History Literature / Spellsinger

19th May '17 10:30:04 AM crazysamaritan
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* GhostLights: The gneechees which appear whenever Jon-Tom's spellsinging is on track and particularly powerful; they don't cause magic, exactly, but their presence facilitates or enhances it. They normally cannot be seen, not because the characters have NoPeripheralVision but because they actively dodge away whenever you try to look at them directly. They also turn out to be more true to the trope than they first seem, since when Jon-Tom is in M'nemaxa's plane he discovers [[spoiler:each is actually the soul of a deceased person]]. Because of this, gneechees have different interests and affinities, and so Couvier Coulb must summon particular musically-inclined ones when retuning the broken duar in ''Time of the Transference''.



* TheGrotesque: The ogres in book six are all this--various species of animals as well as humans, all of great size and with some awful deformity.
** The mutants in book seven, horrifying mish-mashes of various creatures. Not only are they two or more people/species fused together, but their minds/souls as well as bodies were fused. The first sentient one the heroes meet, is a Human/Kangaroo hybrid. All he wishes is to be put out of his misery. Though thankfully [[spoiler: the local town accepts the mutants and treats them like their own]].

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* TheGrotesque: TheGrotesque:
**
The ogres in book six are all this--various species of animals as well as humans, all of great size and with some awful deformity.
** The mutants in book seven, seven are a horrifying mish-mashes of various creatures. Not only are they two or more people/species fused together, but their minds/souls as well as bodies were fused. The first sentient one the heroes meet, is a Human/Kangaroo hybrid. All he wishes is to be put out of his misery. Though thankfully [[spoiler: the local town accepts the mutants and treats them like their own]].



*** Although eventually the trope is played somewhat straight when a lesser guard is fooled into entering their cell by a collection of bones from dead prisoners and a rather convincing performance from Jon-Tom that the ex-wizard of the city had killed them all by "melting off their flesh".

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*** Although eventually the ** The trope is played somewhat straight when a lesser guard is fooled into entering their cell by a collection of bones from dead prisoners and a rather convincing performance from Jon-Tom that the ex-wizard of the city had killed them all by "melting off their flesh".


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* HitodamaLight: Gneechees are floating flames which appear whenever Jon-Tom's spellsinging is on track and particularly powerful. They aren't the ''cause'' of magic, exactly, but their presence facilitates or enhances it. They normally cannot be seen because they actively dodge away whenever you try to look at them directly. When Jon-Tom is in M'nemaxa's plane, he discovers [[spoiler:each is actually the soul of a deceased person]]. Because of this spoiler, gneechees have different interests and affinities, and so Couvier Coulb must summon particular musically-inclined ones when retuning the broken duar in ''Time of the Transference''.
31st Mar '17 12:09:49 AM PaulA
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* DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything: In the fourth book, Markus has some similarities to the Wizard from TheWizardOfOz. [[spoiler: Both he and the Wizard are magicians who dress in a smart suit and top hat, both end up in a fantasy world where they take the throne and call themselves the ruler, and can use real magic in the fantasy world. (In the later Oz novels. the Wizard takes magic lessons from Glinda and learns "real magic" instead of just illusions.) The main difference is, Markus is a tyrant, while Oz is benevolent, though the second Oz novel states that he stole the throne from Princess Ozma which was immediately retconned in every book after.]]

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* DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything: In the fourth book, Markus has some similarities to the Wizard from TheWizardOfOz. [[spoiler: Both ''Film/TheWizardOfOz''. [[spoiler:Both he and the Wizard are magicians who dress in a smart suit and top hat, both end up in a fantasy world where they take the throne and call themselves the ruler, and can use real magic in the fantasy world. (In the later Oz novels. novels, the Wizard takes magic lessons from Glinda and learns "real magic" instead of just illusions.) The main difference is, Markus is a tyrant, while Oz is benevolent, though the second Oz novel states that he stole the throne from Princess Ozma which was immediately retconned in every book after.]]
26th Mar '17 6:12:41 PM zmudaa
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** This also applies to Mudge, as he is eager to have a drink to the point where it puts his health at risk (as noted in Day of Dissonance).
12th Nov '16 5:13:23 PM nombretomado
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* FunetikAksent: For a number of TalkingAnimal characters, including Mudge's rural-British speech and Roseroar's Southern drawl. Colin's accent is described in a way that brings to mind JohnWayne.

