History Literature / TheChroniclesOfNarnia

20th Oct '17 5:39:35 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* DragonsAreDemonic: Dragons appear to be representative of vice, such as in ''Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader'' where Eustace is turned into one after indulging his greed.

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* DragonsAreDemonic: Dragons appear to be representative of vice, such as in ''Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader'' where Eustace is turned into one after indulging his greed.{{greed}}.
13th Oct '17 8:50:41 AM ultimomant
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TelevisionSerial adaptations of the first four books have all been televised by the BBC and released on DVD (in some places as [[CompilationMovie Compilation Movies]]), and the first three (by publication order) have been filmed as the start of a series intended to adapt all seven books. ''Lion'' was also the subject of an earlier TV adaptation on ITV in 1967 (now largely lost) and an AnimatedAdaptation [[WesternAnimation/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe1979 in 1979]]. Unfortunately, the BBC master of ''Lion'' was apparently lost to unknown causes several years ago, so the best quality copies of that series left are the [=DVDs=][[note]]there were also VHS tapes[[/note]]. More recently adapted into movies by Disney (later 20th Century Fox) and Walden Media through the work of Creator/PerryMoore spending several years acquiring the rights for Walden. ''The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe'' came out in late 2005, ''Prince Caspian'' in 2008, and ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader'' in late 2010.

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TelevisionSerial adaptations of the first four books have all been televised by the BBC and released on DVD (in some places as [[CompilationMovie Compilation Movies]]), and the first three (by publication order) have been filmed as the start of a series intended to adapt all seven books. ''Lion'' was also the subject of an earlier TV adaptation on ITV in 1967 (now largely lost) and an AnimatedAdaptation [[WesternAnimation/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe1979 in 1979]]. Unfortunately, the BBC master of ''Lion'' was apparently lost to unknown causes several years ago, so the best quality copies of that series left are the [=DVDs=][[note]]there were also VHS tapes[[/note]]. More recently adapted into movies by Disney (later 20th Century Fox) and Walden Media through the work of Creator/PerryMoore spending several years acquiring the rights for Walden. ''The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe'' ''Film/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe'' came out in late 2005, ''Prince Caspian'' ''Film/PrinceCaspian'' in 2008, and ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader'' ''Film/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader'' in late 2010.
29th Sep '17 7:04:32 PM Tarlonniel
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%% The entries which are commented out are zero context examples. Please add context before removing the markup.
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* AuthorityEqualsAssKicking: The kings and queens of the series along with Aslan.
* BarefootSage: Coriakin, Ramandu, and the Hermit of the Southern March.
* BeCarefulWhatYouSay: Rishda Tarkaan really wasn't expecting Tash to respond to his summons, given he didn't actually believe in the Calormene god in the first place.
--> ''"Thou hast called me Rishda Tarkaan; I have come."''
-->-- '''Tash''', ''The Last Battle''

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* %%* AuthorityEqualsAssKicking: The kings and queens of the series along with Aslan.
* %%* BarefootSage: Coriakin, Ramandu, and the Hermit of the Southern March.
* BeCarefulWhatYouSay: Rishda Tarkaan really wasn't expecting Tash to respond to his summons, given he didn't actually believe in the Calormene god in the first place.
--> ''"Thou hast called me Rishda Tarkaan; I have come."''
-->-- '''Tash''', ''The Last Battle''
March.



* BigBrotherInstinct: Peter Pevensie has it.
** Edmund develops it for Lucy later.



* BittersweetEnding: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Prince Caspian and the Voyage of the Dawn Treader all have these. It doesn't matter how many enemies the children defeat; they always have to leave Narnia in the end.



* {{Brainwashed}}: The Lady of the Green Kirtle does this in ''The Silver Chair'', to the gnomes and Prince Rilian. She also tries to do it to Rilian's rescuers.
* CaptainObvious: the Duffers put him to shame.
* CharacterDevelopment: For example, in ''The Silver Chair'', it's explicitly mentioned that Jill lacks a sense of direction, to the point that she travels through the air towards a setting sun for hours without the concept of "west" ever occurring to her. In ''The Last Battle'', she's more "wood-wise" than Eustace and even Tirian and is repeatedly shown to have a knack for navigating by the stars. It's stated that she's been practicing those skills ever since she returned to England.
** Don't forget Eustace himself, who starts out as a spoiled, whiny child in ''Dawn Treader'' but grew out of it due to his experience of being a dragon.
** Or, for that matter, Edmund, who begins the first book as a selfish, mean-spirited traitor and ends it as a [[BigDamnHeroes Big Damn Hero]] in the desperate battle against the White Witch and her forces.
** It's not a stretch to say that every character who appears in more than one book develops, and not always positively [[spoiler: as with Susan]].
* CharacterizationMarchesOn: For Aslan. Go back and read ''The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe'' after you've read the later books and he is jarringly out of character throughout.
* TheChooserOfTheOne: Aslan chooses who enters Narnia (and would be the kings and queens), and picked the children.



