History Horrible / VideoGamesOther

21st Sep '17 6:42:13 AM WillyFourEyes
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Ouya}}''' started life as a Kickstarter campaign that promised a developer-friendly and easily hackable gaming system and also offered players to try any game (yes, ''any'' game) for free before buying it. It raised $8 million in a month and was the most backed project on Kickstarter, with everyone thinking that the Ouya would revolutionize the industry. When the system was released to backers, word of mouth quickly spread of how much of a colossal disappointment the system was. The system was quickly plagued with shovelware games (with one game even being [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RGvZ8tUKxts nothing but animated rain]]) and was discovered to have trouble even running ''smartphone'' games, despite the system essentially being a smartphone in a game console shell. The controller was criticized for its abysmal build quality, with the grips on the analog sticks wearing after only weeks of use and the buttons sticking down after being pressed and having to be pried back up. The controller was also priced at $50, which was half of what the system sold for. It had a terrible marketing campaign, with an [[{{Horrible/Advertising}} insultingly bad commercial]] that attacked modern gaming systems without having anything to say about the merits of its own software. Despite the hype, the Ouya was a commercial failure, with the company having to sell itself to Razer Inc. just to escape the massive debt that the company put itself in. The same day, Julie Uhrman stepped down as CEO of Ouya Inc. The Ouya was quickly forgotten about and was discontinued in 2015. As if that wasn't humiliating enough, there was an incident where they could not reserve a spot at E3 on time and had to set up their booth outside... in a parking lot across the street. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xTqhyHuKVKA CrowbCat chronicles everything that went horribly wrong with the console in this video.]]

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Ouya}}''' started life as a Kickstarter campaign that promised a developer-friendly and easily hackable gaming system and also offered players to try any game (yes, ''any'' game) for free before buying it. It raised $8 million in a month and was the most backed project on Kickstarter, with everyone thinking that the Ouya would revolutionize the industry. When the system was released to backers, word of mouth quickly spread of how much of a colossal disappointment the system it was. The system was quickly plagued with shovelware games (with one game even being [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RGvZ8tUKxts nothing but animated rain]]) and was discovered to have trouble even running ''smartphone'' games, despite the system essentially being a an Android smartphone in a game console shell. The controller was criticized for its abysmal build quality, with the grips on the analog sticks wearing after only weeks of use and the buttons sticking down after being pressed and having to be pried back up. The controller was also priced at $50, which was half of what the system sold for. It had a terrible marketing campaign, with an [[{{Horrible/Advertising}} insultingly bad commercial]] that attacked modern contemporary gaming systems without having anything to say about the merits of its own software. Despite the hype, the Ouya was a commercial failure, with the company having to sell itself to Razer Inc. just to escape the massive debt that the company put itself in. The same day, Julie Uhrman stepped down as CEO of Ouya Inc. The Ouya was quickly forgotten about and was discontinued in 2015. As if that wasn't humiliating enough, there was an incident where they could not reserve a spot at E3 on time and had to set up their booth outside... in a parking lot across the street. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xTqhyHuKVKA CrowbCat chronicles everything that went horribly wrong with the console in this video.]]
19th Sep '17 8:21:26 PM Sammettik
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** [[WebVideo/TheSpoonyExperiment Dr. Insano]], one of the few lucky who could get one to work, says:

to:

** [[WebVideo/TheSpoonyExperiment Dr. Insano]], one of the few lucky who could enough to get one to work, says:
19th Sep '17 8:21:03 PM Sammettik
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* Tiger Electronics' '''UsefulNotes/RZone''', which manages the impressive feat of being a ShoddyKnockoffProduct of the UsefulNotes/VirtualBoy, which [[CultFollowing just barely]] escaped this list. The one thing it did have in its favor that the Virtual Boy didn't was that you could wear it on your head rather than having to use a stand. However, when you did put it on, you were treated to graphics ''worse than a VideoGame/GameAndWatch'' (mostly due to the eye-searing "red on slightly darker red" color scheme) rendered about three inches in front of your right eye. Needless to say, this didn't produce anything even vaguely resembling virtual reality. Making this whole system even more ridiculous, there were no less than four different versions; the standard "headgear" version, a much larger tabletop variant, a traditional handheld version, and one which also incorporated an electronic organizer, all of which crashed and burned equally. Creator/StuartAshen [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09so0ghPYG4 gives his take]] on the handheld version while WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_u5dtBtG9yU#t=15m23s briefly analyzed]] the headgear version.

