History Literature / AndThenThereWereNone

28th Mar '17 8:20:47 PM PaulA
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* {{Yandere}}: Vera Claythorne, who[[spoiler:, while working as a governess, murdered a child in her care]] so that her lover can become rich and free to marry her.
25th Mar '17 4:49:08 AM Xythos
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* LostInTranslation: In the [[https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/5/5f/Desyatnegrityat.jpg/220px-Desyatnegrityat.jpg poster for the Russian adaptation]], the BlackCapOfDeath is changed to a mortarboard. This is probably due to the cap being peculiar to the British law system and being often called "square".
19th Mar '17 11:31:07 PM NightShade96
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* DeathByAdaptation: [[spoiler:Blore]] was killed by a bear-shaped clock crushing [[spoiler:his]] head in the novel, but in the 2015 BBC adaptation, [[spoiler:he ]] is stabbed by U.N. Owen, who is wearing a bear rug.
19th Mar '17 11:23:31 PM NightShade96
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* AdaptationalAlternateEnding: Most film adaptations (including the 1945 and 1965 versions) change the bleak KillEmAll ending of the book so that one or more characters survive. Also, in the book all the victims except the murderer were guilty of the crimes they were accused of by "U. N. Owen". Any survivors in film versions turn out to be innocent.

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* AdaptationalAlternateEnding: Most film adaptations (including the 1945 and 1965 versions) change the bleak KillEmAll ending of the book so that one or more characters survive. Also, in the book book, all the victims except the murderer were guilty of the crimes they were accused of by "U. N. Owen". Any survivors in the film versions turn out to be innocent.



** The Russian adaptation leaves out [[spoiler:Wargrave's]] obsession with murder and paints him as more of a vigilante who got fed up with [[spoiler:the corrupt judicial system and decided to stage a "perfect trial": "No two-faced [[AmoralAttorney sell-outs of lawyers]], no ridiculous capes or wigs--just the judge face to face with the accused, and the criminal with his executioner."]] He never mentions his terminal illness either, so his decision to kill himself can be seen as a conscious act of self-execution, [[spoiler:since in the end he ''is'' a mass murderer, and "the greatest judge" like himself would never let such a thing go.]]
** The BBC adaptation turn Morris from a shady drug dealer to the owner of an employment agency.

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** The Russian adaptation leaves out [[spoiler:Wargrave's]] obsession with murder and paints him as more of a vigilante who got fed up with [[spoiler:the corrupt judicial system and decided to stage a "perfect trial": "No two-faced [[AmoralAttorney sell-outs of lawyers]], no ridiculous capes or wigs--just wigs -- just the judge face to face with the accused, and the criminal with his executioner."]] He never mentions his terminal illness either, so his decision to kill himself can be seen as a conscious act of self-execution, [[spoiler:since in the end he ''is'' a mass murderer, and "the greatest judge" like himself would never let such a thing go.]]
** The BBC adaptation turn turns Morris from a shady drug dealer to the owner of an employment agency.



*** Rogers is seen abusing his wife and instead of simply withholding the medicine for his elderly employer, [[VorpalPillow he smothers her with a pillow]]
*** Blore and Macarthur, rather than simply sending their victims to a guaranteed death, are both shown to have actively murdered their respective victims [[spoiler: with Blore beating his victim to death and Macarthur shooting his wife's lover in the back of the head.]] ([[PragmaticAdaptation Likely because the use of flashbacks to the actual crimes made the indirect methods less visually interesting and harder to explain.]])
*** Vera is much more frigid and cruel than she appeared in the original novel. In the book, she is wracked with guilt and slowly begins losing her mind as she comes to terms with what she has done, but in the miniseries it is strongly implied to all be an act of a vicious sociopath. Also, Little Cyril's death at sea is now shown to be a cold and calculated murder, while in the book it was implied to be a spur-of-the-moment crime of passion.

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*** Rogers is seen abusing [[DomesticAbuse abusing]] his wife and instead of simply withholding the medicine for his elderly employer, [[VorpalPillow he smothers her with a pillow]]
pillow]].
*** Blore and Macarthur, rather than simply [[UriahGambit sending their victims to a guaranteed death, death]], are both shown to have actively murdered their respective victims [[spoiler: with Blore beating his victim to death due to homophobia, and Macarthur shooting his wife's lover in the back of the head.]] head]] ([[PragmaticAdaptation Likely likely because the use of flashbacks to the actual crimes made the indirect methods less visually interesting and harder to explain.]])
explain]]).
*** Vera is much more frigid and cruel than she appeared to be in the original novel. In the book, she is wracked with guilt and slowly begins losing her mind as she comes to terms with what she has done, but in the miniseries it is strongly implied to all be an act of a vicious sociopath. [[TheSociopath sociopath]]. Also, Little little Cyril's death at sea is now shown to be a cold and calculated murder, while in the book it was implied to be a spur-of-the-moment crime of passion.



