History Literature / DiscWorld

22nd Jun '17 7:47:20 PM PaulA
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** ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'' has a magical storm which includes a rain of sardines, in tins.
** Constable Visit tells of the Murmurians, who were saved from starvation by a magical rain of elephants.
--->"Elephants?"
--->"Well, one elephant, sir," Visit conceded. "But it splashed."



** It's been tried several times in Ankh-Morpork's past. The two standard results are: A) The invaders find themselves leaving the city several days later with confused expressions, armloads of tacky souveniers, and suspiciously light wallets, or B) The city gains a new ethnic neighborhood and, eventually, some really interesting restaurants.

to:

** It's been tried several times in Ankh-Morpork's past. The two standard results are: A) The invaders find themselves leaving the city several days later with confused expressions, armloads of tacky souveniers, souvenirs, and suspiciously light wallets, or B) The city gains a new ethnic neighborhood and, eventually, some really interesting restaurants.



* RealDreamsAreWeirder: A stock joke, appearing in ''Discworld/{{Hogfather}}'', ''Discworld/{{Eric}}'', and ''Discworld/SmallGods'' at least.
* RecruitersAlwaysLie: Touched upon anytime armed forces jobs come up, most obviously in ''Monstrous Regiment'' where one of the markers that the war is going so poorly is that the recruiting party can't even be bothered to try.



* RedHerring: Pratchett uses this trope a LOT. You see it at least once in every Watch book, and in some of the others as well.
* ReferenceOverdosed
* ResurrectiveImmortality: Vampires can be killed in a number of different ways, but will always regenerate when they eventually come into contact with blood. Werewolves have a lesser degree of the same quality, provided their death didn't involve [[SilverHasMysticPowers silver weapons]] or [[KillItWithFire a lot of flame and, presumably, howling.]]

to:

* %%* RedHerring: Pratchett uses this trope a LOT. You see it at least once in every Watch book, and in some of the others as well.
* %%* ReferenceOverdosed
* ResurrectiveImmortality: ResurrectiveImmortality:
**
Vampires can be killed in a number of different ways, but will always regenerate when they eventually come into contact with blood. blood.
**
Werewolves have a lesser degree of the same quality, provided their death didn't involve [[SilverHasMysticPowers silver weapons]] or [[KillItWithFire a lot of flame and, presumably, howling.]]



* RunningGag: "Tiffany Aching was Aching all over", among lots of others.
** Including aside references to Leonard of Quirm's painting of the [[MonaLisaSmile "Mona Ogg"]], whose [[CheshireCatGrin teeth]] follow you around the room.

to:

* RunningGag: RunningGag:
**
"Tiffany Aching was Aching all over", among lots of others.
over".
** Including aside references References to Leonard of Quirm's painting of the [[MonaLisaSmile "Mona Ogg"]], whose [[CheshireCatGrin teeth]] follow you around the room.



* SandIsWater:
** The Dehydrated Ocean. Technically not sand but a fourth state of water that occurs in a high density magical field.
** In ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'', a D'reg refers to ships as a camel of the water.
** In ''Discworld/TheLastContinent'', set in [=EcksEcksEcksEcks=] where it ''never'' rains, the capital city of Bugarup has an annual regatta; the "boats" are on wheels because the riverbed is always dry, and always has been.
* SanityBall: Let's just say there are only a few bouncing around.
* SavingTheWorldWithArt: Generally in the form of music, which can sway a court or preserve the entire universe.

to:

* SandIsWater:
**
SandIsWater: The Dehydrated Ocean. Technically not sand but a fourth state of water that occurs in a high density magical field.
** In ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'', a D'reg refers to ships as a camel of the water.
** In ''Discworld/TheLastContinent'', set in [=EcksEcksEcksEcks=] where it ''never'' rains, the capital city of Bugarup has an annual regatta; the "boats" are on wheels because the riverbed is always dry, and always has been.
*
%%* SanityBall: Let's just say there are only a few bouncing around.
* %%* SavingTheWorldWithArt: Generally in the form of music, which can sway a court or preserve the entire universe.



* SelfProclaimedLiar: Casanunda.

to:

* SelfProclaimedLiar: Casanunda.Casanunda's business card lists, among his other talents, "Outrageous Liar".



* SeriouslyScruffy: Samuel Vimes prefers to conform to this trope, although his wife is quite insistent that he maintain appearances after he marries her. One of his monologues even notes his disgust at a palace guard's sword, since it didn't show any nicks and dents and clearly never saw any use (as opposed to a well maintained sword which still showed wear and tear). Lord Vetinari is a downplayed example, since he dresses in plain black clothes to avoid having to worry about his appearance in the first place.
* ShamefulStrip: Inflicted on captured soldiers in both ''Jingo'' and ''Monstrous Regiment''.
* SheepInSheepsClothing: The Disc has a few examples.

to:

* SeriouslyScruffy: SeriouslyScruffy:
**
Samuel Vimes prefers to conform to this trope, although his wife is quite insistent that he maintain appearances after he marries her. One of his monologues even notes his disgust at a palace guard's sword, since it didn't show any nicks and dents and clearly never saw any use (as opposed to a well maintained sword which still showed wear and tear). tear).
**
Lord Vetinari is a downplayed example, since he dresses in plain black clothes to avoid having to worry about his appearance in the first place.
* ShamefulStrip: Inflicted on captured soldiers in both ''Jingo'' and ''Monstrous Regiment''.
* SheepInSheepsClothing: The Disc has a few examples.
SheepInSheepsClothing:



* SlasherSmile: Carcer. Mr Teatime. Vimes. The werewolves in {{Uberwald}}. Death (by dint of having no other option).

to:

* SlasherSmile: Carcer. Mr Teatime. Vimes. SlasherSmile:
** Vimes.
**
The werewolves in {{Uberwald}}. {{Uberwald}}.
**
Death (by dint of having no other option).



* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism: Played with. The tone of the books and most of the characters are definitely on the cynical side -- the idealistic ones tend to be portrayed as naive, dumb, or [[ObfuscatingStupidity putting up a front]]. However, the universe itself is idealistic: the good guys do triumph, almost always in a BigDamnHeroes way. This is explicitly due to [[TheoryOfNarrativeCausality narrativium]].
** In fact, a big thing amongst all of the Discworld heroes is that they use cynical means to achieve idealistic ends.

to:

* SlidingScaleOfIdealismVersusCynicism: Played with. The tone of the books and most of the characters are definitely on the cynical side -- the idealistic ones tend to be portrayed as naive, dumb, or [[ObfuscatingStupidity putting up a front]]. However, the universe itself is idealistic: the good guys do triumph, almost always in a BigDamnHeroes way. This is explicitly due to [[TheoryOfNarrativeCausality narrativium]].
**
narrativium]]. In fact, a big thing amongst all of the Discworld heroes is that they use cynical means to achieve idealistic ends.



* SocietyOnEdgeEpisode
** ''Discworld/TheColourOfMagic'' has this as an EstablishingCharacterMoment for [[HumansAreBastards Ankh-Morporkians as a whole]]: a fire started in the rougher part of town soon spreads. Rich citizens are soon selfishly [[KickTheDog hacking down the bridges that span the river]] so the panicking crowds won't be able to invade.
** ''Discworld/TheLightFantastic'': A large part of the plot is caused by a very bright, malevolently red star appearing in the sky, and this drives the inhabitants of the Disc to start doomsday cults (''Death himself'' finds them creepy).
** ''Discworld/TheLastHero'' finds the Disc endangered once again, thanks to Cohen the Barbarian's RageAgainstTheHeavens. Unlike the previous examples, Ankh-Morpork's powers-that-be manage to keep the peace and work together to confront the problem.



* SpontaneousCrowdFormation: This is often called the official pastime of Ankh-Morpork. No matter what the citizenry are doing, if something interesting is going on, they '''will''' stop to watch it. As you might imagine, tends to transform into a FreelanceShameSquad regularly.
* SpotlightStealingSquad: According to WordOfGod, any book set in Ankh-Morpork will eventually morph into a City Watch novel, no matter what the original plan -- which is presumably why so many of the later Wizards books involve them travelling away from the city. Moist von Lipwig was created specifically to counter this effect, since it's in his interests to avoid the Watch wherever possible, but even ''Discworld/RaisingSteam'' falls victim to this, with Moist and Vimes essentially dual leads.

to:

* SpontaneousCrowdFormation: This is often called the official pastime of Ankh-Morpork. No matter what the citizenry are doing, if something interesting is going on, they '''will''' stop to watch it. As you might imagine, tends to transform into a FreelanceShameSquad TheFreelanceShameSquad regularly.
* SpotlightStealingSquad: SpotlightStealingSquad:
**
According to WordOfGod, any book set in Ankh-Morpork will eventually morph into a City Watch novel, no matter what the original plan -- which is presumably why so many of the later Wizards books involve them travelling away from the city. Moist von Lipwig was created specifically to counter this effect, since it's in his interests to avoid the Watch wherever possible, but even ''Discworld/RaisingSteam'' falls victim to this, with Moist and Vimes essentially dual leads.leads.
** A similar situation obtains with Granny Weatherwax and the Ramtops, which is why the witch protagonist of ''The Wee Free Men'' lives in a previously-undepicted part of the Disc instead of the region where most of the Disc's witches are found -- she needed to live far enough from Granny that she had a chance to save the day herself before Granny arrived to take over.



** This is an attack strategy for Hamnpork's band of uplifted rats, and a strategy ('attack' goes without saying!) for the Nac Mac Feegle.

to:

** This is an attack strategy for Hamnpork's band of uplifted rats, and a strategy ('attack' goes without saying!) for the Nac Mac Feegle.



* StableTimeLoop: A couple passages imply the ''entire universe'' is one. In ''Eric'', Death watches the final end of the universe and is about to hang up his scythe when he notices matter spontaneously popping into existence and has a HereWeGoAgain realization. Also, at the end of ''Reaper Man'', Azrael comments "I REMEMBER WHEN ALL THIS WILL BE AGAIN."
** This appears to be an article of faith with the golems, or at least the oldest golem, Anghammarad. He failed in his mission to deliver a message several thousand years ago. Being immortal and nigh-indestructible, he resolves to wait for the universe to reboot and do it right the second time around.
* StopWorshippingMe:
** The Lady. One of the few examples of this trope in a universe where GodsNeedPrayerBadly. Explained by the fact that everyone believes in luck, even if no one worships it.
*** There is a passing mention of an attempt by a group of gamblers to worship The Lady. They all died in a series of sudden, improbable events.
** The Duchess from ''Discworld/MonstrousRegiment''. All the prayers to her treat her like a goddess, but as much as she wants to help she's only a deceased woman, powerless to do anything, and she just wants to be let off the hook.
** The Oh God of Hangovers doesn't seem too happy that he was created due to prayers from hungover people until his hangover gets sent to the god of wine instead of him.
* SubvertedTrope: One of the major themes of the series. Not only for jokes, but people and situations often go in unexpected directions.

to:

* StableTimeLoop: A couple passages imply the ''entire universe'' is one. In ''Eric'', Death watches the final end of the universe and is about to hang up his scythe when he notices matter spontaneously popping into existence and has a HereWeGoAgain realization. Also, at the end of ''Reaper Man'', Azrael comments "I REMEMBER WHEN ALL THIS WILL BE AGAIN."
** This appears to be an article of faith with the golems, or at least the oldest golem, Anghammarad. He failed in his mission to deliver a message several thousand years ago. Being immortal and nigh-indestructible, he resolves to wait for the universe to reboot and do it right the second time around.
* StopWorshippingMe:
**
StopWorshippingMe: The Lady. One of the few examples of this trope in a universe where GodsNeedPrayerBadly. Explained by the fact that everyone believes in luck, even if no one worships it.
***
it. There is a passing mention of an attempt by a group of gamblers to worship The Lady. They all died in a series of sudden, improbable events.
** The Duchess from ''Discworld/MonstrousRegiment''. All the prayers to her treat her like a goddess, but as much as she wants to help she's only a deceased woman, powerless to do anything, and she just wants to be let off the hook.
** The Oh God of Hangovers doesn't seem too happy that he was created due to prayers from hungover people until his hangover gets sent to the god of wine instead of him.
*
%%* SubvertedTrope: One of the major themes of the series. Not only for jokes, but people and situations often go in unexpected directions.



* TalkingAnimal: Usually due to the magical equivalent of radioactive waste.
** Notable examples include Gaspode the wonder dog, the eponymous Amazing Maurice, and the puntastically named Quoth the raven.
* ThinDimensionalBarrier: There are "thin places" where other realities brush up against the Disc. One is contained by The Dancers, a CircleOfStandingStones saturated with [[ColdIron meteoric iron]], and causes no end of trouble in ''Discworld/LordsAndLadies'' when TheFairFolk start escaping it.
* ThoseTwoBadGuys: Mr. Tulip and Mr. Pin, out of ''Discworld/TheTruth,'' are fairly archetypal examples.

to:

* TalkingAnimal: Usually due to the magical equivalent of radioactive waste.
** Notable examples
waste. Examples that appear in multiple books include Gaspode the wonder dog, the eponymous Amazing Maurice, Wonder Dog and the puntastically named Quoth the raven.
* ThinDimensionalBarrier: There are "thin places" where other realities brush up against the Disc. One is contained by The Dancers, a CircleOfStandingStones saturated with [[ColdIron meteoric iron]], and causes no end of trouble in ''Discworld/LordsAndLadies'' when TheFairFolk start escaping it.
* ThoseTwoBadGuys: Mr. Tulip and Mr. Pin, out of ''Discworld/TheTruth,'' are fairly archetypal examples.
raven.