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* FunetikAksent: For a number of TalkingAnimal characters, including Mudge's rural-British speech and Roseroar's Southern drawl. Colin's accent is described in a way that brings to mind JohnWayne.Creator/JohnWayne.
7th Nov '16 4:25:25 AM aurora369
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* The way Clothahump distracts the Polastrindu guards is very reminiscent of how Gandalf in ''TheHobbit'' fooled the trolls into quarreling. The same applies to the scene where the cage of insults appears: it initially fools the heroes the same way.

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* ** The way Clothahump distracts the Polastrindu guards is very reminiscent of how Gandalf in ''TheHobbit'' fooled the trolls into quarreling. The same applies to the scene where the cage of insults appears: it initially fools the heroes the same way.
7th Nov '16 4:24:36 AM aurora369
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* The way Clothahump distracts the Polastrindu guards is very reminiscent of how Gandalf in ''TheHobbit'' fooled the trolls into quarreling. The same applies to the scene where the cage of insults appears: it initially fools the heroes the same way.
7th Nov '16 4:16:06 AM aurora369
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** And the final book ends with a duel of two magical rock musicians: the evil Hinckel summons legions of bad musicians from the world of the dead, and the good Jon-Tom dispels all them with giant amplifiers provided by his SufficientlyAdvancedAlien friend.
7th Nov '16 4:07:26 AM aurora369
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* EvilCounterpart: Hinckel, to Jon-Tom. Both are young aspiring rock musicians who end up in a magical world, and both have problems with their particularly unmelodic performances. However, Jon-Tom tries to become a better musician, and Hinckel decides to destroy all music but his.
5th Nov '16 9:25:46 AM dlchen145
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** Subversions do exist, however. [[GiantSpider The Weavers]] of Gossameringue, despite their fearsome appearance, turn out to be loyal and dependable allies; Colin the koala, far from being somnolent, lethargic, and slow of mind is a {{Badass}} warrior and runecaster; and Dormas the hinny, while a bit stubborn, is also one of the calmest and most sensible members of the party. Also, the guinea pig who leads the group of thieves that try to rob Clothahump in ''Time of the Transference'' is anything but cute and harmless.

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** Subversions do exist, however. [[GiantSpider The Weavers]] of Gossameringue, despite their fearsome appearance, turn out to be loyal and dependable allies; Colin the koala, far from being somnolent, lethargic, and slow of mind is a {{Badass}} badass warrior and runecaster; and Dormas the hinny, while a bit stubborn, is also one of the calmest and most sensible members of the party. Also, the guinea pig who leads the group of thieves that try to rob Clothahump in ''Time of the Transference'' is anything but cute and harmless.



* RhinoRampage: In ''Son of Spellsinger'', the young travelers recruit an alcoholic rhino as both transport and bodyguard. When he's not drunk off his feet, he's an armor-wearing BadAss.

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* RhinoRampage: In ''Son of Spellsinger'', the young travelers recruit an alcoholic rhino as both transport and bodyguard. When he's not drunk off his feet, he's an armor-wearing BadAss.badass.



* {{Whatevermancy}}: Colin the BadAss koala is a runecaster, a form of cleromancy.

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* {{Whatevermancy}}: Colin the BadAss badass koala is a runecaster, a form of cleromancy.
3rd Nov '16 10:02:14 PM nombretomado
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* CanonWelding: ''Chorus Skating'', the last novel, includes repeated cameo appearances by [[spoiler: a dimension-hopping [[HumanxCommonwealth thranx]]]].

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* CanonWelding: ''Chorus Skating'', the last novel, includes repeated cameo appearances by [[spoiler: a dimension-hopping [[HumanxCommonwealth [[Literature/HumanxCommonwealth thranx]]]].
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