History Literature / Flashman

13th Jan '17 7:04:58 AM DoktorvonEurotrash
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* DragonLady: The future Dowager Empress Cixi in the appropriately named ''Flashman and the Dragon''

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* DragonLady: The future Dowager Empress Cixi in the appropriately named ''Flashman and the Dragon''Dragon''.
* DumbBlonde: The beautiful, golden-locked Elspeth isn't very bright.



* ShotgunWedding: Flashman's marriage to Elspeth was forced by old man Morrison after Flashy seduced Elspeth on a river bank.



* ShotgunWedding: Flashman's marriage to Elspeth was forced by old man Morrison after Flashy seduced Elspeth on a river bank.
18th Dec '16 6:34:38 PM Discar
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* DoubleStandard: Accurate for the time it's set in, and played for laughs: Flashman is [[AManIsNotAVirgin extremely promiscuous]], has countless lovers all over the world, makes advances at other men's lovers and wives and even ''rapes'' one. The fact that he's utterly shocked when he suspects his own wife, who stays at home for months or years of his absence, might have a lover of her own is hilarious in and of itself - and becomes more so when he quickly forgets about it because she's the one supplying him with cash (broke as his own father is).

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* DoubleStandard: Accurate for the time it's set in, and played for laughs: Flashman is [[AManIsNotAVirgin extremely promiscuous]], promiscuous, has countless lovers all over the world, makes advances at other men's lovers and wives and even ''rapes'' one. The fact that he's utterly shocked when he suspects his own wife, who stays at home for months or years of his absence, might have a lover of her own is hilarious in and of itself - and becomes more so when he quickly forgets about it because she's the one supplying him with cash (broke as his own father is).
16th Dec '16 2:44:25 AM Achaemenid
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* NobleSavage: Averted like all hell. Flashy finds them no better (but in many senses no worse) than the Europeans or the Americans, though he does admire individuals like the Yawner, [[spoiler: who would later become famous as Geronimo]], and Mangas Colorado. And [[NubileSavage Sonsee-array,]] [[TheCasanova of course.]]

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* NobleSavage: Averted like all hell.hell and mocked. Flashy finds them no better (but in many senses no worse) than the Europeans or the Americans, though he does admire individuals like the Yawner, [[spoiler: who would later become famous as Geronimo]], and Mangas Colorado. And [[NubileSavage Sonsee-array,]] [[TheCasanova of course.]]
4th Dec '16 2:08:33 AM Achaemenid
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* HoneyTrap: Flashman is the victim of several of these (in ''Royal Flash''; ''Flashman and the Angel of the Lord'' - twice! -; and ''Flashman and the Redskins'') and he [[GenreBlind never does]] seem to recognise the signs he is walking into one.

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* HoneyTrap: Flashman is the victim of several of these (in ''Royal Flash''; ''Flashman and the Angel of the Lord'' - twice! three times -; and ''Flashman and the Redskins'') and he [[GenreBlind never does]] seem to recognise the signs he is walking into one.
2nd Dec '16 12:58:12 AM Achaemenid
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* Main/{{Trigger}}: Flashman occasionally relates symptoms of PTSD in his memoirs. In particular, he cannot stand the playing or singing of the military march "Garryowen" because it brings back a memory of wounded men singing it in a shed after the charge of the Light Brigade:
-->''I’ve heard it from Afghanistan to Whitehall, from the African veldt to drunken hunting parties in Rutland; heard it sounded on penny whistles by children and roared out by Custer’s 7th on the day of Greasy Grass — and there were survivors of the Light Brigade singing on that day, too — but it always sounds bitter on my ears, because I think of those brave, deluded, pathetic bloody fools in that Russian shed, with their mangled bodies and lost limbs, all for a shilling a day and a pauper’s grave — and yet they thought Cardigan, who’d have flogged ’em for a rusty spur and would see them murdered under the Russian guns because he hadn’t wit and manhood enough to tell Lucan to take his order to hell — they thought he was “a good old commander,” and they even cheered me, who’d have turned tail on ’em at the click of a bolt.''
2nd Dec '16 12:50:44 AM Achaemenid
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* WarIsHell: This is Flashman's perspective, although he isn't totally a pacifist:
-->''It isn’t important whether you win or lose so long as you survive. So long as your people survive. And that’s the only good reason for fighting that anyone ever invented. The survival of your people and race and kind. That’s the only victory that matters.''
2nd Dec '16 12:46:06 AM Achaemenid
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-->''Or her disgraceful great-uncle, for that matter. Now there was a character, and no mistake: still chasing tweeny maids at the age of eighty-seven, treating old age as an advantage rather than a handicap, obviously. What must it be like to be that ancient and just not give a damn?''
-->-''Mr. American'', p202