to:

* Tiger Electronics' '''UsefulNotes/RZone''', which manages the impressive feat of being a ShoddyKnockoffProduct of the UsefulNotes/VirtualBoy, which [[CultFollowing just barely]] escaped this list.UsefulNotes/VirtualBoy. The one thing it did have in its favor that the Virtual Boy didn't was that you could wear it on your head rather than having to use a stand. However, when you did put it on, you were treated to graphics ''worse than a VideoGame/GameAndWatch'' (mostly due to the eye-searing "red on slightly darker red" color scheme) rendered about three inches in front of your right eye. Needless to say, this didn't produce anything even vaguely resembling virtual reality. Making this whole system even more ridiculous, there were no less than four different versions; the standard "headgear" version, a much larger tabletop variant, a traditional handheld version, and one which also incorporated an electronic organizer, all of which crashed and burned equally. Creator/StuartAshen [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09so0ghPYG4 gives his take]] on the handheld version while WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_u5dtBtG9yU#t=15m23s briefly analyzed]] the headgear version.
17th Sep '17 12:52:27 AM CrazyLuigi
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** To add an extra layer of horror, the company once worked on the sequel of ''Zool 2''. Once the creator of ''Zoo Digital'' (created by former Gremlin Graphics employees) managed to get the ''Zool'' license, they obviously wanted a sequel to it, so they contacted the company to do just that. Gremlin Graphics ended up being abhorred by the prototype, and the project was put on ice. Instead of cancelling the game, however, the 5 prototype levels which were all made with a different aesthetic (presumably because the game was early in development) were all continued by Dat Design. The only change that was made was replacing the main character. What started thus as an ObviousBeta for a ''VideoGame/{{Zool}}'' sequel that was never to be became 5 games (''Ninjabread Man'', ''Anubis 2'', ''Myth Makers: Trixie In Toyland'', ''Rock and Roll Adventures'' and ''Billy the Wizard'') with the same level design, but with a different aesthetic and main character.

to:

** To add an extra layer of horror, the company once worked on the sequel of ''Zool 2''. Once the creator of ''Zoo Digital'' (created by former Gremlin Graphics employees) managed to get the ''Zool'' license, they obviously wanted a sequel to it, so they contacted the company to do just that. Gremlin Graphics ended up being abhorred by the prototype, and the project was put on ice. Instead of cancelling the game, however, the 5 prototype levels which were all made with a different aesthetic (presumably because the game was early in development) were all continued by Dat Data Design. The only change that was made was replacing the main character. What started thus as an ObviousBeta for a ''VideoGame/{{Zool}}'' sequel that was never to be became 5 games (''Ninjabread Man'', ''Anubis 2'', ''Myth Makers: Trixie In Toyland'', ''Rock and Roll Adventures'' and ''Billy the Wizard'') with the same level design, but with a different aesthetic and main character.
13th Sep '17 3:28:37 PM WillyFourEyes
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* ''Rainmaker'' Software is already a fairly infamous developer, known for generally poor quality games than many people would rather forget about. But it's their two 90s FPS games that stand out most here.
** First of which is ''[[http://hardcoregaming101.net/kusoge/kusoge-isleofthedead.htm Isle of the Dead]]'', an horrendous FPS which itself feels like a time warp to the previous decade. For starters, it's a ''VideoGame/Wolfenstein3D'' esque title years after ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' was released, with flat and uninteresting levels and horrendously drawn 2D enemy sprites at a time where graphics had gotten significantly more detailed. From there, you've got maze like stages, enemies that are ridiculously annoying to kill, PixelHunt sections where huge chunks of interesting scenery (like a crashed plane with multiple crushed bodies scattered about) are deemed 'irrelevant', as well as a complete lack of mercy invincibility or damage indicators (meaning you'll die at seemingly random).

