History Literature / AlicesAdventuresInWonderland

10th Jul '17 7:58:12 PM HSutherland
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* PrideBeforeTheFall: Humpty Dumpty. Lampshaded with his frequent use of the word "pride" in his conversation with Alice prior to his fall off his wall.

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* PrideBeforeTheFall: PrideBeforeAFall: Humpty Dumpty. Lampshaded with his frequent use of the word "pride" in his conversation with Alice prior to his fall off his wall.
10th Jul '17 7:51:43 PM HSutherland
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* MurderBallad: "The Walrus and the Carpenter"
* NurseryRhyme: Humpty Dumpty, Tweedledee and Tweedledum are characters from nursery rhymes. So are the Lion and the Unicorn, but in that case the nursery rhyme was itself a reference to the preexisting national animals of England and Scotland respectively (as seen on the Royal Arms of the United Kingdom).

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* MurderBallad: "'Twas the Voice of the Lobster" and "The Walrus and the Carpenter"
* NurseryRhyme: The Queen, King and Knave of Hearts, as well as Humpty Dumpty, Tweedledee and Tweedledum are characters from nursery rhymes. So are the Lion and the Unicorn, but in that case the nursery rhyme was itself a reference to the preexisting national animals of England and Scotland respectively (as seen on the Royal Arms of the United Kingdom).



* PlayingCardMotifs: Take a wild guess. The King and Queen of Hearts hold court in Wonderland, with their {{Mooks}} being the lower-ranked cards. In fact, the lower ranks are further identified by their jobs: Spades are gardeners, Clubs are soldiers, Diamonds are couriers, and hearts are younger members of the royal family.

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* PlayingCardMotifs: Take a wild guess. The King and Queen of Hearts hold court in Wonderland, with their {{Mooks}} being the lower-ranked cards. In fact, the lower ranks are further identified by their jobs: Spades are gardeners, Clubs are soldiers, Diamonds are couriers, and hearts are younger members of the royal family. The court cards are, of course, members of the royal court.


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* PrideBeforeTheFall: Humpty Dumpty. Lampshaded with his frequent use of the word "pride" in his conversation with Alice prior to his fall off his wall.
10th Jul '17 5:49:45 PM CaptainColdCutCliche
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*AdaptationalVillainy: The Queen of Hearts is often depicted as actually having people beheaded, instead of them being pardoned by the king.


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*CompositeCharacter: The Queen of Hearts and the Red Queen are often confused and made into the same character, despite very different temperaments.
10th Jul '17 5:42:40 PM CaptainColdCutCliche
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* DarkerandEdgier: Has become more common in recent times, such as Tim Burton's version, Jan Svankmajer's version, and American McGee's version, to name just a few.

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* DarkerandEdgier: DarkerAndEdgier: Has become more common in recent times, such as Tim Burton's version, Jan Svankmajer's version, and American McGee's version, to name just a few.
10th Jul '17 5:39:23 PM CaptainColdCutCliche
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* DarkerandEdgier: Has become more common in recent times, such as [[Film/AliceinWonderland(2010) Tim Burton's version]], [[Film/Alice Jan Svankmajer's version]], ad [[VideoGame/AmericanMcGeesAlice and American McGee's version]], to name just a few.

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* DarkerandEdgier: Has become more common in recent times, such as [[Film/AliceinWonderland(2010) Tim Burton's version]], [[Film/Alice version, Jan Svankmajer's version]], ad [[VideoGame/AmericanMcGeesAlice version, and American McGee's version]], version, to name just a few.
10th Jul '17 5:37:00 PM CaptainColdCutCliche
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*DarkerandEdgier: Has become more common in recent times, such as [[Film/AliceinWonderland(2010) Tim Burton's version]], [[Film/Alice Jan Svankmajer's version]], ad [[VideoGame/AmericanMcGeesAlice and American McGee's version]], to name just a few.
5th Jul '17 8:22:05 AM snichols1973
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* GrammarNazi: The Mad Hatter and March Hare when asking Alice the answer to the riddle:
-->'''Mad Hatter''': Why is a raven like a writing desk?
-->'''Alice''': I believe I can guess that.
-->'''March Hare''': Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to that?
-->'''Alice''': Exactly so.
-->'''March Hare''': Then you should say what you mean.
-->'''Alice''': I do-- at least I mean what I say; that's the same thing, you know.
-->'''Mad Hatter''': Not the same thing a bit! Why, you might just as well say that 'I see what I eat' is the same as 'I eat what I see'!
-->'''March Hare''': You might just as well say that 'I like what I get' is the same thing as 'I get what I like'!
-->'''Dormouse''': You might as well say that 'I breathe when I sleep' is the same thing as 'I sleep when I breathe'!
-->'''Mad Hatter''' [''to the sleepy Dormouse'']: It ''is'' the same thing with you!
** And later on at the same tea party:
-->'''March Hare''': Take some more tea.
-->'''Alice''': I've had nothing yet, so I can't take more.
-->'''Mad Hatter''': You mean you can't take ''less''; it's very easy to take ''more'' than nothing.
7th Jun '17 4:24:26 AM LadyJaneGrey
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** The second book combines this with {{foreshadowing}}. When Alice sees the living chess pieces in miniature form, she writes in the King's notebook, "The White Knight is sliding down the poker; he balances very badly." Several chapters later, when she meets the white Knight in person, he clearly balances ''horribly'', falling off his horse every few steps it makes.
7th Jun '17 1:54:33 AM WillBGood
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** Also, in chapter 6, the Duchess growls, "If everybody minded their own business,' the Duchess said in a hoarse growl, `the world would go round a deal faster than it does." Then, in chapter 9 (when Alice meets her in a much better mood) there's this exchange between them:

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** Also, in chapter 6, the Duchess growls, "If everybody minded their own business,' business," the Duchess said in a hoarse growl, `the "the world would go round a deal faster than it does." Then, in chapter 9 (when Alice meets her in a much better mood) there's this exchange between them:



* {{Camp}}: The 1985 version. Including, but not limited too, its gaudy production designs, hilariously ill-fitting costumes, proliferation of B-list celebrities, the washed-up former Broadway performers too old to achieve name recognition among the film’s demographic, and the largest blonde wig in cinematic history, that was worn by the 1985 version's star, 9-year-old Natalie Gregory.


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* {{Camp}}: The 1985 version. Including, but not limited too, its gaudy production designs, hilariously ill-fitting costumes, proliferation of B-list celebrities, the washed-up former Broadway performers too old to achieve name recognition among the film’s demographic, and the largest blonde wig in cinematic history, that was worn by the 1985 version's star, 9-year-old Natalie Gregory.
21st May '17 10:38:54 AM nombretomado
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* VictorianBritain: The setting of the real world portions -- obviously, ThePresentDay when it was written, but notable since most adaptations keep the time period.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Literature.AlicesAdventuresInWonderland