History Headscratchers / TheChroniclesOfNarnia

27th Nov '16 3:08:05 PM nombretomado
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* The Dufflepuds are actually highly problematic. Consider: When the White Witch turns people into stone, it's one of the things that mark her as a villain. When Eustace gets involuntarily turned into a dragon earlier in ''Literature/{{Voyage of the Dawn Treader}}'', it's a rather miserable experience for him. Yet when the wizard Coriakin transforms these people (against their will, for disobedience) into forms they consider so ugly that they'd rather be invisible...that's suddenly a-ok because he's [[PalsWithJesus pals with Aslan]] and because when the invisibility spell is lifted again, Lucy in an unprecedented display of sympathy finds their transformed bodies hilariously funny and asks if they really ''have'' to be turned back. [[FlatWhat Wat]]. -- And no, they never do get their original form back, and what the author would like us to take away from this episode is that they're silly people who simply didn't know how to properly ''appreciate'' their wizard-given new bodies. If that's not a prime example of ProtagonistCenteredMorality, I don't know what is.

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* The Dufflepuds are actually highly problematic. Consider: When the White Witch turns people into stone, it's one of the things that mark her as a villain. When Eustace gets involuntarily turned into a dragon earlier in ''Literature/{{Voyage of the Dawn Treader}}'', ''Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader'', it's a rather miserable experience for him. Yet when the wizard Coriakin transforms these people (against their will, for disobedience) into forms they consider so ugly that they'd rather be invisible...that's suddenly a-ok because he's [[PalsWithJesus pals with Aslan]] and because when the invisibility spell is lifted again, Lucy in an unprecedented display of sympathy finds their transformed bodies hilariously funny and asks if they really ''have'' to be turned back. [[FlatWhat Wat]]. -- And no, they never do get their original form back, and what the author would like us to take away from this episode is that they're silly people who simply didn't know how to properly ''appreciate'' their wizard-given new bodies. If that's not a prime example of ProtagonistCenteredMorality, I don't know what is.
27th Nov '16 3:07:30 PM nombretomado
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* There's a blog deconstructing the Narnia series out there whose author makes a pretty good case that Eustace's supposed jerkassery may be primarily an InformedFlaw. Whatever his actions and unexplored possible prior issues with the Pevensies, in ''[[Literature/VoyageOfTheDawnTreader VotDT]]'' he quickly ends up shanghaied into Narnia against his will, unlike the golden four in the first novel he doesn't have a ready way back via a magical wardrobe, and rather than having his first encounter with the natives be with a friendly faun or beavers (or even a faux-friendly witch), he ends up on a ship full of strangers who make fun of him for getting seasick. And unlike the other two he's ''not'' legendary-former-royalty of Narnia -- he really ''is'' just a kid who got dragged along. It's not entirely surprising, then, that he wouldn't take it well, no matter how much Lewis himself goes out of his way to mock him.

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* There's a blog deconstructing the Narnia series out there whose author makes a pretty good case that Eustace's supposed jerkassery may be primarily an InformedFlaw. Whatever his actions and unexplored possible prior issues with the Pevensies, in ''[[Literature/VoyageOfTheDawnTreader ''[[Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader VotDT]]'' he quickly ends up shanghaied into Narnia against his will, unlike the golden four in the first novel he doesn't have a ready way back via a magical wardrobe, and rather than having his first encounter with the natives be with a friendly faun or beavers (or even a faux-friendly witch), he ends up on a ship full of strangers who make fun of him for getting seasick. And unlike the other two he's ''not'' legendary-former-royalty of Narnia -- he really ''is'' just a kid who got dragged along. It's not entirely surprising, then, that he wouldn't take it well, no matter how much Lewis himself goes out of his way to mock him.



** In ''[[Literature/TheVoyageoftheDawnTreader Dawn Treader]]'', the difference is even smaller: one Earth year was equal to two Narnian years. And all of this presupposes that, even if there were no magical time-dilation and contraction effects, a Narnian year consists of 365 24-hour days. That could well be a false assumption, rendering any attempt at calculations and formulas (even more) useless.

