History Literature / HistoriaBrittonum

24th Feb '16 8:23:44 AM LordGro
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* DeathByChildbirth: Brutus' mother.

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* DeathByChildbirth: Brutus' mother.mother dies at his birth.



* NastyParty: The "Night of Long Knives", where Hengest invited a bunch of British councillors to talk peace and party, whereupon the Saxon hosts pulled out their concealed knives and stabbed them all to death.

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* NastyParty: The "Night of Long Knives", where Hengest invited a bunch of invites King Vortigern with three hundred British councillors nobles to talk peace and party, whereupon but when they are sitting at table the Saxon hosts pulled pull out their concealed knives knives, stab all the nobles to death and stabbed them all to death.take Vortigern prisoner.



* TropeNamer: Of the term "Night of the Long Knives" (''see above''), which would eventually gain much more fame with regards to UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler and the SS.
24th Feb '16 6:47:09 AM alchixinren
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%% * NastyParty: The "Night of Long Knives". %% Zero Context

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%% * NastyParty: The "Night of Long Knives". %% Zero ContextKnives", where Hengest invited a bunch of British councillors to talk peace and party, whereupon the Saxon hosts pulled out their concealed knives and stabbed them all to death.


Added DiffLines:

* TropeNamer: Of the term "Night of the Long Knives" (''see above''), which would eventually gain much more fame with regards to UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler and the SS.
3rd May '15 5:48:21 PM nombretomado
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On a minor note, the book also veers into {{Irish mythology}} by recounting the legendary traditions about the settlement and early history of UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}}, and dedicates a section to St. Patrick. The final part, strangely enough (obviously just another loosely related appendix tacked on at the end) are genealogies of Anglo-Saxon kings, all of whom are traced back to the god Woden.

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On a minor note, the book also veers into {{Irish Myth/{{Irish mythology}} by recounting the legendary traditions about the settlement and early history of UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}}, and dedicates a section to St. Patrick. The final part, strangely enough (obviously just another loosely related appendix tacked on at the end) are genealogies of Anglo-Saxon kings, all of whom are traced back to the god Woden.
21st Apr '15 12:16:59 PM LordGro
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->''"The cloth represents your kingdom, and the two worms are two dragons. The red worm is your dragon, and the lake represents the world. But the white one is the dragon of [[UsefulNotes/AngloSaxons the people who have seized many peoples and countries in Britain]], and will reach almost from sea to sea; but later our people will arise, and [[IRejectYourReality will valiantly throw the English people across the sea]]."''
-->--'''Ambrosius''' to Vortigern, Section 42

to:

->''"The cloth represents your kingdom, and the two worms are two dragons. The red worm is your dragon, and the lake represents the world. But the white one is the dragon of [[UsefulNotes/AngloSaxons the people who have seized many peoples and countries in Britain]], Britain, and will reach almost from sea to sea; but later our people will arise, and [[IRejectYourReality will valiantly throw the English people across the sea]].sea."''
-->--'''Ambrosius''' to Vortigern, Section ch. 42



Despite its self-designation as a chronicle, the book is pseudohistory rather than history and clearly serves up [[CelticMythology ample helpings of legend]]. Nevertheless, as one of the very few sources on the era in British history otherwise known as the [[DarkAgeEurope Dark Ages]], it developed a huge impact over time; specifically, it is the first known work that offers a coherent description of [[KingArthur "King" Arthur]]'s career, and thus can be considered the first work of what would later become the “Matter of Britain”, a.k.a. the Arthurian Universe.

to:

Despite its self-designation as a chronicle, the book is pseudohistory rather than history and clearly serves up [[CelticMythology [[Myth/CelticMythology ample helpings of legend]]. Nevertheless, as one of the very few sources on the era in British history otherwise known as the [[DarkAgeEurope Dark Ages]], it developed a huge impact over time; specifically, it is the first known work that offers a coherent description of [[KingArthur [[Myth/KingArthur "King" Arthur]]'s career, and thus can be considered the first work of what would later become the “Matter of Britain”, a.k.a. the Arthurian Universe.



According to ''Historia Brittonum'', the culprit for the downfall of the Britons was a certain King Vortigern, who grabbed the hegemonial power over the island after [[TheRomanEmpire the Romans]] had left. When some exiled Saxons under their leaders Hengist and Horsa asked for asylum in Britain, Vortigern allowed them to settle on the island of Thanet in exchange for their military services against Picts and Irish. But once Hengist successfully sets up Vortigern with his own beautiful daughter, the autocratic king grows more and more dependent on his foreign hirelings. Eventually, Vortigern can no longer satisfy the newcomers' greed, and the scheming king of the Saxons shows his true face when, [[NastyParty after inviting them to a banquet]], he has three-hundred British nobles massacred, with Vortigern taken prisoner. Vortigern ransoms himself by ceding Essex, Sussex and Middlesex, having already given away Kent earlier.

to:

According to ''Historia Brittonum'', the culprit for the downfall of the Britons was a certain King Vortigern, who grabbed the hegemonial power over the island after [[TheRomanEmpire [[UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire the Romans]] had left. When some exiled Saxons under their leaders Hengist and Horsa asked for asylum in Britain, Vortigern allowed them to settle on the island of Thanet in exchange for their military services against Picts and Irish. But once Hengist successfully sets up Vortigern with his own beautiful daughter, the autocratic king grows more and more dependent on his foreign hirelings. Eventually, Vortigern can no longer satisfy the newcomers' greed, and the scheming king of the Saxons shows his true face when, [[NastyParty after inviting them to a banquet]], he has three-hundred British nobles massacred, with Vortigern taken prisoner. Vortigern ransoms himself by ceding Essex, Sussex and Middlesex, having already given away Kent earlier.
21st Apr '15 12:15:11 PM LordGro
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* TheGoodKing: Ambrosius.

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* %%* TheGoodKing: Ambrosius.Ambrosius. %% Zero Context



* NastyParty: The "Night of Long Knives".

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%% * NastyParty: The "Night of Long Knives".Knives". %% Zero Context
21st Apr '15 12:14:15 PM LordGro
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* UsefulNotes/TheTrojanWar: Inspired by the ''Literature/{{Aeneid}}'', the author(s) tried to tie in the mythic origin of the Britons with the Trojan War. Unfortunately, they tried to tie it in with [[AncientRome Roman]] and [[Literature/TheBible Biblical]] legend as well. The result is [[ContinuitySnarl a great big mess]].
21st Apr '15 12:13:37 PM LordGro
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* KingArthur: The first known work that offers substantial information on Arthur, so can be considered the TropeMaker. As commander of an alliance of British kings, but not a king himself, Arthur fights twelve victorious battles for the Britons, the last and greatest of which is the Battle of Mount Badon. Other miscalleneous details about Arthur are that he once hunted a giant boar called Troy(n)t – an episode resurfacing in [[Literature/TheMabinogion “Culhwch and Olwen”]] - that his dog was called Cafall (“Cabal”), and that, under unspecified circumstances, he killed a son of his own, a certain Amr (which may or may not be the root for the later tradition that Arthur killed his son Modred).
21st Apr '15 12:12:33 PM LordGro
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* ItMakesSenseInContext: "Long after this, the Scots arrived in Ireland from Spain." (The "Scots" in the terms of the time were the Irish; which were believed to have immigrated to Ireland coming from the Iberian peninsula.)
18th Apr '15 5:01:29 AM jormis29
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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: For Arthurian lore. Arthur isn't a king, Ambrosius is considered the most glorious king of the Britons instead, and there's no {{Merlin}}, no Guinever, no Table Round, no Grail, no Excalibur, and no Knights. There's basically nothing of what defines Arthur in the writings of Creator/ChretienDeTroyes and Creator/ThomasMalory.

to:

* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: For Arthurian lore. Arthur isn't a king, Ambrosius is considered the most glorious king of the Britons instead, and there's no {{Merlin}}, Myth/{{Merlin}}, no Guinever, no Table Round, no Grail, no Excalibur, and no Knights. There's basically nothing of what defines Arthur in the writings of Creator/ChretienDeTroyes and Creator/ThomasMalory.



* WaifProphet: Ambrosius, a child "without a father", points out to Vortigern the two dragons concealed beneath Dinas Emrys (a fact he couldn't possibly know in a natural way) and prophecies the future of Britain. The episode lived on in Arthurian lore, but from ''Literature/HistoriaRegumBritanniae'' onward, the Waif Prophet is always {{Merlin}}. ''Historia Regum Britanniae'' further says Merlin was "also known as Ambrosius".

to:

* WaifProphet: Ambrosius, a child "without a father", points out to Vortigern the two dragons concealed beneath Dinas Emrys (a fact he couldn't possibly know in a natural way) and prophecies the future of Britain. The episode lived on in Arthurian lore, but from ''Literature/HistoriaRegumBritanniae'' onward, the Waif Prophet is always {{Merlin}}.Myth/{{Merlin}}. ''Historia Regum Britanniae'' further says Merlin was "also known as Ambrosius".
16th Mar '15 9:02:51 PM jormis29
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* TheTrojanWar: Inspired by the ''Literature/{{Aeneid}}'', the author(s) tried to tie in the mythic origin of the Britons with the Trojan War. Unfortunately, they tried to tie it in with [[AncientRome Roman]] and [[Literature/TheBible Biblical]] legend as well. The result is [[ContinuitySnarl a great big mess]].

to:

* TheTrojanWar: UsefulNotes/TheTrojanWar: Inspired by the ''Literature/{{Aeneid}}'', the author(s) tried to tie in the mythic origin of the Britons with the Trojan War. Unfortunately, they tried to tie it in with [[AncientRome Roman]] and [[Literature/TheBible Biblical]] legend as well. The result is [[ContinuitySnarl a great big mess]].
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