History Headscratchers / TheChroniclesOfNarnia

22nd Mar '16 4:37:54 AM radams
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* Why couldn't a child of Lilith get from Earth to Charn? We're told in Prince Caspian that "There were many chinks or chasms between worlds in old times, but they have grown rarer."
14th Mar '16 8:43:44 AM akanesarumara
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Added DiffLines:

** It can be seen the other way around too: she was rejected from Heaven, therefore she wasn't allowed to die and was condemned to live out the rest of her life without Narnia or her siblings.


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2nd Dec '15 8:13:13 AM Adept
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* The above statement is correct -- Aslan saves Edmund getting Jadis to "renounce her claim on your brother's blood." Plus, remember that NarniaTime ''doesn't'' work as "X years on Earth=Y years in Narnia." In ''PrinceCaspian'', 1 year on Earth=1000 years in Narnia; in ''TheSilverChair'', 1 year on Earth=70 years in Narnia.

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* The above statement is correct -- Aslan saves Edmund getting Jadis to "renounce her claim on your brother's blood." Plus, remember that NarniaTime ''doesn't'' work as "X years on Earth=Y years in Narnia." In ''PrinceCaspian'', 1 year on Earth=1000 years in Narnia; in ''TheSilverChair'', ''Literature/TheSilverChair'', 1 year on Earth=70 years in Narnia.
25th Nov '15 6:29:15 PM chibibo
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*** Actually, we learn this in ''The Last Battle'' when Tirian is telling Jill about the peaceful times of Narnia: "He told how King Gale, who was ninth in descent from Frank the first of all Kings, had sailed far away into the Eastern seas and delivered the Lone Islanders from a dragon and how, in return, they had given him the Lone Islands to be part of the royal lands of Narnia for ever." Whether this justifies Caspian's actions when he arrived there is up to interpretation.
10th Oct '15 9:29:07 PM LBHills
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*** Whatever Tash is, it's not an Anti-God: King Peter can exorcise it in the name of the Emperor without much effort.



** Alternately, Tash may have been ''part'' of the Emperor-over-Sea's design for the cosmos, not an outside intruder like Jadis. Having recognized that his new world was corrupted from the beginning, he included a Death God among his river gods, tree spirits and so forth (vulture symbolism seems meaningful here) because his universe suddenly had the potential for its creatures to reject his grace. Aslan meant that Tash was 'his opposite' not because he was equal to the Emperor, but because he was the (intended) death of the universe while Aslan has always represented life.

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** Alternately, Tash may have been ''part'' of the Emperor-over-Sea's design for the cosmos, not an outside intruder like Jadis. Having recognized that his new world was corrupted from the beginning, he included a Death God among his river gods, tree spirits and so forth (vulture symbolism seems meaningful here) (note the vulture symbolism) because his universe suddenly had the potential for its creatures to reject his grace. Aslan meant that Tash was 'his opposite' not because he was equal to the Emperor, but because he was the (intended) death of the universe symbolizes oblivion, while Aslan has always represented life.
10th Oct '15 8:48:30 PM LBHills
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* They also had the immediate friendship, counsel and support of the Beavers and Mr. Tumnus, as well as other characters introduced in ''The Horse and his Boy.'' Children as kings is not a new concept and monarchies have a way of working around the issues.

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* They also had the immediate friendship, counsel and support of the Beavers and Mr. Tumnus, as well as other characters introduced in ''The Horse and his Boy.'' Children as kings is not a new concept and monarchies have a way ways of working around the issues.



*** The nice part about ''that'' idea is that it suggests Jadis - despite the prejudice she showed against "book learned" magicians in ''The Magician's Nephew'' - realized that Aslan ''might'' be too much for her, so she overcame her disdain and taught enough "magicians... of a sort" to insure that they could bring back the dead. Or at least, one specific dead person: herself.

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*** The nice fridge-brilliance part about ''that'' idea is that it suggests Jadis - despite the prejudice she showed against "book learned" magicians in ''The Magician's Nephew'' - realized that Aslan ''might'' be too much for her, so she overcame her disdain and taught enough "magicians... of a sort" to insure that they could bring back the dead. Or at least, one specific dead person: herself.



** That's a good point (Uncle Andrew even speculates briefly about doing a little ethnic cleansing), although I'm pretty sure his sudden embrace of willful ignorance was a jab at people - an atheist, in this case - who refuses to believe ''any'' amount of proof that doesn't fit his preconceptions.