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** In ''[[Literature/TheVoyageoftheDawnTreader ''[[Literature/TheVoyageOfTheDawnTreader Dawn Treader]]'', the difference is even smaller: one Earth year was equal to two Narnian years. And all of this presupposes that, even if there were no magical time-dilation and contraction effects, a Narnian year consists of 365 24-hour days. That could well be a false assumption, rendering any attempt at calculations and formulas (even more) useless.
25th Nov '16 9:06:21 PM nombretomado
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This only JustBugsMe in relation to ''BridgeToTerabithia'', but it's really annoying that Walden Media chose to keep Narnia in-period but not Bridge since, 1)the war is really only used as an excuse to get the kids up to the Professor's house while TheSeventies and the whole post-Vietnam mindset looms large in the background of BTT, and 2) They were re-creating America in New Zealand, it wouldn't have been ''that'' much harder to throw in a period setting.

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This only JustBugsMe in relation to ''BridgeToTerabithia'', ''Literature/BridgeToTerabithia'', but it's really annoying that Walden Media chose to keep Narnia in-period but not Bridge since, 1)the war is really only used as an excuse to get the kids up to the Professor's house while TheSeventies and the whole post-Vietnam mindset looms large in the background of BTT, and 2) They were re-creating America in New Zealand, it wouldn't have been ''that'' much harder to throw in a period setting.
22nd Nov '16 4:42:25 PM damnedifiaint
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** So Aravis knew her actions had bad consequences but didn't care, while Caspian and Dr Cornelius didn't even think about the little people in the first place?

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** So Aravis knew her actions had bad consequences but didn't care, while Caspian and Dr Cornelius didn't even think about the little people in the first place?place?
*** Caspian may not have thought of it at the time and was shortly thereafter too preoccupied with a war for his life, while Dr. Cornelius deemed it necessary to save Caspian's life and was shortly thereafter preoccupied with avoiding torture and possibly execution/murder for his part in Caspian's escape. It's not that they didn't care, but there were far more pressing things for them to deal with. In contrast, Aravis essentially got away scot-free and bragged about what she did.
24th Sep '16 4:50:12 PM nombretomado
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* Everybody always focuses on the "lipstick and invitations" bit, but I don't think that's really where the problem lies. I think the most telling reason for why Susan got left out is more of a maturity issue, as shown by when she says "What wonderful memories you have! '''Fancy you still thinking about all those funny games we used to play when we were children'''." The issue isn't that she's being more social, it's that she's basically attempting to deny everything that she experienced because it makes her feel childish, and she ''wants'' to feel mature. CSLewis had some strong opinions on people who felt that "being grown up" was an end in itself, and disparaged childish things for that reason. Maybe this quote will shed some light on where he might have been coming from:

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* Everybody always focuses on the "lipstick and invitations" bit, but I don't think that's really where the problem lies. I think the most telling reason for why Susan got left out is more of a maturity issue, as shown by when she says "What wonderful memories you have! '''Fancy you still thinking about all those funny games we used to play when we were children'''." The issue isn't that she's being more social, it's that she's basically attempting to deny everything that she experienced because it makes her feel childish, and she ''wants'' to feel mature. CSLewis Creator/CSLewis had some strong opinions on people who felt that "being grown up" was an end in itself, and disparaged childish things for that reason. Maybe this quote will shed some light on where he might have been coming from:
19th Sep '16 5:09:56 AM damnedifiaint
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Added DiffLines:

*** Probably Archenland. One of the other books mentioned Calormenes spread oil on their bread. And Calormen is a desert, while Archenland is forested.
2nd Aug '16 7:45:02 AM tafelshrew
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* The difference is that Aravis expressly ''needed'' the lesson, while neither Dr. Cornelius nor Caspian did. Aravis, when asked, states outright that she knows the slave she drugged was most likely beaten for falling asleep and allowing Aravis to get away, and demonstrates no concern or compassion for the fact that it was ''her'' actions that brought the girl's punishment about. It's not just that the slave was hurt because of Aravis' actions, it's that Aravis knew it would happen and didn't consider it a problem. While I don't recall the issue being addressed in ''Prince Caspian'', neither Caspian nor Dr. Cornelius is shown having the kind of dismissive disregard for the misfortunes of those in lower stations that Aravis has, so they don't need the object lesson the way Aravis does.

