History Literature / Evolution

3rd Nov '15 10:01:27 AM Theriocephalus
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** While most of the time Baxter gets the science right, and the speculative leaps he takes are somewhat within the bounds of plausibility, a few examples must be mentioned. First of all, in the story about the sapient ''Ornitholestes'', he mentions that the only evidence humans had of these species is the disappearance of sauropods in the Late Jurassic, since the sapient species bones and technology are too fragile to preserve. Problem is, sauropods didn't go extinct in the Late Jurassic, not even in the Northern Hemisphere. There were as many sauropods infesting North America in the Early Cretaceous as there were in the Late Jurassic, including ''Astrodon'', ''Sauroposeidon'', and ''Sonorasaurus''.
** However there was a mass-extinction at the end of the Jurassic that claimed the dominant Jurassic sauropods, and the sauropods referred to in that story were all ''Diplodocus'', which did go extinct then. The phrase was 'the disappearance of ''the'' giant sauropods'. This could easily have meant just those specific species, not sauropods in general.

to:

** While most of the time Baxter gets the science right, and the speculative leaps he takes are somewhat within the bounds of plausibility, a few examples must be mentioned. First of all, in the story about the sapient ''Ornitholestes'', he mentions that the only evidence humans had of these species is the disappearance of sauropods in the Late Jurassic, since the sapient species species' bones and technology are too fragile to preserve. Problem is, sauropods didn't go extinct in the Late Jurassic, not even in the Northern Hemisphere. There were as many sauropods infesting North America in the Early Cretaceous as there were in the Late Jurassic, including ''Astrodon'', ''Sauroposeidon'', and ''Sonorasaurus''.
** However
''Sonorasaurus''. However, there was ''was'' a mass-extinction mass extinction at the end of the Jurassic that claimed the dominant Jurassic sauropods, and the sauropods referred to in that story were all ''Diplodocus'', which did go extinct then. The phrase was 'the disappearance of ''the'' giant sauropods'. This It could easily have meant just those specific species, not sauropods in general.
3rd Nov '15 9:58:29 AM Theriocephalus
Is there an issue? Send a Message


''Evolution'' is a novel by Creator/StephenBaxter spanning 645 million years of Earth's history, with most chapters focusing on 65 million years ago to 30 million years in the future. The book is split into three parts: Ancestors, which focuses on various director ancestors to humans, starting with a ratlike animal that coexisted with the dinosaurs, Humans, which depicts various turning in human development, and Descendants, which is set AfterTheEnd.

to:

''Evolution'' is a novel by Creator/StephenBaxter spanning 645 million years of Earth's history, with most chapters focusing on 65 million years ago to 30 million years in the future. The book is split into three parts: Ancestors, which focuses on various director ancestors to humans, starting with a ratlike animal that coexisted with the dinosaurs, dinosaurs; Humans, which depicts various turning in human development, development; and Descendants, which is set AfterTheEnd.
3rd Aug '15 3:24:36 PM ScorpiusOB1
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ArtisticLicenseAstronomy: While it's true the Sun gets brighter with time and that increasing brightness will mess so much with Earth's climate that will cause the eventual extinction of life and loss of oceans much before it goes into red giant mode, the Sun that will shine 500 million years in the future, when the last chapter of the book takes place, will not be very different of the current one in size and luminosity and not the ferocious one Baxter describes, at least if stellar evolution models are right. See [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Solar_evolution_%28English%29.svg]]

to:

* ArtisticLicenseAstronomy: While it's true the Sun gets brighter more luminous with time and that increasing brightness luminosity will mess so much with Earth's climate that will cause the eventual extinction of life and loss of oceans much before it goes into red giant red-giant mode, the Sun that will shine 500 million years in the future, when the last chapter of the book takes place, will not be very different of the current one in size and luminosity and not the ferocious one Baxter describes, at least if stellar evolution models are right. See [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Solar_evolution_%28English%29.svg]]
1st Apr '15 9:32:35 PM Kalaong
Is there an issue? Send a Message


''Evolution'' is a novel by StephenBaxter spanning 645 million years of Earth's history, with most chapters focusing on 65 million years ago to 30 million years in the future. The book is split into three parts: Ancestors, which focuses on various director ancestors to humans, starting with a ratlike animal that coexisted with the dinosaurs, Humans, which depicts various turning in human development, and Descendants, which is set AfterTheEnd.

to:

