History Literature / Flashman

3rd Jul '17 3:14:48 PM moloch
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* ''Flashman''(1839-1842): The first instalment begins with Flashman's expulsion from Rugby School, his entry into the Army, and his adventures in the First Anglo-Afghan War.

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* ''Flashman''(1839-1842): ''Flashman'' (1839-1842): The first instalment begins with Flashman's expulsion from Rugby School, his entry into the Army, and his adventures in the First Anglo-Afghan War.


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3rd Jul '17 3:13:09 PM moloch
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* ''Mr American'' (1909-1914): Not a Flashman story itself, ''Mr American'' follows the travels of Mr Mark Franklin, a retired Nevadan silver prospector who returns to England to see his roots. The octogenarian Flashy, wits sharp as ever, makes several appearances.

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And finally, two of Fraser's other novels [[TheVerse feature Flashman in some capacity]]:
* ''Black Ajax'' (1810): Not a Flashman story itself, it's a fictionalised account of the life of bareknuckle boxer Tom Molineaux. Instead, Flash's father Henry Buckley Flashman is a major supporting character.
* ''Mr American'' (1909-1914): Not Also not a Flashman story itself, ''Mr American'' follows the travels of Mr Mark Franklin, a retired Nevadan silver prospector who returns to England to see his roots. The octogenarian Flashy, wits sharp as ever, makes several appearances.
1st Jul '17 2:58:14 PM nombretomado
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* ChasteHero: The series' presentation of the historical figure James Brooke satirizes this trope, as his characterization as a [[TheCape plucky and honorable hero]] who has no lustful reaction to the topless native women around him is given an unorthodox spin by the implication that he was castrated by a bullet wound received in battle. [[note]] Historical records (and Fraser) indicate that he was shot in the lung, however, and carried out an affair shortly after recovering.[[/note]] Oddly, the article on Brooke in TheOtherWiki suggests he was actually a DepravedBisexual.

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* ChasteHero: The series' presentation of the historical figure James Brooke satirizes this trope, as his characterization as a [[TheCape plucky and honorable hero]] who has no lustful reaction to the topless native women around him is given an unorthodox spin by the implication that he was castrated by a bullet wound received in battle. [[note]] Historical records (and Fraser) indicate that he was shot in the lung, however, and carried out an affair shortly after recovering.[[/note]] Oddly, the article on Brooke in TheOtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki suggests he was actually a DepravedBisexual.
28th Jun '17 7:26:30 AM moloch
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[[folder:The Flashman Papers, in chronologial order]]

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[[folder:The Flashman Papers, in chronologial chronological order]]
24th May '17 10:20:22 AM MockFerret
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* OneSteveLimit: Averted and lampshaded in ''Flashman on the March''. Flash encounters both his old crony Speedicut [[note]]from ''Literature/TomBrownsSchooldays''[[/note]] and the historical figure Captain Tristram Speedy. A [[LiteraryAgentHypothesis footnote from Fraser]] observes that a work of fiction would never feature two such similarly-named characters.
13th May '17 2:10:06 AM foxley
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* OldTimeyAnkleTaboo: Flashman was born at just that point in time when attitudes were changing and prudishness descended on Britain. His whole life could be seen as a rebellion against Victorian morality - which at the other end of his life had become the ankle taboo. Something Flashman was somewhat opposed to.
15th Apr '17 1:15:20 PM nombretomado
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* PublicDomainCharacter: Not only is Flashman this, but one novel has unnamed characters who are clearly Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson, and another parodies ''The Prisoner of Zenda''. (Although according to Flashman, his own tale-telling is what gave Anthony Hope the idea for ''Zenda''.) Flashman himself shows up in several novels set in his heyday, including two by SMStirling.

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* PublicDomainCharacter: Not only is Flashman this, but one novel has unnamed characters who are clearly Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson, and another parodies ''The Prisoner of Zenda''. (Although according to Flashman, his own tale-telling is what gave Anthony Hope the idea for ''Zenda''.) Flashman himself shows up in several novels set in his heyday, including two by SMStirling.Creator/SMStirling.
13th Apr '17 10:11:37 AM Eoppen
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** When Flashman has to watch the widows of an Indian ruler committing ''suttee,'' he comes away seething with rage at the cruelty [[PragmaticVillainy and wastefulness]] of it.
** He also finds loading slaves aboard a slave ship to be a sickening experience.
12th Apr '17 1:55:49 AM Solle
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The ''Flashman'' novels by Creator/GeorgeMacDonaldFraser are a {{Picaresque}} series of adventures, starring Harry Flashman. They are presented as the memoirs of an infamous Victorian war hero who is proud to be a bully, rapist, lecher, backstabber, and [[DirtyCoward coward]]. The author had a fondness for RefugeInAudacity and strove to make his stories, narrated by the eponymous rogue from the perspective of his comfortable retired life, as politically incorrect as possible.