* CuckooNest: The Lady of the Green Kirtle attempts to {{brainwash}} the heroes into believing that Narnia was a dream and that her kingdom is the only real world.
* CuriosityIsACrapshoot: "Make your choice, adventurous stranger; Strike the bell and bide the danger! Or wonder till it drives you mad, what would have followed if you had..."
* DeadpanSnarker: Puddleglum, Reepicheep, Edmund and Eustace do this. Even ''Lucy'' gets to snark at one point.
--> '''Peter''': (''While the group is lost'') That's the problem with girls: they never keep a map in their heads!
--> '''Lucy''': That's because our heads have something inside them.



* DistressedDude:
** In ''Literature/TheSilverChair'', [[spoiler: Rilian]] is under the enchantment of the evil Lady of the Green Kirtle. Jill, Eustace, and Puddleglum rescue him.
** In ''Literature/TheLastBattle'', when Tirian accuses Shift of lying, the Calormenes tie him to a tree.
* DoesNotLikeShoes: Actually lots of characters, including The Hermit of the Southern March, Coriakin, Ramandu, possibly Ramandu's Daughter, Shasta, Queen Jadis and, at some point, the Pevensies themselves (especially Lucy).
** It's a bit subverted with Shasta several times when the burning desert sand or the freezing dew-covered grass makes him wish he had shoes like Aravis.
* DragonsAreDemonic: Dragons appear to be representative of vice, such as in ''Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader'' where Eustace is turned into one after indulging his greed.

to:

* DistressedDude:
** In ''Literature/TheSilverChair'', [[spoiler: Rilian]] is under the enchantment of the evil Lady of the Green Kirtle. Jill, Eustace, and Puddleglum rescue him.
** In ''Literature/TheLastBattle'', when Tirian accuses Shift of lying, the Calormenes tie him to a tree.
* DoesNotLikeShoes: Actually lots of characters, including The Hermit of the Southern March, Coriakin, Ramandu, possibly Ramandu's Daughter, Shasta, Queen Jadis and, at some point, the Pevensies themselves (especially Lucy).
**
Lucy). It's a bit subverted with Shasta several times when the burning desert sand or the freezing dew-covered grass makes him wish he had shoes like Aravis.
* DragonsAreDemonic: Dragons appear to be representative of vice, such as in ''Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader'' where Eustace is turned into one after indulging his greed.



* EccentricMentor: Coriakin, who is believed by Dufflepuds to be evil, but turns out to be a wise magician with a good sense of humor. His eccentricities include turning the Duffers into Monopods for disobedience, putting a bearded mirror in his mansion (probably to prank his guests), and an aversion to shoes ([[spoiler:this may have to do with the fact that he's a star]]).
* EeriePaleSkinnedBrunette: The White Witch. You could almost make a poster saying, "[[ThisIsYourIndexOnDrugs THIS IS YOUR SKIN ON TURKISH DELIGHT]]".
* TheEeyore: Puddleglum. Though to be fair, by marshwiggle standards he's ThePollyanna.



* EvilChancellor: Lords Glozelle and Sopespian for Miraz in ''Prince Caspian''; the [[SpaceJews Space Arabs]] of Calormen, moreover, have an Evil Vizier, although the Tisroc himself isn't all that pleasant to begin with.
* EvilOverlord: Jadis as the White Witch; King Miraz; the Tisroc of Calormen; the Lady of the Green Kirtle
* EvilSorcerer: Jadis and the Lady of the Green Kirtle are female, but they fit this one better than WickedWitch. Uncle Andrew tries to be one, but fortunately he's largely inept.

to:

* EvilChancellor: Lords Glozelle and Sopespian for Miraz in ''Prince Caspian''; the The [[SpaceJews Space Arabs]] of Calormen, moreover, Calormen have an Evil Vizier, although the Tisroc himself isn't all that pleasant to begin with.
* EvilOverlord: Jadis as the White Witch; King Miraz; the Tisroc of Calormen; the Lady of the Green Kirtle
* EvilSorcerer: Jadis and the Lady of the Green Kirtle are female, but they fit this one better than WickedWitch. Uncle Andrew tries to be one, but fortunately he's largely inept.
with.



* FaceHeelTurn: Although less common than [[HeelFaceTurn the opposite trope,]] there are a couple of examples, such as Nikabrik.



* FantasyKitchenSink: One of the first examples in literature. J.R.R. Tolkien strongly criticized this.

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* %%* FantasyKitchenSink: One of the first examples in literature. J.R.R. Tolkien strongly criticized this.



