History Literature / AlicesAdventuresInWonderland

23rd Jan '17 4:12:36 PM LarryMullen
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* SequelGap: ''Through the Looking Glass'' was released six years after ''Alice's Adventures In Wonderland''.
10th Jan '17 3:59:59 PM LadyJaneGrey
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Added DiffLines:

* BodyHorror: Alice's first attempt using the mushroom is rocky to say the least. She first shrinks in a way that causes her chin to hit her feet. In her justified haste to correct this with the other piece, she is stretched out, her neck becoming incredibly long and serpentine. (For obvious reasons, Tenniel did not illustrate this scene.)
9th Jan '17 2:17:01 PM LadyJaneGrey
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* AllJustADream: One of the few examples where it worked, mostly because Wonderland worked by dream logic.
* AluminumChristmasTrees: There are many, due to the date it was written, along with the nationality of the author:
** Most modern adaptations have to explain that "treacle" is a word for molasses, and that a "cravat" is actually a forerunner to a man's tie. (One adaption actually has Alice call it a tie.) Some of the humor might go over the heads of modern readers, like the Hatter claiming Alice's hair "wants cutting" (a comment that would have been ''incredibly'' rude in Victorian times) and the Duchess claiming that she was "twice as rich and twice as clever" as Alice. ("Rich" and "clever" were used to describe contradicting terms, making her comment an impossibility.)
** Even some British readers may be confused by some references, like the Hatter saying it's always tea time because it's always six o'clock. (Five o'clock tea would not become a tradition in Britain until later.)



* AllJustADream: One of the few examples where it worked, mostly because Wonderland worked by dream logic.
* There are many, due to the date it was written, along with the nationality of the author:
** Most modern adaptations have to explain that "treacle" is a word for molasses, and that a "cravat" is actually a forerunner to a man's tie. (One adaption actually has Alice call it a tie.) Some of the humor might go over the heads of modern readers, like the Hatter claiming Alice's hair "wants cutting" (a comment that would have been ''incredibly'' rude in Victorian times) and the Duchess claiming that she was "twice as rich and twice as clever" as Alice. ("Rich" and "clever" were used to describe contradicting terms, making her comment an impossibility.)
** Even some British readers may be confused by some references, like the Hatter saying it's always tea time because it's always six o'clock. (Five o'clock tea would not become a tradition in Britain until later.)
9th Jan '17 1:54:35 PM Pamina
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9th Jan '17 1:47:03 PM Pamina
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* AbusiveParents: The first time we meet the Duchess, she's throwing crockery at a screaming baby, shouting "PIG!" Alice attempts to rescue the baby, but it turns into a pig.

to:

* AbusiveParents: The first time we meet the Duchess, she's throwing crockery at violently shaking and tossing around a screaming baby, shouting "PIG!" and paying no attention as her cook throws crockery at them. Alice attempts to rescue the baby, but it turns into a pig.



** Most modern adaptations have to explain that "treacle" is a word for molasses, and that a "cravat" is actually a forerunner to a man's tie. (One adaption actually has Alice call it a tie.) Some of the humor might go over the heads of modern readers, like the Hatter claiming Alice's hair "wants cutting" (a comment that would have been ''incredibly'' rude in Victorian times) and the Duchess claiming that she was "twice as rich and twice as clever" as Alice. ("Rich" and "clever" were used to describe contradicting terms, making her comment an impossibilitiy.
** Even some British readers may be confused by some references, like the Hatter saying it's always tea time because it's always four o'clock. (Five o'clock tea would not become a tradition in Britain until later.)

to:

** Most modern adaptations have to explain that "treacle" is a word for molasses, and that a "cravat" is actually a forerunner to a man's tie. (One adaption actually has Alice call it a tie.) Some of the humor might go over the heads of modern readers, like the Hatter claiming Alice's hair "wants cutting" (a comment that would have been ''incredibly'' rude in Victorian times) and the Duchess claiming that she was "twice as rich and twice as clever" as Alice. ("Rich" and "clever" were used to describe contradicting terms, making her comment an impossibilitiy.
impossibility.)
** Even some British readers may be confused by some references, like the Hatter saying it's always tea time because it's always four six o'clock. (Five o'clock tea would not become a tradition in Britain until later.)



* BlindMistake: The White Rabbit and the Bird in the Tree are short-sighted and mistake Alice for Mary Ann and a snake, respectively.
9th Jan '17 7:49:26 AM LadyJaneGrey
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Added DiffLines:

* There are many, due to the date it was written, along with the nationality of the author:
** Most modern adaptations have to explain that "treacle" is a word for molasses, and that a "cravat" is actually a forerunner to a man's tie. (One adaption actually has Alice call it a tie.) Some of the humor might go over the heads of modern readers, like the Hatter claiming Alice's hair "wants cutting" (a comment that would have been ''incredibly'' rude in Victorian times) and the Duchess claiming that she was "twice as rich and twice as clever" as Alice. ("Rich" and "clever" were used to describe contradicting terms, making her comment an impossibilitiy.
** Even some British readers may be confused by some references, like the Hatter saying it's always tea time because it's always four o'clock. (Five o'clock tea would not become a tradition in Britain until later.)
2nd Dec '16 10:59:24 PM Xtifr
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A parade of the surreal, with all the logic of a dream -- and invoking the madness of quite a lot of mankind's so-called "logic" -- '''''Alice's Adventures in Wonderland''''' (1865) is a children's classic, filled with allusions to Victorian trivia, most of which is now [[WeirdAlEffect long forgotten]]. (The book ''[[TheAnnotatedEdition The Annotated Alice]]'' by Martin Gardner explains all of these, from jokes to basic trivia. It contains both volumes, with Tenniel's original illustrations.)

to:

A parade of the surreal, with all the logic of a dream -- and invoking the madness of quite a lot of mankind's so-called "logic" -- '''''Alice's ''Alice's Adventures in Wonderland''''' Wonderland'' (1865) is a children's classic, filled with allusions to Victorian trivia, most of which is now [[WeirdAlEffect long forgotten]]. (The book ''[[TheAnnotatedEdition The Annotated Alice]]'' by Martin Gardner explains all of these, from jokes to basic trivia. It contains both volumes, with Tenniel's original illustrations.)
27th Nov '16 8:38:30 AM Veanne
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** Well, formally speaking, the ''logic'' is quite [[SoundValidTrue valid]] - only the premises are insane (and some particularly crazy premises are hidden - given implicitly). Compare [[Creator/LewisCarroll Carroll's]] logic textbooks, ''The Game of Logic'' and ''Symbolic Logic'' [[note]]found on Gutenberg Project[[/note]], which feature some deliciously [[TextbookHumour weird examples]].
1st Nov '16 9:08:30 AM Prinzenick
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* SequelGap: ''Through the Looking Glass'' was released six years after ''Alice's Adventures In Wonderland''.
21st Sep '16 6:24:17 AM LadyJaneGrey
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** [[WordOfDante Martin Gardner]] pointed out that an exchange between Alice and Humpty Dumpty is both the blackest and most easily missed joke in the books:

to:

** [[WordOfDante Martin Gardner]] Gardner pointed out that an exchange between Alice and Humpty Dumpty is both the blackest and most easily missed joke in the books:
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