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** That's a good point (Uncle Andrew even speculates briefly about doing a little ethnic cleansing), although I'm pretty sure his sudden embrace of willful ignorance was a jab at people - an atheist, in this case - who refuses refuse to believe ''any'' amount of proof that doesn't fit his their preconceptions.



What is this thing? According to Lewis notes Jadis is Satan figure in Narnia and there was no evil in this world before she entered it. Then where the heck did that thing come from? It's a GodOfEvil in setting in which Christian theology is undeniably true, so no other god aside Christian God should exist, yet here he is, very real. I know he is supposed to represent false gods or gods used to justify horrible acts or something like that, but that doesn't explain his origin in-Universe.

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What is this thing? According to Lewis Lewis' notes Jadis is the Satan figure in Narnia and there was no evil in this world before she entered it. Then where the heck did that thing come from? It's a GodOfEvil in setting in which Christian theology is undeniably true, so no other god aside Christian God should exist, yet here he is, very real. I know he is supposed to represent false gods or gods used to justify horrible acts or something like that, but that doesn't explain his origin in-Universe.



** Alternately, Tash may have been ''part'' of the Emperor-over-Sea's design for the cosmos, not an outside intruder like Jadis. Having recognized that his new world was corrupted from the beginning, he included a Death God among his river gods, tree spirits and so forth (vulture symbolism seems meaningful here). In that sense, Aslan is his 'opposite' as a being of life rather than death. Recognizing that free beings might choose to reject grace puts a universal creator in the odd role of having to provide for them.

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** Alternately, Tash may have been ''part'' of the Emperor-over-Sea's design for the cosmos, not an outside intruder like Jadis. Having recognized that his new world was corrupted from the beginning, he included a Death God among his river gods, tree spirits and so forth (vulture symbolism seems meaningful here). In that sense, Aslan is here) because his 'opposite' as a being of life rather than death. Recognizing that free beings might choose universe suddenly had the potential for its creatures to reject grace puts a universal creator in his grace. Aslan meant that Tash was 'his opposite' not because he was equal to the odd role Emperor, but because he was the (intended) death of having to provide for them.
the universe while Aslan has always represented life.



** In broad strokes, yes. But bear in mind that Archenland is specifically presented as a little kingdom with very little wealth or military power. It's hard to imagine a nastier position than being trapped between a witch-queen and her FantasyAxisOfEvil and Calormen with its conquest-hungry Tarkaans. One thing that Archenland probably ''did'' do was accept human refugees once Jadis started eradicating every human that she could find.

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** In broad strokes, yes. But bear in mind that Archenland is specifically presented as a little kingdom with very little wealth or military power. It's hard to imagine a nastier position than being trapped between a witch-queen and her FantasyAxisOfEvil and Calormen with its conquest-hungry Tarkaans. One thing that If it makes you feel better, the existence of Archenland probably ''did'' do was accept human refugees gave humans in Narnia somewhere to flee once Jadis started eradicating every human that she could find.
their kind in Narnia.



** Despite Lewis' love of allegory, he didn't really do a lot of world building. He had strengths as a writer but he wasn't really interested in creating a FantasyCounterpartCulture for everything. Although your comment about a civiliation that follows the Emperor rather than Aslan does remind me for some reason of the retired stars in ''Voyage,'' though I suspect the parallel there was supposed to be angelic.

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** Despite Lewis' love of allegory, he didn't really do a lot of world building. He had strengths as a writer but he wasn't really interested in creating a FantasyCounterpartCulture for everything. Although your comment about a civiliation civilization that follows the Emperor rather than Aslan does remind me for some reason of the retired stars in ''Voyage,'' though I suspect the parallel there was supposed to be angelic.



[[WMG: What was the point of the dufflepuds?]]

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[[WMG: What was the point of the dufflepuds?]]Dufflepuds?]]
10th Oct '15 8:37:56 PM LBHills
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[[WMG: If Aslan is Jesus and his father is God, who's supposed to be Holy Spirit?]]

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[[WMG: If Aslan is Jesus and his father is God, who's supposed to be the Holy Spirit?]]



*** Aslan observes more than once that he has ''many'' names.


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*** Aslan observes more than once that he has ''many'' names.

names. Names aren't very important to him; deeds are.




* As soon as Lucy suggested they approach the Dwarves, Tirian replied something close to that he "had no love for Dwarves today" but would set that distaste aside to please a lady - old-fashioned chivalry by our standards but not by his.

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* As soon as Lucy suggested they approach the Dwarves, Dwarfs, Tirian replied something close to that he "had no love for Dwarves Dwarfs today" but would set that distaste aside to please a lady - old-fashioned chivalry by our standards but not by his.