*** Edward Seton [[spoiler: was guilty of killing an old woman]] in the original novel. Here, he [[spoiler: was guilty of killing several people]].



** In the BBC adaptation, Arthur Richmond becomes Henry Richmond; James Landor becomes Edward Landor.

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** In the BBC adaptation, Arthur Richmond becomes Henry Richmond; Richmond, and James Landor becomes Edward Landor.



* AintTooProudToBeg: In the 2015 version, [[spoiler: Vera tries to bargain with Wargrave to save her wretched life. [[SoftSpokenSadist Wargrave patiently indulges her...]] then gives her a subdued ReasonYouSuckSpeech, kicks away the chair keeping her from hanging, [[AssholeVictim and then leaves her to her (well-deserved) fate.]]]]

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* AintTooProudToBeg: In the 2015 version, [[spoiler: Vera tries to bargain with Wargrave to save her wretched life. [[SoftSpokenSadist Wargrave patiently indulges her...]] then gives her a subdued ReasonYouSuckSpeech, TheReasonYouSuckSpeech, kicks away the chair keeping her from hanging, [[AssholeVictim and then leaves her to her (well-deserved) fate.]]]]



** In the 2015 adaptation:

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** In the 2015 adaptation:adaptation, we get this exchange:



* LimitedWardrobe: Occurs in the game.

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* LimitedWardrobe: Occurs in the game.game:



* ShipTease: The film adaptations--especially the 1965 one--crank up the {{UST}} between Lombard and Vera into a full-fledged relationship.

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* ShipTease: The film adaptations--especially adaptations -- especially the 1965 one--crank one -- crank up the {{UST}} between Lombard and Vera into a full-fledged relationship.



** [[spoiler: Isaac Morris]] in the BBC adaption.

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** [[spoiler: Isaac Morris]] in the BBC adaption.adaptation.



* WhamShot: In the BBC version when the last survivor goes to hang herself, someone else opens the door. The person is shown with a waist-level shot that pans up to reveal [[spoiler:Justice Wargrave was the killer.]]

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* WhamShot: In the BBC version when the last survivor goes to hang herself, someone else opens the door. The person is shown with a waist-level shot that pans up to reveal that [[spoiler:Justice Wargrave was the killer.]]
19th Mar '17 6:33:49 PM Az_Tech341
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* AlasPoorVillain: The BBC adaptation manages to do this with Blore and Emily Brent of all people. While they are still guilty of their crimes, Blore is made sympathetic enough by his banter with Lombard and eventually [[spoiler: breaks down and confesses his crime, showing actual remorse]], while Miss Brent is shown to be much more affected by Beatrice Taylor's death than in the novel and, [[spoiler: shortly before she is murdered]], she loses her typical stern behavior, showing how frail and scared she actually is. The adaptation also pulls this off with Lombard who [[spoiler:pleads with Vera while being held at gunpoint by her to believe him about the murderer being neither of them and how the murderer will win if she kills him -- something he is completely right about. He had also developed what appeared to be a genuine connection of sorts with Vera beforehand, making his failure to get her to trust him heartbreaking if he really did have feelings for her]].

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* AlasPoorVillain: The BBC adaptation manages to do this with Blore and Emily Brent of all people. While they are still guilty of their crimes, Blore is made sympathetic enough by his banter with Lombard and eventually [[spoiler: breaks down and confesses his crime, showing actual remorse]], while Miss Brent is shown to be much more affected by Beatrice Taylor's death than in the novel and, [[spoiler: shortly before she is murdered]], she loses her typical stern behavior, showing how frail and scared she actually is. The adaptation also pulls this off with Lombard who [[spoiler:pleads with Vera while being held at gunpoint by her to believe him about the murderer being neither of them and how the murderer will win if she kills him -- something he is completely right about. He had also developed what appeared to be a genuine connection of sorts with Vera beforehand, making his failure to get her to trust him heartbreaking if he really did have feelings for her]].beforehand]].



* KickTheSonOfABitch: In the 1987 Soviet film adaptation, [[spoiler:Vera's shooting of Lombard becomes one due to him having raped her not long before. While the shooting still mainly serves as a confirmation that Vera has truly and irreversibly gone off the deep end, you won't be blamed for cheering about Lombard getting his just deserts]].
18th Mar '17 11:18:51 PM Lemia
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* KickTheSonOfABitch: In the 1987 Soviet film adaptation, [[spoiler:Vera's shooting of Lombard becomes one due to him having raped her not long before. While the shooting still mainly serves as a confirmation that Vera has truly and irreversibly gone off the deep end, you won't be blamed for cheering about Lombard getting his just deserts]].
18th Mar '17 10:22:01 PM Lemia
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* AlasPoorVillain: The BBC adaptation manages to do this with Blore and Emily Brent of all people. While they are still guilty of their crimes, Blore is made sympathetic enough by his banter with Lombard and eventually [[spoiler: breaks down and confesses his crime, showing actual remorse]], while Miss Brent is shown to be much more affected by Beatrice Taylor's death than in the novel and, [[spoiler: shortly before she is murdered]], she loses her typical stern behavior, showing how frail and scared she actually is.