* TitleDrop: Several of the books contain their title phrases at least once.
* TooDumbToFool: Vimes describes [[OurTrollsAreDifferent Detritus]] as this in ''Discworld/FeetOfClay'', almost word for word.
** Brought up in ''Discworld/MakingMoney'' when Vimes sends troll guards to the bank. Moist comments that they're not too smart, but you can't talk them over to your side either.
** Also Fred Colon, acting in his role as cell warden. He's stupid, but he's not an idiot. He keeps the keys in a tin box in the bottom drawer of his desk. He also ends up wandering into investigating the key to one of the mysteries in ''Thud''.
*** Due to this, Colon is one of the few people Lord Vetinari finds hard to deal with. Vetinari is so used to dealing with people who treat words as a form of warfare that virtually ''everything'' he says carries multiple connotations, implications, innuendo, traps, and suggestions. All of which reach escape velocity over Colon's head, making him nigh invulnerable to being played, tricked, warned, or helped.
* TooDumbToLive
** To the degree that the Watch in Ankh-Morpork now consider entering the Mended Drum and calling yourself "Vincent the Invulnerable" a form of suicide. Needless to say, there are quite a few means of committing suicide in the city. Many of them involve typical Ankh-Morporkian stupidity and {{Berserk Button}}s, or just entering [[WrongSideOfTheTracks the Shades.]]
** Some soldiers come ''very'' close to this after being ordered to dig up the burial mound home of the local Nac Mac Feegle tribe in ''I Shall Wear Midnight''. Only the timely intervention of Tiffany Aching prevents a massacre...

to:

* %%* TitleDrop: Several of the books contain their title phrases at least once.
* TooDumbToFool: TooDumbToFool:
** Trolls in general.
Vimes describes [[OurTrollsAreDifferent Detritus]] as this in ''Discworld/FeetOfClay'', almost word for word.
** Brought up in
word. In ''Discworld/MakingMoney'' when Vimes sends troll guards to the bank. bank, Moist comments that they're not too smart, but you can't talk them over to your side either.
** Also Fred Colon, acting in his role as cell warden. He's stupid, but he's not an idiot. He keeps the keys in a tin box in the bottom drawer of his desk. He also ends up wandering into investigating the key to one of the mysteries in ''Thud''.
***
''Thud''. Due to this, Colon is one of the few people Lord Vetinari finds hard to deal with. Vetinari is so used to dealing with people who treat words as a form of warfare that virtually ''everything'' he says carries multiple connotations, implications, innuendo, traps, and suggestions. All of which reach escape velocity over Colon's head, making him nigh invulnerable to being played, tricked, warned, or helped.
* TooDumbToLive
**
TooDumbToLive: To the degree that the Watch in Ankh-Morpork now consider entering the Mended Drum and calling yourself "Vincent the Invulnerable" a form of suicide. Needless to say, there are quite a few means of committing suicide in the city. Many of them involve typical Ankh-Morporkian stupidity and {{Berserk Button}}s, or just entering [[WrongSideOfTheTracks the Shades.]]
** Some soldiers come ''very'' close to this after being ordered to dig up the burial mound home of the local Nac Mac Feegle tribe in ''I Shall Wear Midnight''. Only the timely intervention of Tiffany Aching prevents a massacre...
]]



* TrademarkFavouriteFood: Some of the characters have this:

to:

* TrademarkFavouriteFood: Some of the characters have this:TrademarkFavouriteFood:



* TropeOverdosed: So very, very much.
* {{Troperiffic}}: Most likely ''the'' best example on the entire site.

to:

* %%* TropeOverdosed: So very, very much.
* %%* {{Troperiffic}}: Most likely ''the'' best example on the entire site.



* TrueSight: Wizards and witches can see what's really there, on account of them having no WeirdnessCensor. Susan also teaches this in her class in ''Discworld/ThiefOfTime''.

to:

* TrueSight: TrueSight:
**
Wizards and witches can see what's really there, on account of them having no WeirdnessCensor. Susan also teaches this in her class in ''Discworld/ThiefOfTime''.WeirdnessCensor.



* TWordEuphemism: Lots, from the vampires' refrain of "the B-vord", Mr. Tulip's repeated use of "---ing", [[Creator/EdgarAllanPoe Quoth the Raven]]'s "N-word"[[note]] er, that's 'nevermore' and not the OTHER n-word. [[/note]].
** The K-word, the L-word, the T-word, ''both'' S-words, the V-word and the Y-word.
*** "Murdering conniving bastard of a weasel" is acceptable, however.

to:

* TWordEuphemism: Lots, from the TWordEuphemism:
** The reformed
vampires' refrain of "the B-vord", Mr. Tulip's repeated use of "---ing", B-vord".
**
[[Creator/EdgarAllanPoe Quoth the Raven]]'s refusal to use the "N-word"[[note]] er, that's 'nevermore' and not the OTHER n-word. [[/note]].
** The K-word, the L-word, the T-word, ''both'' S-words, the V-word and the Y-word.
*** "Murdering conniving bastard of a weasel" is acceptable, however.
[[/note]].
22nd Jun '17 1:11:28 AM PaulA
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* MicroMonarchy: Lancre, in the Ramtop Mountain, and some of its neighboring kingdoms which are even smaller. Just about every flat spot in the Ramtops (of which there are precious few) is a kingdom. This has led to generational wars over getting hold of somewhere to store the coal.

to:

* MicroMonarchy: Lancre, in the Ramtop Mountain, Mountains, and some of its neighboring kingdoms which are even smaller. Just about every flat spot in the Ramtops (of which there are precious few) is a kingdom. This has led to generational wars over getting hold of somewhere to store the coal.
22nd Jun '17 1:10:49 AM PaulA
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* MadeOfPhlebotinum: This '{{verse}} can seem ordinary enough at first glance, until it's pointed out that, without heavy duty magic involved, a flat world on the back of a giant turtle that swims through space should be utterly impossible.
** The magic is so thick that it ''slows down light'' to create timezones on the Disc. Magic-heavy areas also completely and utterly play with the laws of physics, making the entire world plausible.
** In one passage in ''Jingo'', the narrative recounts the winds of change literally blowing through the city, and the various weather-cocks turning to follow it. Except the one on the wizards' tower, which is running slow and doesn't show the change for twenty minutes.
** In ''The Last Hero'' it is stated that if Cohen is successful in his plan to return fire to the gods (with ''interest'') it will disrupt all magic on the Disc for two years. When someone suggests that they can get by without magic, Ponder Stibbons replies that without magic the seas will run dry, sun crash into the Disc, etc etc. And this will not take place over two years, but within a few ''minutes''. Magic isn't just coloured lights, it holds the Disc together.
* MagicAIsMagicA: As Moist von Lipwig observes in ''Discworld/GoingPostal'', the eventual cost of doing everything by magic (magic having a very steep bill even for little things) is the reason that life on the Disc evolved {{steampunk}} technologies for the advancement of society, rather than FunctionalMagic.
** Whenever there needs to be a reason why the large number of highly skilled wizards of Unseen University cannot counter a problem with magic, one of the standard limitations is that it takes precisely the same amount of work (in the physics sense) to do something by magic as by any other means, and all the other mundane limitations (like action-reaction) as well. The result is that a wizard trying to pick a lock by magic expends most of his effort to keep his brain from squirting out of his ears.
*** Moreso flying without aides (ie, a carpet or broomstick) is theoretically impossible for the same reason, although knocking a big weight off a high place and going up when it goes down is possible.

to:

* MadeOfPhlebotinum: This '{{verse}} can seem ordinary enough at first glance, until it's pointed out that, without heavy duty magic involved, a flat world on the back of a giant turtle that swims through space should be utterly impossible.
**
impossible. The magic is so thick that it ''slows down light'' to create timezones on the Disc. Magic-heavy areas also completely and utterly play with the laws of physics, making the entire world plausible.
** In one passage in ''Jingo'', the narrative recounts the winds of change literally blowing through the city, and the various weather-cocks turning to follow it. Except the one on the wizards' tower, which is running slow and doesn't show the change for twenty minutes.
**
plausible. In ''The Last Hero'' it is stated that if Cohen is successful in his plan to return fire to the gods (with ''interest'') it will disrupt all magic on the Disc for two years. When someone suggests that they can get by without magic, Ponder Stibbons replies that without magic the seas will run dry, sun crash into the Disc, etc etc. And this will not take place over two years, but within a few ''minutes''. Magic isn't just coloured lights, it holds the Disc together.
* MagicAIsMagicA: As Moist von Lipwig observes in ''Discworld/GoingPostal'', the eventual cost of doing everything by magic (magic having a very steep bill even for little things) is the reason that life on the Disc evolved {{steampunk}} technologies for the advancement of society, rather than FunctionalMagic.
**
FunctionalMagic. Whenever there needs to be a reason why the large number of highly skilled wizards of Unseen University cannot counter a problem with magic, one of the standard limitations is that it takes precisely the same amount of work (in the physics sense) to do something by magic as by any other means, and all the other mundane limitations (like action-reaction) as well. The result is that a wizard trying to pick a lock by magic expends most of his effort to keep his brain from squirting out of his ears.
*** Moreso
ears. Moreover flying without aides aids (ie, a carpet or broomstick) is theoretically impossible for the same reason, although knocking a big weight off a high place and going up when it goes down is possible.



* MagicalLibrary: The library of Unseen University leads to other dimensions thanks to the sheer weight of accumulated knowledge distorting the space-time continuum. This is known as L-Space. The library itself is pretty much a universe of its own with all the magical books, library creatures such as the [[GrammarNazi thesaurus]] and lost tribes of research students inside.
** One of the more disturbing features of the Library is the way the dome of the Library is always overhead, no matter how far you seem to move on the floor in any direction. This is compounded by the fact that shelves of books, and occasional people among the shelves of books, are also clearly visible on the ceiling around the dome.

to:

* MagicalLibrary: The library of Unseen University leads to other dimensions thanks to the sheer weight of accumulated knowledge distorting the space-time continuum. This is known as L-Space. The library itself is pretty much a universe of its own with all the magical books, library creatures such as the [[GrammarNazi thesaurus]] and lost tribes of research students inside.
**
inside. One of the more disturbing features of the Library is the way the dome of the Library is always overhead, no matter how far you seem to move on the floor in any direction. This is compounded by the fact that shelves of books, and occasional people among the shelves of books, are also clearly visible on the ceiling around the dome.



* {{Magitek}}: Due to his job before writing, Pratchett likes to compare magic to nuclear physics, hence the High Energy Magic Building and Ponder's staff talking of splitting the thaum. And then there's... [[MagicalComputer Hex]].
** Known flavours of the thaum are: up, down, sideways, sex appeal and peppermint.[[note]]This is a ShoutOut to the somewhat fanciful names of the six "flavours" of quark in the Standard Model: up, down, charm, strange, top, and bottom.[[/note]]

to:

* {{Magitek}}: {{Magitek}}:
**
Due to his job before writing, Pratchett likes to compare magic to nuclear physics, hence the High Energy Magic Building and Ponder's staff talking of splitting the thaum. And then there's... [[MagicalComputer Hex]].
**
Known flavours of the thaum are: up, down, sideways, sex appeal and peppermint.[[note]]This is a ShoutOut to the somewhat fanciful names of the six "flavours" of quark in the Standard Model: up, down, charm, strange, top, and bottom.[[/note]][[/note]]
** And then there's... [[MagicalComputer Hex]].



* MeatgrinderSurgery: Standard medical practice in Ankh-Morpork is hitting the patient over the head with a hammer. The only real doctor in the city is seen as crazy; when Vetinari is poisoned in ''Feet Of Clay'', Vimes calls in a ''horse vet'' to treat him, because many of Doughnut Jimmy's patients survive.
** When asked how good a doctor Doughnut Jimmy is, Vimes mentions that a horse he had treated just before a race didn't fall over until the last furlong. When someone says that doesn't seem very good, Vimes points out that what the horse was treated for was dropping dead on the way to the starting gate.

to:

* MeatgrinderSurgery: MeatgrinderSurgery:
**
Standard medical practice in Ankh-Morpork is hitting the patient over the head with a hammer. The only real doctor in the city is seen as crazy; when Vetinari is poisoned in ''Feet Of Clay'', Vimes calls in a ''horse vet'' to treat him, because many of Doughnut Jimmy's patients survive.
** When asked how good a doctor Doughnut Jimmy is, Vimes mentions that a horse he had treated just before a race didn't fall over until the last furlong. When someone says that doesn't seem very good, Vimes points out that what the horse was treated for was dropping dead on the way to the starting gate.
survive.



* MenCantKeepHouse: Suggested several times to be the case with the City Watch, particularly the canteen. The arrival of female Watchmen didn't seem to have any effect.

to:

* MenCantKeepHouse: MenCantKeepHouse:
**
Suggested several times to be the case with the City Watch, particularly the canteen. The arrival of female Watchmen didn't seem to have any effect.



* MicroMonarchy: Lancre, and some of its neighboring kingdoms which are even smaller.
** Just about every flat spot in the Ramtops (of which there are precious few) is a kingdom. This has led to generational wars over getting hold of somewhere to store the coal.
* MillionToOneChance: Invoked whenever someone needs a long shot to happen. Most notable in ''Discworld/GuardsGuards'', where the Watch is trying to make an impossibly difficult shot, then deliberately makes things even ''harder'' to raise the odds to exactly 1,000,000 to 1.
** They miss because any attempt to purposely invoke this trope results in only a 987,000 to one chance, not attracting The Lady's favor.
*** That, and they had a 0% chance to hit the very specific target, due to reasons discovered later.
** Fortunately, [[spoiler:[[LampshadeHanging surviving the ensuing chaos]] was an exact MillionToOneChance.]]

to:

* MicroMonarchy: Lancre, in the Ramtop Mountain, and some of its neighboring kingdoms which are even smaller.
**
smaller. Just about every flat spot in the Ramtops (of which there are precious few) is a kingdom. This has led to generational wars over getting hold of somewhere to store the coal.
* MillionToOneChance: Invoked whenever someone needs a long shot to happen. Most notable in ''Discworld/GuardsGuards'', where the Watch is trying to make an impossibly difficult shot, then deliberately makes things even ''harder'' to raise the odds to exactly 1,000,000 to 1.
** They miss because any attempt to purposely invoke this trope results in only a 987,000 to one chance, not attracting The Lady's favor.
*** That, and they had a 0% chance to hit the very specific target, due to reasons discovered later.
** Fortunately, [[spoiler:[[LampshadeHanging surviving the ensuing chaos]] was an exact MillionToOneChance.]]
"Million-to-one chances crop up nine times out of ten."



* MisfitMobilizationMoment: The reformation of the Night Watch into the City Watch, particularly in ''[[Discworld/MenAtArms Men-At-Arms]]''.

to:

* MisfitMobilizationMoment: MisfitMobilizationMoment:
**
The reformation of the Night Watch into the City Watch, particularly in ''[[Discworld/MenAtArms Men-At-Arms]]''.''Discworld/MenAtArms''.