* FishPeople[=/=]FrogMen: Marsh-wiggles straddle the line between the two.
* FlatWorld: Eventually {{Lampshaded}} in ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader''. Caspian is surprised to hear that there's such thing is a round world, and thinks Eustace and Edmund are kidding.
* GardenGarment: Dryads.
* TheGhost: The Emperor Beyond The Sea, father of Aslan. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]], as he is the YHWH to Aslan's Christ.

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* %%* FishPeople[=/=]FrogMen: Marsh-wiggles straddle the line between the two.
* FlatWorld: Eventually The world which contains Narnia is flat, with waterfalls on at least one edge (though they fall ''up''). This is eventually {{Lampshaded}} in ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader''. Caspian is surprised to hear that there's such a thing is as a round world, and thinks Eustace and Edmund are kidding.
* %%* GardenGarment: Dryads.
* %%* TheGhost: The Emperor Beyond The Sea, father of Aslan. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]], as he is the YHWH to Aslan's Christ.



* GoodIsNotNice: "Not a tame lion" is a frequent and accurate description of Aslan, who ranges from a warm, welcoming protector to an aloof, condescending figure to one that is outright threatening to protagonist and antagonist alike -- sometimes all within the same book. As a Biblical allegory, he's spot on in this regard.



* HairOfGoldHeartOfGold: Lucy's supposed to be blonde, although you wouldn't know it from the movies, or the Pauline Baynes illustrations. Lucy is also the youngest and most innocent of the Pevensie children. She has a special relationship with Aslan, which can be seen for example in ''Prince Caspian'' when initially nobody but her can see him. She is also the first Pevensie to find Narnia in the first place.



* HeelFaceTurn: Multiple characters throughout the series; most notably Edmund Pevensie, Eustace Clarence Scrubb, Prince Rilian, and Mr. Tumnus.
* HornedHumanoid: The Fauns, Satyrs, Minotaurs, and some of the Gnomes.
* AnIcePerson: The White Witch.
* InformedAttractiveness: In at least two books, Susan is said to be beautiful, and her looks drive a couple of subplots. There's one ''very'' easy to miss reference to Susan's hair being black, and nothing else about her appearance is described anywhere.

to:

* HeelFaceTurn: Multiple characters throughout the series; most notably Edmund Pevensie, Eustace Clarence Scrubb, Prince Rilian, and Mr. Tumnus.
*
%%* HornedHumanoid: The Fauns, Satyrs, Minotaurs, and some of the Gnomes.
* %%* AnIcePerson: The White Witch.
* InformedAttractiveness: In at least two books, Susan is said to be beautiful, and her looks drive a couple of subplots. There's one ''very'' easy to miss reference to Susan's hair being black, and nothing else about her appearance is described anywhere.
Witch.



* ItOnlyWorksOnce: Professor Kirke explains to the Pevensie kids after they return from Narnia for the first time that the wardrobe passage will never work again.
** The White Witch tells Edmund that he can't have any more magical Turkish Delight (until they get to her castle) because her magic is made of this.
* KidsAreCruel: Edmund to Lucy in ''The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe''; Eustace to almost everyone, in ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader''.
** Also the bullies in ''The Silver Chair''.
* KingOfBeasts: Aslan fits this role
* LeftJustifiedFantasyMap: Inverted and combined with the fact that making East the cardinal direction is a characteristic of mediæval Christian maps (because that's the direction UsefulNotes/{{Jerusalem}} is from Europe). Aslan's Country is in the distant East (contrast Tolkien's Valinor being "West of West") and he is said to be the "son of the Emperor over the sea." It is likely in this case that Lewis was particularly influenced by the first book of Edmund Spenser's ''Literature/TheFaerieQueene'', in which Una's father is King of the East and the evil Duessa (who has some affinities with the White Witch) is associated with the West. (Note that the two are allegorical representations of Protestantism and Catholicism, respectively.)
* LegendaryInTheSequel: Thanks to NarniaTime, occurs to the main characters in nearly every book.
* ALightInTheDistance: Lantern Waste

to:

* ItOnlyWorksOnce: Professor Kirke explains to the Pevensie kids after they return from Narnia for the first time that the wardrobe passage will never work again.
** The White Witch tells Edmund that he can't have any more magical Turkish Delight (until they get to her castle) because her magic is made of this.
* KidsAreCruel: Edmund to Lucy in ''The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe''; Eustace to almost everyone, in ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader''.
** Also the bullies in ''The Silver Chair''.
* KingOfBeasts: Aslan fits this role
* LeftJustifiedFantasyMap: Inverted and combined with the fact that making East the cardinal direction is a characteristic of mediæval Christian maps (because that's the direction UsefulNotes/{{Jerusalem}} is from Europe). Aslan's Country is in the distant East (contrast Tolkien's Valinor being "West of West") and he is said to be the "son of the Emperor over the sea." It is likely in this case that Lewis was particularly influenced by the first book of Edmund Spenser's ''Literature/TheFaerieQueene'', in which Una's father is King of the East and the evil Duessa (who has some affinities with the White Witch) is associated with the West. (Note that the two are allegorical representations of Protestantism and Catholicism, respectively.)
* %%* LegendaryInTheSequel: Thanks to NarniaTime, occurs to the main characters in nearly every book.
* %%* ALightInTheDistance: Lantern Waste



* LiteraryAgentHypothesis: Rather hard to reconcile with the events of ''The Last Battle''.

to:

* %%* LiteraryAgentHypothesis: Rather hard to reconcile with the events of ''The Last Battle''.



