History Literature / It

18th Sep '16 7:06:38 PM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


'''''It''''' is a 1986 horror novel by American author Creator/StephenKing. The story is about seven children being terrorized by a malevolent monster -- known only as It -- that takes the form of their deepest fears but primarily appears in the form of a clown, calling itself [[MonsterClown "Pennywise the Dancing Clown"]]. The novel features a nonlinear narrative which alternates between two different time periods (1958 and 1985) and shifts among the different perspectives and stories of its seven protagonists. It deals with themes which would eventually become King staples: the power of memory, childhood trauma and the ugliness lurking behind a small-town façade.

to:

'''''It''''' ''It'' is a 1986 horror novel by American author Creator/StephenKing. The story is about seven children being terrorized by a malevolent monster -- known only as It -- that takes the form of their deepest fears but primarily appears in the form of a clown, calling itself [[MonsterClown "Pennywise the Dancing Clown"]]. The novel features a nonlinear narrative which alternates between two different time periods (1958 and 1985) and shifts among the different perspectives and stories of its seven protagonists. It deals with themes which would eventually become King staples: the power of memory, childhood trauma and the ugliness lurking behind a small-town façade.
18th Sep '16 7:06:16 PM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/itt_1786.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:Want a balloon? They float. They ALL float...]]

to:

[[quoteright:350:http://static.[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/itt_1786.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:Want [[caption-width-right:300:"Want a balloon? They float. They ALL float...]]
"]]
11th Sep '16 8:27:19 PM erforce
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* MythologyGag: When Richard Macklin is convicted for the murder of his stepson Dorsey, he is sent to [[TheShawshankRedemption Shawshank State Prison]].

to:

* MythologyGag: When Richard Macklin is convicted for the murder of his stepson Dorsey, he is sent to [[TheShawshankRedemption [[Literature/DifferentSeasons Shawshank State Prison]].
5th Sep '16 11:49:19 AM kyeo
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* WhyDontYouJustShootHim: There are plenty of times in the story where It has one of the Losers cornered or alone but doesn't kill them. For that matter, it would be child's play for It to enter the kids' houses through the sewer system and kill them in their sleep. The story implies that It doesn't do this for two reasons: 1) It feeds on their fear, and 2) It has fun coming up with different guises and ways to psychologically torment them.
5th Sep '16 11:46:09 AM kyeo
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* OldShame: Stan's wife Patty has never completely gotten over the humiliation of growing up being subject to anti-Semitism, in particular not being admitted to the afterparty at her high school prom, due to it being held at a country club that didn't allow Jewish people.
2nd Sep '16 3:59:09 PM kyeo
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* FightingAShadow: [[spoiler:Some of King's later works imply that IT is NotQuiteDead after all. IT can never truly be destroyed because IT is an extradimensional entity like the Turtle. All they did was kill its physical form. Logic suggests that, having experienced death, It grew fearful (or at least cautious) of the Losers and only projected Itself into their world again once they were gone, their bond finally used up and forgotten forever. Even if It IS somehow truly gone, there's the implication that some of the eggs It laid were left intact, so glimpses in later works may be It's children...Really, it's only a sweet ending for the Losers' Club. Sure, It won't go after THEM anymore but it's far from dead and gone.]]

to:

* FightingAShadow: [[spoiler:Some of King's later works imply that IT is NotQuiteDead after all. IT can never truly be destroyed because IT is an extradimensional entity like the Turtle. All they did was kill its physical form. Logic suggests that, having experienced death, It grew fearful (or at least cautious) of the Losers and only projected Itself into their world again once they were gone, their bond finally used up and forgotten forever. Even if It IS somehow truly gone, there's the implication that some of the eggs It laid were left intact, so glimpses in later works may be It's children...Really, it's only a sweet ending for the Losers' Club. Sure, It won't go after THEM anymore but it's far from dead and gone. Although by killing Its children they may have stopped a new swarm of Its that could have taken over the world.]]
2nd Sep '16 1:36:25 PM kyeo
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* BiggerOnTheInside: The house at 29 Neibolt Street, and the smoke-hole.
16th Aug '16 7:39:42 AM fearlessnikki
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AdaptationalNationality: In the book Audra is an American actress who moved to the UK and has a hybrid of an English and American accent. In the film she appears to be just British.



* DemotedToExtra:
** Tom Rogan has a larger role in the book. After Beverly leaves him, he attacks her friend Kay to get her whereabouts. When he arrives in Derry, he's possessed by It [[spoiler: and kidnaps Audra into the sewers]]. The film leaves this out and Tom disappears from the story once Beverly walks out on him.
** Lesser than most examples, but Stan's wife Patty gets an entire chapter from her POV detailing some of her backstory and how she met Stan. Naturally in the film she only appears briefly in Stan's introductory segments.



* DeusSexMachina: [[spoiler:Bev has sex with the other members of the Losers Club. Apparently it's supposed to be a metaphor for moving from childhood to adulthood.]]
** Another level of irony (and possibly a FamilyUnfriendlyAesop) also exists here, when you contrast this with another scene in the book. Bev's father is portrayed as an abusive, overprotective, borderline psychopath. When he learns that she's been playing with boys, he insists violently on ''physically'' checking to see if she's still a virgin. [[spoiler:Fortunately, she escapes him.]] At this point, she still is, and the scene plays out like an attempted rape.
*** The real irony of the matter is that Beverly is inspired to [[spoiler:have sex with the boys]] ''because'' of what her father did. He put the idea in her head.
* DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu

to:

* DeusSexMachina: [[spoiler:Bev has sex with the other members of the Losers Club. Apparently it's supposed to be a metaphor for moving from childhood to adulthood.]]
**
]] Another level of irony (and possibly a FamilyUnfriendlyAesop) also exists here, when you contrast this with another scene in the book. Bev's father is portrayed as an abusive, overprotective, borderline psychopath. When he learns that she's been playing with boys, he insists violently on ''physically'' checking to see if she's still a virgin. [[spoiler:Fortunately, she escapes him.]] At this point, she still is, and the scene plays out like an attempted rape.
***
rape. The real irony of the matter is that Beverly is inspired to [[spoiler:have sex with the boys]] ''because'' of what her father did. He put the idea in her head.
* DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhuDidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu: Eddie imagines his inhaler produces battery acid and is able to hurt It that way. Beverly eventually does this with the silver bullets.



* InformedJudaism: An early chapter describes the home where Stan Uris lived as an adult. There is a key-board that was given to the family as a present "2 Christmases ago". Granted, it might have been a generic 'holiday' gift from a Christian friend, but it's really old that Stan's wife would describe it that way, instead of saying that it was given to them around Hanukkah. His wife Patricia also tries to assure Stan that he is not a "klutz" (meaning he's not stupid instead of not clumsy) when the actual Yiddish word for a fool is "yutz" and a Jewish person is unlikely to confuse the terms. Many of Stanley's other behaviors (he admits that his family sometimes eats ham, and when he was about 12 years old he still didn't know what 'kosher' meant) seem at odds with a Jewish upbringing. His pals at the Loser's Club sometimes even forget that Stan is a Jew. When a friend suggests using a crucifix to warn off a supernatural creature Stan gets mad and says it won't work for him, but never considers that a symbol of the Jewish faith (such as a Star of David) might grant him protection.

to:

* InformedJudaism: An early chapter describes the home where Stan Uris lived as an adult. There is a key-board that was given to the family as a present "2 Christmases ago". Granted, it might have been a generic 'holiday' gift from a Christian friend, but it's really old that Stan's wife would describe it that way, instead of saying that it was given to them around Hanukkah. His wife Patricia also tries to assure Stan that he is not a "klutz" (meaning he's not stupid instead of not clumsy) when the actual Yiddish word for a fool is "yutz" and a Jewish person is unlikely to confuse the terms. Many of Stanley's other behaviors behaviours (he admits that his family sometimes eats ham, and when he was about 12 years old he still didn't know what 'kosher' meant) seem at odds with a Jewish upbringing. His pals at the Loser's Club sometimes even forget that Stan is a Jew. When a friend suggests using a crucifix to warn off a supernatural creature Stan gets mad and says it won't work for him, but never considers that a symbol of the Jewish faith (such as a Star of David) might grant him protection.



