting a single person who also had ample access and opportunity to deliver the poison to the victims. He just happens to be wrong because he fails to consider that [[spoiler:Valentine herself also had heir heirs and her death would benefit the real poisoner]]. The readers on the other hand, know beforehand that his deduction is wrong because they’ve seen the real culprit spend an entire chapter discussing poisons with Monte Cristo earlier in the book.
23rd May '18 5:22:25 AM AzureOwl
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Added DiffLines:

* EntertaininglyWrong: Doctor d'Avrigny's reasoning to conclude that [[spoiler: Valentine]] is a poisoner is entirely sound: He correctly deduces that three sudden deaths in the same household with the same symptoms are the result of poison, he correctly identifies the exact poison that was used, and he correctly identifies the financial motivation for the crimes as all benefiting a single person who also had ample access and opportunity to deliver the poison to the victims. He just happens to be wrong because he fails to consider that [[spoiler:Valentine herself also had heir and her death would benefit the real poisoner]]. The readers on the other hand, know beforehand that his deduction is wrong because they’ve seen the real culprit spend an entire chapter discussing poisons with Monte Cristo earlier in the book.
19th May '18 6:07:55 PM PaulA
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* TheCobblersChildrenHaveNoShoes: [[spoiler:The home of the king's attorney is the sight of half a dozen murders and attempted murders... by the king's attorney's ''own wife''.]]

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* TheCobblersChildrenHaveNoShoes: [[spoiler:The home of the king's attorney is the sight site of half a dozen murders and attempted murders... by the king's attorney's ''own wife''.]]



-->'''Hermine Danglars:''' Once for all, sir, I tell you I will not hear cash named; it is a style of language I never heard in the house of my parents or in that of my first husband.
-->'''Danglars:''' Oh, I can well believe that, for neither of them was worth a penny.

to:

-->'''Hermine Danglars:''' Once for all, sir, I tell you I will not hear cash named; it is a style of language I never heard in the house of my parents or in that of my first husband.
-->'''Danglars:'''
husband.\\
'''Danglars:'''
Oh, I can well believe that, for neither of them was worth a penny.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheCountOfMonteCristo