History Literature / Flashman

7th Oct '17 12:32:16 AM TendouMan
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* {{Deliberate Values Dissonance}}: Flashman is a white supremacist chauvinist as most average Englishmen of his time were. ** Flashman has all of the worst opinions held by his peers towards the less "civilized" cultures he encounters. He stands out as an equal-opportunity cynic, though; his opinion of his peers is little better.

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* {{Deliberate Values Dissonance}}: Flashman is a white supremacist chauvinist as most average Englishmen of his time were.
** Flashman has all of the worst opinions held by his peers towards the less "civilized" cultures he encounters. He stands out as an equal-opportunity cynic, though; his opinion of his peers is little better.
7th Oct '17 12:00:23 AM JulianLapostat
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* DatedHistory: Some of the novels suffer from this on account of recent historical research by scholars accessing new primary sources in Afghanistan and India from the original languages. Fraser at the time he wrote the books relied on the then available English sources and his own, very good, intuition, and as such his account of the Afghan Wars and the Indian Mutiny while entertaining as always is not exactly insightful as education.

to:

* DatedHistory: Some of the novels suffer from this on account of recent historical research by scholars accessing new primary sources in Afghanistan and India from the original languages. Fraser at the time he wrote the books relied on the then available English sources and his own, very good, intuition, and as such his account of the Afghan Wars and the Indian Mutiny while entertaining as always is not exactly insightful as education. In general, Fraser takes as given that "the Great Game" was an active thing and that Tsarist Russia's designs on India were real, when modern historians like Peter Hopkirk and William Dalrymple have seen the Great Game as a greatly exaggerated diplomatic issue on the part of the English, and used more as an ExcusePlot to grab land, riches, and careers for bored officers than of any practical diplomatic concerns.
6th Oct '17 11:50:45 PM JulianLapostat
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** Also, with the exception of raping the Afghan lady Narreeman in the first book, he never commits rape again [[UnreliableNarrator or so he likes to have us believe]][[note]]Victorian men and other men of their time had differing notions of consent and tended to not consider rape, especially to women of their class and race, what we would consider today for all women[[/note]]. The fact that [[spoiler:Narreeman got frighteningly close to castrating him in revenge]] might have played a part.

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** Also, with the exception of raping the Afghan lady Narreeman in the first book, he never commits rape again [[UnreliableNarrator or so he likes to have us believe]][[note]]Victorian men and other men of their time had differing notions of consent and tended to not consider rape, especially to women of their class and race, what we would consider today for all women[[/note]].women. A good example is the situation where he gropes Betty Parker in ''Flashman''[[/note]]. The fact that [[spoiler:Narreeman got frighteningly close to castrating him in revenge]] might have played a part.



** In the first ''Flashman'' book, he [[spoiler:gets an award, personally fitted by the young UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria with UsefulNotes/TheDukeOfWellington standing by, for his work in holding a position during the Siege of Jalalabad. In actual fact, Flashman slept through most of the siege, and was forced by his own subordinate Sergeant Hudson at sword-point, to fulfill his duty and inspire the troops, and it was Hudson who truly defended the position, but he died, and all he gets is a sentence comemorating his courage, while Flashman gets the credit. Flashman even notes that even if the truth came out, Hudson would never gotten high honours anyway since as a sergeant it wouldn't mean that he had done more than his duty, whereas for an officer like Flashman, who bought his commission, what he did made him a hero]].



* HistoricalDomainCharacter: Basically every character that appears.

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* HistoricalDomainCharacter: Basically every character that appears.With the exceptions of the characters from ''Tom Brown's Schooldays'': Tom, Flashman, 'Scud' East, Flashman's family, and his wife, and [[spoiler:Sherlock Holmes for some reason]], most of the characters are historical figures, even ones, such as Sir Colin Campbell, Elspeth's Uncle, who might seem fictional.



--> "An American wrote to me urging me to write it, saying [[WeAllLiveInAmerica it had to be the high point of Flashman's career]]. I wrote back saying: 'Son, it's a foreign sideshow. The Crimea, the Indian Mutiny, these were the important things in Flashman's life. Your civil war? He was so disinterested that he fought on both sides."

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--> "An American wrote to me urging me to write it, saying [[WeAllLiveInAmerica it had to be the high point of Flashman's career]]. I wrote back saying: 'Son, it's a foreign sideshow. The Crimea, the Indian Mutiny, these were the important things in Flashman's life. Your civil war? He was so disinterested that he fought on both sides.""[[note]]Of course this might be Fraser's own CreatorProvincialism talking, since modern historians do consider the American Civil War a majorly significant event, far more so than the Crimean War at any rate[[/note]]




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* YourCheatingHeart: Flashman cheats on Elspeth, and it's regularly implied, but not confirmed fully that Elspeth is doing the same to Flashman.
6th Oct '17 3:04:09 PM JulianLapostat
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** ''Flashman on the March'', the last published novel in the series has an Author's Introduction and Footnotes that's more or less a TakeThat to TheWarOnTerror in general, and Bush and Blair in particular.
5th Oct '17 10:17:02 PM JulianLapostat
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-->-- '''Sir Henry Paget Flashman''', ''From the Flashman Papers 1839-1842''

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-->-- '''Sir Henry Harry Paget Flashman''', ''From the Flashman Papers 1839-1842''
5th Oct '17 7:41:56 PM JulianLapostat
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->''One fine summer evening Flashman had been regaling himself on gin-punch, at Brownsover; and, having exceeded his usual limits, started home uproarious. He fell in with a friend or two coming back from bathing, proposed a glass of beer, to which they assented, the weather being hot, and they thirsty souls, and unaware of the quantity of drink which Flashman had already on board. The short result was, that Flashy became beastly drunk. They tried to get him along, but couldnít; so they chartered a hurdle and two men to carry him. One of the masters came upon them, and they naturally enough fled. The flight of the rest excited the masterís suspicions, and the good angel of the fags incited him to examine the freight, and, after examination, to convoy the hurdle himself up to the School-house; and the doctor, who had long had his eye on Flashman, arranged for his withdrawal next morning.''
-->-- '''Thomas Hughes''', ''Literature/TomBrownsSchooldays''

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->''One fine summer evening Flashman had been regaling himself on gin-punch, -> ''I have served at Brownsover; and, having exceeded his usual limits, started home uproarious. He fell Balaclava, Cawnpore, and Little Big Horn. Name the biggest born fools who wore uniform in with a friend or two coming back the nineteenth century...I knew them all. Think of all the conceivable misfortunes that can arise from bathing, proposed a glass combinations of beer, to which they assented, the weather being hot, folly, cowardice, and they thirsty souls, sheer bad luck, and unaware of the quantity of drink which Flashman had already on board. The short result was, that Flashy became beastly drunk. They tried to get him along, but couldnít; so they chartered a hurdle I'll give you chapter and two men to carry him. One of the masters came upon them, and they naturally enough fled. The flight of the rest excited the masterís suspicions, and the good angel of the fags incited him to examine the freight, and, after examination, to convoy the hurdle himself up to the School-house; and the doctor, who had long had his eye on Flashman, arranged for his withdrawal next morning.verse.''
-->-- '''Thomas Hughes''', ''Literature/TomBrownsSchooldays''
'''Sir Henry Paget Flashman''', ''From the Flashman Papers 1839-1842''



* DatedHistory: Some of the novels suffer from this on account of recent historical research by scholars accessing new primary sources in Afghanistan and India from the original languages. Fraser at the time he wrote the books relied on the then available English sources and his own, very good, intuition, and as such his account of the Afghan Wars and the Indian Mutiny while entertaining as always is not exactly insightful as education.



* {{Deliberate Values Dissonance}}: Flashman is one hell of a bigot.
** ''Flash For Freedom!'' is made of this trope, to the point where it's almost painful to read. On the other hand, Flashy, despite his intense racism, is more than willing to admit that the British soldier is not automatically superior to the natives other officers and civilians consider nothing more than barbaric savages. Flashman has had too many near-death experiences to underestimate a Sikh or a Ghazi. (He mentions at one point that he takes his blood-brotherhood with a Central Asian warlord quite seriously; far more seriously than his marriage vows, [[TheCasanova though that is not saying much]].)
** Flashman has all of the worst opinions held by his peers towards the less "civilized" cultures he encounters. He stands out as an equal-opportunity cynic, though; his opinion of his peers is little better.
*** Flashman isn't a bigot; he certainly doesn't believe that his British/English compatriots are braver, smarter or more moral than other people -- not that he'd give a fig for morality. His view of most of his social and military superiors is that they're bloody lunatics and often criminally incompetent and/or corrupt. He certainly strongly identifies with England, as long as he doesn't have to risk anything for Queen and Country, but that's another matter. He's a chauvinist and cynically brutal towards everyone, but not a bigot.
** A more subtle one from ''Flashman and the Angel of the Lord'' - several American characters praise Oliver Cromwell as a straightforward heroic figure rather than the WellIntentionedExtremist even many of his admirers see him as today.

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* {{Deliberate Values Dissonance}}: Flashman is one hell a white supremacist chauvinist as most average Englishmen of a bigot.
** ''Flash For Freedom!'' is made of this trope, to the point where it's almost painful to read. On the other hand, Flashy, despite
his intense racism, is more than willing to admit that the British soldier is not automatically superior to the natives other officers and civilians consider nothing more than barbaric savages. Flashman has had too many near-death experiences to underestimate a Sikh or a Ghazi. (He mentions at one point that he takes his blood-brotherhood with a Central Asian warlord quite seriously; far more seriously than his marriage vows, [[TheCasanova though that is not saying much]].)
time were. ** Flashman has all of the worst opinions held by his peers towards the less "civilized" cultures he encounters. He stands out as an equal-opportunity cynic, though; his opinion of his peers is little better.
*** ** ''Flash For Freedom!'' is made of this trope. Flashy is able to admit in the mould of 19th Century educated bigots, that the British soldier is not automatically superior to the natives other officers and civilians consider nothing more than barbaric savages. Flashman isn't a bigot; he certainly doesn't believe that like Victorian officers as his British/English compatriots are braver, smarter or more moral than other people -- not that he'd give day has a fig for morality. His view of most of his social warrior-caste sentimentality and military superiors is that they're bloody lunatics romanticism about Sikh and often criminally incompetent and/or corrupt. He certainly strongly identifies with England, as long as Ghazi enemies But in general he doesn't have to risk anything for Queen consider them, and Country, but that's another matter. He's a chauvinist and cynically brutal towards everyone, but not a bigot.
their people equal to the English or see them as having identities beyond being soldiers.
** A more subtle one from ''Flashman and the Angel of the Lord'' - several American characters praise Oliver Cromwell as a straightforward heroic figure rather than the WellIntentionedExtremist even many of his admirers see him as today. Of course Fraser like others is probably mocking the GlobalIgnorance of Americans of his time.



* {{Epigraph}}: The first novel opens with the following epigraph from the novel from which Fraser borrowed Flashman:
--> ''One fine summer evening Flashman had been regaling himself on gin-punch, at Brownsover; and, having exceeded his usual limits, started home uproarious. He fell in with a friend or two coming back from bathing, proposed a glass of beer, to which they assented, the weather being hot, and they thirsty souls, and unaware of the quantity of drink which Flashman had already on board. The short result was, that Flashy became beastly drunk. They tried to get him along, but couldnít; so they chartered a hurdle and two men to carry him. One of the masters came upon them, and they naturally enough fled. The flight of the rest excited the masterís suspicions, and the good angel of the fags incited him to examine the freight, and, after examination, to convoy the hurdle himself up to the School-house; and the doctor, who had long had his eye on Flashman, arranged for his withdrawal next morning.''
-->-- '''Thomas Hughes''', ''Literature/TomBrownsSchooldays''



** Also, with the exception of raping the Afghan lady Narreeman in the first book, he never commits rape again, though that's rather because he finds it a lot less fun than consensual seduction than from any moral qualms. Of course, the fact that [[spoiler:Narreeman got frighteningly close to castrating him in revenge]] might have played a part.

to:

** Also, with the exception of raping the Afghan lady Narreeman in the first book, he never commits rape again, though that's rather because again [[UnreliableNarrator or so he finds it a lot less fun than consensual seduction than from any moral qualms. Of course, the likes to have us believe]][[note]]Victorian men and other men of their time had differing notions of consent and tended to not consider rape, especially to women of their class and race, what we would consider today for all women[[/note]]. The fact that [[spoiler:Narreeman got frighteningly close to castrating him in revenge]] might have played a part.
28th Sep '17 7:10:15 PM Eoppen
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Added DiffLines:

* ArtisticLicenseHistory: While Fraser is known for his careful research, he does occasionally slip. He portrays the Underground Railroad as much more organized and far-reaching than it was, and also invents a pre-1865 precursor of the KuKluxKlan.
25th Sep '17 11:35:15 AM roxana
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* TheDitz: Flashman's wife, Elspeth. As far as he knows. She does show reserves of amazing fortitude, though: in Madagascar, fleeing from mad Queen Ravonalova, a searching guard steps on her finger and breaks it--and she doesn't even cry out.

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** In ''Flashman's Lady'' the possibility, or as Harry sees it the near certainty, he will fail Elspeth is as terrifying to him as death itself.
* TheDitz: Flashman's wife, Elspeth. As far as he knows. She does show reserves of amazing fortitude, though: in Madagascar, fleeing from mad Queen Ravonalova, a searching guard steps on her finger and breaks it--and she doesn't even cry out. In ''Flashman and the Redskins'' Harry comments on his wife's 'cold courage'.
22nd Sep '17 6:33:41 AM ClintEastwood
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* TakeThat:
** ''Flashman and the Tiger'' sees Flashman become tangled up in Literature/SherlockHolmes story "The Adventure of the Empty House". Flashman is [[spoiler: seconds from murdering Colonel Moran himself]] when he realises the Metropolitan Police are standing ready to apprehend him. Fraser consciously mocks the contemporary depictions of Holmes and Watson - Watson immediately sees through Flashman's disguise as a tramp, but is convinced by Holmes that Flashman must be a German-American sailor.
** Fraser's opinion of the American Civil War as a "colossal bore", especially when American readers began to treat it as [[{{Eagleland}} obviously the most important historical event Flashman witnessed]]:
--> "An American wrote to me urging me to write it, saying [[WeAllLiveInAmerica it had to be the high point of Flashman's career]]. I wrote back saying: 'Son, it's a foreign sideshow. The Crimea, the Indian Mutiny, these were the important things in Flashman's life. Your civil war? He was so disinterested that he fought on both sides."
21st Sep '17 1:01:45 PM Eoppen
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** And he is not favorably impressed by the casual cruelty of the Lady Yehonala [[spoiler: later to be better known as the Dowager Empress Cixi]] while being held captive in the Imperial Palace in Beijing.
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