History InformedAbility / Literature

13th Jun '18 7:56:06 PM phylos
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** Can be considered a deconstruction of the trope. [[spoiler:Aegon]] is a stand-in for the stereotypical fantasy heroes who become great rulers because they grew up in a simple life. Never mind that they completely lack the training and experience to be even remotely competent. Demonstrated in [[spoiler:Aegon's]] case by the fact that [[spoiler:Tyrion]] manipulates him with ease.
31st Mar '18 12:42:05 AM kaninefat
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** Thufir was actually surprised by Jessica's Voice ability and seemed to be unaware that something like that was possible. Despite the fact that she had been training Paul to use it. Also, Gurney was aware of it and had been trained to resist it. Thufir seems to be completely oblivious.
31st Mar '18 12:39:39 AM kaninefat
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** At least partially justified in that cleverness in a society lady was measured by her ability to make witty remarks and discuss issues like lterature, theatre, and poetry, rather than actual intelligence.
30th Mar '18 5:01:32 AM ImpudentInfidel
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* In ''Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'' the title character is repeatedly referred to as being "noble" and "selfless". However, his actions in the book are consistently irresponsible and selfish. First, he tries to create a living creature. Then, when it doesn't turn out as expected he runs away and pretends it never happened, leaving the creature free to wreak havoc. When the creature comes looking for him and tries to make a deal, he reneges, which leads to even more deaths. Through it all, he denies any responsibility for the situation he created.

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* In ''Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'' the title character is repeatedly referred to as being "noble" and "selfless". However, his actions in the book are consistently irresponsible and selfish. First, he tries to create a living creature. Then, when it doesn't turn out as expected he runs away and pretends it never happened, leaving the creature free to wreak havoc. When the creature comes looking for him and tries to make a deal, he reneges, which leads to even more deaths. Through it all, he denies any responsibility for the situation he created. Of course, he's also something of an UnreliableNarrator.
30th Mar '18 4:44:16 AM ImpudentInfidel
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** Thrawn in the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse is a good example of ''why'' this happens. He's supposed to be a brilliant tactician, but most of those writing him aren't tactical experts, so they must either leave his abilities vague, show him outwitting the protagonist [[YouAreTooLate in nontactical ways]], or give his opponents an IdiotBall. Later appearances rectify this.

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** Thrawn in the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse is a good example of ''why'' this happens. He's supposed to be a brilliant tactician, but most of those writing him aren't tactical experts, so they must either leave his abilities vague, show him outwitting the protagonist [[YouAreTooLate in nontactical ways]], or give his opponents an IdiotBall. Later appearances rectify this. Even in his [[Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy original appearance]] it was a major plot point that his abilities were massively overblown in-universe; he was good, but looked better simply because his predecessors had been complete jokes.
19th Jan '18 9:57:15 AM JackG
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* In "Literature/Frankenstein", the title character is repeatedly referred to as being "noble" and "selfless". However, his actions in the book are consistently irresponsible and selfish. First, he tries to create a living creature. Then, when it doesn't turn out as expected he runs away and pretends it never happened, leaving the creature free to wreak havoc. When the creature comes looking for him and tries to make a deal, he reneges, which leads to even more deaths. Through it all, he denies any responsibility for the situation he created.

to:

* In "Literature/Frankenstein", ''Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'' the title character is repeatedly referred to as being "noble" and "selfless". However, his actions in the book are consistently irresponsible and selfish. First, he tries to create a living creature. Then, when it doesn't turn out as expected he runs away and pretends it never happened, leaving the creature free to wreak havoc. When the creature comes looking for him and tries to make a deal, he reneges, which leads to even more deaths. Through it all, he denies any responsibility for the situation he created.
19th Jan '18 9:54:25 AM JackG
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* Alistair [=MacLean's=] (actually John Denis) ''Air Force One Is Down'' goes to great detail describing master thief (now secret agent) Sabrina and how good she is, then portrays her as a classic DamselInDistress throughout the rest of the book. Most notably in a scene where Sabrina can't lie to the BigBad because she can't keep her thoughts off her face (and she's supposed to be a former ''criminal''???)

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* Alistair [=MacLean's=] (actually John Denis) ''Air Force One Is Down'' goes to great detail describing master thief (now secret agent) Sabrina and how good she is, then portrays her as a classic DamselInDistress throughout the rest of the book. Most notably in a scene where Sabrina can't lie to the BigBad because she can't keep her thoughts off her face (and she's supposed to be a former ''criminal''???)master thief whose ability to deceive others is specifically discussed at the start of the novel).
8th Jan '18 10:03:29 PM kaninefat
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* In "Literature/Frankenstein, the title character is repeatedly referred to as being "noble" and "selfless". However, his actions in the book are consistently irresponsible and selfish. First, he tries to create a living creature. Then, when it doesn't turn out as expected he runs away and pretends it never happened, leaving the creature free to wreak havoc. When the creature comes looking for him and tries to make a deal, he reneges, which leads to even more deaths. Through it all, he denies any responsibility for the situation he created.

to:

* In "Literature/Frankenstein, "Literature/Frankenstein", the title character is repeatedly referred to as being "noble" and "selfless". However, his actions in the book are consistently irresponsible and selfish. First, he tries to create a living creature. Then, when it doesn't turn out as expected he runs away and pretends it never happened, leaving the creature free to wreak havoc. When the creature comes looking for him and tries to make a deal, he reneges, which leads to even more deaths. Through it all, he denies any responsibility for the situation he created.
8th Jan '18 10:02:11 PM kaninefat
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** Can be considered a deconstruction of the trope. [[spoiler:Aegon]] is a stand-in for the stereotypical fantasy heroes who become great rulers because they grew up in a simple life. Never mind that they completely lack the training and experience to be even remotely competent. Demonstrated in [[spoiler:Aegon's]] case by the fact that [[spoiler:Tyrion]] manipulates him with ease.
8th Jan '18 9:48:21 PM kaninefat
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Added DiffLines:

* In "Literature/Frankenstein, the title character is repeatedly referred to as being "noble" and "selfless". However, his actions in the book are consistently irresponsible and selfish. First, he tries to create a living creature. Then, when it doesn't turn out as expected he runs away and pretends it never happened, leaving the creature free to wreak havoc. When the creature comes looking for him and tries to make a deal, he reneges, which leads to even more deaths. Through it all, he denies any responsibility for the situation he created.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=InformedAbility.Literature