History Literature / Evolution

24th Sep '17 8:57:11 AM HTD
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* TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture: Baxter starts the novel 30 years into the future with civilisation at its apex, yet simultaneously threatened by the damage it has done to the ecosystem that supports it.



* AnachronicOrder: The second chapter is set eighty million years earlier than the first and third ones, during the Jurassic.

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* AnachronicOrder: The second chapter is set eighty million years earlier than Halfway throughout Purga's story in the first and third ones, during Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary, the book takes a side-trip to the ''Ornitholestes'' Listener, an intelligent dinosaur living in the depths of the Jurassic.



* ADogNamedDog: Three of the first protagonists of the story are a ''Purgatorius'' named Purga, a ''Plesiadapis'' named Plesi and a ''Notharctus'' named Noth.

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* CosmicHorrorStory: Baxter's explanation of how human civilisation ends emphasises that we are prey to powerful forces that we cannot control. The undoing of humanity is not nuclear war, global warming or a deadly virus grown in a laboratory, but an enormous super-volcano that disrupts the planet's weather systems enough to cause civilisation to collapse. Humans are no different from the millions of species that have come into being, thrived, then vanished into oblivion. In the eyes of Earth, we are a minor flash in the pan. In the eyes of the cosmos, we are less than a speck of dust. Look at those who have fallen before us; why should we fare any better? Are we really any different?
* ADogNamedDog: Three of the first protagonists of the story are a ''Purgatorius'' named Purga, a ''Plesiadapis'' named Plesi and a ''Notharctus'' named Noth. Of course none of these characters actually call themselves by names; they are more like convenient labels used by the story to refer to them.


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* FuturePrimitive: Millions of years from now, humanity's distant descendants have shed their intelligence and reverted to a simpler way of life.


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* HumanSacrifice: An invention of Mother to remove political dissidents, under the guise of bringing rain. Fortunately only two sacrificial victims are required before the rains come; she was quite prepared to work her way through the entire tribe.


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* NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished: A Neanderthal known as the Old Man looks after Jahna and her brother when they are cut off from a hunting party in a snowstorm. Does his hospitality result in gratitude, reconciliation with the skinnies? No, his generosity is rewarded by the children's father only with a brutal death.


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* RodentsOfUnusualSize: 30 millions after the end of civilisation, the rodent survivors of the crash have diversified into rat-cheetahs, rat-leopards and rat-raptors that hunt rabbit-gazelles and duck-billed goats.


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* SlaveRace: 31000 years ago, humans co-exist with the last Neanderthals, but despise them, calling them 'boneheads', treat them no better than vermin and have reduced them to pack-animals to haul their sleds.
23rd Sep '17 8:34:07 PM HTD
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* AfterTheEnd: Due to the timescale of the books, many chapters could qualify, but the Descendants section is the most obvious from a human perspective.



* AnachronicOrder: The second chapter is set eighty million years earlier than the first and third ones, during the Jurassic.



* AfterTheEnd: Due to the timescale of the books, many chapters could qualify, but the Descendants section is the most obvious from a human perspective.



** Another 3a happens to the intelligent dinosaurs from "The Hunters of Pangea". It may have been hastened by the decision of the protagonist to kill the matriarch of the diplodocus herd that they depend upon, but at that point she was aware that they were doomed.

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** Another 3a happens to the intelligent dinosaurs from "The Hunters of Pangea".Pangaea". It may have been hastened by the decision of the protagonist to kill the matriarch of the diplodocus herd that they depend upon, but at that point she was aware that they were doomed.