''Evolution'' is a novel by StephenBaxter Creator/StephenBaxter spanning 645 million years of Earth's history, with most chapters focusing on 65 million years ago to 30 million years in the future. The book is split into three parts: Ancestors, which focuses on various director ancestors to humans, starting with a ratlike animal that coexisted with the dinosaurs, Humans, which depicts various turning in human development, and Descendants, which is set AfterTheEnd.
28th Aug '14 1:59:01 PM ScorpiusOB1
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ArtisticLicenseAstronomy: While it's true the Sun gets brighter with time and that increasing brightness will mess so much with Earth's climate that will cause the eventual extinction of life and loss of oceans much before it goes red giant the Sun that will shine 500 million years in the future will not be very different of the current one in size and luminosity and not the ferocious one Baxter describes, at least if stellar evolution models are right. See [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Solar_evolution_%28English%29.svg]]

to:

* ArtisticLicenseAstronomy: While it's true the Sun gets brighter with time and that increasing brightness will mess so much with Earth's climate that will cause the eventual extinction of life and loss of oceans much before it goes into red giant mode, the Sun that will shine 500 million years in the future future, when the last chapter of the book takes place, will not be very different of the current one in size and luminosity and not the ferocious one Baxter describes, at least if stellar evolution models are right. See [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Solar_evolution_%28English%29.svg]]
28th Aug '14 1:55:23 PM ScorpiusOB1
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ArtisticLicenseAstronomy: While it's true the Sun gets brighter with time and that increasing brightness will mess so much with Earth's climate that will cause the eventual extinction of life and loss of oceans, far before it goes red giant, the Sun that will shine 500 million years in the future will not very different of the current one in size and luminosity, not the ferocious one Baxter describes. See [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Solar_evolution_%28English%29.svg]]

to:

* ArtisticLicenseAstronomy: While it's true the Sun gets brighter with time and that increasing brightness will mess so much with Earth's climate that will cause the eventual extinction of life and loss of oceans, far oceans much before it goes red giant, giant the Sun that will shine 500 million years in the future will not be very different of the current one in size and luminosity, luminosity and not the ferocious one Baxter describes.describes, at least if stellar evolution models are right. See [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Solar_evolution_%28English%29.svg]]
28th Aug '14 1:53:23 PM ScorpiusOB1
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ArtisticLicenseAstronomy: While it's true the Sun gets brighter with time and that increasing brightness will mess so much with Earth's climate that will cause the eventual extinction of life and loss of oceans, far before it goes red giant, the Sun that will shine 500 million years in the future will not very different of the current one in size and luminosity, not the ferocious one Baxter describes. See [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Solar_evolution_%28English%29.svg]]



* Ragnarok-Proofing: averted. Very little remains of human civilization except fossils and some very durable structures such as a cave or a gorge excavated to build a road.

to:

* Ragnarok-Proofing: RagnarokProofing: averted. Very little remains of human civilization except fossils and some very durable structures such as a an artificial cave or a gorge excavated to build a road.
28th Aug '14 1:32:36 PM ScorpiusOB1
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Ragnarok-Proofing: averted. Very little remains of human civilization except fossils and some very durable structures such as a cave or a gorge excavated to build a road.
13th Jun '14 1:08:05 AM SeptimusHeap
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ArtisticLicensePaleontology:
** While most of the time Baxter gets the science right, and the speculative leaps he takes are somewhat within the bounds of plausibility, a few examples must be mentioned. First of all, in the story about the sapient ''Ornitholestes'', he mentions that the only evidence humans had of these species is the disappearance of sauropods in the Late Jurassic, since the sapient species bones and technology are too fragile to preserve. Problem is, sauropods didn't go extinct in the Late Jurassic, not even in the Northern Hemisphere. There were as many sauropods infesting North America in the Early Cretaceous as there were in the Late Jurassic, including ''Astrodon'', ''Sauroposeidon'', and ''Sonorasaurus''.
** However there was a mass-extinction at the end of the Jurassic that claimed the dominant Jurassic sauropods, and the sauropods referred to in that story were all ''Diplodocus'', which did go extinct then. The phrase was 'the disappearance of ''the'' giant sauropods'. This could easily have meant just those specific species, not sauropods in general.
** The story about primates coming to North America has some anachronism and MisplacedWildlife in it too. Not only does it have indricotherid rhinos (native only to Asia), camels (who were only found in North America at this time), and such, it has gastornid birds inhabiting Oligocene-Miocene Africa...yes, even after these animals were supposed to have died out in the middle Eocene.
** In addition, the story involving ''Purgatorius'' has some flaws too. While Baxter does get it right by cloaking his troodonts in feathers, he leaves them off his dromaeosaurs. To add insult to injury, he makes the raptors cold-blooded, despite the fact that raptors are the very dinosaurs which ignited the cold blood, warm blood debate. In fact, even paleontologists who doubt endothermy in ornithischians and sauropods don't deny that raptors were most likely endothermic. And then there are the ''Giganotosaurus'' and ''Suchomimus'' in North America. Not only are these animals in the wrong place (''Giganotosaurus'' was from South America, ''Suchomimus'' from Africa), but they are from the wrong time, both species were from the Early Cretaceous.
*** The ''Giganotosaurus'' in that story was no less implausible that any of the other speculations not directly supported by fossil evidence Baxter uses, namely that a giganotosaur species whose fossil remains had not been found by modern human paleontologists, descended from the known early ''Giganotosaurus'' finds, survived to the end of the Cretaceous and migrated to North America across the land bridge between North and South America when it formed in the late Cretaceous. Similarly the ''Suchomimus'' is a not implausible speculation that a member of that particular family did in fact live in North America, though only fossils from the African branch of the family have so far been found. This is certainly possible since similar pairs of "sister taxa" in North America and Africa are known for many other dinosaur families, and the origins of these families date back to when North America and Africa were connected.