* MortalityPhobia: Magic users can see Death and know when their time is up. However, where witches tend to FaceDeathWithDignity (due to serving as midwives and burial attendants, they see quite a lot of death), wizards usually try to cheat their way out (in one's case, [[{{Discworld/Sourcery}} moving his spirit into a staff, from which he orders his son around]], while another gets into a box with all the sigils and wards he can think of, only to hear "[[AC:Cramped in here, isn't it?]]").
* MuggingTheMonster: Usually [[{{Werewolf}} Angua]], but has happened to others enough that the robber at the beginning of ''Discworld/TheAmazingMauriceAndHisEducatedRodents'' had to go through a little checklist before he'd try to attack the coach.
** Also, Casanunda makes a cameo in ''Discworld/CarpeJugulum'' just to witness a highwayman getting killed by the Magpyrs.

to:

* MortalityPhobia: Magic users can see Death and know when their time is up. However, where witches tend to FaceDeathWithDignity (due to serving as midwives and burial attendants, they see quite a lot of death), wizards usually try to cheat their way out (in one's case, [[{{Discworld/Sourcery}} moving his spirit into a staff, from which he orders his son around]], while another gets into a box with all the sigils and wards he can think of, only to hear "[[AC:Cramped in here, isn't it?]]").
* MuggingTheMonster:
MuggingTheMonster:
**
Usually [[{{Werewolf}} Angua]], but has happened to others enough that the robber at the beginning of ''Discworld/TheAmazingMauriceAndHisEducatedRodents'' had to go through a little checklist before he'd try to attack the coach.
** Also, Casanunda makes a cameo in ''Discworld/CarpeJugulum'' just to witness a highwayman getting killed by the Magpyrs.
Angua]].



*** Zebbo Mooty, Thief Third Class.
** Wee Mad Arthur (in ''Discworld/FeetOfClay''). He will ''not'' join the Ratcatchers' Guild, or pay their dues, and he will tell you that by ''breaking your kneecaps''. It should be mentioned that Wee Mad Arthur is a gnome [[spoiler:by adoption - he was born a Feegle]], and is therefore eight inches high [[spoiler:apparently a giant Feegle, or someone's WildMassGuess]].
** Invoked at Mightily Oats in ''Discworld/CarpeJugulum'' when he tries to rally the people of Lancre to go rescue Granny Weatherwax. He tells them she's out there with monsters. Bestiality Carter asks "What do we care what happens to monsters?"



* NationalWeapon: Dwarfs consider their battleaxes cultural artifacts, and will not part with them even when circumstances require them to relinquish all other weapons (at a diplomatic function, for instance). In ''Discworld/{{Thud}}'', we are introduced to a more liberal sect of dwarfs who do not carry them, believing that the axe is "a state of mind". One of said revolutionaries [[spoiler: wins a duel against an armed opponent... with kung-fu.]]
** We also get to meet some of the Low King's most elite soldiers. While some soldiers bristle with weapons, they bristle with one weapon.

to:

* NationalWeapon: Dwarfs consider their battleaxes cultural artifacts, and will not part with them even when circumstances require them to relinquish all other weapons (at a diplomatic function, for instance). In ''Discworld/{{Thud}}'', we are introduced to a more liberal sect of dwarfs who do not carry them, believing that the axe is "a state of mind". One of said revolutionaries [[spoiler: wins a duel against an armed opponent... with kung-fu.]] \n** We also get to meet some of the Low King's most elite soldiers. While some soldiers bristle with weapons, they bristle with one weapon.



* NiceHat: Wizards, witches, and various other professionals have to have one. Much is made of the importance of having the right hat for any job, as assuring people that you are a ''real'' witch/wizard/postmaster/whatever is half the battle. Sir Terry always wore one in real life, too.
** Mustrum Ridcully, Moist von Lipwig and Nanny Ogg have practically made careers of it.
* NiceShoes: A recurring theme.

to:

* NiceHat: Wizards, witches, and various other professionals have to have one. Much is made of the importance of having the right hat for any job, as assuring people that you are a ''real'' witch/wizard/postmaster/whatever is half the battle. Sir Terry always wore one in real life, too.
**
Mustrum Ridcully, Moist von Lipwig and Nanny Ogg have practically made careers of it.
* %%* NiceShoes: A recurring theme.



* NobodyPoops: Averted; night-soil wagons provide an important clue in ''Thud!'', and ''Discworld/TheWorldOfPoo'' takes the aversion to extremes. Mort can also testify that Binky subverts this trope a ''lot''.
** Harry King, called "King of the Golden River", made a living out of the fact that everybody poops.

to:

* NobodyPoops: Averted; night-soil wagons provide an important clue in ''Thud!'', and ''Discworld/TheWorldOfPoo'' takes the aversion to extremes. Mort can also testify that Binky subverts this trope a ''lot''.
**
''lot''. Harry King, called "King of the Golden River", made a living out of the fact that everybody poops.



** Several Ankh-Morpork-based books make references to "what happened to Mr. Hong when he opened the Three Jolly Luck Take-Away Fish Bar on the site of the old fish-god temple in Dagon Street on the night of the full moon." (The implication is something very nasty involving an EldritchAbomination, but even ''[[OutOfCharacterIsSeriousBusiness the Patrician]]'' doesn't know for sure.)
*** He also left very quickly. The type of quickly that involves leaving behind a kidney and an ear hole.

to:

** Several Ankh-Morpork-based books make references to "what happened to Mr. Hong when he opened the Three Jolly Luck Take-Away Fish Bar on the site of the old fish-god temple in Dagon Street on the night of the full moon." (The implication is something very nasty involving an EldritchAbomination, but even ''[[OutOfCharacterIsSeriousBusiness the Patrician]]'' doesn't know for sure.)
***
) He also left very quickly. The type of quickly that involves leaving behind a kidney and an ear hole.



* NoSenseOfHumor: Several characters exhibit this trope, most notably Granny Weatherwax. She understands humor on a conceptual level, but has absolutely no sense of humor and has no understanding of how or why jokes work.

to:

* NoSenseOfHumor: Several characters exhibit this trope, most notably NoSenseOfHumor:
**
Granny Weatherwax. She understands humor on a conceptual level, but has absolutely no sense of humor and has no understanding of how or why jokes work.



* NoSocialSkills: A number of characters fail spectacularly at relating to people. Among them:
** Jeremy Clockson. He's sane. He has a piece of paper that says so.
** Nutt
** Death

to:

* NoSocialSkills: A number of characters fail Death fails spectacularly at relating to people. Among them:
** Jeremy Clockson. He's sane. He has a piece of paper that says so.
** Nutt
** Death
people.



* OddlySmallOrganization: Happens all the time. The most notable examples are Lancre, where 90% of the civil service posts, along with every military position, is held by Shawn Ogg, and the Ankh-Morpork City Watch, which in the first Watch book has a grand total of four people on the night shift, and in the final Watch book has a combined night and day watch of about 250. For a city of a million people. That's roughly one watchman for every four thousand people (for comparison, New York City's cop per capita ratio is about twenty times higher), and Vimes complains about how ''large'' the watch is, since he can no longer know every person under his command personally.
* OfficialCouple: Since Discworld is mercifully short on romantic drama, any couple whose initial courtship forms a sub-plot in one book are likely to follow this trope for the remainder of the series. Prominent examples include Vimes/Sybil and Carrot/Angua in the City Watch books, Magrat/Verence in the Witches books, Moist/Adora in the Moist von Lipwig books and Mort/Ysabelle in the Death books [[spoiler: (although the latter were KilledOffForReal in ''Soul Music'', they counted as this before their deaths and are still alluded to in this way by other characters)]]. It's hinted that Susan/[[spoiler:Lobsang]] may end up following this trope - it's hard to say since their 'perfect moment' together occurred on the last page of the final Death book.
** While Tiffany and Roland were a bit young to start in with a romance right off the bat, later Tiffany Aching books see a touch of WillTheyOrWontThey develop between them, until eventually [[spoiler:Official Couple status goes to Roland/Letitia and Tiffany/Preston instead.]]
** While this trope is rarer in the standalone novels, [[spoiler:Tonker/Lofty, a.k.a. Magda/Tilda]] are quickly recognised by the other characters to be the Official Couple of ''Discworld/{{Monstrous Regiment}}''.
* OhLookMoreRooms: Death's Domain. The initial hallway is intimidating enough, but several of the rooms along it open up into cavernous chambers filled with books or hourglasses.
** Some get it worse than others. Entirely mundane people just see the entirely mundane bits. Those who see what's really there notice that the mundane bits in most rooms are tiny islands surrounded by vast oceans of empty floor...

to:

* OddlySmallOrganization: Happens all the time. The most notable examples are OddlySmallOrganization:
** In
Lancre, where 90% of the civil service posts, along with every military position, is held by Shawn Ogg, and the Ogg.
** The
Ankh-Morpork City Watch, which in the first Watch book has a grand total of four people on the night shift, and in the final Watch book has a combined night and day watch of about 250. For a city of a million people. That's roughly one watchman for every four thousand people (for comparison, New York City's cop per capita ratio is about twenty times higher), and Vimes complains about how ''large'' the watch is, since he can no longer know every person under his command personally.
* OfficialCouple: Since Discworld is mercifully short on romantic drama, any couple whose initial courtship forms a sub-plot in one book are likely to follow this trope for the remainder of the series. Prominent examples include Vimes/Sybil and Carrot/Angua in the City Watch books, Magrat/Verence in the Witches books, Moist/Adora in the Moist von Lipwig books and Mort/Ysabelle in the Death books [[spoiler: (although the latter were KilledOffForReal in ''Soul Music'', they counted as this before their deaths and are still alluded to in this way by other characters)]]. It's hinted that Susan/[[spoiler:Lobsang]] may end up following this trope - it's hard to say since their 'perfect moment' together occurred on the last page of the final Death book.
**
While Tiffany and Roland were a bit young to start in with a romance right off the bat, later Tiffany Aching books see a touch of WillTheyOrWontThey develop between them, until eventually [[spoiler:Official Couple status goes to Roland/Letitia and Tiffany/Preston instead.]]
** While this trope is rarer in the standalone novels, [[spoiler:Tonker/Lofty, a.k.a. Magda/Tilda]] are quickly recognised by the other characters to be the Official Couple of ''Discworld/{{Monstrous Regiment}}''.
* OhLookMoreRooms: Death's Domain. The initial hallway is intimidating enough, but several of the rooms along it open up into cavernous chambers filled with books or hourglasses.
**
hourglasses. Some get it worse than others. Entirely mundane people just see the entirely mundane bits. Those who see what's really there notice that the mundane bits in most rooms are tiny islands surrounded by vast oceans of empty floor...



* OneHourWorkWeek: William de Worde before starting The Times. Also seems to be all the wizards get up to these days, which is a pity since that would be Victor Tugelbend's dream job. Colon and Nobby are technically on duty as much as the next watch officer but often call it quits sooner rather than later.
* OneSteveLimit: Played oddly with the Unseen University head faculty introduced in ''Discworld/MovingPictures'': because they're known only by their titles, the first part of the title is effectively their first name, and so the Dean of Pentacles is the only Dean, the Lecturer in Recent Runes is the only Lecturer, the Chair of Indefinite Studies is the only Chair, and so on.

to:

* OneHourWorkWeek: William de Worde before starting The Times. Also seems OneHourWorkWeek:
** Seems
to be all the wizards get up to these days, which is a pity since that would be Victor Tugelbend's dream job. job.
**
Colon and Nobby are technically on duty as much as the next watch officer but often call it quits sooner rather than later.
* OneSteveLimit: OneSteveLimit:
**
Played oddly with the Unseen University head faculty introduced in ''Discworld/MovingPictures'': because they're known only by their titles, the first part of the title is effectively their first name, and so the Dean of Pentacles is the only Dean, the Lecturer in Recent Runes is the only Lecturer, the Chair of Indefinite Studies is the only Chair, and so on.



* TheOneWhoMadeItOut: Lancre is "the place people come from to become successful somewhere else" (usually Ankh-Morpork). Opera singer Enrico Basilica grew up in Rookery Yard, in the Shades, where "you could fight your way out, or you could sing your way out" ([[{{Metaphorgotten}} or you could get out by going through an alley into Shamlegger Street]], but no-one came to anything going ''that'' way).
** Notably, Lancre has produced a quite disproportionate number of notable (and not so notable) wizards. There's not usually a whole lot of entertainment in the evenings, particularly in the winter...

to:

* TheOneWhoMadeItOut: Lancre is "the place people come from to become successful somewhere else" (usually Ankh-Morpork). Opera singer Enrico Basilica grew up in Rookery Yard, in the Shades, where "you could fight your way out, or you could sing your way out" ([[{{Metaphorgotten}} or you could get out by going through an alley into Shamlegger Street]], but no-one came to anything going ''that'' way).
**
Notably, Lancre has produced a quite disproportionate number of notable (and not so notable) wizards. There's not usually a whole lot of entertainment in the evenings, particularly in the winter...



* OurDragonsAreDifferent: Swamp dragons are unstable, UglyCute little runts that manufacture volatile chemicals in their insides for firebreathing purposes and are prone to exploding violently. Noble dragons are your typical fantasy dragon, but have all disappeared for some reason.
** They seem to have retreated to fantasy but can show up under certain circumstances which always involve a lot of belief and/or magic. Examples are the Wyrmberg and ''Discworld/GuardsGuards!''
** Though never stated, the implication seems to be that the dragons left due to the lessening of magical energy on Discworld, possibly due to the lack of Sourcerors.



* OurDragonsAreDifferent:
** Swamp dragons are unstable, UglyCute little runts that manufacture volatile chemicals in their insides for firebreathing purposes and are prone to exploding violently.
** Noble dragons are your typical fantasy dragon, but have all disappeared for some reason. They seem to have retreated to fantasy but can show up under certain circumstances which always involve a lot of belief and/or magic. Examples are the Wyrmberg and ''Discworld/GuardsGuards'' Though never stated, the implication seems to be that the dragons left due to the lessening of magical energy on Discworld, possibly due to the lack of Sourcerors.