to:

* ''Rainmaker'' Software '''''Rainmaker Software''''' is already a fairly infamous developer, known for generally poor quality games than many people would rather forget about. But it's their two 90s '90s FPS games that stand out most here.
** First of which is ''[[http://hardcoregaming101.net/kusoge/kusoge-isleofthedead.htm Isle of the Dead]]'', an horrendous FPS which itself feels like a time warp to [[UsefulNotes/TheEighties the previous decade.decade]]. For starters, it's a ''VideoGame/Wolfenstein3D'' esque title years after ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' was released, with flat and uninteresting levels and horrendously drawn 2D enemy sprites at a time where graphics had gotten significantly more detailed. From there, you've got maze like maze-like stages, enemies that are ridiculously annoying to kill, PixelHunt sections where huge chunks of interesting scenery (like a crashed plane with multiple crushed bodies scattered about) are deemed 'irrelevant', as well as a complete lack of mercy invincibility or damage indicators (meaning you'll die at seemingly random).



* Creator/SquareEnix has proven that it can publish good smartphone games, as shown by the excellent ''VideoGame/ChaosRings'' and the respectable ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyDimensions''... which makes it incredibly baffling that they'd release a game as terrible and shallow as ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyAllTheBravest''. The only thing the game has going for it is the accurate 16-bit-style recreations of familiar ''FF'' characters and monsters, including those from the post-SNES era (a style later replicated by the much more well-received ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyRecordKeeper''). However, the actual differences between characters are purely cosmetic; with no special skills to speak of, all one can do is attack and then pray their precious party members don't get [[OneHitPointWonder offed in one hit]] (or that they won't have to dip into the [[{{Microtransactions}} cash shop]] to bypass the wait time to get their fragile characters into fighting shape again, which can run up to two hours with a full stable of ''40'' active party members). Predictably, players and critics were outraged when the game came out, labeling it the absolute rock bottom of all ''Final Fantasy'' products ([[http://www.ign.com/articles/2013/01/18/final-fantasy-all-the-bravest-review IGN in particular]] decried ''ATB'' as both an insultingly obvious cash grab and [[TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot a waste of a potentially cool idea]]).

to:

* Creator/SquareEnix has proven that it can publish good smartphone games, as shown by the excellent ''VideoGame/ChaosRings'' and the respectable ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyDimensions''... which makes it incredibly baffling that they'd release a game as terrible and shallow as ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyAllTheBravest''. The only thing the game has going for it is the accurate 16-bit-style recreations of familiar ''FF'' characters and monsters, including those from the post-SNES era (a style later replicated by the much more well-received ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyRecordKeeper''). However, the actual differences between Commanding a full squad of 40 FF characters are purely cosmetic; with no special skills to speak of, at once sounds cool in practice, but since they all one can do is attack and then pray their precious party members don't get [[OneHitPointWonder offed die in one hit]] (or that they won't and have to dip into the [[{{Microtransactions}} cash shop]] to bypass the wait time to get none of their fragile characters into fighting shape again, which can run up to two hours with a full stable of ''40'' active party members).signature skills from their respective games, it's rendered completely pointless. Predictably, players and critics were outraged when the game came out, labeling it the absolute rock bottom of all ''Final Fantasy'' products ([[http://www.ign.com/articles/2013/01/18/final-fantasy-all-the-bravest-review IGN in particular]] decried ''ATB'' as both an insultingly obvious cash grab and [[TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot a waste of a potentially cool idea]]).



