History Literature / TheChroniclesOfNarnia

14th May '16 12:28:21 PM Silverblade2
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* BarefootSage[=/=]MagicalBarefooter: Coriakin, Ramandu, and the Hermit of the Southern March.

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* BarefootSage[=/=]MagicalBarefooter: BarefootSage: Coriakin, Ramandu, and the Hermit of the Southern March.



* BecauseDestinySaysSo

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* %%* BecauseDestinySaysSo



* CaptainObvious - the Duffers put him to shame.

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* CaptainObvious - CaptainObvious: the Duffers put him to shame.



* ComesGreatResponsibility

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* %%* ComesGreatResponsibility



* FaeriesDontBelieveInHumansEither
* FairyTaleMotifs

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* %%* FaeriesDontBelieveInHumansEither
* %%* FairyTaleMotifs



* FaunsAndSatyrs: Lewis describes both FaunsAndSatyrs as inhabitants of Narnia. Although he describes fauns as having the hindlegs of goats, long tails, curly hair, and small horns, the only description for the satyrs is that they are red as foxes or reddish-brown in color. The book illustrations depict fauns and satyrs as basically identical, with the exception of Mr. Tumnus, who is drawn with a long tail. The movies expand the difference by making fauns goat-legged and human bodied, with regular goat tails instead of long tails, and satyrs as basically human sized goats that walk on their hindlegs.



* InterdimensionalTravelDevice

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* %%* InterdimensionalTravelDevice



** See also: TitleDrop



* LightIsGood / DarkIsEvil: Played with. Most of the villains are not "dark", and while Aslan arguably fills the "light BigGood" niche the only truly light-oriented creatures, the stars, don't play a big role - nor do they seem any more morally conventional than any other race. The inhabitants of Narnia's underworld [[DarkIsNotEvil are mostly good]], and the very first villain is a [[WomanInWhite witch dressed in white]] (although not explicitly light related).

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* LightIsGood / DarkIsEvil: LightIsGood: Played with. Most of the villains are not "dark", and while Aslan arguably fills the "light BigGood" niche the only truly light-oriented creatures, the stars, don't play a big role - nor do they seem any more morally conventional than any other race. The inhabitants of Narnia's underworld [[DarkIsNotEvil are mostly good]], and the very first villain is a [[WomanInWhite witch dressed in white]] (although not explicitly light related).



* [[TokyoIsTheCenterOfTheUniverse Narnia Is The Center Of The Universe]]: Aside from ''Dawn Treader'', all the books' antagonists' plans involve Narnia in one form or another. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]], in that Narnia was the first country made in the other world, and therefore the one most special to Aslan.



* [[FaunsAndSatyrs Our Goat People Are Different]]: Lewis describes both FaunsAndSatyrs as inhabitants of Narnia. Although he describes fauns as having the hindlegs of goats, long tails, curly hair, and small horns, the only description for the satyrs is that they are red as foxes or reddish-brown in color. The book illustrations depict fauns and satyrs as basically identical, with the exception of Mr. Tumnus, who is drawn with a long tail. The movies expand the difference by making fauns goat-legged and human bodied, with regular goat tails instead of long tails, and satyrs as basically human sized goats that walk on their hindlegs.



* [[PalsWithJesus Pals With Aslan]]

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* [[PalsWithJesus Pals With Aslan]]%%* PalsWithJesus



* PathOfInspiration: Subverted.
* PintsizedPowerhouse: Reepicheep, and how.
* PlantPerson: Dryads

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* %%* PathOfInspiration: Subverted.
* %%* PintsizedPowerhouse: Reepicheep, and how.
* %%* PlantPerson: Dryads



* {{Talking Animal}}s: We'd be strung up if we didn't mention this one.

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* {{Talking Animal}}s: Animal}}: We'd be strung up if we didn't mention this one.



* TokyoIsTheCenterOfTheUniverse: Aside from ''Dawn Treader'', all the books' antagonists' plans involve Narnia in one form or another. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]], in that Narnia was the first country made in the other world, and therefore the one most special to Aslan.