* SomewhereAPalaeontologistIsCrying: While most of the time Baxter gets the science right, and the speculative leaps he takes are somewhat within the bounds of plausibility, a few examples must be mentioned. First of all, in the story about the sapient ''Ornitholestes'', he mentions that the only evidence humans had of these species is the disappearance of sauropods in the Late Jurassic, since the sapient species bones and technology are too fragile to preserve. Problem is, sauropods didn't go extinct in the Late Jurassic, not even in the Northern Hemisphere. There were as many sauropods infesting North America in the Early Cretaceous as there were in the Late Jurassic, including ''Astrodon'', ''Sauroposeidon'', and ''Sonorasaurus''.
** However there was a mass-extinction at the end of the Jurassic that claimed the dominant Jurassic sauropods, and the sauropods referred to in that story were all ''Diplodocus'', which did go extinct then. The phrase was 'the disappearance of ''the'' giant sauropods'. This could easily have meant just those specific species, not sauropods in general.
** The story about primates coming to North America has some anachronism and MisplacedWildlife in it too. Not only does it have indricotherid rhinos (native only to Asia), camels (who were only found in North America at this time), and such, it has gastornid birds inhabiting Oligocene-Miocene Africa...yes, even after these animals were supposed to have died out in the middle Eocene.
** In addition, the story involving ''Purgatorius'' has some flaws too. While Baxter does get it right by cloaking his troodonts in feathers, he leaves them off his dromaeosaurs. To add insult to injury, he makes the raptors cold-blooded, despite the fact that raptors are the very dinosaurs which ignited the cold blood, warm blood debate. In fact, even paleontologists who doubt endothermy in ornithischians and sauropods don't deny that raptors were most likely endothermic. And then there are the ''Giganotosaurus'' and ''Suchomimus'' in North America. Not only are these animals in the wrong place (''Giganotosaurus'' was from South America, ''Suchomimus'' from Africa), but they are from the wrong time, both species were from the Early Cretaceous.
*** The ''Giganotosaurus'' in that story was no less implausible that any of the other speculations not directly supported by fossil evidence Baxter uses, namely that a giganotosaur species whose fossil remains had not been found by modern human paleontologists, descended from the known early ''Giganotosaurus'' finds, survived to the end of the Cretaceous and migrated to North America across the land bridge between North and South America when it formed in the late Cretaceous. Similarly the ''Suchomimus'' is a not implausible speculation that a member of that particular family did in fact live in North America, though only fossils from the African branch of the family have so far been found. This is certainly possible since similar pairs of "sister taxa" in North America and Africa are known for many other dinosaur families, and the origins of these families date back to when North America and Africa were connected.
28th Mar '14 10:51:15 AM matruz
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* SleptThroughTheApocalypse

to:

* SleptThroughTheApocalypseSleptThroughTheApocalypse: One of the stories deals with a group of soldiers who were in suspended animation waking up hundreds of thousands of years after the human civilization collapsed, they encounter the precursors of raptor-like rodents and a group of feral humans.
This list shows the last 10 events of 25. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.Evolution