History Literature / AHeroOfOurTime

9th May '17 7:34:18 AM Koveras
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* AuthorAvatar: Some interpret Pechorin as this, although Lermontov vehemently denied it in the foreword, instead claiming Pechorin to be a CompositeCharacter of his time's creative spirits.
* TheBerserker: Pechorin has traces of this, such as when he (according to Maxim Maximich) took on an equally angry bear with nothing but a hunting spear.

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* AuthorAvatar: Some interpret Pechorin as this, although Lermontov vehemently denied it in the foreword, instead claiming Pechorin to be a CompositeCharacter of his time's creative spirits.
all "superfluous men"--a topic also addressed in ''Literature/EugeneOnegin'' and, later, ''Literature/{{Oblomov}}''.
* TheBerserker: Pechorin has traces of this, such as when he (according to Maxim Maximich) took on an equally angry bear with nothing but a hunting spear.spear, or when he charged an armed drunk cossack and subdued him with bare hands.



* {{Foil}}: Grushnitsky to Pechorin.

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* {{Foil}}: Grushnitsky to Pechorin. Where Pechorin is [[IdleRich rich, idle]], and stylish, Grushnitsky is a desperate and pretentious social climber. On the other hand, both compete to be the most brooding ByronicHero in town, except that Grushnitsky only plays the part to attract the ladies, while Pechorin actually is one, with [[RealityEnsues depressingly realistic consequences]] to anyone involved with him.



* AnOfficerAndAGentleman
* OldFlame: Vera to Pechorin (and probably vice versa).
* OldSoldier: Maxim Maximich.

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* AnOfficerAndAGentleman
AnOfficerAndAGentleman: Pechorin is an ensign ([[CommonRanks praporschik]]) at the time of writing his diaries, although the main bulk of the narration concerns his exploits in the high society.
* OldFlame: Vera to Pechorin (and probably vice versa).
versa). It is never quite revealed what relationship they had before, or why the broke up, however.
* OldSoldier: Maxim Maximich.Maximich has been serving on Caucasus his entire life, getting promoted to staff captain (an Imperial rank somewhere between army lieutenant and captain) in charge of an outpost by the time Pechorin meets him.



* SceneryPorn: Lermontov's descriptions of Caucasus mountains and the nature.

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* SceneryPorn: Lermontov's descriptions of Caucasus mountains and the region's nature.
9th May '17 6:52:02 AM Koveras
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Lermontov also published a short essay ''The Caucasian'' (1840; as in "someone from Caucasus", not "pale-faced"), wherein he more or less describes Maxim Maximich's BackStory (without any names). Additionally, ''[=AHoOT=]'' can be seen as a sequel to his unfinished novel ''Princess Ligovskaya'' (1838), which also features a Grigory Pechorin (who may or [[InNameOnly may not]] be the same character) and is set in StPetersburg.

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In 1840, Lermontov also published a short essay ''The Caucasian'' (1840; as (as in "someone from Caucasus", not "pale-faced"), wherein he more or less describes Maxim Maximich's BackStory (without any names). Additionally, ''[=AHoOT=]'' can be seen as a sequel to his unfinished novel ''Princess Ligovskaya'' (1838), which also features a Grigory Pechorin (who may or [[InNameOnly may not]] be the same character) and is set in StPetersburg.



* AuthorAvatar: Some interpret Pechorin as this.
* TheBerserker: Pechorin has traces of this.

to:

* AuthorAvatar: Some interpret Pechorin as this.
this, although Lermontov vehemently denied it in the foreword, instead claiming Pechorin to be a CompositeCharacter of his time's creative spirits.
* TheBerserker: Pechorin has traces of this.this, such as when he (according to Maxim Maximich) took on an equally angry bear with nothing but a hunting spear.



** ''Bela'', ''Maxim Maximich'', and ''Princess Mary'' are all named after the characters whose life Pechorin has a major impact upon.

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** ''Bela'', ''Maxim Maximich'', and ''Princess Mary'' are all named after the characters upon whose life lives Pechorin has a major impact upon.impact.



* TheDandy: Pechorin.

to:

* TheDandy: Pechorin.Pechorin is always sharply dressed and groomed, which adds to his conflict with Grushnitsky, who appears to be unable to afford expensive clothes.



* DecoyProtagonist: The story begins with the narrator traveling over the Caucasus Mountains; then he meets Maxim Maximych, who narrates ''Bela'', thus shifting the focus to Pechorin.



* FemmeFatale: The "Undine".

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* FemmeFatale: The "Undine"."Undine" from ''Taman'' is a beautiful peasant girl, who, upon learning of Pechorin's discovery of her paramour Yanko's smuggling operation, attempts to seduce him in order to lure him out to the sea and to drown him.



