History Literature / AlicesAdventuresInWonderland

24th Apr '17 8:50:55 PM Kuruni
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Norwegian fantasy/Sci-fi author ''Tor Åge Bringsværd'' actually wrote a sequel to this book, called ''Alice wants to go back'', telling the story of Alice as an old woman with her life behind her. Two regular (Norwegian) kids help her locate the rabbit, and thus help her find her way back to Wonderland, where she actually decides to stay, because she feels at home there. The story states that Alice always carried Wonderland with her, something that made her somewhat of a CloudCuckoolander in our world. Bringsværd also wrote a poem about her, telling how Alice searched for her rabbit hole in vain, in a "world stained with shell craters".
24th Apr '17 11:30:49 AM Eilevgmyhren
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Norwegian fantasy/Sci-fi author ''Tor Åge Bringsværd'' actually wrote a sequel to this book, called ''Alice wants to go back'', telling the story of Alice as an old woman with her life behind her. Two regular (Norwegian) kids help her locate the rabbit, and thus help her find her way back to Wonderland, where she actually decides to stay, because she feels at home there. The story states that Alice always carried Wonderland with her, something that made her somewhat of a CloudCuckoolander in our world. Bringsværd also wrote a poem about her, telling how Alice searched for her rabbit hole in vain, in a "world stained with shell craters".
12th Apr '17 6:22:52 AM tropesinreadiness
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* UnconventionalFormatting: The Mouse's "long and sad tale" is given as a poem [[VisualPun in the shape of his own tail]]. Compare [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calligram calligrams]] and AsciiArt.
25th Mar '17 3:30:50 AM LadyJaneGrey
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* HangingJudge: The Queen of Hearts, although according to the Gryphon, they never executes nobody. How reliable the Gryphon is as a source is open to interpretation, as are the number of negatives in his assertion. There is one scene where the King quietly pardons everyone who she sentences to death at the croquet game, which makes Alice feel a little better.
** Ironically, at the actual trial of the Knave of Hearts, the King - not the Queen - is the judge.

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* HangingJudge: The Queen of Hearts, although according to the Gryphon, they never executes nobody. How reliable the Gryphon is as a source is open to interpretation, as are the number of negatives in his assertion. There is one scene where the King quietly pardons everyone who she sentences to death at the croquet game, which makes Alice feel a little better.
** Ironically,
better. (Ironically, at the actual trial of the Knave of Hearts, the King - not the Queen - is the judge.)



* KangarooCourt: One of the most well-known examples in literature. example. The judge (the King of Hearts) asks the jury to consider their verdict before any evidence is given (the White Rabbit convinces him to hear the evidence, although none of the witnesses contribute anything useful), and the Queen has an odd view of how proceedings should go, believing that the sentence should come before the verdict. Also a blatant conflict of interest, as the Queen is the victim of the alleged crime.

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* KangarooCourt: One of the most well-known examples in literature. example. The judge (the King of Hearts) asks the jury to consider their verdict before any evidence is given (the White Rabbit convinces him to hear the evidence, although none of the witnesses contribute anything useful), and the Queen has an odd view of how proceedings should go, believing that the sentence should come before the verdict. Also a blatant conflict of interest, as the Queen is the victim of the alleged crime.
8th Mar '17 11:46:59 AM corruptmalemenace
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* HairOfGoldHeartOfGold: Alice is a great deal kinder and more patient than the infuriating creatures around her probably deserve, and appears to have blonde hair judging by the Tenniel illustrations. Although, curiously, Lewis Carroll may not have been intending this trope, firstly because he based Alice on a dark-haired child he knew in RealLife, and secondly because by Victorian social mores Alice's forwardness and curiosity would likely have been seen as rude.



* KindheartedCatLover: Alice is very fond of her pet cat Dinah, and later of Dinah's kittens Snowdrop and [[ADogNamedDog Kitty]].



* NurseryRhyme: Humpty Dumpty, Tweedledee and Tweedledum are characters from nursery rhymes.