* OurWerewolvesAreDifferent: They have great regenerative capabilities, are only truly vulnerable to silver and fire, can switch freely between wolf and human form unless they are in the light of the full moon (which renders them wolves), and they struggle with conflicting sets of instincts and thought processes after changing. (Being effectively a human/wolf mix, they also have a nagging tendency to compromise and think like dogs.) They're considered undead on the basis of "They're big and scary, they come from {{Uberwald}}, and they don't die when you stick them with a sword, what more do you want?"
** There are distinct varieties, too, within the traditional variety and without. There are yennorks, who are naturally born werewolves who are stuck permanently in one shape or the other. In ''Discworld/ReaperMan'' we're introduced to a pair of werewolves who more fit the Hollywood 'big humanoid mound of fur and muscle' stereotype, with an additional twist that one of them is a regular wolf most of the time, the other a beautiful girl, and they meet one another half-way one week a month.
** The werewolves of Discworld also illustrate a rarely-considered point: Humans hate werewolves. ''Wolves hate werewolves so much more.'' (This is because humans use werewolves as an excuse to kill wolves, and the opposite never occurs.) A lone werewolf is relatively safe mixing in a human community. A lone werewolf who stumbles into a pack of wolves has a very short life expectancy.
*** Not always the case, as Angua ran with real wolves in a real wolfpack, and knew quite well how rubbish Big Fido's notions of wolves were. (Big Fido seemed to think of a wolf pack as something like a poorly-run street gang of dogs.)
*** Angua was only accepted by the wolves because that pack was run by Gavin, Carrot's [[NobleWolf lupine equivalent.]] Werewolves can at least hide among humans, but a real wolf (not ruled by a furry messiah) will smell them straight away.

to:

* OurWerewolvesAreDifferent: They have great regenerative capabilities, are only truly vulnerable to silver and fire, can switch freely between wolf and human form unless they are in the light of the full moon (which renders them wolves), and they struggle with conflicting sets of instincts and thought processes after changing. (Being effectively a human/wolf mix, they also have a nagging tendency to compromise and think like dogs.) They're considered undead on the basis of "They're big and scary, they come from {{Uberwald}}, and they don't die when you stick them with a sword, what more do you want?"
**
want?" There are distinct varieties, too, within the traditional variety and without. There are yennorks, who are naturally born werewolves who are stuck permanently in one shape or the other. In ''Discworld/ReaperMan'' we're introduced to a pair of werewolves who more fit the Hollywood 'big humanoid mound of fur and muscle' stereotype, with an additional twist that one of them is a regular wolf most of the time, the other a beautiful girl, and they meet one another half-way one week a month.
**
month. The werewolves of Discworld also illustrate a rarely-considered point: Humans hate werewolves. ''Wolves hate werewolves so much more.'' (This is because humans use werewolves as an excuse to kill wolves, and the opposite never occurs.) A lone werewolf is relatively safe mixing in a human community. A lone werewolf who stumbles into a pack of wolves generally has a very short life expectancy.
*** Not always the case, as Angua ran with real wolves in a real wolfpack, and knew quite well how rubbish Big Fido's notions of wolves were. (Big Fido seemed to think of a wolf pack as something like a poorly-run street gang of dogs.)
*** Angua was only accepted by the wolves because that pack was run by Gavin, Carrot's [[NobleWolf lupine equivalent.]] Werewolves can at least hide among humans, but a real wolf (not ruled by a furry messiah) will smell them straight away.
expectancy.



* ParodiedTrope

to:

* %%* ParodiedTrope



* PimpedOutDress: Naturally, ladies of stature will wear one when appropriate. Four notable examples are the vermine-trimmed coronation dress [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses Princess Keli Sto Lat]] wears in ''Discworld/{{Mort}}'', the dress Granny Weatherwax steals to infiltrate the ball in ''Discworld/WitchesAbroad'' and the one she wears to infiltrate the opera in ''Discworld/{{Maskerade}}'', the gaudy dress Cheery Littlebottom wears in ''Discworld/TheFifthElephant'' to show she was embracing her gender, and Tiffany Aching in ''Discworld/IShallWearMidnight'' continues the tradition rather well based on how Prachett describes her as looking "damn good" wearing midnight. Lady Sybil inverts this by having the rank suitable to wear such dresses, and clumping around in tweed and galoshes.
** Wizards in full regalia probably count, as well. They are likened to what would happen if you found a way to inflate a Bird of Paradise covered in glitter.
* PlayingWithATrope: The creator's ''entire body of work'' does this.

to:

* PimpedOutDress: Naturally, ladies of stature will wear one when appropriate. Four notable examples are the vermine-trimmed coronation dress [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses Princess Keli Sto Lat]] wears in ''Discworld/{{Mort}}'', the dress Granny Weatherwax steals to infiltrate the ball in ''Discworld/WitchesAbroad'' and the one she wears to infiltrate the opera in ''Discworld/{{Maskerade}}'', the gaudy dress Cheery Littlebottom wears in ''Discworld/TheFifthElephant'' to show she was embracing her gender, and Tiffany Aching in ''Discworld/IShallWearMidnight'' continues the tradition rather well based on how Prachett describes her as looking "damn good" wearing midnight. Lady Sybil inverts this by having the rank suitable to wear such dresses, and clumping around in tweed and galoshes.
**
Wizards in full regalia probably count, as well.count. They are likened to what would happen if you found a way to inflate a Bird of Paradise covered in glitter.
* %%* PlayingWithATrope: The creator's ''entire body of work'' does this.



* PragmaticVillainy: Vetinari does not actually rule his realm with an iron fist. He has the novel idea of maintaining control by making people actually ''want'' to keep him in charge, or at the very least, make removing him from power an unsavory prospect. See VetinariJobSecurity.
** The problem is that the guild leaders and nobility all hate each other too much to support any other candidate. There's also the fact that virtually every other Patrician before Vetinari has turned out to be insane, or has become insane once they've taken the position.
*** A case could be made for Vetinari being just as crazy as his predecessors, with the silver lining that his mania is an obsessive desire to see the city run smoothly. It helps that he has the inventive genius to back it up.
* PrettyInMink: When some characters want to glam up their appearance.
* ProfessionalKiller: Played with. Ankh-Morpork has an Assassins' Guild, but assassins have a certain style and code, involving wearing lots of black. There are plenty of [[PsychoForHire Psychos For Hire]], and if they're titled at all, they're just plain old "killers".
** Though since the Assassins' Guild is not fond of freelancers, in a very short time most of them wind up as plain old ''dead''. The Assassins seem more or less indifferent to those who are AxeCrazy for free, but if they start ''making money'' from it...
** There is also indications that the guild may only take a dim view of hired killers taking down people of certain classes, specifically those that conventionally hire Assassins. They don't take commissions on just ''anyone'', or just ''from'' anyone.
** Assassins are also loath to kill unless paid to. Their guild motto translates to "Never kill without payment". In his youth, Lord Vetinari once told his Aunt that if she kept on a particular direction of action, he might have to find someone to pay him to kill her.

to:

* PragmaticVillainy: Vetinari does not actually rule his realm with an iron fist. He has the novel idea of maintaining control by making people actually ''want'' to keep him in charge, or at the very least, make removing him from power an unsavory prospect. See VetinariJobSecurity.
** The problem is that the guild leaders and nobility all hate each other too much to support any other candidate. There's also the fact that virtually every other Patrician before Vetinari has turned out to be insane, or has become insane once they've taken the position.
***
VetinariJobSecurity. A case could be made for Vetinari being just as crazy as his predecessors, with the silver lining that his mania is an obsessive desire to see the city run smoothly. It helps that he has the inventive genius to back it up.
* %%* PrettyInMink: When some characters want to glam up their appearance.
* ProfessionalKiller: Played with. Ankh-Morpork has an Assassins' Guild, but assassins have a certain style and code, involving wearing lots of black. There are plenty of [[PsychoForHire Psychos For Hire]], and if they're titled at all, they're just plain old "killers".
**
"killers". Though since the Assassins' Guild is not fond of freelancers, in a very short time most of them wind up as plain old ''dead''. The Assassins seem more or less indifferent to those who are AxeCrazy for free, but if they start ''making money'' from it...
**
it... There is also indications that the guild may only take a dim view of hired killers taking down people of certain classes, specifically those that conventionally hire Assassins. They don't take commissions on just ''anyone'', or just ''from'' anyone.
**
anyone. Assassins are also loath to kill unless paid to. Their guild motto translates to "Never kill without payment". In his youth, Lord Vetinari once told his Aunt that if she kept on a particular direction of action, he might have to find someone to pay him to kill her.



* PsychoForHire: Some of the villains, especially [[Discworld/{{Hogfather}} Mr Teatime]].
* PublicExecution: Occurs in ''Discworld/WitchesAbroad'', ''Discworld/GoingPostal'', and ''Discworld/TheLastContinent''.
* PunyHumans: If anything, this is played straighter in the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' books than in most fantasy. Most sapient races are flat out ''better'' than humans: dwarfs are tougher, stronger, and live longer (though Carrot, a human raised by dwarfs, is described as a dwarf scaled to 200%, so the strength bit is not inherent but more due to them working out by constantly mining), trolls and golems are near indestructible and incredibly strong (and trolls are incredibly intelligent when in cooler temperatures), vampires have all their standard strengths and can even learn to replace their lust for blood, werewolves are extremely capable in combat and have fantastic regenerative capabilities, pictsies are unbelivably strong and ferocious (gnomes are described as being as strong as a human despite being the size of a Barbie doll), Igors (if they count as non-human) are all brilliant surgeons and also great healers, and orcs can only be called superbeings.
** Humans do, however, seem to be the only race that produces wizards, witches, or sourcerers. Even ''one'' of the latter can potentially invert this trope. They're also the most numerous and gregarious, and have the most infections culture. They're also the most innovative.
** A brief mention of how the "first men" all but destroyed the Disc in a fit of pique immediately after their creation suggests that the PunyHumans trope was subsequently invoked by their divine makers so that they wouldn't do it again. Among other things they were made considerably smaller.

to:

* PsychoForHire: Some of the villains, especially [[Discworld/{{Hogfather}} Mr Teatime]].
* PublicExecution: Occurs in ''Discworld/WitchesAbroad'', ''Discworld/GoingPostal'', and ''Discworld/TheLastContinent''.
* PunyHumans: If anything, this is played straighter in the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' books than in most fantasy. Most sapient races are flat out ''better'' than humans: dwarfs are tougher, stronger, and live longer (though Carrot, a human raised by dwarfs, is described as a dwarf scaled to 200%, so the strength bit is not inherent but more due to them working out by constantly mining), trolls and golems are near indestructible and incredibly strong (and trolls are incredibly intelligent when in cooler temperatures), vampires have all their standard strengths and can even learn to replace their lust for blood, werewolves are extremely capable in combat and have fantastic regenerative capabilities, pictsies are unbelivably strong and ferocious (gnomes are described as being as strong as a human despite being the size of a Barbie doll), Igors (if they count as non-human) are all brilliant surgeons and also great healers, and orcs can only be called superbeings.
**
superbeings. Humans do, however, seem to be the only race that produces wizards, witches, or sourcerers. Even ''one'' of the latter can potentially invert this trope. They're also the most numerous and gregarious, and have the most infections infectious culture. They're also the most innovative.
**
innovative. A brief mention of how the "first men" all but destroyed the Disc in a fit of pique immediately after their creation suggests that the PunyHumans trope was subsequently invoked by their divine makers so that they wouldn't do it again. Among other things they were made considerably smaller.
21st Jun '17 11:58:52 PM PaulA
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* [[LuckySeven Unlucky Eight]]: eight makes many appearances as an occult number, most of them bad. Has a much stronger presence in the first two books, though.

to:

* [[LuckySeven Unlucky Eight]]: LuckySeven: Inverted -- eight makes many appearances as an occult number, most of them bad. Has a much stronger presence in the first two books, though.



* [[OurDwarvesAreAllTheSame Our Dwarfs Are All The Same]]: Discworld dwarfs started out as an intentionally Flanderized parody of this trope. Later books subverted it by introducing Yiddish elements to their culture, among other things.
** Becomes a DeconstructedTrope with the introduction of Dwarf counter-culture (openly female dwarfs who wear leather skirts and braids in their beards) as well as Dwarf fundamentalists who violently oppose anything non-dwarfish.

to:

* [[OurDwarvesAreAllTheSame Our Dwarfs Are All The Same]]: OurDwarvesAreAllTheSame: Discworld dwarfs started out as an intentionally Flanderized parody of this trope. Later books subverted it by introducing Yiddish elements to their culture, among other things.
**
things. Becomes a DeconstructedTrope with the introduction of Dwarf counter-culture (openly female dwarfs who wear leather skirts and braids in their beards) as well as Dwarf fundamentalists who violently oppose anything non-dwarfish.
20th Jun '17 10:16:09 PM Materioptikon
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Moist von Lipwig keeps stealing Drumknott's pencils.
19th Jun '17 9:17:47 PM PaulA
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* TheIgor: An entire family of them that does henching and MadScience professionally. They also pioneer surgical techniques and do it almost recreationally; when an Igor is said to have his father's eyes, it's probably not a figure of speech. They may have been handed down through the generations (a good pair of hands are worth hanging onto as well). One of them has a pet dog made up of the pieces of many other pet dogs; though he's very upset when Scraps gets killed off, he consoles himself that it's only a matter of time until the next thunderstorm.
** It's important to also note that the male Igors are [[KavorkaMan Kavorka Men]] and considered quite the prize for young women, whereas the Igorinas are [[CuteMonsterGirl cute monster girls]] mixed with HelloNurse - in lieu of scarred up bodies, they are mind-bogglingly attractive except for a bit of cute stitching for show, for example around a wrist like a tattoo, or in a celtic-like pattern on their cheeks.
*** When we finally get an on-screen Igorina (in Discworld/MonstrousRegiment) she makes an off-hand remark that the scars from the stitching can be gotten rid of in 15 minutes with the right ointment. That means that Igors go around covered in scars ''because that's how Igors want to look''. Other books clarify that the igor stitches are actually clan markings.
* IJustWantToBeNormal: Susan Sto Helit desperately wants to lead an ordinary life, which is complicated by the fact that her parents are Death's adopted daughter and his former apprentice. And she's a duchess. Rincewind also hates being forced into dangerous quests to save the world, and would like nothing more than to be bored the rest of his life. Carrot Ironfoundersson may also qualify, as despite the fact that he probably is the heir to the throne of Ankh-Morpork, he prefers to be a copper.
* ImperfectRitual:
** Subverted, as usual. Wizard magic is often done with an elaborate ritual, but most of that is just for looks. ''Discworld/{{Mort}}'' provides the example of the Rite of Ashk'Ente, which only ''needs'' one wizard, three bits of wood, and a fresh egg. If you haven't got a fresh egg, a mouse will do. But wizards generally feel that if you don't have eight archmages chanting at the corners of an octagram filled with occult paraphenalia, you aren't doing it ''properly''.[[note]]Description ganked from HermeticMagic.[[/note]] [[UnequalRites Witches]] are more practical; they're not above doing something impressive for [[YourMindMakesItReal headological purposes]] but when nobody's watching will take whatever shortcuts are available.
** Inverted in ''Discworld/GuardsGuards'': the Elucidated Brethren of the Ebon Night are trying to summon a dragon, and the cult leader orders the brethren to find magical objects to sacrifice. They come up with really low grade magical junk, like [[SignsOfDisrepair a still-fizzing letter from a bar]] and an amulet the SnakeOilSalesman swore was magical. And yet, it works.