* WorldBuilding

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* %%* WorldBuilding
12th May '16 9:13:02 AM Jeduthun
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Added DiffLines:

* MadLibFantasyTitle: Most likely the TropeMaker for [[FollowTheLeader all the later fantasy series]] that include "Chronicles" in their title. The books themselves also count, with their titles' invocations of such stock fantasy elements as "Magician," "Prince," "Battle," "Dawn", and so on.
6th May '16 12:26:20 AM GoldenSeals
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* HalfHumanHybrid: Several cases, even with at least one ''star,'' of all things. A couple decades after Narnia's beginning, the children of King Frank and Queen Helen wedded non-human Narnians. The sons married wood nymphs and river nymphs, and the daughters married wood gods and river gods. The peoples of Archenland and Calormen could count, being that they are descendants of these unions, despite the fact that they physically look completely human. After the Telmarine Conquest in Narnia, some of the dwarfs disguised themselves as humans and married humans and spawned a few half-dwarfs, Dr. Cornelius being one of them. It is debated whether Ramandu's daughter (Named "Lilliandil" in the film) is a full star or only half-star, though her son Rilian and his descendants, like Tirian, at least count as part-star. If you put the beavers' account of the White Witch's origins to her story of being queen of Charn and being brought into Narnia, it can be assumed that the race of Charn are descended from Jinn (demons) Giants.

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* HalfHumanHybrid: Several cases, even with at least one ''star,'' of all things. A couple decades after Narnia's beginning, the children of King Frank and Queen Helen wedded non-human Narnians. The sons married wood nymphs and river nymphs, and the daughters married wood gods and river gods. The peoples of Archenland and Calormen could count, being that they are descendants of these unions, despite the fact that they physically look completely human. After the Telmarine Conquest in Narnia, some of the dwarfs disguised themselves as humans and married humans and spawned a few half-dwarfs, Dr. Cornelius being one of them. It is debated whether Ramandu's daughter (Named "Lilliandil" in the film) is a full star or only half-star, though her son Rilian and his descendants, like Tirian, at least count as part-star. If you put the beavers' account of the White Witch's origins to her story of being queen of Charn and being brought into Narnia, it can be assumed that the race of Charn are descended from Jinn (demons) Giants.
21st Apr '16 1:43:32 PM Glim
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* BarefootSage: Coriakin, Ramandu, and the Hermit of the Southern March.

to:

* BarefootSage: BarefootSage[=/=]MagicalBarefooter: Coriakin, Ramandu, and the Hermit of the Southern March.
19th Mar '16 3:26:18 PM caffeinatedkate
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Added DiffLines:

* CharacterizationMarchesOn: For Aslan. Go back and read ''The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe'' after you've read the later books and he is jarringly out of character throughout.
16th Jan '16 12:09:17 AM Underachiever
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* ActorAllusion: In the BBC TV adaptation of ''The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe'', Professor Kirke is played by Michael Aldridge, who essentially plays a softer version of his character Seymour Utterthwaite from ''LastOfTheSummerWine'', a former headmaster. This is particularly noticeable with his use of Kirke's CatchPhrase:
-->'''Kirke''': What DO they teach them in schools these days?



* HeyItsThatGuy:
** Is that Puddleglum or is that [[Series/DoctorWho The Fourth Doctor?]]
** Creator/WarwickDavis (who would go on to play Nikabrik in the Walden Media films) played Reepicheep in the [=BBC=] version, and Griphook the goblin in the Harry Potter films.
** A very young Samuel West, now a well-respected stage, film, and television actor, played Caspian in the [=BBC=] version.
** A young Gabrielle Anwar of ''Series/BurnNotice'' has a small role as Ramandu's daughter in the [=BBC=] version of ''Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader.''
16th Jan '16 12:06:02 AM Underachiever
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* BlackAndWhiteMorality: Aslan stands for good, those who would oppose him are evil, and it's generally made quickly obvious to the reader who's on which side. Recurring characters not clearly committed to either cause when introduced will end up joining one side or the other (human protagonists always ending up on Team Good, of course) before the end of the book.



* KeepCirculatingTheTapes: Because the books, for most their entire published history, were ordered in publishing order and only recently re-ordered by a different publisher, older volumes of the series that maintain the classic numbering go for a lot more money today than they used to.
9th Dec '15 9:49:41 PM Vilui
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C.S. Lewis (re-)converted from atheism to Christianity and wrote many works of apologetics and theology; the ''Narnia'' series, his only work directly targeted at children, is at once a work of creative fiction and applied apologetics, even dealing with atheism. Narnia borrows creatures and myths from many different cultures and ages, from the Edwardian adventure stories of Lewis's youth to the ''Literature/ArabianNights'', from Shakespearean tragedies to the [[Creator/TheBrothersGrimm Grimms]]' fairy-tales, from the Classical and Germanic mythologies that were Lewis's avocation to the mediaeval literature that was his professional study, interwoven with creatures of Lewis's own imagination (as found also in Lewis's so-called Literature/SpaceTrilogy) -- a profusion of fantasy highly unorthodox in the prosaic, "realistic" Machine Age, post-[[WorldWarTwo war]] '40's and '50's -- all undergirded with a solid structure of Christian doctrine. By the third (published) book, it is clear that Aslan is a [[CrystalDragonJesus fictional version of Jesus]] -- yet, as Lewis insisted, the works do not form an ''allegory'' of Christian life, as some have assumed, but rather an adventure-tale in which {{God}} is a [[PalsWithJesus fellow]]-[[JesusWasWayCool adventurer]]. He also said that he didn't set out to include any religious elements in the story, it just ended up that way.