* ''VideoGame/RollerCoasterTycoon 4'' was the supposed mobile follow-up to the popular ''Rollercoaster Tycoon 3'', except it combines the worst aspects of the aforementioned ''VideoGame/DungeonKeeper Mobile'' with the worst aspects of free-to-play smartphone games. The game not only used to require money to buy alone, it also runs on a freemium system that is designed to rip off the player with the usual "pay real life money to speed thing up" and cool features actually requiring real money to buy! This game is part of the ongoing horrible trend of smartphone porting of popular franchises which brings out the worst of monetization. To add insult to injury, when Atari tried to pacify the fans by saying there would be a more AAA-like experience on the PC, they ended up botching ''that'' up beyond all belief too, though for [[DevelopmentHell different]] [[ObviousBeta reasons]].

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* ''VideoGame/RollerCoasterTycoon 4'' was the supposed mobile follow-up to the popular ''Rollercoaster Tycoon 3'', except it combines the worst aspects of the aforementioned ''VideoGame/DungeonKeeper Mobile'' with the worst aspects of free-to-play smartphone games. The game not only used to require money to buy alone, it also runs on a freemium system that is designed to rip off the player with the usual "pay real life money to speed thing up" and cool features actually requiring real money to buy! This game is part of the ongoing horrible trend of smartphone porting of popular franchises which brings out the worst of monetization.buy. To add insult to injury, when Atari tried to pacify the fans by saying there would be a more AAA-like experience on the PC, they ended up botching ''that'' up beyond all belief too, though for [[DevelopmentHell different]] [[ObviousBeta reasons]].



* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Ouya}}''' started life as a Kickstarter campaign that promised a developer-friendly and easily hackable gaming system and also offered players to try any game (yes, ''any'' game) for free before buying it. It raised $8 million in a month and was the most backed project on Kickstarter, with everyone thinking that the Ouya would revolutionize the industry. When the system was released to backers, word of mouth quickly spread of how much of a colossal disappointment the system was. The system was quickly plagued with shovelware games (with one game even being [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RGvZ8tUKxts nothing but animated rain]]) and was discovered to have trouble even running ''smartphone'' games, despite the system essentially being a smartphone in a game console shell. The controller was criticized for its abysmal build quality, with the grips on the analog sticks wearing after only weeks of use and the buttons sticking down after being pressed and having to be pried back up. The controller was also priced at $50, which was half of what the system sold for. It had a terrible marketing campaign, with a commercial that landed a spot in [[{{Horrible/Advertising}} the Advertising page of So Bad, It's Horrible]]. Despite the hype, it was a commercial failure, with Ouya having to sell itself to Razer Inc. just to escape the massive debt that the company has put itself in. The same day, Julie Uhrman stepped down as CEO of Ouya Inc. The Ouya was quickly forgotten about and was discontinued in 2015. As if that wasn't humiliating enough, there was an incident where they could not reserve a spot at E3 on time and had to set up their booth outside... in a parking lot across the street. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xTqhyHuKVKA CrowbCat chronicles everything that went horribly wrong with the console in this video.]]

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Ouya}}''' started life as a Kickstarter campaign that promised a developer-friendly and easily hackable gaming system and also offered players to try any game (yes, ''any'' game) for free before buying it. It raised $8 million in a month and was the most backed project on Kickstarter, with everyone thinking that the Ouya would revolutionize the industry. When the system was released to backers, word of mouth quickly spread of how much of a colossal disappointment the system was. The system was quickly plagued with shovelware games (with one game even being [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RGvZ8tUKxts nothing but animated rain]]) and was discovered to have trouble even running ''smartphone'' games, despite the system essentially being a smartphone in a game console shell. The controller was criticized for its abysmal build quality, with the grips on the analog sticks wearing after only weeks of use and the buttons sticking down after being pressed and having to be pried back up. The controller was also priced at $50, which was half of what the system sold for. It had a terrible marketing campaign, with a commercial that landed a spot in an [[{{Horrible/Advertising}} insultingly bad commercial]] that attacked modern gaming systems without having anything to say about the Advertising page merits of So Bad, It's Horrible]]. its own software. Despite the hype, it the Ouya was a commercial failure, with Ouya the company having to sell itself to Razer Inc. just to escape the massive debt that the company has put itself in. The same day, Julie Uhrman stepped down as CEO of Ouya Inc. The Ouya was quickly forgotten about and was discontinued in 2015. As if that wasn't humiliating enough, there was an incident where they could not reserve a spot at E3 on time and had to set up their booth outside... in a parking lot across the street. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xTqhyHuKVKA CrowbCat chronicles everything that went horribly wrong with the console in this video.]]