* IntroOnlyPointOfView

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* IntroOnlyPointOfViewIntroOnlyPointOfView: The story begins with the narrator traveling over the Caucasus Mountains; then he meets Maxim Maximych, who narrates ''Bela'', thus shifting the focus to Pechorin.
7th May '17 5:13:24 AM Koveras
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* DecoyProtagonist: The story begins with the narrator travelling through the Caucasian; then he meets Maxim Maximych, who narrates ''Bela'', thus shifting the focus to Pechorin.

to:

* DecoyProtagonist: The story begins with the narrator travelling through traveling over the Caucasian; Caucasus Mountains; then he meets Maxim Maximych, who narrates ''Bela'', thus shifting the focus to Pechorin.
2nd Dec '16 11:18:24 AM N1KF
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''A Hero of Our Time'' (Russian: "Герой нашего времени") is a classical Russian novel by [[RussianReading Mikhail Yuryevich Lermontov]], written and revised between 1839 and 1841.

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''A Hero of Our Time'' (Russian: "Герой нашего времени") is a classical Russian UsefulNotes/{{Russia}}n novel by [[RussianReading [[UsefulNotes/RussianReading Mikhail Yuryevich Lermontov]], written and revised between 1839 and 1841.
14th Sep '16 10:34:06 AM JulianLapostat
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Added DiffLines:

* RussianGuySuffersMost: Lermontov reflects on this trope (in the Nabokov translation):
--> ''I could not help being struck by the capacity of the Russian to adapt himself to the customs of that people among which he happens to be living. I do not know whether this trait of the mind deserves blame or praise, but it attests to his incredible flexibility and the presence of that lucid common sense that pardons evil wherever it recognizes its necessity or the impossibility of its abolishment.''
2nd Jul '16 5:53:22 AM Slothjr
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Added DiffLines:

* DecoyProtagonist: The story begins with the narrator travelling through the Caucasian; then he meets Maxim Maximych, who narrates ''Bela'', thus shifting the focus to Pechorin.


Added DiffLines:

* KilledOffscreen: By the time we start reading Pechorin's diaries, he's already dead.
16th Jun '16 2:00:23 AM Koveras
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* ''Princess Mary''. Pechorin is stationed in Pyatigorsk and has an affair with two women: an OldFlame of his and the title princess. In the end, he kills a guy on a duel and is [[ReassignedToAntarctica reassigned to Maxim Maximich's outpost]].

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* ''Princess Mary''. Pechorin is stationed in Pyatigorsk and has an affair with two women: an OldFlame of his and the title princess.character. In the end, he kills a guy on a duel and is [[ReassignedToAntarctica reassigned to Maxim Maximich's outpost]].



Lermontov also published a short essay ''The Caucasian'' (1840; as in "someone from Caucasus", not "pale-faced"), wherein he more or less describes Maxim Maximich's BackStory (without any names). Additionally, ''[=AHoOT=]'' can be seen as a sequel to his unfinished novel ''Princess Ligovskaya'' (1838), which also features Grigory Pechorin (who may or [[InNameOnly may not]] be the same character) and is set in StPetersburg.

to:

Lermontov also published a short essay ''The Caucasian'' (1840; as in "someone from Caucasus", not "pale-faced"), wherein he more or less describes Maxim Maximich's BackStory (without any names). Additionally, ''[=AHoOT=]'' can be seen as a sequel to his unfinished novel ''Princess Ligovskaya'' (1838), which also features a Grigory Pechorin (who may or [[InNameOnly may not]] be the same character) and is set in StPetersburg.
16th Jun '16 1:49:06 AM Koveras
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* ''Maxim Maximich''. TheWatson tells of a chance meeting between Maxim Maximich and Pechorin that he accidentally witnessed. Afterwards, Maxim Maximich hands over Pechorin's diaries to him.

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* ''Maxim Maximich''. TheWatson tells of a chance meeting between Maxim Maximich and Pechorin that he had accidentally witnessed. Afterwards, Maxim Maximich hands over Pechorin's diaries to him.



* ''Princess Mary''. Pechorin is stationed in Pyatigorsk and has an affair with two women: an OldFlame of his and the eponymous princess. In the end, he kills a guy on a duel and is [[ReassignedToAntarctica reassigned to Maxim Maximich's outpost]].

to:

* ''Princess Mary''. Pechorin is stationed in Pyatigorsk and has an affair with two women: an OldFlame of his and the eponymous title princess. In the end, he kills a guy on a duel and is [[ReassignedToAntarctica reassigned to Maxim Maximich's outpost]].
16th Jun '16 1:46:48 AM Koveras
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The plot concerns a certain Grigory Pechorin, a [[IdleRich Russian aristocrat]], a [[AnOfficerAndAGentleman military officer]], and a ByronicHero, and follows his adventures during his stay (implied to be involuntary) in the Caucasus Region. The novel consists of five parts (plus FramingDevice):

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The plot concerns a certain one Grigory Pechorin, a [[IdleRich Russian aristocrat]], a [[AnOfficerAndAGentleman military officer]], and a ByronicHero, and follows his adventures during his stay (implied to be involuntary) [[TheExile involuntary]]) in the Caucasus Region. The novel consists of five parts (plus FramingDevice):
1st Jan '16 4:01:10 PM griffmongers
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* ByronicHero: Pechorin is one of the most famous ones in Russian literature. However, see DeconstructorFleet below.



* ByronicHero: Pechorin is one of the most famous ones in Russian literature. However, see DeconstructorFleet below.
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