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* NurseryRhyme: Humpty Dumpty, Tweedledee and Tweedledum are characters from nursery rhymes. So are the Lion and the Unicorn, but in that case the nursery rhyme was itself a reference to the preexisting national animals of England and Scotland respectively (as seen on the Royal Arms of the United Kingdom).


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* SelfDeprecation: The White Knight is widely believed to be Carroll's AuthorAvatar, and while he's one of the more likable characters in the Looking-Glass Lands he's also portrayed as clumsy, foolish and unoriginal (Alice recognises his "song of my own invention" to be actually the same tune as an existing song). Interestingly, the White Knight also engages in this trope in-universe, portraying himself in his own song as being so caught up in thinking of useless inventions that he continuously misses important bits of the conversation, and terrorising an innocent old man as a result.
1st Mar '17 6:09:50 PM kraas
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* YouKeepUsingThatWord: When Alice, the Mouse and the other animals wash up on the shore of the Pool of Tears, the Mouse declares that they all need to dry off. He then starts reciting a history of William the Conqueror, an excerpt from a real history book by a guy named Havilland Le Mesurier Chepmell, as it's "the driest thing I know." It certainly is dry (boring), but it unsurprisingly fails to make Alice and the others any more dry (less wet).



* YouKeepUsingThatWord: When Alice, the Mouse and the other animals wash up on the shore of the Pool of Tears, the Mouse declares that they all need to dry off. He then starts reciting a history of William the Conqueror, an excerpt from a real history book by a guy named Havilland Le Mesurier Chepmell, as it's "the driest thing I know." It certainly is dry (boring), but it unsurprisingly fails to make Alice and the others any more dry (less wet).
23rd Jan '17 4:12:36 PM LarryMullen
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* SequelGap: ''Through the Looking Glass'' was released six years after ''Alice's Adventures In Wonderland''.
10th Jan '17 3:59:59 PM LadyJaneGrey
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* BodyHorror: Alice's first attempt using the mushroom is rocky to say the least. She first shrinks in a way that causes her chin to hit her feet. In her justified haste to correct this with the other piece, she is stretched out, her neck becoming incredibly long and serpentine. (For obvious reasons, Tenniel did not illustrate this scene.)
9th Jan '17 2:17:01 PM LadyJaneGrey
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* AllJustADream: One of the few examples where it worked, mostly because Wonderland worked by dream logic.
* AluminumChristmasTrees: There are many, due to the date it was written, along with the nationality of the author:
** Most modern adaptations have to explain that "treacle" is a word for molasses, and that a "cravat" is actually a forerunner to a man's tie. (One adaption actually has Alice call it a tie.) Some of the humor might go over the heads of modern readers, like the Hatter claiming Alice's hair "wants cutting" (a comment that would have been ''incredibly'' rude in Victorian times) and the Duchess claiming that she was "twice as rich and twice as clever" as Alice. ("Rich" and "clever" were used to describe contradicting terms, making her comment an impossibility.)
** Even some British readers may be confused by some references, like the Hatter saying it's always tea time because it's always six o'clock. (Five o'clock tea would not become a tradition in Britain until later.)



* AllJustADream: One of the few examples where it worked, mostly because Wonderland worked by dream logic.
* There are many, due to the date it was written, along with the nationality of the author:
** Most modern adaptations have to explain that "treacle" is a word for molasses, and that a "cravat" is actually a forerunner to a man's tie. (One adaption actually has Alice call it a tie.) Some of the humor might go over the heads of modern readers, like the Hatter claiming Alice's hair "wants cutting" (a comment that would have been ''incredibly'' rude in Victorian times) and the Duchess claiming that she was "twice as rich and twice as clever" as Alice. ("Rich" and "clever" were used to describe contradicting terms, making her comment an impossibility.)
** Even some British readers may be confused by some references, like the Hatter saying it's always tea time because it's always six o'clock. (Five o'clock tea would not become a tradition in Britain until later.)
9th Jan '17 1:54:35 PM Pamina
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