* There are a number of [[ShoddyKnockoffProduct Shoddy Knockoff]] systems continue to be churned out by an unnamed company affectionately dubbed as simply '''"POP Station"'''. Why are they so bad? They're glorified VideoGame/{{Game And Watch}}es masquerading as high-end electronics. The only good thing out of them have been the reviews by [[Creator/StuartAshen Dr. Stuart Ashen]]. Worse, they in themselves have their own knockoffs--and true to form, they're still [[SerialEscalation worse than the original]].
** For that matter, just about every other "knockoff" system being made. Such as the '''Zone 40''' (a Wii knockoff) and '''Guitar Star''' (a ''Guitar Hero'' knockoff that you plug straight into your television set). It plays horridly with fragile and often unresponsive or delayed controls, the charts don't match the songs at all, and the songs themselves are poor quality MIDI files with ear-grating guitar soundfonts. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhHOaMXYXU4 Ashens reviewed a similar piece of hardware called "Guitar Fever",]] but no matter which name you call it, it is still bad.

to:

* There are a number of [[ShoddyKnockoffProduct Shoddy Knockoff]] game systems continue to be regularly churned out by an unnamed company affectionately dubbed as simply '''"POP Station"'''. Why are they so bad? They're glorified VideoGame/{{Game And Watch}}es masquerading as high-end electronics. The only good thing out of them have been the reviews by [[Creator/StuartAshen Dr. Stuart Ashen]]. Worse, they in themselves have their own knockoffs--and true to form, they're still [[SerialEscalation worse than the original]].
** For that matter, just about every other "knockoff" system being made. Such as the '''Zone 40''' (a Wii knockoff) and '''Guitar Star''' (a ''Guitar Hero'' knockoff that you plug straight into your television set). It plays horridly with fragile and often unresponsive or delayed controls, the charts don't match the songs at all, and the songs themselves are poor quality MIDI files with ear-grating guitar soundfonts. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhHOaMXYXU4 Ashens reviewed a similar piece of hardware called "Guitar Fever",]] but no matter which name you call it, it is still bad.sucks.



** As of August 2011, this product is still being sold through newspaper ads... with the same ad they made in ''1998''.

to:

** As of August 2011, this product is still being sold Inexplicably, the ''Pro 200'' continued to be advertised through newspaper ads... with the same ad they made in ''1998''.



* Tiger Electronics' '''UsefulNotes/RZone''', which manages the impressive feat of being a ShoddyKnockoffProduct of the UsefulNotes/VirtualBoy, which [[CultFollowing just barely]] escaped this list. The one thing it did have that the Virtual Boy didn't was that you could wear it on your head rather than having to use a stand. When you did put it on however, you were treated to graphics ''worse than a VideoGame/GameAndWatch'' (mostly due to the eye-searing "red on slightly darker red" color scheme) rendered about three inches in front of your right eye. Needless to say, this didn't produce anything even vaguely resembling virtual reality. Making this whole system even more ridiculous, there were no less than four different versions; the standard "headgear" version, a much larger tabletop variant, a traditional handheld version, and one which also incorporated an electronic organizer, all of which crashed and burned equally. Creator/StuartAshen [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09so0ghPYG4 gives his take]] on the handheld version while WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_u5dtBtG9yU#t=15m23s briefly analyzed]] the headgear version.

to:

* Tiger Electronics' '''UsefulNotes/RZone''', which manages the impressive feat of being a ShoddyKnockoffProduct of the UsefulNotes/VirtualBoy, which [[CultFollowing just barely]] escaped this list. The one thing it did have in its favor that the Virtual Boy didn't was that you could wear it on your head rather than having to use a stand. When However, when you did put it on however, on, you were treated to graphics ''worse than a VideoGame/GameAndWatch'' (mostly due to the eye-searing "red on slightly darker red" color scheme) rendered about three inches in front of your right eye. Needless to say, this didn't produce anything even vaguely resembling virtual reality. Making this whole system even more ridiculous, there were no less than four different versions; the standard "headgear" version, a much larger tabletop variant, a traditional handheld version, and one which also incorporated an electronic organizer, all of which crashed and burned equally. Creator/StuartAshen [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09so0ghPYG4 gives his take]] on the handheld version while WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_u5dtBtG9yU#t=15m23s briefly analyzed]] the headgear version.
11th Sep '17 7:53:25 AM WillyFourEyes
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* The ''notoriously'' bad [[ShoddyKnockoffProduct Shoddy Knockoff]] systems continue to be churned out by an unnamed company affectionately dubbed as simply '''"POP Station"'''. Why are they so bad? They're glorified VideoGame/{{Game And Watch}}es masquerading as high-end electronics. The only good thing out of them have been the reviews by [[Creator/StuartAshen Dr. Stuart Ashen]]. Worse, they in themselves have their own knockoffs--and true to form, they're still [[SerialEscalation worse than the original]].
** For that matter, just about every other "knockoff" system being made. Such as the '''Zone 40''' (a Wii knockoff) and '''Guitar Star''' (a Guitar Hero knockoff that you plug straight into your television set). It plays horridly with fragile and often unresponsive or delayed controls, the charts don't match the songs at all, and the songs themselves are poor quality MIDI files with ear-grating guitar soundfonts. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhHOaMXYXU4 Ashens reviewed a similar piece of hardware called "Guitar Fever",]] but no matter which name you call it, it is still bad.
** Special note goes to the infamous Laden vs. US made by the same people who make Pop Stations. Yes, they made a terrible VideoGame/GameAndWatch knock-off game based on one of the most horrific terrorist attacks in history. Watch [[Creator/StuartAshen Dr. Ashens]] review it and see the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XNJM_Kamyg sheer disgust he has with its very existence become all but visible on video]].

to:

* The ''notoriously'' bad There are a number of [[ShoddyKnockoffProduct Shoddy Knockoff]] systems continue to be churned out by an unnamed company affectionately dubbed as simply '''"POP Station"'''. Why are they so bad? They're glorified VideoGame/{{Game And Watch}}es masquerading as high-end electronics. The only good thing out of them have been the reviews by [[Creator/StuartAshen Dr. Stuart Ashen]]. Worse, they in themselves have their own knockoffs--and true to form, they're still [[SerialEscalation worse than the original]].
** For that matter, just about every other "knockoff" system being made. Such as the '''Zone 40''' (a Wii knockoff) and '''Guitar Star''' (a Guitar Hero ''Guitar Hero'' knockoff that you plug straight into your television set). It plays horridly with fragile and often unresponsive or delayed controls, the charts don't match the songs at all, and the songs themselves are poor quality MIDI files with ear-grating guitar soundfonts. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhHOaMXYXU4 Ashens reviewed a similar piece of hardware called "Guitar Fever",]] but no matter which name you call it, it is still bad.
** Special note goes to the infamous Laden ''Laden vs. US US'' made by the same people who make Pop Stations. Yes, they made a terrible VideoGame/GameAndWatch knock-off game based on one of the most horrific terrorist attacks in history. Watch [[Creator/StuartAshen Dr. Ashens]] review it and see the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XNJM_Kamyg sheer disgust he has with its very existence become all but visible on video]].
10th Sep '17 10:49:51 PM Twentington
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Pippin}}''', released in 1996 as a partnership between Apple (yes, the ''same'' Apple that brought you the Macintosh, iPhone, iPod and iPad) and Bandai, was an unusual cross between a computer and a console, created with the intent of having a cheaper computer play on your TV screen. Instead, the sticker price was $599 USD at the time of launch, and the device had substandard hardware below even those of computers of its day, including a 14.4k modem, an anemic RAM supply of 6 MB, and practically no hard drive storage, other than a floppy dock drive capable of handling four disks. Even its controller, the [="AppleJack"=], was apparently not of much use for connecting the Pippin to a standard UsefulNotes/AppleMacintosh computer. As the only ''legitimate'' game console Apple Computer released (this was before the iPhone and iPad), the library of games on the Pippin was small, with four times more games released in Japan than in the U.S.; most of them were from Bandai. Not surprisingly, the Pippin was an enormous failure, selling only 42,000 units and being released at a time when Apple was on the verge of bankruptcy. It's only real saving grace is that it did have a few notable game developers (such as Bungie) that made some really good games for it.