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* The difference is that Aravis expressly ''needed'' the lesson, while neither Dr. Cornelius nor Caspian did. Aravis, when asked, states outright that she knows the slave she drugged was most likely beaten for falling asleep and allowing Aravis to get away, and demonstrates no concern or compassion for the fact that it was ''her'' actions that brought the girl's punishment about. It's not just that the slave was hurt because of Aravis' actions, it's that Aravis knew it would happen and didn't consider it a problem. While I don't recall the issue being addressed in ''Prince Caspian'', neither Caspian nor Dr. Cornelius is shown having the kind of dismissive disregard for the misfortunes of those in lower stations that Aravis has, so they don't need the object lesson the way Aravis does.does.
** So Aravis knew her actions had bad consequences but didn't care, while Caspian and Dr Cornelius didn't even think about the little people in the first place?
25th Jul '16 2:28:31 PM StFan
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* The above statement is correct -- Aslan saves Edmund getting Jadis to "renounce her claim on your brother's blood." Plus, remember that NarniaTime ''doesn't'' work as "X years on Earth=Y years in Narnia." In ''PrinceCaspian'', 1 year on Earth=1000 years in Narnia; in ''Literature/TheSilverChair'', 1 year on Earth=70 years in Narnia.
** In [[Literature/TheVoyageoftheDawnTreader Dawn Treader]], the difference is even smaller: one Earth year was equal to two Narnian years. And all of this presupposes that, even if there were no magical time-dilation and contraction effects, a Narnian year consists of 365 24-hour days. That could well be a false assumption, rendering any attempt at calculations and formulas (even more) useless.

to:

* The above statement is correct -- Aslan saves Edmund getting Jadis to "renounce her claim on your brother's blood." Plus, remember that NarniaTime ''doesn't'' work as "X years on Earth=Y years in Narnia." In ''PrinceCaspian'', '''Literature/PrinceCaspian'', 1 year on Earth=1000 years in Narnia; in ''Literature/TheSilverChair'', 1 year on Earth=70 years in Narnia.
** In [[Literature/TheVoyageoftheDawnTreader ''[[Literature/TheVoyageoftheDawnTreader Dawn Treader]], Treader]]'', the difference is even smaller: one Earth year was equal to two Narnian years. And all of this presupposes that, even if there were no magical time-dilation and contraction effects, a Narnian year consists of 365 24-hour days. That could well be a false assumption, rendering any attempt at calculations and formulas (even more) useless.
17th Jul '16 7:19:07 PM Discar
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* The theory that the L. of the G. K. was "of the same sort" was expounded by a Narnian courtier who only knew that the White Witch 'originally' came out of the North, too (remember, ''Magician's Nephew'' hadn't been written and Lewis may have come up with her real origin between books.) I don't conflate the two witches myself, but I can see how folks would latch onto this line to give some context to a well-written but essentially OutsideContextVillain. Once Lewis established Jadis as the "serpent" in this world's mythos, folks would naturally seek patterns - daughter, apprentice, reincarnation - to link her to the L. of the G. K.

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* The theory that the L. of the G. K. was "of the same sort" was expounded by a Narnian courtier who only knew that the White Witch 'originally' came out of the North, too (remember, ''Magician's Nephew'' hadn't been written and Lewis may have come up with her real origin between books.) I don't conflate the two witches myself, but I can see how folks would latch onto this line to give some context to a well-written but essentially OutsideContextVillain.OutsideContextProblem. Once Lewis established Jadis as the "serpent" in this world's mythos, folks would naturally seek patterns - daughter, apprentice, reincarnation - to link her to the L. of the G. K.
22nd Mar '16 4:37:54 AM radams
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* Why couldn't a child of Lilith get from Earth to Charn? We're told in Prince Caspian that "There were many chinks or chasms between worlds in old times, but they have grown rarer."
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