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* No one is ever told what ''would'' have happened.




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** In broad strokes, yes. But bear in mind that Archenland is specifically presented as a little kingdom with very little wealth or military power. It's hard to imagine a nastier position than being trapped between a witch-queen and her FantasyAxisOfEvil and Calormen with its conquest-hungry Tarkaans. One thing that Archenland probably ''did'' do was accept human refugees once Jadis started eradicating every human that she could find.



Basically, if Uncle Andrew didn't ever go to the wood between the worlds how could he know that the green ones bring you back?

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Basically, if Uncle Andrew didn't ever go to the wood Wood between the worlds Worlds how could he know that the green ones bring you back?



[[WMG: The Dwarves]]
Why didn't the king move the dwarves so far appart that they could never reach each other right behind over a chasm so that the shock of the sheer notion of a deep chasm in a stable shocks them to reality(''no'' hole in a ''stable'' is ''that'' deep)?

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[[WMG: The Dwarves]]
Dwarves in the Stable]]
Why didn't the king move the dwarves Dwarfs so far appart apart that they could never reach each other right behind over a chasm so that the shock of the sheer notion of a deep chasm in a stable shocks them to reality(''no'' hole in a ''stable'' is ''that'' deep)?




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** Despite Lewis' love of allegory, he didn't really do a lot of world building. He had strengths as a writer but he wasn't really interested in creating a FantasyCounterpartCulture for everything. Although your comment about a civiliation that follows the Emperor rather than Aslan does remind me for some reason of the retired stars in ''Voyage,'' though I suspect the parallel there was supposed to be angelic.




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** This one's got a ShrugOfGod right there in the text: "(By the way, I never have heard how these remote islands became attached to the crown of Narnia..." Nobody knows how strong Caspian's claim is, not even Lewis.
10th Oct '15 8:17:25 PM LBHills
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After reading this page, it's evident that most commenters are not aware that Lewis wrote the Narnia books ''specifically'' to tell younger readers his thoughts about Christian theology without being bound into the narrow structure permitted such discussions in his day. (Or in many others, including the present, if you think about it.) His intent, and the title of the best book about Lewis and Narnia, was to slip his ideas and discussions PastWatchfulDragons. Keep that in mind as you read and analyze the whys and wherefores...

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After reading this page, it's evident that most commenters are not aware that Lewis wrote the Narnia books ''specifically'' to tell younger readers his thoughts about Christian theology without being bound into the narrow structure permitted such discussions in his day. (Or in many others, including the present, if you think about it.) His intent, and the title of the best book about Lewis and Narnia, was to slip his ideas and discussions PastWatchfulDragons.'Past Watchful Dragons'. Keep that in mind as you read and analyze the whys and wherefores...



** The Beavers could have been just plain wrong, of course - how would Narnians generally have been in a position to know?

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** The Beavers could have been just plain wrong, of course - how would Narnians generally have been in a position to know?know? They knew of Adam and Eve... and Lilith... because their original King and Queen would have told those tales to explain ''their'' origins. But Frank, Helen, and Fledge had never been to Charn and only knew of Jadis as a woman of mysterious origins and superhuman strength.



I know it's MoralDissonance, but it just really bugs me that Eustace is implied to be the jerkass that he is because he's an ActualPacifist, a feminist, his school didn't use corporal punishment and his parents were non-smoking vegetarian teetotalers. So refraining from beating your child and smoking will result in him being a total JerkAss? Nice {{Aesop}}, Lewis.

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I know it's MoralDissonance, but it just really bugs me that Eustace is implied to be the jerkass that he is because he's an ActualPacifist, a feminist, his school didn't use corporal punishment and his parents were non-smoking vegetarian teetotalers. So refraining from beating smoking and refusing to beat your child and smoking will result in him being a total JerkAss? Nice {{Aesop}}, Lewis.