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Pippin}}''', released in 1996 as a partnership between Apple (yes, the ''same'' Apple that brought you the Macintosh, iPhone, iPod and iPad) and Bandai, was an unusual cross between a computer and a console, created with the intent of having a cheaper computer play on your TV screen. Instead, the sticker price was $599 USD at the time of launch, and the device had substandard hardware below even those of computers of its day, including a 14.4k modem, an anemic RAM supply of 6 MB, and practically no hard drive storage, other than a floppy dock drive capable of handling four disks. Even its controller, the [="AppleJack"=], was apparently not of much use for connecting the Pippin to a standard UsefulNotes/AppleMacintosh computer. As the only ''legitimate'' game console Apple Computer released (this was before the iPhone and iPad), the library of games on the Pippin was small, with four times more games released in Japan than in the U.S.; most of them were from Bandai. Not surprisingly, the Pippin was an enormous failure, selling only 42,000 units and being released at a time when Apple was on the verge of bankruptcy. It's Its only real saving grace is that it did have a few notable game developers (such as Bungie) that made some really good games for it.
10th Sep '17 10:40:23 PM Twentington
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* Whereas the first ''Super Mario Kollision'' was a fair bit better than blackout77's later ''[[HammerBrother Hammer Brother Demo 3]]'' game, it's sequel ''Super Mario Kollision 2'' is arguably about as bad. With awful level design, glitchy graphics, mediocre gameplay and somehow even more plagiarism than Hammer Brother Demo 3 had (seriously, almost 80% of the game is ripping off ''VideoGame/BrutalMario'' now), it's a trainwreck that even levelengine couldn't be bothered to finish. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efUmbBky9D8 Watch his thoughts on the first four worlds or so of this thing here.]]

to:

* Whereas the first ''Super Mario Kollision'' was a fair bit better than blackout77's later ''[[HammerBrother Hammer Brother Demo 3]]'' game, it's its sequel ''Super Mario Kollision 2'' is arguably about as bad. With awful level design, glitchy graphics, mediocre gameplay and somehow even more plagiarism than Hammer Brother Demo 3 had (seriously, almost 80% of the game is ripping off ''VideoGame/BrutalMario'' now), it's a trainwreck that even levelengine couldn't be bothered to finish. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efUmbBky9D8 Watch his thoughts on the first four worlds or so of this thing here.]]
6th Sep '17 7:13:03 PM Lirodon
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* The '''VIS''' (Video Information System) was released by Tandy in 1992, initially sold exclusively at Radioshack, but later through mail-order catalogs. The VIS was basically yet another CD-ROM "multimedia" console, following in the footsteps of the Phillips CD-I and Amiga's CDTV, except this one was based on PC-like hardware with an already outdated Intel 286 processor, and ran a "modular" version of Windows 3.1, as one of Microsoft's first attempts to bring Windows to embedded platforms. The reason why the system flopped can be summed up as such: it was marketed as primarily being an edutainment device, and its lineup was mainly cheap interactive storybooks and ports of existing Windows and DOS software, such as the Compton's [=MultiMedia=] Encyclopedia (which was promoted in the console's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y73XriwHJxQ (extremely cheesy) promo video]] as being a killer app, and was practically a killer app for multimedia [=PCs=] in general). The closest thing to a legitimate video game was ''Links'' golf -- but it was already available on PC and Amiga too. With a launch price of $699, itself the same range as the 3DO system (whom the latter was a far more decent platform and had an above average gaming library despite also being a commercial flop), it was too expensive for a game console, and one could spend a few hundred dollars more to get a ''real'' PC that could do everything the VIS could ''and then some''; thanks to mixed customer reception, some Radioshack employees jokingly declared that the VIS was [[FunWithAcronyms "Virtually Impossible to Sell"]]. In early-1993, Tandy attempted to sell the VIS through mail-order catalogs at a lower price of $399, and re-branded it as a Memorex product. Eventually, Tandy gave up, after only being able to sell 11,000 units.