* LoopholeAbuse: How the Pevensies justify taking fur coats that don't belong to them into Narnia, on the grounds that they're not actually removing them from the wardrobe.



* MagicalLand: Narnia itself, of course. Compared even to the rest of Narnia, the islands and the ocean the further East you go. And the underground realm of Bism. And possibly the vast unexplored Western lands.
* MagicAntidote: Lucy's cordial, made from flowers that grow only on the surface of the sun, no less.
* MeaningfulName: Aslan. In Turkish, the word for 'lion' is 'aslan.'

to:

* %%* MagicalLand: Narnia itself, of course. Compared even to the rest of Narnia, the islands and the ocean the further East you go. And the underground realm of Bism. And possibly the vast unexplored Western lands.
* %%* MagicAntidote: Lucy's cordial, made from flowers that grow only on the surface of the sun, no less.
* MeaningfulName: Aslan. In Turkish, the word for 'lion' is 'aslan.'
less.



* MessianicArchetype: Aslan again. At the end of ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader'' he alludes that [[spoiler:he is known by a 'different name' on Earth - make of that what you will]].
* MultiArmedAndDangerous: The Calormene god, Tash.



* NiceHat: Reepicheep's circlet counts.

to:

* %%* NiceHat: Reepicheep's circlet counts.



* OffstageVillainy: Tash, who doesn't harm anyone "on screen" except for the villain who summoned him. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]], as he's not "on screen" much besides in that scene, and it's implied that if [[spoiler: King Peter]] hadn't stopped him, he would have gone after the heroes. Even "off screen", it's mentioned that he requires HumanSacrifice.
* {{Ojou}}: Queen Susan



* PantheraAwesome: Aslan. [[MemeticMutation Jesus Christ is a lion, get in the wardrobe!]]



%%* PintsizedPowerhouse: Reepicheep, and how.



* PlatonicLifePartners: Eustace and Jill as well as Polly and Digory



* RightfulKingReturns: ''Prince Caspian'' and ''The Horse and His Boy''
* RoyalBlood: Jadis believes this is a requirement for magic (as indeed it apparently was on Charn) in order to use [[FunctionalMagic Rule Magic]]. [[FunctionalMagic Device Magic]] is usable by anyone, but according to Jadis, non-royal magicians on Charn were wiped out.



* SapientSteed: Inevitable when you have sentient and {{Talking Animal}}s. Particularly important in ''Literature/TheHorseAndHisBoy''.
** This is lampshaded in the Disney film adaptation of ''Film/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe'' when Edmund is nearly thrown off his horse while he and Peter are practicing their horseback swordfighting.
-->'''Edmund''': Whoa, horsey!
-->'''Edmund's horse''': My name is Philip.
** Philip is an MeaningfulName as it means 'someone who likes horses'
*** In the ''books'', however, this is noted as something not done except in times of need.
* {{Satan}}: Jadis and Tash.
* SatanicArchetype: The Northern Witches.
* SavvyGuyEnergeticGirl: A brother-sister example. The books mention that the adult version of Edmund was a silent, collected, wise man [[JusticeWillPrevail who made all the justice in Narnia]], while Lucy was a wild, bright, [[{{Tomboy}} tomboyish]] girl. Their movie versions are close to it, since Edmund is a witty DeadpanSnarker and Lucy is an [[ThePollyanna optimistic]] PluckyGirl .
* SevenMinuteLull: After falling victim to this in ''The Magician's Nephew'', a talking bird is delighted to discover that he has [[RunningGag become the first joke]].
* ShutUpHannibal: Puddleglum has a truly ''[[MomentOfAwesome awesome]]'' one at the climax of ''The Silver Chair.''
* SiblingRivalry: Edmund and Lucy in ''Literature/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe'', due to Edmund's [[BigBrotherBully tendency of tormenting her]]. Then again, Edmund has an aversion to all of his siblings.
* SignatureRoar: Aslan is known for his.
* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVsCynicism: Fallen right off the Ideal end.

to:

* SapientSteed: Inevitable when you have sentient and {{Talking Animal}}s. Particularly Animal}}s, and particularly important in ''Literature/TheHorseAndHisBoy''.
** This is lampshaded in
''Literature/TheHorseAndHisBoy'', where two of the Disney film adaptation of ''Film/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe'' when Edmund is nearly thrown off his horse while he and Peter protagonists are practicing their horseback swordfighting.
-->'''Edmund''': Whoa, horsey!
-->'''Edmund's horse''': My name is Philip.
** Philip is an MeaningfulName as it means 'someone who likes horses'
*** In the ''books'', however,
horses. However, it's noted that this is noted as something not done except in times of need.
* {{Satan}}: Jadis and Tash.
*
%%* SatanicArchetype: The Northern Witches.
* SavvyGuyEnergeticGirl: A brother-sister example. The books mention that the adult version of Edmund was a silent, collected, wise man [[JusticeWillPrevail who made all the justice in Narnia]], while Lucy was a wild, bright, [[{{Tomboy}} tomboyish]] girl. Their movie versions are close to it, since Edmund is a witty DeadpanSnarker and Lucy is an [[ThePollyanna optimistic]] PluckyGirl .
* SevenMinuteLull: After falling victim to this in ''The Magician's Nephew'', a talking bird is delighted to discover that he has [[RunningGag become the first joke]].
* ShutUpHannibal: Puddleglum has a truly ''[[MomentOfAwesome awesome]]'' one at the climax of ''The Silver Chair.''
* SiblingRivalry: Edmund and Lucy in ''Literature/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe'', due to Edmund's [[BigBrotherBully tendency of tormenting her]]. Then again, Edmund has an aversion to all of his siblings.
* SignatureRoar: Aslan is known for his.
*
%%* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVsCynicism: Fallen right off the Ideal end.



* StrawmanPolitical: Eustace. Even to those who read the novel as children, it becomes pretty obvious pretty quickly that Lewis is not only a theist, but a monarchist, too.
** Lewis claimed in "A Reply to Professor Haldane" to be a democrat, but he certainly celebrates kingship in a number of his writings.
** Lewis was a great respecter of literary forms. Fairy tales have royalty. No one ever killed an ogre to win the hand of the prime minister's daughter.
* SuperFunHappyThingOfDoom: Both the "[[NightmareSequence Island Where Dreams Come True]]" in ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader'' and the "{{Gentle Giant}}s" in ''The Silver Chair'' are not what they seem.
* TalkingAnimal: Narnia is full of them and some like the Beavers act like CivilizedAnimals. It's important to note however that there are ordinary "dumb" animals which can be used for labor and be butchered for meat; but killing and eat a talking beast is a grave offense, and so is mistreating them -- King Tirian ''kills'' a Calormene solider who dared to whip a talking a horse
** Aslan was one the who create the Talking Beasts, they were originally ordinary animals that he granted the gifts of speech and intelligence and he still does so centuries after Narnia's creation; Reepicheep and his followers are descended from the mice that freed Aslan from the White Witch's ropes, and where given the gift of speech in gratitude. However Aslan can also take the gift of speech away; [[spoiler: In "The Last Battle" those talking animals that reject him or betrayed Narnia to Calormen become dumb beasts.]]
* TitleDrop: One of the long-recounted legends from the Golden Age of Narnia is known as the tale of 'The Horse and His Boy' (Eustace and Jill hears it in The Silver Chair, before that book was published but Lewis had already written it).

to:

* StrawmanPolitical: Eustace. Even to those who read the novel as children, it becomes pretty obvious pretty quickly that Lewis is not only a theist, but a monarchist, too.
** Lewis claimed in "A Reply to Professor Haldane" to be a democrat, but he certainly celebrates kingship in a number of his writings.
** Lewis was a great respecter of literary forms. Fairy tales have royalty. No one ever killed an ogre to win the hand of the prime minister's daughter.
* SuperFunHappyThingOfDoom: Both the "[[NightmareSequence Island Where Dreams Come True]]" in ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader'' and the "{{Gentle Giant}}s" in ''The Silver Chair'' are not what they seem.
* TalkingAnimal: Narnia is full of them and some like the Beavers act like CivilizedAnimals. It's important to note however that there are ordinary "dumb" animals which can be used for labor and be butchered for meat; but killing and eat a talking beast is a grave offense, and so is mistreating them -- King Tirian ''kills'' a Calormene solider who dared to whip a talking a horse
**
horse. Aslan was one the who create the Talking Beasts, Beasts; they were originally ordinary animals that he granted the gifts of speech and intelligence and he still does so centuries after Narnia's creation; creation - Reepicheep and his followers are descended from the mice that freed Aslan from the White Witch's ropes, and where were given the gift of speech in gratitude. However However, Aslan can also take the gift of speech away; [[spoiler: In "The Last Battle" those talking animals that reject him or betrayed Narnia to Calormen become dumb beasts.]]
* TitleDrop: One of the long-recounted legends from the Golden Age of Narnia is known as the tale of 'The Horse and His Boy' (Eustace and Jill hears it in The Silver Chair, before that book was published but Lewis had already written it).
]]