* ArtisticLicensePaleontology:
** While most of the time Baxter gets the science right, and the speculative leaps he takes are somewhat within the bounds of plausibility, a few examples must be mentioned. First of all, in the story about the sapient ''Ornitholestes'', he mentions that the only evidence humans had of these species is the disappearance of sauropods in the Late Jurassic, since the sapient species' bones and technology are too fragile to preserve. Problem is, sauropods didn't go extinct in the Late Jurassic, not even in the Northern Hemisphere. There were as many sauropods infesting North America in the Early Cretaceous as there were in the Late Jurassic, including ''Astrodon'', ''Sauroposeidon'', and ''Sonorasaurus''. However, there ''was'' a mass extinction at the end of the Jurassic that claimed the dominant Jurassic sauropods, and the sauropods referred to in that story were all ''Diplodocus'', which did go extinct then. The phrase was 'the disappearance of ''the'' giant sauropods'. It could easily have meant just those specific species, not sauropods in general.
** The story about primates coming to North America has some anachronism and MisplacedWildlife in it too. Not only does it have indricotherid rhinos (native only to Asia), camels (who were only found in North America at this time), and such, it has gastornid birds inhabiting Oligocene-Miocene Africa...yes, even after these animals were supposed to have died out in the middle Eocene.

to:

* ArtisticLicensePaleontology:
**
ArtisticLicensePaleontology: While most of the time Baxter gets the science right, and the speculative leaps he takes are somewhat within the bounds of plausibility, a few examples must be mentioned. mentioned.
**
First of all, in the story about the sapient ''Ornitholestes'', he mentions that the only evidence humans had of these species is the disappearance of sauropods in the Late Jurassic, since the sapient species' bones and technology are too fragile to preserve. Problem is, sauropods didn't go extinct in the Late Jurassic, not even in the Northern Hemisphere. There were as many sauropods infesting North America in the Early Cretaceous as there were in the Late Jurassic, including ''Astrodon'', ''Sauroposeidon'', and ''Sonorasaurus''. However, there ''was'' a mass extinction at the end of the Jurassic that claimed the dominant Jurassic sauropods, and the sauropods referred to in that story were all ''Diplodocus'', which did go extinct then. The phrase was 'the disappearance of ''the'' giant sauropods'. It could easily have meant just those specific species, not sauropods in general.
** The story about primates coming to North South America has some anachronism and MisplacedWildlife in it too. Not only does it have indricotherid rhinos (native only to Asia), camels (who were only found in North America at this time), and such, it has gastornid birds inhabiting Oligocene-Miocene Africa...yes, even after these animals were supposed to have died out in the middle Eocene.



* CorruptChurch: Religion is depicted as the creation of a manipulative woman wielding her dead son's memory as a weapon in a bid to gain political power.
** On the other hand, religion is shown to have also a positive impact on the tribe since its teachings improve the quality of life of its members and bring unity to them.

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* CorruptChurch: Religion is depicted as the creation of a manipulative woman wielding her dead son's memory as a weapon in a bid to gain political power.
**
power. On the other hand, religion is shown to have also a positive impact on the tribe since its teachings improve the quality of life of its members and bring unity to them.them.
* ADogNamedDog: Three of the first protagonists of the story are a ''Purgatorius'' named Purga, a ''Plesiadapis'' named Plesi and a ''Notharctus'' named Noth.



* GiantFlyer: The air whale, a giant pterosaurs that lives in the stratosphere and leaves no fossil evidence behind.

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* GiantFlyer: The air whale, a giant pterosaurs pterosaur with a 100-metre wingspan that lives in the stratosphere and leaves no fossil evidence behind.behind.
* GroinAttack: Solo bites off a testicle from the ''Notharctus'' troopís alpha male, the Emperor. Fortunately they seem have much a lower pain threshold in that particular part of their anatomy than humans.



* NoPartyLikeADonnerParty: During their unintended journey from Africa to South America, the hungry anthros are forced to eat their own dead so the living won't starve to death.



* QuestToTheWest: "The Crossing". A group of monkeys are swept out from the Congo River to the Atlantic by a flash flood. They survive the immediate peril by clinging to a raft of matted vegetation, but then have to endure weeks of thirst and starvation, during which many of them die. At length, the raft drifts ashore and the survivors find themselves in South America, becoming the progenitors of the New World monkeys that live there to this day.