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* The '''VIS''' (Video Information System) was released by Tandy at [=RadioShack=] stores in 1992, initially sold exclusively at Radioshack, but later through mail-order catalogs. The VIS 1992. It was basically yet another CD-ROM "multimedia" console, following built in the footsteps of the Phillips CD-I and Amiga's CDTV, except this one was CDTV as yet another CD-ROM based on "multimedia" device, and had PC-like hardware with an already outdated already-outdated Intel 286 processor, and ran a "modular" version of Windows 3.1, as one of Microsoft's first attempts to bring Windows to embedded platforms.1. The reason why the system flopped can be summed up as such: it was marketed as primarily being an edutainment device, and its lineup was mainly cheap interactive storybooks and ports of existing Windows and DOS software, such as the Compton's [=MultiMedia=] Encyclopedia (which was promoted in the console's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y73XriwHJxQ (extremely cheesy) extremely cheesy promo video]] as being a killer app, and as it was practically a killer app for multimedia [=PCs=] in general). The closest thing to a legitimate video game was ''Links'' golf -- but it was already available on PC and Amiga too. With a launch price of $699, itself $699 (around the same range price as the similarly unsuccessful 3DO system (whom the latter -- which was a far more decent platform and had an above average above-average gaming library despite also being a commercial flop), library), it was too expensive for a game console, and one could spend a few hundred dollars more to get a ''real'' PC that could do everything the VIS could ''and then some''; thanks to mixed customer reception, some Radioshack employees jokingly declared that the VIS was [[FunWithAcronyms "Virtually Impossible to Sell"]]. In early-1993, Tandy attempted to sell the VIS through mail-order catalogs at a lower price of $399, and re-branded it as a Memorex product. Eventually, Tandy gave up, after only being able to sell 11,000 units.
6th Sep '17 6:09:22 PM TheWarioBros
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* Blujin Adventure is a ROM hack made by a user called YourAverageROMHacker on SMW Central, and it may well compete with Hammer Brother Demo 3 in the bad hack design department. For starters, the level design is either completely flat and boring with minimal variation or ridiculously hard due to enemy spam, with whole levels feeling like nothing but level elements placed at random. The graphics are used in ridiculous situations with no context (like a fortress background behind a grassy field, or a snow background in a green forest level), the music is used at random and large percentages of the levels are quite [[CutAndPasteEnvironments literally copied and pasted together]] from earlier parts of the same stage. It's not even tested; enemies are placed on platforms they can't actually stand on in the game's physics engine. It's an utter mess all around.
** Which is also true of [[https://www.smwcentral.net/?p=viewthread&t=90999 Yet Another Mario Hack]] and [[https://www.smwcentral.net/?p=viewthread&t=91017&page=1&pid=1442440#p1442440 Super Worlds]], both are which are by the same creator. Again, they feature boring or frustrating level design, mismatched or glitched graphics, huge amounts of lag leading to sprite spam and many glitches indicating the creator did no testing at all. It's basically blackout77 and Hammer Brother Demo 3 all over again.
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