to:

* TheIgor: An entire family of them that does henching and MadScience professionally. They also pioneer surgical techniques and do it almost recreationally; when an Igor is said to have his father's eyes, it's probably not a figure of speech. They may have been handed down through the generations (a good pair of hands are worth hanging onto as well). One of them has a pet dog made up of the pieces of many other pet dogs; though he's very upset when Scraps gets killed off, he consoles himself that it's only a matter of time until the next thunderstorm.
** It's important to also note that the male
thunderstorm. Male Igors are [[KavorkaMan Kavorka Men]] and considered quite the prize for young women, whereas the Igorinas are [[CuteMonsterGirl cute monster girls]] mixed with HelloNurse - in lieu of scarred up bodies, they are mind-bogglingly attractive except for a bit of cute stitching for show, for example around a wrist like a tattoo, or in a celtic-like pattern on their cheeks.
***
cheeks. When we finally get an on-screen Igorina (in Discworld/MonstrousRegiment) she makes an off-hand remark that the scars from the stitching can be gotten rid of in 15 minutes with the right ointment. That means that Igors go around covered in scars ''because that's how Igors want to look''. Other books clarify that the igor stitches are actually clan markings.
* IJustWantToBeNormal: IJustWantToBeNormal:
**
Susan Sto Helit desperately wants to lead an ordinary life, which is complicated by the fact that her parents are Death's adopted daughter and his former apprentice. And she's a duchess. duchess.
**
Rincewind also hates being forced into dangerous quests to save the world, and would like nothing more than to be bored the rest of his life. life.
**
Carrot Ironfoundersson may also qualify, as despite the fact that he probably is the heir to the throne of Ankh-Morpork, he prefers to be a copper.
* ImperfectRitual:
**
ImperfectRitual: Subverted, as usual. Wizard magic is often done with an elaborate ritual, but most of that is just for looks. ''Discworld/{{Mort}}'' provides the example of Several books feature the Rite of Ashk'Ente, which only ''needs'' one wizard, three bits of wood, and a fresh egg. If you haven't got a fresh egg, a mouse will do. But wizards generally feel that if you don't have eight archmages chanting at the corners of an octagram filled with occult paraphenalia, you aren't doing it ''properly''.[[note]]Description ganked from HermeticMagic.[[/note]] [[UnequalRites Witches]] are more practical; they're not above doing something impressive for [[YourMindMakesItReal headological purposes]] but when nobody's watching will take whatever shortcuts are available.
** Inverted in ''Discworld/GuardsGuards'': the Elucidated Brethren of the Ebon Night are trying to summon a dragon, and the cult leader orders the brethren to find magical objects to sacrifice. They come up with really low grade magical junk, like [[SignsOfDisrepair a still-fizzing letter from a bar]] and an amulet the SnakeOilSalesman swore was magical. And yet, it works.
available.



* [[IncrediblyLamePun Incredibly Lame Pune, or Play on Words]]: Common, though often subtle.



* InstantBookDeal: Although in this case, it appears to be an aspect of the universe itself.
* InterspeciesRomance: A few cases, here and there.
** Throughout the City Watch cycle we have Carrot (male human) and Angua (female werewolf).
** Towards the end of ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'', Nobby Nobbs (horrifically ugly male human...probably) gets involved with Shine of the Rainbow (female goblin).
*** The same novel also mentions a heavily implied dwarf/troll relationship, much to the bemusement of Sam Vimes.
** ''Discworld/RaisingSteam'' has: a male human/female dwarf couple who get married [[spoiler: before extremist dwarfs kill her for marrying a human]], a heavily implied romantic elopement between Dopey Docson (male dwarf) and Crackle (female troll), and confirmation that Nobby and Shine of the Rainbow are still together.
* InTheDoldrums: Some people end up in one when they die, an apparently infinite dusky desert. Some march on resolutely, others just stay there with different results ([[spoiler:[[Discworld/GoingPostal Anghammarad]], being a golem,]] enjoyed finally being free, [[spoiler:[[Discworld/SmallGods Vorbis]]]], having no clue what to do, was paralyzed with fear for a century).
* InTheLocalTongue: Discussed several times. For example, Mount Oolskunrahod in Skund, which translates as "Who is this fool who doesn't know what a mountain is?"
** The above is found in a forest named "Your finger, you fool," after an explorer pointed and asked a native "What's this?"

to:

* %%* InstantBookDeal: Although in this case, it appears to be an aspect of the universe itself.
* InterspeciesRomance: A few cases, here and there.
**
Throughout the City Watch cycle we have Carrot (male human) and Angua (female werewolf).
** Towards the end of ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'', Nobby Nobbs (horrifically ugly male human...probably) gets involved with Shine of the Rainbow (female goblin).
*** The same novel also mentions a heavily implied dwarf/troll relationship, much to the bemusement of Sam Vimes.
** ''Discworld/RaisingSteam'' has: a male human/female dwarf couple who get married [[spoiler: before extremist dwarfs kill her for marrying a human]], a heavily implied romantic elopement between Dopey Docson (male dwarf) and Crackle (female troll), and confirmation that Nobby and Shine of the Rainbow are still together.
* InTheDoldrums: Some people end up in one when they die, an apparently infinite dusky desert. Some march on resolutely, others just stay there with different results ([[spoiler:[[Discworld/GoingPostal Anghammarad]], being a golem,]] enjoyed finally being free, [[spoiler:[[Discworld/SmallGods Vorbis]]]], having no clue what to do, was paralyzed with fear for a century).
* InTheLocalTongue: Discussed several times. For example, Mount Oolskunrahod in Skund, which translates as "Who is this fool who doesn't know what a mountain is?"
** The above is found in a forest named "Your finger, you fool," after an explorer pointed and asked a native "What's this?"
werewolf).



* InvisibleWriting:
** Parodied in the book ''Discworld/WitchesAbroad''. The witches come upon a dwarf mine, identified by invisible runes. Magrat states she can't see them, which Nanny Ogg points out is how you know you got your money's worth with invisible runes.
** Also, the Unseen University faculty includes the Reader in Invisible Writings.
* JerkassGods: Most of the gods are fairly weak and mundane, but some of the more powerful ones view human life as a game for them to manipulate.
** And some of the ''less'' powerful ones, too. Nuggan, for example, who seems to be the divine equivalent of someone who's gone pants-on-head neurotic.
** Some try to join in on the fun. Like P'Tang-P'Tang, god of all of 51 people, having one fisherman join a war until he was told that 50 is a lot less than 51. (And said fisherman made a fortune selling fish to the army).
* JustFollowingOrders: Subverted, inverted, played with, deconstructed, and generally given hell from (at the very latest) ''Discworld/GuardsGuards!'' onwards.
** Discworld/TheFifthElephant probably attacked it most viciously, when Vimes encounters a man who let the enemies take his wife, Lady Sybil, because of "orders". He ordered Detritus to shoot the man on the spot, which the troll refused to do, proving why Vimes works with him at all. Doubles as a CrowningMomentOfAwesome for both Detritus, and for Vimes, who trusts his officers not to take bad orders ''even from him''.

to:

* InvisibleWriting:
** Parodied in the book ''Discworld/WitchesAbroad''. The witches come upon a dwarf mine, identified by invisible runes. Magrat states she can't see them, which Nanny Ogg points out is how you know you got your money's worth with invisible runes.
** Also, the Unseen University faculty includes the Reader in Invisible Writings.
* JerkassGods: Most of the gods are fairly weak and mundane, but some of the more powerful ones view human life as a game for them to manipulate.
**
manipulate. And some of the ''less'' powerful ones, too. Nuggan, for example, who seems to be the divine equivalent of someone who's gone pants-on-head neurotic.
** Some try to join in on the fun. Like P'Tang-P'Tang, god of all of 51 people, having one fisherman join a war until he was told that 50 is a lot less than 51. (And said fisherman made a fortune selling fish to the army).
*
%%* JustFollowingOrders: Subverted, inverted, played with, deconstructed, and generally given hell from (at the very latest) ''Discworld/GuardsGuards!'' onwards.
** Discworld/TheFifthElephant probably attacked it most viciously, when Vimes encounters a man who let the enemies take his wife, Lady Sybil, because of "orders". He ordered Detritus to shoot the man on the spot, which the troll refused to do, proving why Vimes works with him at all. Doubles as a CrowningMomentOfAwesome for both Detritus, and for Vimes, who trusts his officers not to take bad orders ''even from him''.
''Discworld/GuardsGuards'' onwards.



** Early books actually justify it. Dwarfs as a species evolved underground, and thusly metaphor and similie never caught on in their language, due to the dangers of not being able to communicate important facts (for example, the impending collapse of the ceiling) quickly, promptly and ''accurately''. Humans, meanwhile, had most of their capacity for imagination and metaphor bred out of them as a survival response to the Mage Wars, when reality was even ''looser'' in the Discworld than it already is, and so stray thoughts and idioms could become real if careless.

to:

** Early books actually justify it. Dwarfs as a species evolved underground, and thusly metaphor and similie simile never caught on in their language, due to the dangers of not being able to communicate important facts (for example, the impending collapse of the ceiling) quickly, promptly and ''accurately''. Humans, meanwhile, had most of their capacity for imagination and metaphor bred out of them as a survival response to the Mage Wars, when reality was even ''looser'' in the Discworld than it already is, and so stray thoughts and idioms could become real if careless.



* TheLittleShopThatWasntThereYesterday: Pops up in quite a few books, including ''Discworld/TheLightFantastic'' and ''Discworld/SoulMusic''.
** Lampshaded, and then nearly [[SubvertedTrope subverted in the latter]] but [[ZigZaggingTrope played straight]].
** Mentioned in ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'' as the sort of shop which Twoflower purchased The Luggage from.



* LivingCrashpad: Multiple examples.
** In ''Discworld/WyrdSisters'', Magrat falls on "something soft" from a great height, which turns out to be the Fool.
** Vimes believes it doesn't really count as killing someone when both you and your target fall off a roof and it's even odds who ends up on bottom when you land.
** The Bursar's been a target for this once or twice.
* LivingLegend: The Discworld runs on narrative causality and its characters are all archetypal, so it's no surprise that there are many living legends.

to:

* LivingCrashpad: Multiple examples.
** In ''Discworld/WyrdSisters'', Magrat falls on "something soft" from a great height, which turns out to be the Fool.
** Vimes believes it doesn't really count as killing someone when both you and your target fall off a roof and it's even odds who ends up on bottom when you land.
**
The Bursar's been a target for this once or twice.
* LivingLegend: The Discworld runs on narrative causality and its characters are all archetypal, so it's no surprise that there are many living legends.LivingLegend:



--> '''Vetinari''': "People know about you, commander. Descendant of a watchman who believed that if a corrupted court will not behead an evil king, then the watchman should do it himself [...] Sam Vimes once arrested ''me'' for treason. And Sam Vimes once arrested a dragon. Sam Vimes stopped a war between nations by arresting two high commands. He's an arresting fellow, Sam Vimes. Sam Vimes killed a werewolf with his bare hands, and carries law with him like a lamp [...] Watchmen across half the continent will say that Sam Vimes is as straight as an arrow, can't be corrupted, won't be turned, never took a bribe..."
** Similarly, Captain Carrot Ironfoundersson, the rightful heir to the throne of Ankh-Morpork (who just happens to like being a guard). His charisma is so strong it warps reality. Also, he has a punch that trolls respect.

to:

--> '''Vetinari''': "People '''Vetinari:''' People know about you, commander. Descendant of a watchman who believed that if a corrupted court will not behead an evil king, then the watchman should do it himself [...] Sam Vimes once arrested ''me'' for treason. And Sam Vimes once arrested a dragon. Sam Vimes stopped a war between nations by arresting two high commands. He's an arresting fellow, Sam Vimes. Sam Vimes killed a werewolf with his bare hands, and carries law with him like a lamp [...] Watchmen across half the continent will say that Sam Vimes is as straight as an arrow, can't be corrupted, won't be turned, never took a bribe..."
bribe...
** Similarly, Captain Carrot Ironfoundersson, the rightful heir to the throne of Ankh-Morpork (who just happens to like being a guard). His charisma is so strong it warps reality. Also, he has a punch that trolls respect.



** Sergeant Jackrum of the Borogravian army has fought in every single war for forty years. The Sergeant knows everyone. Everyone knows the Sergeant. The Sergeant's reputation is such that generals will leave the room at the Sergeant's request.



** Miss Treason (from ''Discworld/{{Wintersmith}}'') is in line for this, albeit for a few people.



* LonelyBachelorPad: In ''Men at Arms'', Carrot and Angua discover that Captain Vimes lives in a one-room undecorated apartment with no furnishings but a bed. [[spoiler:He puts all his disposable income into the Watch Widows and Orphans fund.]]
* LongRunningBookSeries
19th Jun '17 8:30:12 PM PaulA
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* EccentricExterminator: ''Any'' rat catcher so far. And it seems the job is TheVerse equivalent to a RedShirt by the way, unless you're a [[OurGnomesAreWeirder gnome]] of course. And sometimes it's even better than RedShirt. At least one of these guys upon dying was [[spoiler:greeted with "[[AC:Squeak!]]" and... reincarnated. No prize for guessing into ''what'' exactly.]]

to:

* %%* EccentricExterminator: ''Any'' rat catcher so far. And it seems the job is TheVerse equivalent to a RedShirt by the way, unless you're a [[OurGnomesAreWeirder gnome]] of course. And sometimes it's even better than RedShirt. At least one of these guys upon dying was [[spoiler:greeted with "[[AC:Squeak!]]" and... reincarnated. No prize for guessing into ''what'' exactly.]]far.