* TheRemnant: "The Last Burrow" depicts the Antarctica ecosystem 55 million years after the Cretaceous impact, where small lemming-like primates compete with the last non-avian dinosaurs which survived the Cretaceous impact, including the descendants of ''Muttaburrasaurus'', ''Leaellynasaura'' and ''Allosaurus'', with a ''Koolasuchus'' thrown in somewhere.
* SceneryGorn: After many vivid descriptions of the world of the dinosaurs, both in the late Jurassic and the late Cretaceous, the destruction of that world is described just as vividly.



* SceneryGorn: After many vivid descriptions of the world of the dinosaurs, both in the late Jurassic and the late Cretaceous, the destruction of that world is described just as vividly.
3rd Nov '15 10:01:27 AM Theriocephalus
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** While most of the time Baxter gets the science right, and the speculative leaps he takes are somewhat within the bounds of plausibility, a few examples must be mentioned. First of all, in the story about the sapient ''Ornitholestes'', he mentions that the only evidence humans had of these species is the disappearance of sauropods in the Late Jurassic, since the sapient species bones and technology are too fragile to preserve. Problem is, sauropods didn't go extinct in the Late Jurassic, not even in the Northern Hemisphere. There were as many sauropods infesting North America in the Early Cretaceous as there were in the Late Jurassic, including ''Astrodon'', ''Sauroposeidon'', and ''Sonorasaurus''.
** However there was a mass-extinction at the end of the Jurassic that claimed the dominant Jurassic sauropods, and the sauropods referred to in that story were all ''Diplodocus'', which did go extinct then. The phrase was 'the disappearance of ''the'' giant sauropods'. This could easily have meant just those specific species, not sauropods in general.

to:

** While most of the time Baxter gets the science right, and the speculative leaps he takes are somewhat within the bounds of plausibility, a few examples must be mentioned. First of all, in the story about the sapient ''Ornitholestes'', he mentions that the only evidence humans had of these species is the disappearance of sauropods in the Late Jurassic, since the sapient species species' bones and technology are too fragile to preserve. Problem is, sauropods didn't go extinct in the Late Jurassic, not even in the Northern Hemisphere. There were as many sauropods infesting North America in the Early Cretaceous as there were in the Late Jurassic, including ''Astrodon'', ''Sauroposeidon'', and ''Sonorasaurus''.
** However
''Sonorasaurus''. However, there was ''was'' a mass-extinction mass extinction at the end of the Jurassic that claimed the dominant Jurassic sauropods, and the sauropods referred to in that story were all ''Diplodocus'', which did go extinct then. The phrase was 'the disappearance of ''the'' giant sauropods'. This It could easily have meant just those specific species, not sauropods in general.
3rd Nov '15 9:58:29 AM Theriocephalus
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''Evolution'' is a novel by Creator/StephenBaxter spanning 645 million years of Earth's history, with most chapters focusing on 65 million years ago to 30 million years in the future. The book is split into three parts: Ancestors, which focuses on various director ancestors to humans, starting with a ratlike animal that coexisted with the dinosaurs, Humans, which depicts various turning in human development, and Descendants, which is set AfterTheEnd.

to:

''Evolution'' is a novel by Creator/StephenBaxter spanning 645 million years of Earth's history, with most chapters focusing on 65 million years ago to 30 million years in the future. The book is split into three parts: Ancestors, which focuses on various director ancestors to humans, starting with a ratlike animal that coexisted with the dinosaurs, dinosaurs; Humans, which depicts various turning in human development, development; and Descendants, which is set AfterTheEnd.
3rd Aug '15 3:24:36 PM ScorpiusOB1
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* ArtisticLicenseAstronomy: While it's true the Sun gets brighter with time and that increasing brightness will mess so much with Earth's climate that will cause the eventual extinction of life and loss of oceans much before it goes into red giant mode, the Sun that will shine 500 million years in the future, when the last chapter of the book takes place, will not be very different of the current one in size and luminosity and not the ferocious one Baxter describes, at least if stellar evolution models are right. See [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Solar_evolution_%28English%29.svg]]

