History Headscratchers / TheChroniclesOfNarnia

9th Jul '17 10:44:06 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[WMG: WorldWarTwo.]]

to:

[[WMG: WorldWarTwo.UsefulNotes/WorldWarII.]]
16th Jun '17 10:32:29 PM Dreamwalker
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

*** Exactly. London could actually survive Jadis. I'm pretty sure Reepicheep would conquer Europe either for the challenge or because someone made a short joke.
13th Jun '17 11:54:20 PM Psycho_Hobbit1
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** We know there are edible things (gems!) deep underground in Bism, which wouldn't be inhibited from "growing" by winter conditions on the surface. Perhaps the dwarfs used to trade with the Underworld folk, whose gemstones (and underground crops, maybe?) could still grow during the frozen times.

to:

*** The Archenlanders have had 100 years to establish an extensive smuggling operation for simple food that wasn't infused with Walter White's product, thus reducing the threat the witch poses to Archenland by ensuring fewer Narnians will actively work for her due to addictive magic candy.
** We know there are edible things (gems!) deep underground in Bism, which wouldn't be inhibited from "growing" by winter conditions on the surface. Perhaps the dwarfs used to trade with the Underworld folk, whose gemstones (and underground crops, maybe?) could still grow during the frozen times.
30th Apr '17 9:14:40 PM asknostalgiabum
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Caspian may not have thought of it at the time and was shortly thereafter too preoccupied with a war for his life, while Dr. Cornelius deemed it necessary to save Caspian's life and was shortly thereafter preoccupied with avoiding torture and possibly execution/murder for his part in Caspian's escape. It's not that they didn't care, but there were far more pressing things for them to deal with. In contrast, Aravis essentially got away scot-free and bragged about what she did.

to:

*** Caspian may not have thought of it at the time and was shortly thereafter too preoccupied with a war for his life, while Dr. Cornelius deemed it necessary to save Caspian's life and was shortly thereafter preoccupied with avoiding torture and possibly execution/murder for his part in Caspian's escape. It's not that they didn't care, but there were far more pressing things for them to deal with. In contrast, Aravis essentially got away scot-free and bragged about what she did.did.

[[WMG: Timeline between PC and TVOTDT]]
*So in Prince Caspian 1000 Narnia years are 1 year in Earth time, right? So what's the timespan between Caspian and Dawn Treader? It would seem that some period of time has passed, but how long can it really have been?
25th Apr '17 1:01:03 PM Golondrina
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Might also be the result of the BBC production, which recycled actresses for the two characters. Though to be honest, they're best off getting TildaSwinton to player her anyway, because the it's evident the movies miss something without her.

to:

** Might also be the result of the BBC production, which recycled actresses for the two characters. Though to be honest, they're best off getting TildaSwinton Creator/TildaSwinton to player her anyway, because the it's evident the movies miss something without her.
13th Mar '17 2:45:21 PM MasterFuzzy
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

** This troper thought that it might be the Dwarves. In Book 7, they refuse to follow Aslan and instead bicker amongst themselves in the darkness, which sounds like what Lewis, who wasn't overly fond of Jews, might've thought of them.
4th Mar '17 9:46:19 AM Jebedee
Is there an issue? Send a Message




to:

\n*** What happens to her is obviously horrible when you think about it, but to say it's "supposed to be punishment and damnation" implies the book wants us to see it as some sort of retribution for Susan's actions, which I think is a lot more dubious. For starters, her doing the "right" thing wouldn't have prevented the deaths, just meant that she was among them. More significantly, the narrative never shows the slightest interest in how the deaths might impact on Susan; she's only briefly mentioned (before anyone knows they're dead) to explain why she's not present.

8th Feb '17 11:41:56 AM akanesarumara
Is there an issue? Send a Message




to:

\n** Can someone explain how a teenager losing her siblings and other relatives in a train crash is ''not'' supposed to be punishment and damnation?



Added DiffLines:

** Can someone explain how a teenager losing her siblings and other relatives in a train crash is ''not'' supposed to be punishment and damnation?