* EternalHero: Parodied in ''Discworld/TheLastContinent'', where Death speculates that Rincewind is a counterbalance to this, the "Coward with a thousand retreating backs". Discworld also gives us another parody, the octogenarian warrior-hero Cohen the Barbarian, who "[[BadassGrandpa has a lifetime's experience of not dying]]". Discworld also plays the trope straight with BadassGrandpa Lu-Tze, who's a 900-year-old member of a monastic TimePolice. Also perhaps Sam Vimes since ''Discworld/{{Thud}}'': his possession by the [[EldritchAbomination Summoning Dark]] and his resulting special abilities seem to be turning him into an eternal policeman, which can be seen in ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}''.
** Cohen and his henchmen ''do'' fit the trope. At the end of ''Discworld/TheLastHero'', they suffer a huge explosion that should've killed them. But Death doesn't come for them. Why? Because of this trope.
*** Death, in a manner of speaking, comes for them all right, in the form of a crew of Valkyries. Whom they promptly horsejack and proceed to ride off to further adventures.
* EthnicGod: Some consider Tak the god of the Dwarfs; however, while the Dwarfs believe Tak made the world (as well as Dwarfs, men, and trolls), they don't worship him as a rule. Some human nationalities also have their own specific gods: Omnians worship Om, and Borogravians have Nuggan (though most of them actually worship the Duchess, who has posthumously become the equivalent against her will).
* EvilChancellor: It's pretty much a default rule of the Disc that any man made chancellor is a corrupt, scheming bastard, if he wasn't one already.

to:

* EternalHero: Parodied in ''Discworld/TheLastContinent'', where Death speculates that Rincewind is a counterbalance to this, the "Coward with a thousand retreating backs". Discworld also gives us another parody, the octogenarian warrior-hero Cohen the Barbarian, who "[[BadassGrandpa has a lifetime's experience of not dying]]". Discworld also plays the trope straight with BadassGrandpa Lu-Tze, who's a 900-year-old member of a monastic TimePolice. Also perhaps Sam Vimes since ''Discworld/{{Thud}}'': his possession by the [[EldritchAbomination Summoning Dark]] and his resulting special abilities seem to be turning him into an eternal policeman, which can be seen in ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}''.
EthnicGod:
** Cohen and his henchmen ''do'' fit the trope. At the end of ''Discworld/TheLastHero'', they suffer a huge explosion that should've killed them. But Death doesn't come for them. Why? Because of this trope.
*** Death, in a manner of speaking, comes for them all right, in the form of a crew of Valkyries. Whom they promptly horsejack and proceed to ride off to further adventures.
* EthnicGod:
Some consider Tak the god of the Dwarfs; however, while the Dwarfs believe Tak made the world (as well as Dwarfs, men, and trolls), they don't worship him as a rule. rule.
**
Some human nationalities also have their own specific gods: Omnians worship Om, and Borogravians have Nuggan (though most of them actually worship the Duchess, who has posthumously become the equivalent against her will).
* %%* EvilChancellor: It's pretty much a default rule of the Disc that any man made chancellor is a corrupt, scheming bastard, if he wasn't one already.



* ExcuseMeComingThrough: An important element of the Law of Narrative Causality, complete with {{lampshade}} and two guys carrying a pane of glass.
* ExpositionOfImmortality: In a FantasyKitchenSink world populated by Anthropomorphic personifications, golems, gods, and wizards, you should expect plenty of this. The golems are one of bigger examples, given that they're made of rock and effectively unkillable. [[TimeAbyss Anghammarad]] is an extreme example: built over 20,000 years ago and still functioning, remembering times, events, places, and languages that nothing else on the Disc does. Several of the vampires who pop up get in on this, too. The Count de Magpyr (the old, traditional one, not the trendy new one) recognises the names of several of the peasants in the mob at his castle and makes mentioning of remembering their grandparents.
** To give the sheer scale of Anghammarad's intentions for what to do with his near-immortal status: He's carrying a message on a tablet strapped to his arm. He intends to deliver it. To do so, he has to wait ''for time to start over''. To quote Ms. Dearheart: "Golems aren't afraid of forever. They aren't afraid of ''anything''."

to:

* %%* ExcuseMeComingThrough: An important element of the Law of Narrative Causality, complete with {{lampshade}} and two guys carrying a pane of glass.
* %%* ExpositionOfImmortality: In a FantasyKitchenSink world populated by Anthropomorphic personifications, golems, gods, and wizards, you should expect plenty of this. The golems are one of bigger examples, given that they're made of rock and effectively unkillable. [[TimeAbyss Anghammarad]] is an extreme example: built over 20,000 years ago and still functioning, remembering times, events, places, and languages that nothing else on the Disc does. Several of the vampires who pop up get in on this, too. The Count de Magpyr (the old, traditional one, not the trendy new one) recognises the names of several of the peasants in the mob at his castle and makes mentioning of remembering their grandparents.\n** To give the sheer scale of Anghammarad's intentions for what to do with his near-immortal status: He's carrying a message on a tablet strapped to his arm. He intends to deliver it. To do so, he has to wait ''for time to start over''. To quote Ms. Dearheart: "Golems aren't afraid of forever. They aren't afraid of ''anything''."



** The Ramtop Mountains has a naming convention in which a child is named by whatever the priest doing the ceremony says, regardless of whether it was intentional or not. This has resulted in names like James What The Hell's That Cow Doing In Here Poorchick (known as Moocow Poorchick to his friends). Even royalty is not immune, with at least one of Lancre's ruler being named King My-God-He's-Heavy the First and most recently, in ''Carpe Jugulum'', Princess Esmerelda Margaret Note Spelling of Lancre.
** ''Reaper Man'' had One Man Bucket, whose tribe names children after the first thing the mother sees upon looking outside their tent after the birth. One Man Bucket's full name is "One Man Throwing A Bucket Of Water Over Two Dogs." His twin brother, born just a few minutes earlier, wishes he could've been called "Two Dogs ''Fighting.''"



* FantasticRacism: dwarfs versus trolls; humans versus trolls in some places; just about everyone versus goblins.

to:

* FantasticRacism: dwarfs FantasticRacism:
** Dwarfs
versus trolls; humans trolls.
** Humans
versus trolls in some places; just places.
** Just
about everyone versus goblins.



** Vimes, who regards dwarfs and trolls as just people, has a ''thing'' against vampires.
* FantasyConflictCounterpart: In addition to examples in ''Discworld/{{Pyramids}}'' and ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'', later novels draw parallels to TheWarOnTerror. The terrorist actions of the fundamentalist "deep dwarfs" (who [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything cover themselves from head to foot]] because they consider it a sin to look on sunlight) are highly reminiscent of radical Islam.
* FantasyCounterpartAppliance: All over the place, with counterparts ranging from [=PDAs=] (the pocket imp Vimes uses) to the telegraph (the clacks system). In the beginning this was clearly done more with humour in mind, but over time these ideas have been extrapolated to have more complexity and effect on the setting.
** The clacks has recently been ungraded to take account of colour, not unlike fibre-optics...

to:

** Vimes, who regards dwarfs and trolls as just people, has a ''thing'' against vampires.
the undead, although he gets over it gradually as the series goes on and various types of undead prove to be useful members of the Watch.
* FantasyConflictCounterpart: In addition to examples in ''Discworld/{{Pyramids}}'' and ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'', later Later novels draw parallels to TheWarOnTerror. The terrorist actions of the fundamentalist "deep dwarfs" (who [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything cover themselves from head to foot]] because they consider it a sin to look on sunlight) are highly reminiscent of radical Islam.
* FantasyCounterpartAppliance: All over the place, with counterparts ranging from [=PDAs=] (the pocket imp Vimes uses) to the telegraph (the clacks system). In the beginning this was clearly done more with humour in mind, but over time these ideas have been extrapolated to have more complexity and effect on the setting.
**
setting. The clacks has recently been ungraded to take account of colour, not unlike fibre-optics...



** Lancre is part a [[StandardFantasySetting fantasy-land]] countryside of witches, farmers, small kingdoms, mountains, elves and such, and largely rural England, particularly UsefulNotes/{{the West Country}} or the Lake District.
*** Perhaps more specifically Lancashire, especially the northern, more hilly and more rural, half, famous for the Pendle Witches of the early 17th century.

to:

** Lancre is part a [[StandardFantasySetting fantasy-land]] countryside of witches, farmers, small kingdoms, mountains, elves and such, and largely rural England, particularly UsefulNotes/{{the West Country}} or the Lake District.
***
District. Perhaps more specifically Lancashire, especially the northern, more hilly and more rural, half, famous for the Pendle Witches of the early 17th century.



*** This is lampshaded so heavily that one castle's name is "Don't Go Near The".



* FeatheredSerpent: Quezovercoatl is believed to be this by his worshippers, [[spoiler:he isn't]].



* FlatWorld: People, fish, and sea monsters continually fall over the rim.
** As indeed does ''the sea'', but the ''Discworld Companion'' says "arrangements are made" to prevent it all draining away.

to:

* FlatWorld: People, fish, and sea monsters continually fall over the rim.
**
rim. As indeed does ''the sea'', but the ''Discworld Companion'' says "arrangements are made" to prevent it all draining away.



* FluffyTamer: Lady Sybil Ramkin and her dragons. Nanny Ogg and Greebo. Granny Weatherwax and You the cat.

to:

* FluffyTamer: FluffyTamer:
**
Lady Sybil Ramkin and her dragons. dragons.
**
Nanny Ogg and Greebo. Greebo.
**
Granny Weatherwax and You the cat.



* FriendlyNeighbourhoodVampire: All the members of the League of Temperance, who only drink animal blood taken from slaughterhouses.
** Or switch to something completely different. Coffee, anyone?

to:

* FriendlyNeighbourhoodVampire: All the members of the League of Temperance, who only drink animal blood taken from slaughterhouses.
**
slaughterhouses. Or switch to something completely different. Coffee, different -- coffee, anyone?



* GemTissue: The Diamond King of the Trolls isn't just a flowery regal title. He really is made of diamond. Trolls are made of what is called ''metamorphorical rock'', where the silicon-based substance of their bodies is predominantly one form of inorganic silicon tissue: the stuff of their being is partly down to genetic factors, but can also be mimetic of the dominat rock of their surroundings. Many male trolls are simply "Granite" or "Marble" or similar: but female trolls tend to incorporate a lot more wholly and semi-precious gemstones, ie Ruby, Beryl, et c. And, of course, ''all'' trolls have diamond teeth - the only material strong enough to grind and break down rock.

to:

* GemTissue: The Diamond King of the Trolls isn't just a flowery regal title. He really is made of diamond. Trolls are made of what is called ''metamorphorical rock'', where the silicon-based substance of their bodies is predominantly one form of inorganic silicon tissue: the stuff of their being is partly down to genetic factors, but can also be mimetic of the dominat dominant rock of their surroundings. Many male trolls are simply "Granite" or "Marble" or similar: but female trolls tend to incorporate a lot more wholly and semi-precious gemstones, ie Ruby, Beryl, et c. And, of course, ''all'' trolls have diamond teeth - the only material strong enough to grind and break down rock.



* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Multiple times in every single book. For instance, much is made of the donkey/buttocks pun.
* TheGhost: Bergholt Stuttley "Bloody Stupid" Johnson, Discworld's most infamous inventor. His works are present throughout the series, but Johnson himself has never made an appearance. Probably because Sybil's grandfather shot the man when it looked like he was about to do work for the Ramkins.
** Messr Honeyplace, [[AmoralAttorney Mr Slant's]] vampiric partner at Morecombe, Slant and Honeyplace, have never made an appearance. Morecombe is also a vampire and the Ramkin's family solicitor (for multiple generations), but Honeyplace has not been sighted to date.

to:

* %%* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: Multiple times in every single book. For instance, much is made of the donkey/buttocks pun.
* TheGhost: TheGhost:
**
Bergholt Stuttley "Bloody Stupid" Johnson, Discworld's most infamous inventor. His works are present throughout the series, but Johnson himself has never made an appearance. Probably because Sybil's grandfather shot the man when it looked like he was about to do work for the Ramkins.
** Messr Honeyplace, [[AmoralAttorney Mr Slant's]] vampiric partner at Morecombe, Slant and Honeyplace, have has never made an appearance. Morecombe is also a vampire and the Ramkin's family solicitor (for multiple generations), but Honeyplace has not been sighted to date.



** Rincewind (who grew up in Ankh-Morpork and HATES being anywhere else) certainly believes this is common in some rural districts. This led to him thinking that certain mustachioed people wearing dresses in a city on XXXX were women who happened to have mustaches, instead of cross-dressed men.



* GonkyFemme:
** In the novel Going Postal, they put a golem into a dress and rename it "Gladys", in order to make it proper for "her" to clean the ladies' bathroom. The golem promptly starts to act very girly.
** Dwarfs of all genders in Discworld look like small bearded men, so Cheery has to employ Tertiary Sexual Characteristics to show her femininity.

to:

* GonkyFemme:
** In the novel Going Postal, they put a golem into a dress and rename it "Gladys", in order to make it proper for "her" to clean the ladies' bathroom. The golem promptly starts to act very girly.
**
GonkyFemme: Dwarfs of all genders in Discworld look like small bearded men, so Cheery has to employ Tertiary Sexual Characteristics to show her femininity.



* GuileHero: Moist, Vetinari (although his position on the hero-villain continuum is complicated), Nanny Ogg, and Granny Weatherwax, all in different ways.
** Carrot and (somewhat less so) Vimes also get moments of this.

to:

* GuileHero: Moist, Vetinari (although his position on the hero-villain continuum is complicated), Nanny Ogg, and Granny Weatherwax, all in different ways.
**
ways. Carrot and (somewhat less so) Vimes also get moments of this.



* HappilyMarried: Commander Vimes and Lady Sybil, Fred Colon and his [[TheGhost unnamed wife]], and King Verence and Queen Magrat of Lancre.
** And Mort and Ysabell, [[spoiler:despite their death in a carriage accident]].

to:

* HappilyMarried: HappilyMarried:
**
Commander Vimes and Lady Sybil, Sybil.
**
Fred Colon and his [[TheGhost unnamed wife]], and wife]].
**
King Verence and Queen Magrat of Lancre.
** And Mort and Ysabell, [[spoiler:despite their death in a carriage accident]].