to:

C.S. Lewis (re-)converted from atheism to Christianity and wrote many works of apologetics and theology; the ''Narnia'' series, his only work directly targeted at children, is at once a work of creative fiction and applied apologetics, even dealing with atheism. Narnia borrows creatures and myths from many different cultures and ages, from the Edwardian adventure stories of Lewis's youth to the ''Literature/ArabianNights'', from Shakespearean tragedies to the [[Creator/TheBrothersGrimm Grimms]]' fairy-tales, from the Classical and Germanic mythologies that were Lewis's avocation to the mediaeval literature that was his professional study, interwoven with creatures of Lewis's own imagination (as found also in Lewis's so-called Literature/SpaceTrilogy) -- a profusion of fantasy highly unorthodox in the prosaic, "realistic" Machine Age, post-[[WorldWarTwo war]] '40's '40s and '50's '50s -- all undergirded with a solid structure of Christian doctrine. By the third (published) book, it is clear that Aslan is a [[CrystalDragonJesus fictional version of Jesus]] -- yet, as Lewis insisted, the works do not form an ''allegory'' of Christian life, as some have assumed, but rather an adventure-tale in which {{God}} is a [[PalsWithJesus fellow]]-[[JesusWasWayCool adventurer]]. He also said that he didn't set out to include any religious elements in the story, it just ended up that way.
23rd Nov '15 8:56:17 AM PurrElise
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TelevisionSerial adaptations of the first four books have all been televised by the BBC and released on DVD (in some places as [[CompilationMovie Compilation Movies]]), and the first three (by publication order) have been filmed as the start of a series intended to adapt all seven books. ''Lion'' was also the subject of an earlier TV adaptation on ITV in 1967 (now largely lost) and an AnimatedAdaptation in 1979. Unfortunately, the BBC master of ''Lion'' was apparently lost to unknown causes several years ago, so the best quality copies of that series left are the [=DVDs=][[note]]there were also VHS tapes[[/note]]. More recently adapted into movies by Disney (later 20th Century Fox) and Walden Media through the work of Creator/PerryMoore spending several years acquiring the rights for Walden. ''The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe'' came out in late 2005, ''Prince Caspian'' in 2008, and ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader'' in late 2010.

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TelevisionSerial adaptations of the first four books have all been televised by the BBC and released on DVD (in some places as [[CompilationMovie Compilation Movies]]), and the first three (by publication order) have been filmed as the start of a series intended to adapt all seven books. ''Lion'' was also the subject of an earlier TV adaptation on ITV in 1967 (now largely lost) and an AnimatedAdaptation [[WesternAnimation/TheLionTheWitchAndTheWardrobe1979 in 1979.1979]]. Unfortunately, the BBC master of ''Lion'' was apparently lost to unknown causes several years ago, so the best quality copies of that series left are the [=DVDs=][[note]]there were also VHS tapes[[/note]]. More recently adapted into movies by Disney (later 20th Century Fox) and Walden Media through the work of Creator/PerryMoore spending several years acquiring the rights for Walden. ''The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe'' came out in late 2005, ''Prince Caspian'' in 2008, and ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader'' in late 2010.
25th Oct '15 12:08:51 AM LBHills
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* ExpansionPackWorld

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* ExpansionPackWorldExpansionPackWorld: The first book published was focused only on the kingdom of Narnia. The next four books cover cardinal directions - west in ''Prince Caspian'', east in ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader'' (as well as some asides about the inhabitants of Narnia's skies), north in ''The Silver Chair'' as well as two levels of 'underworld', and south in ''The Horse and His Boy.'' The last two books cover ''chronal'' directions, with the extreme past detailed in ''The Magician's Nephew'' and the end of time featuring in ''The Last Battle.''
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.TheChroniclesOfNarnia