The character Flashman is taken from the Victorian novel, ''Literature/TomBrownsSchooldays'', where he is presented without any redeeming qualities. He has ''almost'' no redeeming qualities in Fraser's books, either, except from a crystal-clear powers of observation and real affection for his wife, Elspeth, and his grandchildren and great-grandchildren - in fact, these last two are the only categories of people in the world he's prepared to risk his own life for. Like his latter-day literary child Literature/CiaphasCain, there is the occasional indication that Flashy doth protest too much and is braver than he thinks he is - but unlike Cain, even if this is the case, cowardice is only one aspect of the bullying, self-centered, and misogynistic Flashy's awfulness. Of course, given the many military catastrophes and disasters of the 19th-century British Empire, frequently in the situations Flashy finds himself in "being a coward" also counts as "being the OnlySaneMan" (certainly, a certain George Armstrong Custer should have retreated when Flashman advised it).

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The ''Flashman'' novels by Creator/GeorgeMacDonaldFraser are a {{Picaresque}} series of adventures, starring Harry Flashman. They are presented as the memoirs of an infamous Victorian war hero who is proud to be describes his adventures as a bully, rapist, lecher, backstabber, and [[DirtyCoward coward]]. The author had a fondness for RefugeInAudacity and strove to make his stories, narrated by the eponymous rogue from the perspective of his comfortable retired life, as politically incorrect deliciously offensive as possible.

The character Flashman is taken from the Victorian novel, ''Literature/TomBrownsSchooldays'', where he is presented without any redeeming qualities. He has ''almost'' no redeeming qualities in Fraser's books, books either, except from a crystal-clear powers of observation and real affection for his wife, Elspeth, wife Elspeth and his grandchildren and great-grandchildren - in great-grandchildren. In fact, these last two are the only categories of people in the world he's prepared to risk his own life for. Like his latter-day literary child Literature/CiaphasCain, there is the occasional indication that Flashy doth protest too much and is braver than he thinks he is - but unlike Cain, even if this is the case, cowardice is only one aspect of the bullying, self-centered, and misogynistic Flashy's awfulness. Of course, given the many military catastrophes and disasters of the 19th-century British Empire, frequently in the situations Flashy finds himself in "being a coward" also counts as "being the OnlySaneMan" (certainly, a certain George Armstrong Custer should have retreated when Flashman advised it).
10th Apr '17 5:14:16 PM Xtifr
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* Main/{{Trigger}}: Flashman occasionally relates symptoms of PTSD in his memoirs. In particular, he cannot stand the playing or singing of the military march "Garryowen" because it brings back a memory of wounded men singing it in a shed after the charge of the Light Brigade:
-->''I’ve heard it from Afghanistan to Whitehall, from the African veldt to drunken hunting parties in Rutland; heard it sounded on penny whistles by children and roared out by Custer’s 7th on the day of Greasy Grass — and there were survivors of the Light Brigade singing on that day, too — but it always sounds bitter on my ears, because I think of those brave, deluded, pathetic bloody fools in that Russian shed, with their mangled bodies and lost limbs, all for a shilling a day and a pauper’s grave — and yet they thought Cardigan, who’d have flogged ’em for a rusty spur and would see them murdered under the Russian guns because he hadn’t wit and manhood enough to tell Lucan to take his order to hell — they thought he was “a good old commander,” and they even cheered me, who’d have turned tail on ’em at the click of a bolt.''


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* TraumaButton: Flashman occasionally relates symptoms of PTSD in his memoirs. In particular, he cannot stand the playing or singing of the military march "Garryowen" because it brings back a memory of wounded men singing it in a shed after the charge of the Light Brigade:
-->''I’ve heard it from Afghanistan to Whitehall, from the African veldt to drunken hunting parties in Rutland; heard it sounded on penny whistles by children and roared out by Custer’s 7th on the day of Greasy Grass — and there were survivors of the Light Brigade singing on that day, too — but it always sounds bitter on my ears, because I think of those brave, deluded, pathetic bloody fools in that Russian shed, with their mangled bodies and lost limbs, all for a shilling a day and a pauper’s grave — and yet they thought Cardigan, who’d have flogged ’em for a rusty spur and would see them murdered under the Russian guns because he hadn’t wit and manhood enough to tell Lucan to take his order to hell — they thought he was “a good old commander,” and they even cheered me, who’d have turned tail on ’em at the click of a bolt.''
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