* TheHatMakesTheMan: The king's crown and the archmage's hat both influence their wearer's personality.



** Played with in ''Discworld/LordsAndLadies'', the helmet of queen Ynci is presumed to be one until it's revealed at the end that it isn't, but the wearer ''presumably'' still believed it was.



* HellBentForLeather: Not used a lot, but it comes up.
** In ''Discworld/{{Sourcery}}'' we get a would-be Barbarian Hero dressed in (a very small amount of) leather. He's trying to learn Heroing from a book, which might actually have some connection with the alleged author, Cohen the Barbarian.
** In ''Discworld/SoulMusic'', the Dean gets a leather jacket with "Born to Rune" on the back. It doesn't come out often, but when it does, it should be an instant OhCrap for whatever the Wizards of UU are going to war against.
* HeWhoMustNotBeNamed: Inverted with [[spoiler: Lady Luck]], the only goddess who must depart if her name is spoken. Played straight with elves, as saying or even ''thinking'' their name too much tends to attract them.
* HorseOfADifferentColor: Vermine, "a more careful relative of the lemming" with black and white fur much prized by royalty and nobility for [[RequisiteRoyalRegalia lining their robes]].
** Its fur is also much prized by the vermine itself; the selfish little bastard will do anything rather than let go of it.

to:

* HellBentForLeather: Not used a lot, but it comes up.
** In ''Discworld/{{Sourcery}}'' we get a would-be Barbarian Hero dressed in (a very small amount of) leather. He's trying to learn Heroing from a book, which might actually have some connection with the alleged author, Cohen the Barbarian.
**
In ''Discworld/SoulMusic'', the Dean gets a leather jacket with "Born to Rune" on the back. It doesn't come out often, often after that, but when it does, it should be an instant OhCrap for whatever the Wizards of UU are going to war against.
* HeWhoMustNotBeNamed: HeWhoMustNotBeNamed:
**
Inverted with [[spoiler: Lady Luck]], the only goddess who must depart if her name is spoken. spoken.
**
Played straight with elves, as saying or even ''thinking'' their name too much tends to attract them.
* HorseOfADifferentColor: HorseOfADifferentColor:
**
Vermine, "a more careful relative of the lemming" with black and white fur much prized by royalty and nobility for [[RequisiteRoyalRegalia lining their robes]].
**
robes]]. Its fur is also much prized by the vermine itself; the selfish little bastard will do anything rather than let go of it.



* HoldYourHippogriffs

to:

* %%* HoldYourHippogriffs
19th Jun '17 7:25:43 PM PaulA
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* ConservationOfNinjitsu: Narrativium pretty much guarantees this. For example, in ''Discworld/GuardsGuards!'' the palace guard are afraid of Vimes because there is only one of him and he is smiling at them.
** Pratchett explains this phenomenon by reasoning that the side with numbers has to think before hitting, whereas the hopelessly outnumbered side can just attack anything nearby and be pretty much sure it is an enemy, thus giving them an advantage. This makes sense in Discworld logic.
** In ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'', where 7 very old barbarians decided to face off against 700,000 enemy troops. Guess which side is afraid.
** These same barbarians back off when faced by the single threat of Carrot in ''Discworld/TheLastHero''. You just don't mess with a hero and his big (magic?) sword when you outnumber him. They're very old heroes, which means they have a lot of experience doing extremely dangerous things ''without dying'', and they know the odds.
** The Nac Mac Feegle take a mass-based rather than numbers-based approach: they are described as having all the strength of a normal-sized person compressed into six inches... and like most things when compressed, they have a tendency to explode. They like big enemies because there's more of them to hit, and they're so small and fast it's almost impossible for said enemies to hit them back.
* ComicallyMissingThePoint: After saving a woman, Carrot is invited to stay with her at Mrs. Palms'. "She kept waking me up and asking me if I wanted anything but she didn't have any apples." Dwarfs in general are extremely literal minded.

to:

* ConservationOfNinjitsu: ConservationOfNinjutsu: Narrativium pretty much guarantees this. For example, in ''Discworld/GuardsGuards!'' the palace guard are afraid of Vimes because there is only one of him and he is smiling at them.
**
Pratchett explains this phenomenon by reasoning that the side with numbers has to think before hitting, whereas the hopelessly outnumbered side can just attack anything nearby and be pretty much sure it is an enemy, thus giving them an advantage. This makes sense in Discworld logic.
** In ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'', where 7 very old barbarians decided to face off against 700,000 enemy troops. Guess which side is afraid.
** These same barbarians back off when faced by the single threat of Carrot in ''Discworld/TheLastHero''. You just don't mess with a hero and his big (magic?) sword when you outnumber him. They're very old heroes, which means they have a lot of experience doing extremely dangerous things ''without dying'', and they know the odds.
** The Nac Mac Feegle take a mass-based rather than numbers-based approach: they are described as having all the strength of a normal-sized person compressed into six inches... and like most things when compressed, they have a tendency to explode. They like big enemies because there's more of them to hit, and they're so small and fast it's almost impossible for said enemies to hit them back.
* ComicallyMissingThePoint: After saving a woman, Carrot is invited to stay with her at Mrs. Palms'. "She kept waking me up and asking me if I wanted anything but she didn't have any apples." Dwarfs in general are extremely literal minded.
logic.



* CorruptPolitician:
** Subverted by Ephebe. They have the only elected politician on the disc, a new one is elected every five years on the basis of honesty, and they call him [[GeniusBonus The Tyrant]]. It's his actual title.
** The residents of Fourecks always throw their politicians in prison immediately after they're elected, to save time.
* CrazyPrepared: Commander Samuel Vimes has set up numerous traps at his home and office to deal with those pesky Assassins, to the point that some of the more mean-spirited instructors have begun sending out students to do "mock assassinations". If they can draw a bead on him with a crossbow, they pass. Good luck.
** More importantly, his name has been taken off the register for ''real'' assassinations, meaning they're no longer accepting contracts on him. This means two things: First, it means that he's made himself more trouble than any amount of money the city's rich and influential are willing to pay is worth, and second, it means that the guild reckons that killing him would be a ''really bad idea'' for all involved. The only other person for this to ever happen to is ''Lord Vetinari himself''.
*** Sam Vimes explains it to himself as the guild deciding that killing him or Vetinari wouldn't just spoil the game, it would ''smash the board''.
* CreatingLifeIsUnforeseen: According to one legend told in ''Thud'', Tak (the Dwarf creator deity) made the First Man and the First Dwarf from a rock. Afterward, he noticed the rock was trying to come life by itself, leading to the creation of the First Troll.

to:

* CorruptPolitician:
**
CorruptPolitician: Subverted by Ephebe. They have the only elected politician on the disc, a new one is elected every five years on the basis of honesty, and they call him [[GeniusBonus The Tyrant]]. It's his actual title.
** The residents of Fourecks always throw their politicians in prison immediately after they're elected, to save time.
* CrazyPrepared: Commander Samuel Vimes has set up numerous traps at his home and office to deal with those pesky Assassins, to the point that his name has been taken off the register for ''real'' assassinations, but some of the more mean-spirited instructors have begun sending out students to do "mock assassinations". If they can draw a bead on him with a crossbow, they pass. Good luck.
** More importantly, his name has been taken off the register for ''real'' assassinations, meaning they're no longer accepting contracts on him. This means two things: First, it means that he's made himself more trouble than any amount of money the city's rich and influential are willing to pay is worth, and second, it means that the guild reckons that killing him would be a ''really bad idea'' for all involved. The only other person for this to ever happen to is ''Lord Vetinari himself''.
*** Sam Vimes explains it to himself as the guild deciding that killing him or Vetinari wouldn't just spoil the game, it would ''smash the board''.
* CreatingLifeIsUnforeseen: According to one legend told in ''Thud'', Tak (the Dwarf creator deity) made the First Man and the First Dwarf from a rock. Afterward, he noticed the rock was trying to come life by itself, leading to the creation of the First Troll.
luck.



* CultureChopSuey: Numerous examples, one of them {{lampshaded}} by a discussion amongst the gods about the empires on the Counterweight Continent:
-->"They are five great families feuding. [[TheClan The Hongs]], the Sungs, [[TheTriadsAndTheTongs the Fangs,]] [[FeudingFamilies the Tangs,]] [[AerithAndBob and the McSweeneys]]."
-->"''[=McSweeneys=]?''"
-->"Very old, established family."
** This has been explained as a ShoutOut to JamesClavell's epics of the inscrutable Orient, especially ''Noble House'', which deals with the first Westerners to settle in Hong Kong. One of the "noble houses", which over the years has become Anglo-Chinese (perhaps more Chinese than Anglo) has a suspiciously Scottish name...



* DeathFromAbove: Don't go into wherever the Librarian has chosen as his base of operations if he considers you an enemy. He will generally drop down onto your shoulders and try to unscrew your head.
** A favored tactic of wild banshees like [[spoiler: Mr. Grylle]].
** Don't make camp under a eucalyptus tree in Fourecks, or the Drop-Bears will attack you. [[spoiler:But if you're a wizard, you're probably safe, on account of your pointy hat.]]

to:

* DeathFromAbove: DeathFromAbove:
**
Don't go into wherever the Librarian has chosen as his base of operations if he considers you an enemy. He will generally drop down onto your shoulders and try to unscrew your head.
** A favored tactic of wild banshees like [[spoiler: Mr. Grylle]].
** Don't make camp under a eucalyptus tree in Fourecks, or the Drop-Bears will attack you. [[spoiler:But if you're a wizard, you're probably safe, on account of your pointy hat.]]
head.



* DeFictionalization: A number of board/card games appear in the novels, and several of them have been given real life versions, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thud_(game) Thud!]] being one example. Stealth Chess, for example, is a [[VariantChess chess variant]]; Thud! is based on the ancient Norse game of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hnefatafl hnefatafl]], as befits a game of [[Myth/NorseMythology dwarfs and trolls]].
** For trivia fans: The dwarf name for Thud is Hnaflbaflsniflwhifltafl (pronounced Hur-naffle-baffle-sniffle-wiffle-taffle) a rather more obvious connection to the Norse game.

to:

* DeFictionalization: A number of board/card games appear in the novels, and several of them have been given real life versions, versions.
**
[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thud_(game) Thud!]] being one example. Stealth Chess, for example, is a [[VariantChess chess variant]]; Thud! is based on the ancient Norse game of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hnefatafl hnefatafl]], as befits a game of [[Myth/NorseMythology dwarfs and trolls]].
**
trolls]]. For trivia fans: The dwarf name for Thud is Hnaflbaflsniflwhifltafl (pronounced Hur-naffle-baffle-sniffle-wiffle-taffle) a rather more obvious connection to the Norse game.



* DidNotGetTheGirl: Pterry seems fond of this one. In quite a few books, a relationship will be teased between the male and female lead, only for them to go their separate ways at the end.

to:

* %%* DidNotGetTheGirl: Pterry seems fond of this one. In quite a few books, a relationship will be teased between the male and female lead, only for them to go their separate ways at the end.



* DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything: So many examples, in so many books.

to:

* DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything: So many examples, in so many books.DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything:



* TheDon: "Legitimate Businessman" Chrysophrase the troll. Naturally, Pterry can't help but pun--high level troll gangsters are referred to as "Tons". Harry King fits the type as well, but he's not a criminal (though ironically, he is literally in the recycling business, which could also be called waste management, a stereotype for American Dons' "legitimate" businesses).
* DontFearTheReaper: [[AC:Lord, what can the harvest hope for, if not for the care of the reaper man?]]
** Also the motto on Sto Helit's coat of arms, befitting a house that passed to Death's apprentice and his adopted daughter - "Non Timetis Messor".
** Also the subject of Darktan's speech as he assumes leadership of the Changelings in ''Amazing Maurice''.

to:

* TheDon: TheDon:
**
"Legitimate Businessman" Chrysophrase the troll. Naturally, Pterry can't help but pun--high level troll gangsters are referred to as "Tons". "Tons".
**
Harry King fits the type as well, but he's not a criminal (though ironically, he is literally in the recycling business, which could also be called waste management, a stereotype for American Dons' "legitimate" businesses).
* DontFearTheReaper: [[AC:Lord, Although he initially appears as a hostile figure, Death rapidly develops into a sympathetic and well-meaning public servant who takes an interest in humanity and does his best to ease people through their transition to the next world.
-->[[AC:Lord,
what can the harvest hope for, if not for the care of the reaper man?]]
** Also the motto on Sto Helit's coat of arms, befitting a house that passed to Death's apprentice and his adopted daughter - "Non Timetis Messor".
** Also the subject of Darktan's speech as he assumes leadership of the Changelings in ''Amazing Maurice''.
man?]]
18th Jun '17 8:12:49 PM PaulA
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* ''Discworld/{{Eric}}'' (or "''[[strike:Faust]] Eric''") (1990 - Rincewind; originally published as an illustrated novel)

to:

* ''Discworld/{{Eric}}'' (or "''[[strike:Faust]] Eric''") (1990 - Rincewind; originally published as an illustrated novel)



* ''[[strike: Faust]] Discworld/{{Eric}}'' (illustrated by Josh Kirby) (1990 - Rincewind; also available in paperback novel format)

to:

* ''[[strike: Faust]] Discworld/{{Eric}}'' ''Discworld/{{Eric}}'' (illustrated by Josh Kirby) (1990 - Rincewind; also available in paperback novel format)



** For the love of God, ''don't'' [[strike: call the Librarian a]] ''say'' [[strike: monkey]] the M-word near the Librarian.

to:

** For the love of God, ''don't'' [[strike: call the Librarian a]] ''say'' [[strike: monkey]] the M-word near the Librarian.