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* AlasPoorVillain: The BBC adaptation manages to do this with Blore and Emily Brent of all people. While they are still guilty of their crimes, Blore is made sympathetic enough by his banter with Lombard and eventually [[spoiler: breaks down and confesses his crime, showing actual remorse]], while Miss Brent is shown to be much more affected by Beatrice Taylor's death than in the novel and, [[spoiler: shortly before she is murdered]], she loses her typical stern behavior, showing how frail and scared she actually is. The adaptation also pulls this off with Lombard who [[spoiler:pleads with Vera while being held at gunpoint by her to believe him about the murderer being neither of them and how the murderer will win if she kills him -- something he is completely right about. He had also developed what appeared to be a genuine connection of sorts with Vera beforehand, making his failure to get her to trust him heartbreaking if he really did have feelings for her]].



** The 2015 BBC adaptation goes for this to some extent, including scenes such as Marston taking cocaine, Rogers beating his wife, gorier deaths than those described in the book, and very brutal flashbacks to the murders committed by each victim. And to top all that, all but one of the indirect deaths caused by the guests in the novels are turned into straight up murders committed by their own hands, presumably to make said flashbacks more interesting.

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** The 2015 BBC adaptation goes for this to some extent, including scenes such as Marston taking cocaine, Rogers beating his wife, gorier deaths than those described in the book, and very brutal flashbacks to the murders committed by each victim. And to top all that, all but one two of the indirect deaths caused by the guests in the novels are turned into straight up murders committed by their own hands, presumably to make said flashbacks more interesting.



** The 2015 adaption makes liberal use of Vera in a tight red swimsuit, and has Lombard walk around in just a towel during all the searches while the other guests wear dressing gowns.

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** The 2015 adaption adaptation makes liberal use of Vera in a tight red swimsuit, and has Lombard walk around in just a towel during all the searches while the other guests wear dressing gowns.
18th Mar '17 9:13:18 AM Lemia
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* SettingUpdate: The 1965 film changed the setting from an island to a snowbound mansion and the 1989 film changed it to an African safari.



* SerialKillerKiller: In the 2015 TV series, [[spoiler:Wargrave]] is a literal one in the backstory, as [[spoiler: Edward Seton undergoes AdaptationalVillainy to become a genuine serial killer]].

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* SerialKillerKiller: In the 2015 TV series, BBC miniseries, [[spoiler:Wargrave]] is a literal one in the backstory, as [[spoiler: Edward Seton undergoes AdaptationalVillainy to become a genuine serial killer]].


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* StagedShooting: In all English-language adaptations except for the 2015 BBC miniseries, [[spoiler:Vera's shooting of Lombard turns out to be a faked one to draw the killer out of hiding]].
18th Mar '17 9:01:43 AM Lemia
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* AdaptationInducedPlotHole:
** In the 1945 film, the way the killer disposes of William Blore has ''nothing'' in common with the rhyme's line of "a big bear hugged one" ([[spoiler:crushing him with generic bricks instead of a bear-shaped clock like in the book]]). While not a full-blown plot hole, it can seem really weird that the killer went to lengths to make sure that each killing corresponded in some way to the rhyme except for ''one'' of them.
** The 2005 video game adaptation changes the killer's identity but still has them [[spoiler:fake their death]], which opens up the plot hole of [[spoiler:how they managed to fool Armstrong, a trained doctor, into believing they were dead]] because the killer doesn't have the book's justification of [[spoiler:persuading Armstrong beforehand to help them fake their death]] here.



** In the BBC adaption, Arthur Richmond becomes Henry Richmond; James Landor becomes Edward Landor.

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** In the BBC adaption, Arthur Richmond becomes Henry Richmond; James Landor becomes Edward Landor. 1945 film, Macarthur is changed to Mandrake, Lawrence Wargrave to Francis Quinncannon, and Anthony Marston to Prince Nikita Starloff.


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** In the BBC adaptation, Arthur Richmond becomes Henry Richmond; James Landor becomes Edward Landor.


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* SpannerInTheWorks:
** In the 1945 film and several other adaptations, the last stages of the killer's plan are foiled by [[spoiler:Philip Lombard unexpectedly committing suicide after receiving his letter and another man taking his place and gaining Vera's trust]].
** In the 2005 PC game, the killer didn't count on Blore wrecking Patrick Narracott's boat and stranding him on the island too.
16th Mar '17 11:18:41 PM NightShade96
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[[caption-width-right:196:A really bad weekend getaway.]]

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[[caption-width-right:196:A really ''really'' bad weekend getaway.]]
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