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-->''Or her disgraceful great-uncle, for that matter. Now there -->''The car was a character, lost to sight as it turned through the gates and no mistake: still chasing tweeny maids at made towards the age of eighty-seven, treating Palace, even as the lights on the balcony came up again and royalty reappeared. The singing swelled to a triumphant climax; Mr Franklin could imagine the monarch glimpsing the car with its eccentric occupant as it sped across the open space before the Palace — what in God’s name was the old age as an advantage rather than a handicap, obviously. What must it be like villain going to be that ancient say when he got inside and just the Palace minions discovered he was an entirely unauthorised visitor bent only on relieving himself? Mr Franklin could not give guess — but he had no doubt Sir Harry would think of something. He’d had a damn?''
lot of practice.''
-->-''Mr. American'', p202p526
23rd Nov '16 1:54:37 PM Achaemenid
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* GambitPileup: Flashman's part in the raid on Harper's Ferry comes as a result of this. Finding himself shanghai'd to Baltimore, Flashman is first dragooned by Mr Crixus of the Underground Railroad (portrayed by Fraser as far more extensive and organised than it was) to become Brown's second in command for the raid and help Brown establish a black Republic. He is then kidnapped by the Kuklos (a fictional Southern secret society and forerunner of the KKK) who want to ensure that Brown succeeds and thus start a war for Southern seccession but fails to create the slave republic. He is then kidnapped by Allan Pinkerton and the US secret service who want him to foil the raid from the inside to prevent Civil War.


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* HiddenDepths: Flashman occasionally shows concern for people other than himself - in ''Flashman'', for example, he is actually offended when old man Morrison believes he doesn't really care about Elspeth. Elspeth, for her part, occasionally shows flashes of serious cunning and steady nerve, which Flashman never notices.
20th Nov '16 11:23:46 AM Achaemenid
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[[caption-width-right:180:[[Series/{{Blackadder}} Flash by name! Flash by nature!]]]]

-->Damn yer eyes!

The ''Flashman'' novels by Creator/GeorgeMacDonaldFraser are a {{Picaresque}} series of adventures, starring Harry Flashman. They are presented as the memoirs of an infamous Victorian war hero who is proud to be a bully, rapist, lecher, backstabber, and [[DirtyCoward coward]]. The author had a fondness for RefugeInAudacity and strove to make his stories, narrated by the eponymous rogue from the perspective of his comfortable retired life, as politically incorrect as possible.

The character Flashman is taken from the Victorian novel, ''Literature/TomBrownsSchooldays'', where he is presented without any redeeming qualities. He has no redeeming qualities in Fraser's books, either, despite occasional feelings of love for his wife and always coming out of a situation alright, so he might be considered a MagnificentBastard. There is the ''very'' occasional indication that Flashy doth protest too much, and, to be honest, in the situations he finds himself in, "being a coward" also counts as "being the OnlySaneMan".

The novels are extremely well-researched, and Flashman encounters pretty much anyone who was famous during the Victorian times, as well as living through most of the great political movements of the era.

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[[caption-width-right:180:[[Series/{{Blackadder}} Flash by name! Flash by nature!]]]]

-->Damn
[[caption-width-right:180:''Damn' yer eyes!

eyes!'']]

-->''One fine summer evening Flashman had been regaling himself on gin-punch, at Brownsover; and, having exceeded his usual limits, started home uproarious. He fell in with a friend or two coming back from bathing, proposed a glass of beer, to which they assented, the weather being hot, and they thirsty souls, and unaware of the quantity of drink which Flashman had already on board. The short result was, that Flashy became beastly drunk. They tried to get him along, but couldn’t; so they chartered a hurdle and two men to carry him. One of the masters came upon them, and they naturally enough fled. The flight of the rest excited the master’s suspicions, and the good angel of the fags incited him to examine the freight, and, after examination, to convoy the hurdle himself up to the School-house; and the doctor, who had long had his eye on Flashman, arranged for his withdrawal next morning.''
-->-'''Thomas Hughes''', ''Literature/TomBrownsSchooldays''