* IJustWantToBeNormal: Susan Sto Helit desperately wants to lead an ordinary life, which is complicated by the fact that her parents are Death's adopted daughter and his former apprentice. And she's a duchess. Rincewind also hates being forced into dangerous quests to save the world, and would like nothing more than to be bored the rest of his life. Carrot Ironfoundersson may also qualify, as despite the fact that he [[strike: is]] probably is the heir to the throne of Ankh-Morpork, he prefers to be a copper.

to:

* IJustWantToBeNormal: Susan Sto Helit desperately wants to lead an ordinary life, which is complicated by the fact that her parents are Death's adopted daughter and his former apprentice. And she's a duchess. Rincewind also hates being forced into dangerous quests to save the world, and would like nothing more than to be bored the rest of his life. Carrot Ironfoundersson may also qualify, as despite the fact that he [[strike: is]] probably is the heir to the throne of Ankh-Morpork, he prefers to be a copper.



* MisfitMobilizationMoment: The reformation of the [[strike:Night]] City Watch, particularly in ''[[Discworld/MenAtArms Men-At-Arms]]''.

to:

* MisfitMobilizationMoment: The reformation of the [[strike:Night]] Night Watch into the City Watch, particularly in ''[[Discworld/MenAtArms Men-At-Arms]]''.
18th Jun '17 8:09:48 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BerserkButton: For the love of God, ''don't'' [[strike: call the Librarian a]] ''say'' [[strike: monkey]] the M-word near the Librarian.

to:

* BerserkButton: BerserkButton:
**
For the love of God, ''don't'' [[strike: call the Librarian a]] ''say'' [[strike: monkey]] the M-word near the Librarian.



** Or mispronounce Teatime. "Teh-ah-tim-eh"
** Or say "garlic" to Chef Aimsbury. It's not that it makes him ''angry'', but it's still not a good idea to cause someone whose job more or less requires that he be carrying or at least have ready access to knives, cleavers, etc. to lose control of himself.



* BewitchedAmphibians: Nodded to many times, by both witches and wizards.

to:

* %%* BewitchedAmphibians: Nodded to many times, by both witches and wizards.wizards. %% Trope examples should give specific instances.



* BilingualConversation: Any conversation with the Unseen University's librarian (an orangutan). His vocabulary is limited to "Oook" with varying punctuation, but everyone seems to know exactly what he means.

to:

* BilingualConversation: BilingualConversation:
**
Any conversation with the Unseen University's librarian (an orangutan). His vocabulary is limited to "Oook" with varying punctuation, but everyone seems to know exactly what he means.



** In ''Discworld/LordsAndLadies'', elves are sensitive to magnetic fields, thus explaining their aversion to iron which distorts and "blinds" such senses.



* BoyMeetsGirl: In the majority of books. Of course, there are generally complications, but that's why books have so many pages.
* BrainlessBeauty: [[Discworld/MovingPictures Laddie]], [[Discworld/{{Maskerade}} Christine]], [[Discworld/{{Thud}} Tawneee]], and [[Discworld/UnseenAcademicals Juliet]]. Perhaps surprisingly, with the slight exception of Christine, they are portrayed sympathetically as good-natured innocents.
* BrawnHilda: Vimes' wife Sybil in ''Discworld/TheFifthElephant''; the [[{{Valkyries}} valkyrie]] in ''Discworld/SoulMusic''. To a lesser extent, Agnes Nitt in ''Discworld/{{Maskerade}}''.
** Sybil Ramkin right from her first appearance in ''Discworld/GuardsGuards'' In that one, some Palace Guards come to take her to be eaten by the dragon. She takes exception to being dragged off by a load of guards... with a broadsword. It doesn't work out for her, but two of her pets (Sam Vimes and a most peculiar young male swamp dragon) rescue her later on.
** It is noted on several occasions, as recently as ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'', that Sybil is descended from the kind of old aristocracy that kept its place by being more than able to defend themselves. Hence why even in ''Discworld/NightWatch'' a younger Sybil grabs a ornamental sword (or something else long and metal?) to defend herself when (stranger to her at that time) Vimes comes to the door.
** There were previous references to the martial activities of Sybil's male ancestors, usually in the context of her even tougher female ancestors looking after everything else, including caring for whatever portions of their male relatives made it back from battle. As well, given the later references to the family apparently never throwing anything away if it could possibly have any use, there's no reason to think that sword wasn't entirely functional. (Given how badly she handles a sword in the chronologically later events of ''Discworld/GuardsGuards'' she probably didn't know how to use it, but that's not important when you consider the kind of help the family tends to hire and the fact that her father might well have been home.)
** The Duchess from ''Wyrd Sisters'' is a villainous example.
** Even Big Savings from ''Amazing Maurice'' may qualify, despite being a rat.
* BrickJoke: Happens quite often, even across books in the form of {{Continuity Nod}}s. As one example, in ''Discworld/TheTruth'', there's mention of someone trying to pass a parrot off as a dog by teaching it to bark and writing "[=DoG=]" on its feathers. In ''Discworld/TheLastHero'', Leonard of Quirm is shown feeding a bunch of birds, one of which is that parrot.
** Also, a bar called The Broken Drum (You Can't Beat It!) burns down in the first book. It appears rebuilt subsequently throughout later books as The Mended Drum (You Can Get Beaten).

to:

* %%* BoyMeetsGirl: In the majority of books. Of course, there are generally complications, but that's why books have so many pages.
* BrainlessBeauty: [[Discworld/MovingPictures Laddie]], [[Discworld/{{Maskerade}} Christine]], [[Discworld/{{Thud}} Tawneee]], and [[Discworld/UnseenAcademicals Juliet]]. Perhaps surprisingly, with the slight exception of Christine, they are portrayed sympathetically as good-natured innocents.
* BrawnHilda: Vimes' wife wife, Sybil in ''Discworld/TheFifthElephant''; the [[{{Valkyries}} valkyrie]] in ''Discworld/SoulMusic''. To a lesser extent, Agnes Nitt in ''Discworld/{{Maskerade}}''.
** Sybil Ramkin
Ramkin, right from her first appearance in ''Discworld/GuardsGuards'' ''Discworld/GuardsGuards''. In that one, some Palace Guards come to take her to be eaten by the dragon. She takes exception to being dragged off by a load of guards... with a broadsword. It doesn't work out for her, but two of her pets (Sam Vimes and a most peculiar young male swamp dragon) rescue her later on.
**
on. It is noted on several occasions, as recently as ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'', that Sybil is descended from the kind of old aristocracy that kept its place by being more than able to defend themselves. Hence why even in ''Discworld/NightWatch'' a younger Sybil grabs a ornamental sword (or something else long and metal?) to defend herself when (stranger to her at that time) Vimes comes to the door.
**
door. There were previous references to the martial activities of Sybil's male ancestors, usually in the context of her even tougher female ancestors looking after everything else, including caring for whatever portions of their male relatives made it back from battle. As well, given the later references to the family apparently never throwing anything away if it could possibly have any use, there's no reason to think that sword wasn't entirely functional. (Given how badly she handles a sword in the chronologically later events of ''Discworld/GuardsGuards'' she probably didn't know how to use it, but that's not important when you consider the kind of help the family tends to hire and the fact that her father might well have been home.)
** The Duchess from ''Wyrd Sisters'' is a villainous example.
** Even Big Savings from ''Amazing Maurice'' may qualify, despite being a rat.
* BrickJoke: Happens quite often, even across books in the form of {{Continuity Nod}}s. As one example, in Nod}}s.
** In
''Discworld/TheTruth'', there's mention of someone trying to pass a parrot off as a dog by teaching it to bark and writing "[=DoG=]" on its feathers. In ''Discworld/TheLastHero'', Leonard of Quirm is shown feeding a bunch of birds, one of which is that parrot.
** Also, a A bar called The Broken Drum (You Can't Beat It!) burns down in the first book. It appears rebuilt subsequently throughout later books as The Mended Drum (You Can Get Beaten).



** Also inverted with Goldeneyes Silverhand Dactylos: One client tore out his eyes to prevent him from making any works greater for anyone else. Another had his hand cut off. He replaced both and was still the Discworld's greatest engineer... until he died near the end of the first book, killed by his ''last'' client, for the same reason.



* ButtMonkey: Rincewind, obviously.

to:

* ButtMonkey: ButtMonkey:
**
Rincewind, obviously.



** Subverted by the de Magpyrs at the start of ''Carpe Jugulum'', and lampshaded by the Count when he lectures his kids about it.



* ChalkOutline: Invoked rarely, and only for laughs. For example, the Ankh is the only river in the world you can draw a chalk outline on. Also, one of the previous postmasters spied into the sorting machine, and his outline was all over the sorting office.
** In ''The Truth'', the probably human Corporal Nobbs drew a chalk outline of a victim, which is all fine and normal for a copper, except he did it in colored chalk, and felt the need to add a pipe and draw some clouds and flowers.
** Vimes presumably needed a ''big'' piece of chalk when he outlined the position which the great Ankh-Morpork dragon had occupied when the patsy-king "slew" it.
* ChameleonCamouflage: Susan Sto Helit, Granny Weatherwax, and Granny's apprentice Tiffany Aching have powers to do this. The young Vetinari learns this in ''Discworld/NightWatch'' [[{{Irony}} (to the point that he nearly fails his Camouflage class for non-attendance)]], and Vimes has an uncanny ability to blend neatly into the shadows.
** The Wizards of UU can do this so well that they look more like what they're pretending to be than the real thing does. Granny, on the other hand, merely fades into the foreground.
* CharacterizationMarchesOn: Remember when the The Patrician of Ankh-Morpork was obese? Or when Death seemed to actively cause people to die rather than merely collect their souls? Both have gotten excuses, one of which is that Death changed character after Mort, the other that it was a different Patrician. Pratchett denies the latter, admitting it is this trope.
--> '''Pratchett:''' "How about: maybe he was Vetinari, but written by a more stupid writer?"

to:

* ChalkOutline: Invoked rarely, and only for laughs. For example, the Ankh is the only river in the world you can draw a chalk outline on. Also, one of the previous postmasters spied into the sorting machine, and his outline was all over the sorting office.
on.
* ChameleonCamouflage:
** In ''The Truth'', the probably human Corporal Nobbs drew a chalk outline of a victim, which is all fine and normal for a copper, except he did it in colored chalk, and felt the need to add a pipe and draw some clouds and flowers.
** Vimes presumably needed a ''big'' piece of chalk when he outlined the position which the great Ankh-Morpork dragon had occupied when the patsy-king "slew" it.
* ChameleonCamouflage:
Susan Sto Helit, Helit.
**
Granny Weatherwax, and Weatherwax.
**
Granny's apprentice Tiffany Aching have powers to do this. The young Vetinari learns this in ''Discworld/NightWatch'' [[{{Irony}} (to the point that he nearly fails his Camouflage class for non-attendance)]], and Aching.
**
Vimes has an uncanny ability to blend neatly into the shadows.
** The Wizards of UU can do this so well that they look more like what they're pretending to be than the real thing does. Granny, on the other hand, merely fades into the foreground.
does.
* CharacterizationMarchesOn: CharacterizationMarchesOn:
**
Remember when the The Patrician of Ankh-Morpork was obese? obese?
**
Or when Death seemed to actively cause people to die rather than merely collect their souls? Both have gotten excuses, one of which is that Death changed character after Mort, the other that it was a different Patrician. Pratchett denies the latter, admitting it is this trope.
--> '''Pratchett:''' "How about: maybe he was Vetinari, but written by a more stupid writer?"
souls?



* CharacterDevelopment: Or rather, ''setting'' development. Over the course of the series, Ankh-Morpork goes from a WretchedHive locked in MedievalStasis to a bustling SteamPunk CityOfAdventure.
** It's still a pretty much a WretchedHive, it's just that everyone is more civilized about it.

to:

* CharacterDevelopment: CharacterDevelopment:
**
Or rather, ''setting'' development. Over the course of the series, Ankh-Morpork goes from a WretchedHive locked in MedievalStasis to a bustling SteamPunk CityOfAdventure.
**
CityOfAdventure. It's still a pretty much a WretchedHive, it's just that everyone is more civilized about it.



* ChekhovsGun: Pterry is evidently a huge fan of these. If it's not in a footnote, then you can put good money on that aside bit of characterization, world-building, rule, or so forth to become vitally important near the end of the book.
** Or indeed, a much later book.

to:

* %%* ChekhovsGun: Pterry is evidently a huge fan of these. If it's not in a footnote, then you can put good money on that aside bit of characterization, world-building, rule, or so forth to become vitally important near the end of the book.
** %%** Or indeed, a much later book.



* TheChosenZero: Nobby Nobbs is [[spoiler:almost certainly falsely]] revealed to be the Earl of Ankh and the successor to the throne of Ankh-Morpork. The rich and powerful citizens who want to dispose of Lord Vetinari see Nobby's claim to the throne as a stroke of luck (he is a useful idiot and will make a good puppet ruler). The nobility of Ankh-Morpork couldn't accept Carrot because he was intelligent and a good person. The BigBad couldn't accept Carrot because he's dating a werewolf.
** And Nobby wouldn't accept the job because "Vimes'd go ''spare''!"



** TheCityNarrows: The Shades within Ankh-Morpork, where the cops (and criminals) never go for fear of not coming out alive. (Of course that makes it okay for those members of the Watch who aren't technically alive.)
* ClassicalMovieVampire: Usually subverted, but played straight sometimes.
* CleverCrows: Ravens living around the High-Energy Magic building at Unseen University have developed intelligence beyond their already-clever limits, and view the city panorama below as a sort of daytime entertainment. A couple of them bother gnome constable Buggy Swires on a stakeout, constantly pestering him for details. Also, Quoth the Raven (yeah...) who starts off as a wizard's familiar in Mort, and ends up becoming the steed for the Death of Rats in later books. He advises a number of protagonists and is clearly more level-headed than most characters on the disc.

to:

** * TheCityNarrows: The Shades within Ankh-Morpork, where the cops (and criminals) never go for fear of not coming out alive. (Of course that makes it okay for those members of the Watch who aren't technically alive.)
* %%* ClassicalMovieVampire: Usually subverted, but played straight sometimes.
* CleverCrows: CleverCrows:
**
Ravens living around the High-Energy Magic building at Unseen University have developed intelligence beyond their already-clever limits, and view the city panorama below as a sort of daytime entertainment. A couple of them bother gnome constable Buggy Swires on a stakeout, constantly pestering him for details. Also, details.
**
Quoth the Raven (yeah...) who starts off as a wizard's familiar in Mort, ''Mort'', and ends up becoming the steed for the Death of Rats in later books. He advises a number of protagonists and is clearly more level-headed than most characters on the disc.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.DiscWorld