* MyBelovedSmother: Eddie's mother is a quintessential example, to the point where she's convinced her non-asthmatic son has asthma, leading to the pharmacist giving him a placebo-filled inhaler.

to:

* MyBelovedSmother: MyBelovedSmother:
**
Eddie's mother is a quintessential example, to the point where she's convinced her non-asthmatic son has asthma, leading to the pharmacist giving him a placebo-filled inhaler.



* NWordPrivileges: A variant on this in that the Loser's Club all have "N-word privileges" with respect to each other. Thus, it's okay for a member of the club to make fun of Stan for being Jewish or Ben for being fat or Bill for his stutter, but God help any outsider who does the same thing.

to:

* NWordPrivileges: NWordPrivileges:
**
A variant on this in that the Loser's Club all have "N-word privileges" with respect to each other. Thus, it's okay for a member of the club to make fun of Stan for being Jewish or Ben for being fat or Bill for his stutter, but God help any outsider who does the same thing.



* ParentalObliviousness

to:

* ParentalObliviousnessParentalObliviousness: None of the children's parents are aware of what's happening in Derry.



* SparedByTheAdaptation: [[spoiler: Tom Rogan, Beverley's abusive husband]]. In the book he travels to Derry looking for her and [[spoiler: gets possessed and later killed by It]]. This is left out of the film so presumably [[spoiler: Tom]] is still alive.

to:

* SparedByTheAdaptation: SparedByTheAdaptation:
**
[[spoiler: Tom Rogan, Beverley's abusive husband]]. In the book he travels to Derry looking for her and [[spoiler: gets possessed and later killed by It]]. This is left out of the film so presumably [[spoiler: Tom]] is still alive.alive.
** Eddie's mother has been dead for some years in the present, and Eddie is married to a woman just like her. In the film however she's still alive and Eddie is still living with her in the present.
5th Aug '16 12:46:02 PM Miracle@StOlaf
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DisposableWoman: Audra.

to:

* DisposableWoman: Audra.It goes after Audra just to cause Bill further pain. [[spoiler:Luckily, Bill is able to save her from being StuffedInTheFridge and cure her Deadlights-induced catatonia]].
13th Jul '16 1:09:30 PM MikaHaeli8
Is there an issue? Send a Message


In 2009, Creator/WarnerBros (who owned Creator/{{Lorimar}} when the original TV adaption was made, but was folded into Warner Bros. TV in 1993) announced that a remake of ''It'' was being planned, with Dan Lin, Roy Lee and Doug Davison tabbed to produce. However, the film spent some time in DevelopmentHell until director Cary Fukunaga, attached to the project since 2012, announced that production will begin in summer 2016, with [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Skarsg%C3%A5rd Bill Skarsgård]] as Pennywise the Dancing Clown.

to:

In 2009, Creator/WarnerBros (who owned Creator/{{Lorimar}} when the original TV adaption was made, but was folded into Warner Bros. TV in 1993) announced that a remake of ''It'' was being planned, with Dan Lin, Roy Lee and Doug Davison tabbed to produce. However, the film spent some time in DevelopmentHell until director Cary Fukunaga, attached to the project since 2012, announced that production will begin in summer 2016, with [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Skarsg%C3%A5rd org/wiki/Bill_Skarsgård Bill Skarsgård]] as Pennywise the Dancing Clown.
This list shows the last 10 events of 223. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.It