There are limits on how far you can take ArbitrarySkepticism. He is a man who genuinely believes that his godmother had fairy blood, that he could learn and practice magic and that he owns a boxful of dust from Atlantis that can be converted into rings that allow you to travel into other dimensions - yet he can't bring himself to believe in talking animals?! And that's not the only reason why he's so infuriating: at start he seems to have the makings of an interesting, nuanced character with fleshed out motivations for his amoral actions, but as the story progreses he's reduced to a caricature with no place in the story, except to be Lewis' StrawAtheist ButtMonkey. When I read a story called ''Literature/TheMagiciansNephew'', I expect for the Magician to have some significance in the main plot, as well.
* The impression I got was that Uncle Andrew convinced himself it all wasn't real not because he didn't believe in it, but because he was ''scared'' of it. He'd spent his whole life looking for magic, yes, but he always kept it at arms' length- remember how he balked at the idea of sending ''himself'' to AnotherDimension? When he got to proto-Narnia, he was perfectly willing to believe in its rejuvenaitng properties, but the Talking Animals and Aslan frightened him enough that he convinced himself they were mundane animals to deal with it. It might have something to do with the fact that the magic he does is (he thinks) under his control and therefore safe- the Talking Animals obviously ''aren't''.

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There are limits on how far you can take ArbitrarySkepticism. He is a man who genuinely believes that his godmother had fairy blood, that he could learn and practice magic and that he owns a boxful of dust from Atlantis that can be converted into rings that allow you to travel into other dimensions - yet he can't bring himself to believe in talking animals?! And that's not the only reason why he's so infuriating: at start he seems to have the makings of an interesting, nuanced character with fleshed out motivations for his amoral actions, but as the story progreses progresses he's reduced to a caricature with no place in the story, except to be Lewis' StrawAtheist ButtMonkey. When I read a story called ''Literature/TheMagiciansNephew'', I expect for the Magician to have some significance in the main plot, as well.
* The impression I got was that Uncle Andrew convinced himself it all wasn't real not because he didn't believe in it, but because he was ''scared'' of it. He'd spent his whole life looking for magic, yes, but he always kept it at arms' arm's length- remember how he balked at the idea of sending ''himself'' to AnotherDimension? When he got to proto-Narnia, he was perfectly willing to believe in its rejuvenaitng rejuvenating properties, but the Talking Animals and Aslan frightened him enough that he convinced himself they were mundane animals to deal with it. It might have something to do with the fact that the magic he does is (he thinks) under his control and therefore safe- the Talking Animals obviously ''aren't''.



** That's a good point (Uncle Andrew even speculates briefly about doing a little ethnic cleansing), although I'm pretty sure his sudden embrace of willful ignorance was a jab at people - an atheist, in this case - who refuses to believe ''any'' amount of proof that doesn't fit his preconceptions.



I feel cheated

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I feel cheatedcheated.



* There is a strong implication of some creatures being AlwaysChaoticEvil - in Prince Caspian, Peter orders that Nikabrik's body [[DueToTheDead be returned to his people for burial while the Wer-Wolf and the Hag are to be thrown in a pit]], which implies either they genuinely are inferior or that Peter is a big old racist, not to mention the description of the Pevensies hunting down and killing the remnants of Jadis' army in the early years of their reign (with no mention of trials or any kind of justice) - possibly that combined with assumptions carried over from Tolkien.

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* There is a strong implication of some creatures being AlwaysChaoticEvil - in Prince Caspian, Peter orders that Nikabrik's body [[DueToTheDead be returned to his people for burial while the Wer-Wolf and the Hag are to be thrown in a pit]], which implies either they 'the vermin' genuinely are inferior or that Peter is a big old racist, not to mention the description of the Pevensies hunting down and killing the remnants of Jadis' army in the early years of their reign (with no mention of trials or any kind of justice) - possibly that combined with assumptions carried over from Tolkien.
* It was the movies that gave the minotaurs their later redemption. In the books they're never mentioned again (and may, like the talking beavers, have been one of the races fully wiped out in the interim.)



** Stupid question, but why would Lucy and Edmund (and the other two, natch) be moved from the professor's house to Cambridge? I'm sorry, I just don't see that as a good idea... Add to that the fact that PC inbetween LWW and [=VoDT=] shows the four running around the tube and going to school and all... I thought there was a war on? Is this just something that they don't teach in American schools?

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** Stupid question, but why would Lucy and Edmund (and the other two, natch) be moved from the professor's house to Cambridge? I'm sorry, I just don't see that as a good idea... Add to that the fact that PC inbetween in between LWW and [=VoDT=] shows the four running around the tube and going to school and all... I thought there was a war on? Is this just something that they don't teach in American schools?