27th Nov '16 3:08:05 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Dufflepuds are actually highly problematic. Consider: When the White Witch turns people into stone, it's one of the things that mark her as a villain. When Eustace gets involuntarily turned into a dragon earlier in ''Literature/{{Voyage of the Dawn Treader}}'', it's a rather miserable experience for him. Yet when the wizard Coriakin transforms these people (against their will, for disobedience) into forms they consider so ugly that they'd rather be invisible...that's suddenly a-ok because he's [[PalsWithJesus pals with Aslan]] and because when the invisibility spell is lifted again, Lucy in an unprecedented display of sympathy finds their transformed bodies hilariously funny and asks if they really ''have'' to be turned back. [[FlatWhat Wat]]. -- And no, they never do get their original form back, and what the author would like us to take away from this episode is that they're silly people who simply didn't know how to properly ''appreciate'' their wizard-given new bodies. If that's not a prime example of ProtagonistCenteredMorality, I don't know what is.

to:

* The Dufflepuds are actually highly problematic. Consider: When the White Witch turns people into stone, it's one of the things that mark her as a villain. When Eustace gets involuntarily turned into a dragon earlier in ''Literature/{{Voyage of the Dawn Treader}}'', ''Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader'', it's a rather miserable experience for him. Yet when the wizard Coriakin transforms these people (against their will, for disobedience) into forms they consider so ugly that they'd rather be invisible...that's suddenly a-ok because he's [[PalsWithJesus pals with Aslan]] and because when the invisibility spell is lifted again, Lucy in an unprecedented display of sympathy finds their transformed bodies hilariously funny and asks if they really ''have'' to be turned back. [[FlatWhat Wat]]. -- And no, they never do get their original form back, and what the author would like us to take away from this episode is that they're silly people who simply didn't know how to properly ''appreciate'' their wizard-given new bodies. If that's not a prime example of ProtagonistCenteredMorality, I don't know what is.
27th Nov '16 3:07:30 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* There's a blog deconstructing the Narnia series out there whose author makes a pretty good case that Eustace's supposed jerkassery may be primarily an InformedFlaw. Whatever his actions and unexplored possible prior issues with the Pevensies, in ''[[Literature/VoyageOfTheDawnTreader VotDT]]'' he quickly ends up shanghaied into Narnia against his will, unlike the golden four in the first novel he doesn't have a ready way back via a magical wardrobe, and rather than having his first encounter with the natives be with a friendly faun or beavers (or even a faux-friendly witch), he ends up on a ship full of strangers who make fun of him for getting seasick. And unlike the other two he's ''not'' legendary-former-royalty of Narnia -- he really ''is'' just a kid who got dragged along. It's not entirely surprising, then, that he wouldn't take it well, no matter how much Lewis himself goes out of his way to mock him.

to:

* There's a blog deconstructing the Narnia series out there whose author makes a pretty good case that Eustace's supposed jerkassery may be primarily an InformedFlaw. Whatever his actions and unexplored possible prior issues with the Pevensies, in ''[[Literature/VoyageOfTheDawnTreader ''[[Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader VotDT]]'' he quickly ends up shanghaied into Narnia against his will, unlike the golden four in the first novel he doesn't have a ready way back via a magical wardrobe, and rather than having his first encounter with the natives be with a friendly faun or beavers (or even a faux-friendly witch), he ends up on a ship full of strangers who make fun of him for getting seasick. And unlike the other two he's ''not'' legendary-former-royalty of Narnia -- he really ''is'' just a kid who got dragged along. It's not entirely surprising, then, that he wouldn't take it well, no matter how much Lewis himself goes out of his way to mock him.



** In ''[[Literature/TheVoyageoftheDawnTreader Dawn Treader]]'', the difference is even smaller: one Earth year was equal to two Narnian years. And all of this presupposes that, even if there were no magical time-dilation and contraction effects, a Narnian year consists of 365 24-hour days. That could well be a false assumption, rendering any attempt at calculations and formulas (even more) useless.

to:

** In ''[[Literature/TheVoyageoftheDawnTreader ''[[Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader Dawn Treader]]'', the difference is even smaller: one Earth year was equal to two Narnian years. And all of this presupposes that, even if there were no magical time-dilation and contraction effects, a Narnian year consists of 365 24-hour days. That could well be a false assumption, rendering any attempt at calculations and formulas (even more) useless.
This list shows the last 10 events of 304. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Headscratchers.TheChroniclesOfNarnia