* ToServeMan: The Lady of the Green Kirtle sends Scrubb and Pole to Harfang with instructions to greet their hosts from her and say she is sending them two Southern children for the Autumn Feast. [[spoiler: "It's a cookbook," indeed - they literally find one.]]
* TomboyPrincess: Aravis, after [[spoiler: her marriage to Cor]].
* TomboyAndGirlyGirl: Aravis is the tomboy to Lasaraleen's girly-girl. When they meet after some years apart, each finds the other boring -- Lasaraleen doesn't understand why Aravis wants to dress like a boy and do rough things, whilst Aravis can't stand Lasaraleen's whirl of parties and dresses.
* TownWithADarkSecret: Harfang.
* TrapIsTheOnlyOption: Digory feels this way about the bell [[spoiler:that will awaken Jadis]], lest their [[CuriosityIsACrapshoot curiosity]] [[BrownNote drive them mad]]. Polly disagrees, considering it pure SchmuckBait. [[spoiler:Unfortunately, she's "overruled". However, she's later proved right and vindicated, by Aslan no less.]]



* UnderdressedForTheOccasion: Inverted. When Aslan magically summons soon-to-be-Queen Helen to Narnia, she is described as looking beautiful in her simple attire. The narrator informs us that if she had known this was going to happen and had put on her best outfit, she would have looked tacky.
* UnfortunateNames: ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader'' memorably begins, "There was a boy called Eustace Clarence Scrubb, and he almost deserved it." Later in ''Literature/TheSilverChair," he's introduced with, "His name unfortunately was Eustace Scrubb, but he wasn't a bad sort." This is [[WordOfGod explicitly]] a reference to Lewis' own given name, "Clive Staples", which he intensely disliked, and from childhood preferred to be referred to as "Jack".
** Mocked when a hard-of-hearing dwarf thinks his name is Useless.
* VanityIsFeminine: The otherwise completely down to earth Polly immediately starts to trust Digory's ObviouslyEvil uncle after he calls her pretty. Lucy, generally shown as more virtuous than her older and vainer sister Susan (who was disgraced from the heroes after she grew up and took too much of an interest in lipstick and nylons), is so tempted by the idea of being more beautiful and desirable than her that only the appearance of Aslan stops her from casting a spell allowing her to do so.
** On the other hand, the Witch appeals to Edmund's vanity often in the "Turkish Delight" tempting scene from ''Literature/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe''.
* WasOnceAMan: Implied in the case of Lord Octesian. [[spoiler: A major element in Eustace's CharacterDevelopment.]] Played for laughs with Prince Rabadash.



* WritersCannotDoMath: Averted in discussing how high Aslan's country is. If you take Lewis' clues as to its height literally, in both Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader and Literature/TheSilverChair, they add up to the same figure: approximately 1,500,000 feet above sea level.
* YearInsideHourOutside: Narnia's time moves far more quickly than our universe's. They spend years in Narnia but then return to find it is the same day as when they entered. They revisit Narnia a year later, and find that centuries have since passed.
* YoungestChildWins: Lucy Pevensie

to:

* WritersCannotDoMath: Averted in discussing how high Aslan's country is. If you take Lewis' clues as to its height literally, in both Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader ''Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader'' and Literature/TheSilverChair, ''Literature/TheSilverChair'', they add up to the same figure: approximately 1,500,000 feet above sea level.
* YearInsideHourOutside: Narnia's time moves far more quickly than our universe's. They Characters spend years in Narnia but then return to find it is the same day as when they entered. They revisit Narnia a year later, and find that centuries have since passed.
* YoungestChildWins: Lucy Pevensie
19th Sep '17 12:29:38 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* FishPeople: Marsh-wiggles, though they're more like amphibian people.

to:

* FishPeople: Marsh-wiggles, though they're more like amphibian people.FishPeople[=/=]FrogMen: Marsh-wiggles straddle the line between the two.
10th Aug '17 7:11:16 AM Jeduthun
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C.S. Lewis (re-)converted from atheism to Christianity and wrote many works of apologetics and theology; the ''Narnia'' series, his only work directly targeted at children, is at once a work of creative fiction and applied apologetics, even dealing with atheism. Narnia borrows creatures and myths from many different cultures and ages, from the Edwardian adventure stories of Lewis's youth to the ''Literature/ArabianNights'', from [[Creator/WilliamShakespeare Shakespearean]] tragedies to the [[Creator/TheBrothersGrimm Grimms]]' fairy-tales, from the Classical and Germanic mythologies that were Lewis's avocation to the mediaeval literature that was his professional study, interwoven with creatures of Lewis's own imagination (as found also in Lewis's so-called Literature/SpaceTrilogy) -- a profusion of fantasy highly unorthodox in the prosaic, "realistic" Machine Age, post-[[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII war]] '40s and '50s -- all undergirded with a solid structure of Christian doctrine. By the third (published) book, it is clear that Aslan is a [[CrystalDragonJesus fictional version of Jesus]] -- yet, as Lewis insisted, the works do not form an ''allegory'' of Christian life, as some have assumed, but rather an adventure-tale in which {{God}} is a [[PalsWithJesus fellow]]-[[JesusWasWayCool adventurer]]. He also said that he didn't set out to include any religious elements in the story, it just ended up that way.