The ''Flashman'' novels by Creator/GeorgeMacDonaldFraser are a {{Picaresque}} series of adventures, starring Harry Flashman. They are presented as the memoirs of an infamous Victorian war hero who is proud to be a bully, rapist, lecher, backstabber, and [[DirtyCoward coward]]. The author had a fondness for RefugeInAudacity and strove to make his stories, narrated by the eponymous rogue from the perspective of his comfortable retired life, as politically incorrect as possible. \n\n

The character Flashman is taken from the Victorian novel, ''Literature/TomBrownsSchooldays'', where he is presented without any redeeming qualities. He has ''almost'' no redeeming qualities in Fraser's books, either, despite occasional feelings except from a crystal-clear powers of love observation and real affection for his wife wife, Elspeth, and always coming out his grandchildren and great-grandchildren - in fact, these last two are the only categories of a situation alright, so he might be considered a MagnificentBastard. There people in the world he's prepared to risk his own life for. Like his latter-day literary child Literature/CiaphasCain, there is the ''very'' occasional indication that Flashy doth protest too much, and, to be honest, much and is braver than he thinks he is - but unlike Cain, even if this is the case, cowardice is only one aspect of the bullying, self-centered, and misogynistic Flashy's awfulness. Of course, given the many military catastrophes and disasters of the 19th-century British Empire, frequently in the situations he Flashy finds himself in, in "being a coward" also counts as "being the OnlySaneMan".

OnlySaneMan" (certainly, a certain George Armstrong Custer should have retreated when Flashman advised it).

The novels are extremely well-researched, and Flashman encounters pretty much anyone who was famous during the Victorian times, as well as living through most of the great political movements and scandals of the era.
era.

[[folder:The Flashman Papers, in chronologial order]]