What is this thing? According to Lewis notes Jadis is Satan figure in Narnia and there was no evil in this world before she entered it. Then where the heck did that thing come from? It's a GodOfEvil in setting in which Christian theology is undeniably true, so no other god aside Christian God should exist, yet here he is, very real. I know he is supposet to represent false gods or gods used to justify horrible acts or something like that, but that doesn't explain his origin in-Universe.
** He's some kind of Outsider, just like Jadis. Remember, he doesn't actually walk Narnian soil until he's called, and he doesn't stay for long either. He's a rather uncaring god/demon/bird thing. Worship of Tash probably entered Calormen sometime in the middle period of their civilization, but like Aslan says,(paraphrasing) whoever does good in Tash's name is in reality serving Aslan, and whoever does evil in Aslan's name is in reality serving Tash. While Jadis might be the original Satan-figure, Tash could well be the actual Satan.

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What is this thing? According to Lewis notes Jadis is Satan figure in Narnia and there was no evil in this world before she entered it. Then where the heck did that thing come from? It's a GodOfEvil in setting in which Christian theology is undeniably true, so no other god aside Christian God should exist, yet here he is, very real. I know he is supposet supposed to represent false gods or gods used to justify horrible acts or something like that, but that doesn't explain his origin in-Universe.
** He's some kind of Outsider, just like Jadis. Remember, he doesn't actually walk Narnian soil until he's called, and he doesn't stay for long either. He's a rather uncaring god/demon/bird thing. Worship of Tash probably entered Calormen sometime in the middle period of their civilization, but like Aslan says,(paraphrasing) to paraphrase Aslan's words, whoever does good in Tash's name is in reality serving Aslan, and whoever does evil in Aslan's name is in reality serving Tash. While Jadis might be the original Satan-figure, Tash could well be the actual Satan.



** If Aslan is to be taken literally when he says that they are opposites, then Tash may be far worse that Satan. To be truly opposite to Aslan he couldn't be his creation, he'd have to be an being of independent and equal power. Jadis is Lucifer, Tash is some kind of Anti-God.

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** If Aslan is to be taken literally when he says that they are opposites, then Tash may be far worse that than Satan. To be truly opposite to Aslan he couldn't be his creation, he'd have to be an being of independent and equal power. Jadis is Lucifer, Tash is some kind of Anti-God.




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** Alternately, Tash may have been ''part'' of the Emperor-over-Sea's design for the cosmos, not an outside intruder like Jadis. Having recognized that his new world was corrupted from the beginning, he included a Death God among his river gods, tree spirits and so forth (vulture symbolism seems meaningful here). In that sense, Aslan is his 'opposite' as a being of life rather than death. Recognizing that free beings might choose to reject grace puts a universal creator in the odd role of having to provide for them.



I cannot really believe that Lewis wouldn't include equivalent of thirth part of the Holy Trinity in his series, yet the only thing that seems to be close is Eagle from ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader''.

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I cannot really believe that Lewis wouldn't include equivalent equivalents of thirth part two parts of the Holy Trinity in his series, yet the only thing that seems to be close is Eagle from ''The Voyage of the Dawn Treader''.




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* I can think of only two references that ''might'' be the third of the Trinity: the first is the aforementioned albatross, the second is in ''The Horse and His Boy'' when Shasta asks an unseen being shrouded in fog 'Who are you?' and receives the answer 'Myself' in three voices. Once the fog clears, only the physically-manifest member of the Trinity (Aslan) is seen.



* This comes straight from Christian theology (see the parable of the GoodSamaritan) especially Lewis' take is a particularly forgiving take here. Good (read: God) and Evil are rather like hot and cold in physics, namely that cold does not really exist and is merely a lacking of heat. Ergo nothing can be good that does not reflect God in some way. Therefore if Emeth was a good, noble, and loyal servant who lived a virtuous life... that he didn't do so explicitly for Aslan is of little importance. Emeth didn't need explicit knowledge of God to live in a Godly manner, his heart simply knew that as the only Truth.
** Essentially he was always (unknowingly) disloyal to Tash who as not-God is harsh and evil, because you could not be loyal to Tash (or any other false faith) in truth and avoid being some total baby-killer class evil dude. Essentially this underwrites all sorts of virtuous pagans (or athiests or whatever else) because if God is equivalent to virtue all virtue reflects a belief in God, however a person may choose to wrap that. Though Tash is a Satanic figure here the point would remain unchanged if he was just superstition or some human philosopher that got wise sitting under a tree or something.