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* ArtisticLicenseAstronomy: While it's true the Sun gets brighter more luminous with time and that increasing brightness luminosity will mess so much with Earth's climate that will cause the eventual extinction of life and loss of oceans much before it goes into red giant red-giant mode, the Sun that will shine 500 million years in the future, when the last chapter of the book takes place, will not be very different of the current one in size and luminosity and not the ferocious one Baxter describes, at least if stellar evolution models are right. See [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Solar_evolution_%28English%29.svg]]
1st Apr '15 9:32:35 PM Kalaong
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''Evolution'' is a novel by StephenBaxter spanning 645 million years of Earth's history, with most chapters focusing on 65 million years ago to 30 million years in the future. The book is split into three parts: Ancestors, which focuses on various director ancestors to humans, starting with a ratlike animal that coexisted with the dinosaurs, Humans, which depicts various turning in human development, and Descendants, which is set AfterTheEnd.

to:

''Evolution'' is a novel by StephenBaxter Creator/StephenBaxter spanning 645 million years of Earth's history, with most chapters focusing on 65 million years ago to 30 million years in the future. The book is split into three parts: Ancestors, which focuses on various director ancestors to humans, starting with a ratlike animal that coexisted with the dinosaurs, Humans, which depicts various turning in human development, and Descendants, which is set AfterTheEnd.
28th Aug '14 1:59:01 PM ScorpiusOB1
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* ArtisticLicenseAstronomy: While it's true the Sun gets brighter with time and that increasing brightness will mess so much with Earth's climate that will cause the eventual extinction of life and loss of oceans much before it goes red giant the Sun that will shine 500 million years in the future will not be very different of the current one in size and luminosity and not the ferocious one Baxter describes, at least if stellar evolution models are right. See [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Solar_evolution_%28English%29.svg]]

to:

* ArtisticLicenseAstronomy: While it's true the Sun gets brighter with time and that increasing brightness will mess so much with Earth's climate that will cause the eventual extinction of life and loss of oceans much before it goes into red giant mode, the Sun that will shine 500 million years in the future future, when the last chapter of the book takes place, will not be very different of the current one in size and luminosity and not the ferocious one Baxter describes, at least if stellar evolution models are right. See [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Solar_evolution_%28English%29.svg]]
28th Aug '14 1:55:23 PM ScorpiusOB1
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* ArtisticLicenseAstronomy: While it's true the Sun gets brighter with time and that increasing brightness will mess so much with Earth's climate that will cause the eventual extinction of life and loss of oceans, far before it goes red giant, the Sun that will shine 500 million years in the future will not very different of the current one in size and luminosity, not the ferocious one Baxter describes. See [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Solar_evolution_%28English%29.svg]]

to:

* ArtisticLicenseAstronomy: While it's true the Sun gets brighter with time and that increasing brightness will mess so much with Earth's climate that will cause the eventual extinction of life and loss of oceans, far oceans much before it goes red giant, giant the Sun that will shine 500 million years in the future will not be very different of the current one in size and luminosity, luminosity and not the ferocious one Baxter describes.describes, at least if stellar evolution models are right. See [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Solar_evolution_%28English%29.svg]]
28th Aug '14 1:53:23 PM ScorpiusOB1
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* ArtisticLicenseAstronomy: While it's true the Sun gets brighter with time and that increasing brightness will mess so much with Earth's climate that will cause the eventual extinction of life and loss of oceans, far before it goes red giant, the Sun that will shine 500 million years in the future will not very different of the current one in size and luminosity, not the ferocious one Baxter describes. See [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Solar_evolution_%28English%29.svg]]



* Ragnarok-Proofing: averted. Very little remains of human civilization except fossils and some very durable structures such as a cave or a gorge excavated to build a road.

to:

* Ragnarok-Proofing: RagnarokProofing: averted. Very little remains of human civilization except fossils and some very durable structures such as a an artificial cave or a gorge excavated to build a road.
28th Aug '14 1:32:36 PM ScorpiusOB1
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Added DiffLines:

* Ragnarok-Proofing: averted. Very little remains of human civilization except fossils and some very durable structures such as a cave or a gorge excavated to build a road.
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