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C.S. Lewis (re-)converted from atheism to Christianity and wrote many works of apologetics and theology; the ''Narnia'' series, his only work directly targeted at children, is at once a work of creative fiction and applied apologetics, even dealing with atheism. Narnia [[FantasyKitchenSink borrows creatures and myths from many different cultures and ages, ages]], from the Edwardian adventure stories of Lewis's youth to the ''Literature/ArabianNights'', from [[Creator/WilliamShakespeare Shakespearean]] tragedies to the [[Creator/TheBrothersGrimm Grimms]]' fairy-tales, from the Classical and Germanic mythologies that were Lewis's avocation to the mediaeval literature that was his professional study, interwoven with creatures of Lewis's own imagination (as found also in Lewis's so-called Literature/SpaceTrilogy) -- a profusion of fantasy highly unorthodox in the prosaic, "realistic" Machine Age, post-[[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII war]] '40s and '50s -- all undergirded with a solid structure of Christian doctrine. By the third (published) book, it is clear that Aslan is a [[CrystalDragonJesus fictional version of Jesus]] -- yet, as Lewis insisted, the works do not form an ''allegory'' of Christian life, as some have assumed, but rather an adventure-tale in which {{God}} is a [[PalsWithJesus fellow]]-[[JesusWasWayCool adventurer]]. He also said that he didn't set out to include any religious elements in the story, it just ended up that way.
9th Jul '17 10:24:08 AM nombretomado
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C.S. Lewis (re-)converted from atheism to Christianity and wrote many works of apologetics and theology; the ''Narnia'' series, his only work directly targeted at children, is at once a work of creative fiction and applied apologetics, even dealing with atheism. Narnia borrows creatures and myths from many different cultures and ages, from the Edwardian adventure stories of Lewis's youth to the ''Literature/ArabianNights'', from [[Creator/WilliamShakespeare Shakespearean]] tragedies to the [[Creator/TheBrothersGrimm Grimms]]' fairy-tales, from the Classical and Germanic mythologies that were Lewis's avocation to the mediaeval literature that was his professional study, interwoven with creatures of Lewis's own imagination (as found also in Lewis's so-called Literature/SpaceTrilogy) -- a profusion of fantasy highly unorthodox in the prosaic, "realistic" Machine Age, post-[[WorldWarTwo war]] '40s and '50s -- all undergirded with a solid structure of Christian doctrine. By the third (published) book, it is clear that Aslan is a [[CrystalDragonJesus fictional version of Jesus]] -- yet, as Lewis insisted, the works do not form an ''allegory'' of Christian life, as some have assumed, but rather an adventure-tale in which {{God}} is a [[PalsWithJesus fellow]]-[[JesusWasWayCool adventurer]]. He also said that he didn't set out to include any religious elements in the story, it just ended up that way.

to:

C.S. Lewis (re-)converted from atheism to Christianity and wrote many works of apologetics and theology; the ''Narnia'' series, his only work directly targeted at children, is at once a work of creative fiction and applied apologetics, even dealing with atheism. Narnia borrows creatures and myths from many different cultures and ages, from the Edwardian adventure stories of Lewis's youth to the ''Literature/ArabianNights'', from [[Creator/WilliamShakespeare Shakespearean]] tragedies to the [[Creator/TheBrothersGrimm Grimms]]' fairy-tales, from the Classical and Germanic mythologies that were Lewis's avocation to the mediaeval literature that was his professional study, interwoven with creatures of Lewis's own imagination (as found also in Lewis's so-called Literature/SpaceTrilogy) -- a profusion of fantasy highly unorthodox in the prosaic, "realistic" Machine Age, post-[[WorldWarTwo post-[[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII war]] '40s and '50s -- all undergirded with a solid structure of Christian doctrine. By the third (published) book, it is clear that Aslan is a [[CrystalDragonJesus fictional version of Jesus]] -- yet, as Lewis insisted, the works do not form an ''allegory'' of Christian life, as some have assumed, but rather an adventure-tale in which {{God}} is a [[PalsWithJesus fellow]]-[[JesusWasWayCool adventurer]]. He also said that he didn't set out to include any religious elements in the story, it just ended up that way.
6th Jul '17 7:14:27 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* LeftJustifiedFantasyMap: Inverted and combined with the fact that making East the cardinal direction is a characteristic of mediæval Christian maps (because that's the direction Jerusalem is from Europe). Aslan's Country is in the distant East (contrast Tolkien's Valinor being "West of West") and he is said to be the "son of the Emperor over the sea." It is likely in this case that Lewis was particularly influenced by the first book of Edmund Spenser's ''Literature/TheFaerieQueene'', in which Una's father is King of the East and the evil Duessa (who has some affinities with the White Witch) is associated with the West. (Note that the two are allegorical representations of Protestantism and Catholicism, respectively.)