* ''Flashman''(1839-1842): The first instalment begins with Flashman's expulsion from Rugby School, his entry into the Army, and his adventures in the First Anglo-Afghan War.
* ''Royal Flash'' (first part, 1842-43): Flashman meets Lola Montez and Otto von Bismarck in London.
* ''Flashman's Lady'' (1843 - 45): Flashman finds himself in hot waters after a cricket match between Rugby and England ends up causing a pan-Indian Ocean adventure as Flashman, his wife, and, worst of all, his father-in-law, find themselves abducted by pirates and enslaved by Queen Ranavalona I of Madagascar.
* ''Flashman and the Mountain of Light'': Flashman is given the (very much unwanted) mission of spying on the Maharani Jind Kaur of the Punjab and intriguing against the Sikh Khalsa in the run-up to the Anglo-Sikh War.
* ''Royal Flash'' (second part, 1847-48): Flashman takes an ill-advised trip to Munich and finds himself tangled up in Bismarck's schemes...as well as in the artful Montez and the delightful Duchess Irma von Strackenz.
* ''Flash for Freedom!'': After being framed as a card sharp and almost killing his accuser, Flashman is sent out of the country as supercargo on the illegal slave ship ''Balliol College'' by his father in law until the scandal blows over. Flashman must dodge the Dahomey Amazons, the British laws against slave trading, the American laws against slave-stealing, and ''Balliol College'''s insane Latin-quoting captain, John Charity Spring.
* ''Flashman and the Redskins'', "The Forty-Niner" (1849-50): Ending ''Flash for Freedom!'' still stuck to Spring and wanted for perjury, murder, and impersonating a naval officer, Flashman escapes New Orleans as wagon-captain of Miss Susie Willinck, a brothel madam and old flame who is taking her business to San Francisco to, er, service the needs of the California gold rushers. But the Mimbreno Apache conspire to throw a tomahawk into Flashy's best-laid plans.
* ''Flashman at the Charge'' (1854-55): "Forward the Light Brigade! Was there a man dismayed?" Damn right there was, Flashman, who finds himself galloping towards the Russian guns with the Light Brigade and, latterly, fleeing headlong across Tajikistan and Uzbekistan with the sadistic Nikolai Ignatiev in hot pursuit.
* ''Flashman in the Great Game'' (1856-58): Wintering at Balmoral with Queen Victoria, Flashman is sent to India by Lord Palmerston to investigate rumours of an impending uprising by the sepoys. After trying (and failing) to seduce the Rani of Jhansi, Flashman finds himself fighting - on both sides, naturally - of the 1857 War of Indian Independence.
* ''Flashman and the Angel of the Lord'' (1858-59): Caught ''in flagrante'' whilst recharging in Calcutta following the events of ''Flashman in the Great Game'', Flashman prudently takes the next mail packet to Cape Town before the jealous husband tracks him dwn - but there he bumps into an old and unhappy acquaintance. Before he knows it, he's been shanghaied to Baltimore and finds himself caught up in a train of conspiracy that is hurtling headlong to the sleepy Virginia town of Harper's Ferry...
* ''Flashman and the Dragon'' (1860): Seduced by the promise of a dalliance with a beautiful minister's wife, Flashman agrees to accompany a cargo of opium into Hong Kong - and so begins a breakneck adventure in Taiping Rebellion-shattered China, as Lord Elgin's army marches steadily towards Peking.
* ''Flashman on the March'' (1867): Most unwillingly, Flashman finds himself on a secret mission to incite rebellion against the mad king Tewodros II, as Abyssinia is riven with rebellion and foreign invasion. Still, Africa has its charms in the form of the ravishing Queen Masteeat of the Wollo Galla...
* ''Flashman and the Redskins'' "The Seventy-Sixer" (1875-6): Flashman and his wife Elspeth are holidaying in Washington DC when Flashman encounters old comrade George Armstrong Custer and the beautiful Ms Arthur B. Candy. But not everything is as it seems. An old face from Flashman's past is plotting terrible revenge, and events are in motion that will sweep our reluctant hero inexorably towards the blood-soaked grass of the Little Bighorn.
* ''Flashman and the Tiger'', "The Road to Charing Cross" (1878): Flashman finds himself at the Congress of Berlin to try and steal a copy of the Treaty of Berlin, compelled by French journalist Henri Blowitz and tempted by the beautiful French spy Caprice. The caper goes off without a hitch...but other eyes are fixed on Flashy.
* ''Flashman and the Tiger'' (1879): Holidaying in South Africa, Flashman finds himself hurtling headlong from the carnage at Isandl'wana straight into the mission station at Rorke's Drift in the company of the Captain John Sebastian "Tiger Jack" Moran.
* ''Flashman and the Tiger'', "The Road to Charing Cross" (1883-84): Picking up where we left off, Flashman finds himself riding the inaugural journey of the Orient Express and in the company of Henri Blowitz, the beautiful Princess Kralta, Kaiser Franz-Josef II of Austria and, to his horror, Otto von Bismarck.
* ''Flashman and the Tiger'', "The Subleties of Baccarat" (1890-91): In Yorkshire ("a sort of English Texas") for the Doncaster Cup, Flashman finds himself lodging at Tranby Croft with Elspeth and the Prince of Wales, bored rigid. But a scandal at the baccarat tables soon offers him a chance for some amusing devilment.
* ''Flashman and the Tiger'' (1894): Flashman finds himself in a race against time to save the honour of his granddaughter Selina, and ends up meeting one of the 19th-century's [[Literature/SherlockHolmes other great literary creations]].
* ''Mr American'' (1909-1914): Not a Flashman story itself, ''Mr American'' follows the travels of Mr Mark Franklin, a retired Nevadan silver prospector who returns to England to see his roots. The octogenarian Flashy, wits sharp as ever, makes several appearances.

Order of Publication: ''Flashman'' (1969), ''Royal Flash'' (1970), ''Flash for Freedom'' (1971), ''Flashman at the Charge'' (1973), ''Flashman in the Great Game'' (1975), ''Flashman's Lady'' (1977), ''Mr American'' (1980) ''Flashman and the Redskins'' (1982), ''Flashman and the Dragon'' (1985), ''Flashman and the Mountain of Light'' (1990), ''Flashman and the Angel of the Lord'' (1994), ''Flashman and the Tiger'' (1999), ''Flashman on the March'' (2005)
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-->''Or her disgraceful great-uncle, for that matter. Now there was a character, and no mistake: still chasing tweeny maids at the age of eighty-seven, treating old age as an advantage rather than a handicap, obviously. What must it be like to be that ancient and just not give a damn?''
-->-''Mr. American'', p202
6th Nov '16 11:06:48 AM Achaemenid
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** Even Flashy is astonished that John Charity Spring would stoop so low as to sell his own cabin boy as a slave to the King of Dahomey in exchange for six Amazon slaves.
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