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*** We can't know that without knowing Emeth better. But if he's considered as a symbolic figure in a parable, then yes: he would refuse to be untrue to ''his'' interpretation of Tash, even if it meant the sacrificial knife or the stake. Dying at the hands of priests of Tash, to remain true to 'his' Tash, would be his choice.
* This comes straight from Christian theology (see the parable of the GoodSamaritan) especially - in fact, Lewis' take interpretation is a particularly forgiving take here.one. Good (read: God) and Evil are rather like hot and cold in physics, namely that cold does not really exist and is merely a lacking of heat. Ergo nothing can be good that does not reflect God in some way. Therefore if Emeth was a good, noble, and loyal servant who lived a virtuous life... that he didn't do so explicitly for Aslan is of little importance. Emeth didn't need explicit knowledge of God to live in a Godly manner, his heart simply knew that as the only Truth.
** Essentially he was always (unknowingly) disloyal to Tash who as not-God is harsh and evil, because you could not be loyal to Tash (or any other false faith) in truth and avoid being some total baby-killer class evil dude. Essentially this underwrites all sorts of virtuous pagans (or athiests atheists or whatever else) because if God is equivalent to virtue all virtue reflects a belief in God, however a person may choose to wrap that. Though Tash is a Satanic figure here here, the point would remain unchanged if he was just superstition or some human philosopher that got wise sitting under a tree or something.





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\n*** Aslan observes more than once that he has ''many'' names.

10th Oct '15 7:43:30 PM LBHills
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* The theory that the L. of the G. K. was "of the same sort" was expounded by a Narnian courtier who only knew that the White Witch 'originally' came out of the North, too (remember, ''Magician's Nephew'' hadn't been written and Lewis may have come up with her real origin between books.) I don't conflate the two witches myself, but I can see how folks would latch onto this line to give some context to a well-written but essentially OutsideContextVillain. Once Lewis established Jadis as the "serpent" in this world's mythos, folks would naturally seek patterns - daughter, apprentice, reincarnation - to link her to the L. of the G. K.




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** Well, in that case, it was worth the wait. (Besides, better to have Jadis wreaking havoc on London than Reepicheep.)



** To pick at a tiny niggling point, it's not a planet (c.f. ''Voyage of the Dawn Treader).''






* In the movie, the Luftwaffe (...Um, I don't know if you know or not, and I'm sorry if you do, but they're kind of like the German airforce/bombers during WWII IIRC) are bombing London during the opening. The Pevensie's house doesn't get bombed, and none of ''[[InferredHolocaust them]]'' die, but the Luftwaffe are ''still'' dropping bombs all over London, and there must have been a few death's. Ya know, for kids! Does that help?

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* In the movie, the Luftwaffe (...Um, I don't know if you know or not, and I'm sorry if you do, but they're kind of like the German airforce/bombers during WWII IIRC) are bombing London during the opening. The Pevensie's house doesn't get bombed, and none of ''[[InferredHolocaust them]]'' die, but the Luftwaffe are ''still'' dropping bombs all over London, and there must have been a few death's.deaths. Ya know, for kids! Does that help?




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** It happens in the books as well, but entirely offscreen to set up the reason the four Pevensies are suddenly being sent off to live in somebody's old mansion.




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* They also had the immediate friendship, counsel and support of the Beavers and Mr. Tumnus, as well as other characters introduced in ''The Horse and his Boy.'' Children as kings is not a new concept and monarchies have a way of working around the issues.



** Given that the Silver Chair is thousands of years after TMN, its possible that the Northern Witches are Jadis's descendants. She's the last of her kind from Charn, but she could have had 'lovers' and children in the time since. Also, the bit about her being related to Lilith may just be conjecture on the part of Narnians, since they probably didnt know about Charn.

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** Given that the Silver Chair is thousands of years after TMN, its possible that the Northern Witches are Jadis's descendants. She's the last of her kind from Charn, but she could have had 'lovers' and children in the time since. Also, the bit about her being related to Lilith may just be conjecture on the part of Narnians, since they probably didnt didn't know about Charn.




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*** The nice part about ''that'' idea is that it suggests Jadis - despite the prejudice she showed against "book learned" magicians in ''The Magician's Nephew'' - realized that Aslan ''might'' be too much for her, so she overcame her disdain and taught enough "magicians... of a sort" to insure that they could bring back the dead. Or at least, one specific dead person: herself.
10th Oct '15 7:04:43 PM LBHills
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* Back to the larger issue ('Aslan only cares for Narnia as a way to provide character development for young Earthlings'): Seeming to realize he'd conveyed that impression, C.S. Lewis went on to write ''The Horse and His Boy'' (in which Narnians save Narnia and Aslan is shown to be watching over them just as diligently), and also mentions a storyteller in ''The Last Battle'' telling several tales from the hundreds of years of Narnian history that Eustace and Jill missed out on.
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