History Literature / Jumper

9th Jul '17 7:13:40 PM Kalaong
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* RestrainingBolt: Part of an ongoing arc beginning in ''Reflex''; an unnamed NebulousEvilOrganisation implants Davy with a ShockCollar that ''[[AgonyBeam directly stimulates the pain center of his brain]]'' on command or when he Jumps outside safe zones - which doubles as an ExplosiveLeash capable of blowing his head off. [[spoiler:Davy discovers that every member of the [=NEO=] have similar implants - and are [[TwoPlusTortureMakesFive pain-conditioned to believe they requested the implants as proof of loyalty]]. This extends even to the old man initially assumed to be the BigBad - who is killed in the final confrontation of ''Reflex'' without naming his superiors. They're still at large in ''Impulse'', breaking out the FemmeFatale who nearly seduced Davy in ''Reflex'', who proceeds to challenge Cent.]]

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* RestrainingBolt: Part of an ongoing arc beginning in ''Reflex''; an unnamed NebulousEvilOrganisation implants Davy with a ShockCollar that ''[[AgonyBeam directly stimulates the pain center of his brain]]'' on command or when he Jumps outside safe zones - which doubles as an ExplosiveLeash capable of blowing his head off. [[spoiler:Davy discovers that every member of the [=NEO=] have has similar implants - and are [[TwoPlusTortureMakesFive pain-conditioned to believe they requested the implants as proof of loyalty]]. This extends even to the old man initially assumed to be the BigBad - who is killed in the final confrontation of ''Reflex'' [[FoundTheKillerLostTheMurderer without naming his superiors.superiors]]. They're still at large in ''Impulse'', breaking out the FemmeFatale who nearly seduced Davy in ''Reflex'', who proceeds to challenge Cent.]]
9th Jul '17 7:05:54 PM Kalaong
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* RestrainingBolt: Part of an ongoing arc beginning in ''Reflex'' - an unnamed NebulousEvilOrganisation implants Davy with a ShockCollar that ''[[AgonyBeam directly stimulates the pain center of his brain]]'' on command or when he Jumps outside safe zones - which doubles as an ExplosiveLeash capable of blowing his head off. [[spoiler:Davy discovers that every member of the [=NEO=] have similar implants - and are [[TwoPlusTortureMakesFive pain-conditioned to believe they requested the implants as proof of loyalty]]. This extends even to the old man initially assumed to be the BigBad - who is killed in the final confrontation of ''Reflex'' without naming his superiors. They're still at large in ''Impulse'', breaking out the FemmeFatale who nearly seduced Davy in ''Reflex'', who proceeds to challenge Cent.]]

to:

* RestrainingBolt: Part of an ongoing arc beginning in ''Reflex'' - ''Reflex''; an unnamed NebulousEvilOrganisation implants Davy with a ShockCollar that ''[[AgonyBeam directly stimulates the pain center of his brain]]'' on command or when he Jumps outside safe zones - which doubles as an ExplosiveLeash capable of blowing his head off. [[spoiler:Davy discovers that every member of the [=NEO=] have similar implants - and are [[TwoPlusTortureMakesFive pain-conditioned to believe they requested the implants as proof of loyalty]]. This extends even to the old man initially assumed to be the BigBad - who is killed in the final confrontation of ''Reflex'' without naming his superiors. They're still at large in ''Impulse'', breaking out the FemmeFatale who nearly seduced Davy in ''Reflex'', who proceeds to challenge Cent.]]
22nd Jun '17 1:24:41 PM Occidensill
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''Jumper'' is a 1992 ComingOfAgeStory sci-fi story by Steven Gould about a teenager who finds out he can [[TeleportersAndTransporters teleport]] and his attempts to find out if he's the LastOfHisKind.

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''Jumper'' is a 1992 ComingOfAgeStory sci-fi story by Steven Gould about a teenager who finds out he can [[TeleportersAndTransporters teleport]] and his attempts to find out if he's experiences with the LastOfHisKind.
consequences of his ability.



** In the third book, ''Impulse'', [[spoiler: Davey's daughter, Cent, figures out how to ''un-cancel'' this momentum, granting her very temporary boosts of SuperSpeed and SuperStrength.]]

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** In the third book, ''Impulse'', [[spoiler: Davey's daughter, Cent, figures out how to ''un-cancel'' this momentum, granting her very temporary boosts of SuperSpeed and SuperStrength.]] SuperStrength.
26th May '17 11:46:27 PM Ramidel
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Added DiffLines:

* TheReliableOne: In ''Exo'', Cory Matoska fits this role for Cent. Cent is a bit of a MadScientist who prefers to fly by the seat of her pants, and Cory's the one who makes sure that she follows the checklist and does her math when she's doing something new.
30th Apr '17 4:45:53 PM Occidensill
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Added DiffLines:

* {{Teleportation}} Jumper and its sequels are about a man, David Rice (and, in the ensuing decades, his wife Millie and daughter Cent, because apparently teleportation is catching) who can teleport to any location he can remember clearly. He remains unclear on why he can do so, despite unwilling participation in research of his ability, but the initial trigger appears to be an extreme fight or flight experience (in order by person, rape, falling, and avalanche). Other nuances also come into play, such as the preservation of momentum through 'jumps', the RequiredSecondaryPowers that allow them to jump with him anything they can lift (therefore leaving things they 'can't' lift as potential restraints) and the utilization of the hole in space created to pour water, air, sand, and vacuum from one place into another. It also explores the ethical implications to a limited degree, as David and family have a strict no killing policy, but he initially uses his powers to rob a bank and later uses them as a one man infil/exfil team for the government (with, again, tight restrictions).
28th Apr '17 7:07:33 AM Ramidel
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* Jumper and its sequels are about a man, David Rice (and, in the ensuing decades, his wife and daughter, because apparently teleportation is catching) who can teleport to any location he can remember clearly. He remains unclear on why he can do so, despite unwilling participation in research of his ability, but the initial trigger appears to be an extreme fight or flight experience (in order by person, rape, falling, and avalanche). Other nuances also come into play, such as the preservation of momentum through 'jumps', the RequiredSecondaryPowers that allow him to jump with him anything he can lift (therefore leaving things he 'can't' lift as potential restraints) and the utilization of the hole in space created and the displacement of whatever is being jumped into to pour water, air, sand, and vacuum from one place into another. It also explores the ethical implications to a limited degree, as David and family have a strict no killing policy, but he initially uses his powers to rob a bank and later uses them as a one man infil/exfil team for the government (with, again, tight restrictions).
28th Apr '17 7:07:04 AM Ramidel
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* EstablishingCharacterMoment: In Impulse, we learn everything we need to know about Cent before we even meet her based on this note she pastes on her bedroom door.

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* EstablishingCharacterMoment: In Impulse, ''Impulse'', we learn everything we need to know about Cent before we even meet her based on this note she pastes on her bedroom door.



* PhraseCatcher: Cent repeatedly gets "This is no way to run a space program!" from exasperated authority figures.



* StrawFeminist: Subverted. Cent is rather aggressively feminist ([[spoiler: halting conversations to insist on womanned, not manned, as a term for her ventures and insisting that her first interview be with a woman reporter]]), but not to the point of hating men or becoming a caricature.

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* StrawFeminist: Subverted. Cent is rather aggressively feminist ([[spoiler: halting conversations to insist on womanned, not manned, as a term for her ventures and insisting that her first interview be with a woman reporter]]), but not to this never reaches the point of hating men or becoming a caricature.
21st Mar '17 10:11:33 PM Occidensill
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Added DiffLines:

* Jumper and its sequels are about a man, David Rice (and, in the ensuing decades, his wife and daughter, because apparently teleportation is catching) who can teleport to any location he can remember clearly. He remains unclear on why he can do so, despite unwilling participation in research of his ability, but the initial trigger appears to be an extreme fight or flight experience (in order by person, rape, falling, and avalanche). Other nuances also come into play, such as the preservation of momentum through 'jumps', the RequiredSecondaryPowers that allow him to jump with him anything he can lift (therefore leaving things he 'can't' lift as potential restraints) and the utilization of the hole in space created and the displacement of whatever is being jumped into to pour water, air, sand, and vacuum from one place into another. It also explores the ethical implications to a limited degree, as David and family have a strict no killing policy, but he initially uses his powers to rob a bank and later uses them as a one man infil/exfil team for the government (with, again, tight restrictions).
23rd Feb '17 6:03:25 PM Occidensill
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** In later books, the protagonists are heavily involved in humanitarian work - mildly in in Reflex, where Davy uses places tight constrictions on what jobs he'll do for the NSA and personally intervenes in multiple homeless peoples lives, then with dedication to larger causes after TheConspiracy precludes government work. A short story shows David and Millie intervening in a drought stricken area, and multiple stories have them move supplies, resources, and people to where they're needed.

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** In later books, the protagonists are heavily involved in humanitarian work - mildly in in Reflex, where Davy uses places tight constrictions on what jobs he'll do for the NSA and personally intervenes in multiple homeless peoples lives, then with dedication to larger causes after TheConspiracy precludes government work. A short story shows David and Millie intervening in a drought stricken area, and multiple stories have them move supplies, resources, and people to where they're needed.
22nd Feb '17 6:46:59 PM Occidensill
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** In later books, the protagonists are heavily involved in humanitarian work - mildly in in Reflex, where Davy uses places tight constrictions on what jobs he'll do for the NSA and personally intervenes in multiple homeless peoples lives, then with dedication to larger causes after TheConspiracy precludes government work. A short story shows David and Millie intervening in a drought stricken area, and multiple stories have them move supplies, resources, and people to where they're needed.
** In the last two books, Cent serves as a mouthpiece for the author's opinions on various identity politics debates.



* CutLexLuthorACheck: Davy ''starts'' by robbing a bank, but later on gets legitimate work doing jumps for the NSA that pays even better than disappearing money from the bank (and with less likelihood of getting caught). He still doesn't miss the opportunity to pocket a bit of bad-guy cash when the opportunity presents itself, though.