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* LeftJustifiedFantasyMap: Inverted and combined with the fact that making East the cardinal direction is a characteristic of mediæval Christian maps (because that's the direction Jerusalem UsefulNotes/{{Jerusalem}} is from Europe). Aslan's Country is in the distant East (contrast Tolkien's Valinor being "West of West") and he is said to be the "son of the Emperor over the sea." It is likely in this case that Lewis was particularly influenced by the first book of Edmund Spenser's ''Literature/TheFaerieQueene'', in which Una's father is King of the East and the evil Duessa (who has some affinities with the White Witch) is associated with the West. (Note that the two are allegorical representations of Protestantism and Catholicism, respectively.)
30th Jun '17 9:04:52 PM Jeduthun
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* TrapIsTheOnlyOption: Digory feels this way about the bell [[spoiler:that will awaken Jadis]], lest their [[CuriosityIsACrapshoot curiosity]] [[BrownNote drive them mad]]. Polly disagrees, considering it pure SchmuckBait. [[spoiler:Unfortunately, she's "overruled".]]
* TrappedInAnotherWorld

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* TrapIsTheOnlyOption: Digory feels this way about the bell [[spoiler:that will awaken Jadis]], lest their [[CuriosityIsACrapshoot curiosity]] [[BrownNote drive them mad]]. Polly disagrees, considering it pure SchmuckBait. [[spoiler:Unfortunately, she's "overruled". However, she's later proved right and vindicated, by Aslan no less.]]
* TrappedInAnotherWorldTrappedInAnotherWorld: With the slight twist that characters who stay in Narnia age normally-- quite considerably in the Pevensies' case-- but SnapBack to their original ages when they return to Earth. Also, finding a way back home is never a goal of anyone's quest in Narnia.
22nd Jun '17 11:29:36 AM ProfessorGrimm
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* TalkingAnimal: Narnia is full of them and some like the Beavers act like CivilizedAnimal. It's important to note however that there are ordinary "dumb" animals which can be used for labor and be butchered for meat; but killing and eat a talking beast is a grave offense, and so is mistreating them -- King Trilian ''kills'' a Calormene solider who dared to whip a talking a horse
** Aslan was one the who create the Talking Beasts, they were originally ordinary animals that he granted the gifts of speech and intelligence and he still does centuries after Narnia's creation; Reepicheep and his followers are descended from the mice that freed Aslan from the White Witch's ropes. However Aslan can also take the gift of speech away; [[spoiler: In "The Last Battle" those talking animals that reject him or betray Narnia to Calormen become dumb beasts.]]

to:

* TalkingAnimal: Narnia is full of them and some like the Beavers act like CivilizedAnimal. CivilizedAnimals. It's important to note however that there are ordinary "dumb" animals which can be used for labor and be butchered for meat; but killing and eat a talking beast is a grave offense, and so is mistreating them -- King Trilian Tirian ''kills'' a Calormene solider who dared to whip a talking a horse
** Aslan was one the who create the Talking Beasts, they were originally ordinary animals that he granted the gifts of speech and intelligence and he still does so centuries after Narnia's creation; Reepicheep and his followers are descended from the mice that freed Aslan from the White Witch's ropes. ropes, and where given the gift of speech in gratitude. However Aslan can also take the gift of speech away; [[spoiler: In "The Last Battle" those talking animals that reject him or betray betrayed Narnia to Calormen become dumb beasts.]]
20th Jun '17 12:47:45 PM ProfessorGrimm
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* {{Talking Animal}}: We'd be strung up if we didn't mention this one.

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* {{Talking Animal}}: We'd TalkingAnimal: Narnia is full of them and some like the Beavers act like CivilizedAnimal. It's important to note however that there are ordinary "dumb" animals which can be strung up if we didn't mention this one.used for labor and be butchered for meat; but killing and eat a talking beast is a grave offense, and so is mistreating them -- King Trilian ''kills'' a Calormene solider who dared to whip a talking a horse
** Aslan was one the who create the Talking Beasts, they were originally ordinary animals that he granted the gifts of speech and intelligence and he still does centuries after Narnia's creation; Reepicheep and his followers are descended from the mice that freed Aslan from the White Witch's ropes. However Aslan can also take the gift of speech away; [[spoiler: In "The Last Battle" those talking animals that reject him or betray Narnia to Calormen become dumb beasts.]]
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