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* CutLexLuthorACheck: Davy ''starts'' by robbing a bank, but later on gets legitimate work doing jumps for the NSA that pays even better than disappearing money from the bank (and with less likelihood of getting caught). bank. He still doesn't miss the opportunity to pocket a bit of bad-guy cash when the opportunity presents itself, though.though.
** This bites him a bit though when a conspiracy sets its sights on him, since they conclude there's no way they could simply hire him to do their dirty work due to his ethical restrictions and copious cash, and jump straight to kidnapping and murder.



* GovernmentConspiracy: In the first book, the NSA acts a lot like this. It's played fairly realistically - the NSA are an ordinary government intelligence agency that want to force David to work for them, and are stepping outside of their constitutional authority to make it happen. Also, going to the courts is in fact a reasonable response to their illegal activities (assuming you have someone on the outside who knows that they've done something).

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* GovernmentConspiracy: In the first book, the NSA acts a lot like this. It's played fairly realistically - the NSA are an ordinary government intelligence agency that want to understand how the heck David is teleporting and force David him to work for them, them (or neutralize him as a potential threat), and are stepping outside of their constitutional authority to make it happen. Also, going to the courts is in fact a reasonable response to their illegal activities (assuming you have someone on the outside who knows that they've done something).something).
** In the later books, government agencies are more benign or actively helpful, with their size and hierarchy instead exploited by a business conspiracy for its ends. Two prominent NSA agents who were antagonists in the first book are outright allies in the second book, with one dying attempting to protect Davy, and the FBI is treated as largely incorruptible (to the point that they only back off when the White House Chief of Staff orders it and the Agent In Charge and her boss are set up). Dozens of agents from the NSA and FBI are deployed in a sincere effort to back up Millie, but as leaks occur and the NSA as an organization eventually turns on her, people on the ground and other organizations are still benevolent.
** In the third and fourth books, the government still gets used by the conspiracy, but there are severe consequences when it happens, with intensive investigations launched when a [[spoiler:Predator drone from Italy destroys their house in Canada]]. In the third book, the conspiracy uses local criminals because they can't use the government to do their dirty work. Much of this can be ascribed to the real world evolution of the government and the authors perspective, from 1992 to 2005 to 2013 and 2014.



* IJustWantToBeNormal: Once she's able to jump, Cent puts her foot down and tells her parents that she is going to go to school and be a regular teenager [[IJustWantToHaveFriends with regular friends]]. [[spoiler: The "normal life" part doesn't work out, but she does manage to make some friends. [[BrickJoke She's still waiting on the ice cream, though]].]]

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* IJustWantToBeNormal: Once she's able to jump, Cent puts her foot down and tells her parents that she is going to go to school and be a regular teenager [[IJustWantToHaveFriends with regular friends]]. [[spoiler: The By the end, the "normal life" part doesn't work out, but she does manage to make some friends. [[BrickJoke She's still waiting on the ice cream, though]].]]



* {{Intangibility}}: It's discovered that whenever Davy jumps he becomes a gateway for a fraction of a second. [[UpToEleven Taken to the next level]] in book 2 when [[spoiler: he works out how to "twin" himself, basically opening a Davy-shaped hole between any two locations.]]

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* {{Intangibility}}: It's discovered that whenever Davy jumps he becomes opens a gateway for about a fraction fifth of a second. [[UpToEleven Taken to the next level]] in book 2 when [[spoiler: he works out how to "twin" himself, basically opening a Davy-shaped hole between any two locations.]]



* ShownTheirWork: The author knows quite a bit about the space program, and that knowledge (along with speculation on how teleportation would help) is important to the plot of ''Exo''.

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* ShownTheirWork: The author knows quite a bit about the current state of space program, travel, and that knowledge (along with speculation on how teleportation would help) is important to the plot of ''Exo''.



* StrawFeminist: Subverted. Cent is rather aggressively feminist ([[spoiler: naming her space station after Sally Ride and insisting that her first interview be with a woman reporter]]), but not to the point of hating men or becoming a caricature.

to:

* StrawFeminist: Subverted. Cent is rather aggressively feminist ([[spoiler: naming halting conversations to insist on womanned, not manned, as a term for her space station after Sally Ride ventures and insisting that her first interview be with a woman reporter]]), but not to the point of hating men or becoming a caricature.



* ThouShaltNotKill: Davy is unwilling to kill anyone. Even terrorists, NSA agents, or his dad - though he comes really close with Dad. Millie is the same way. As for Cent? [[spoiler: Nope. When she's captured by the NebulousEvilOrganization and she and Joe are threatened, she almost ''immediately'' uses deadly force to free herself.]]

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* ThouShaltNotKill: Davy is unwilling to kill anyone. Even terrorists, NSA agents, or his dad - though he comes really close with Dad. Millie is the same way. As for Millie largely follows his lead. Cent? [[spoiler: Nope. When she's captured [[spoiler:captured by the NebulousEvilOrganization NebulousEvilOrganization]] and she and Joe are threatened, she almost ''immediately'' uses deadly force to free herself.]]


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* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Granted, it's 3 books and nearly 30 years later, but no one mentions Davy's promise to give a reporter from the first book the exclusive if and when teleporting goes public after Cent very publicly saves a cosmonaut.
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