History Headscratchers / Music

1st Aug '17 5:31:22 AM DoctorNemesis
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** The brand owners simply may not / might not have considered it worth pursuing, especially in cases where a brand is so commonly referred to in everyday discussion that it almost borders on generic (as Vegemite is in Australia and Greyhound is in America) or if it's just a single mention. Quoting a substantial part of another work, however, may potentially be getting into areas of potential plagiarism. Also possible is that the brand owners might not have noticed the reference; after all, the owners of "Kookaburra" didn't notice that Men At Work had borrowed from them until 2008, twenty-eight years after the song was first released.

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** The brand owners simply may not / might not have considered it worth pursuing, especially in cases where a brand is so commonly referred to in everyday discussion that it almost borders on generic (as Vegemite is in Australia and Greyhound is in America) or if it's just a single mention. Quoting a substantial part of another work, however, may potentially be getting into areas of potential plagiarism. Also possible is that the brand owners might not have noticed the reference; after all, the owners of "Kookaburra" didn't notice that Men At Work had borrowed from them until 2008, twenty-eight years after the song was first released.
1st Aug '17 5:29:31 AM DoctorNemesis
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** The brand owners simply may not / might not have considered it worth pursuing, especially in cases where a brand is so commonly referred to in everyday discussion that it almost borders on generic (as Vegemite is in Australia and Greyhound is in America) or if it's just a single mention. Quoting a substantial part of another work, however, may potentially be getting into areas of potential plagiarism. Also possible is that the brand owners might not have noticed the reference; after all, the owners of "Kookaburra" didn't notice that Men At Work had borrowed from them until 2008, twenty-eight years after the song was first released.
27th Jul '17 10:22:44 AM AgProv
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** Sometimes the intention, while good, is let down by lack of good material, good tunes or just sheer lack of musical talent. Using an orchestra suggests there is enough depth and dimension in the musical concept to justify it. When it doesn't - it falls flat and only highlights the failings - it can even be seen as overblown and pretentious. Who, as a for instance, remembers Music/TheMoodyBlues' album ''Days Of Future Past'' which matched progressive rock band to a full concert orchestra - except for the one redeeming and truly magnificent standout track ''Nights In White Satin''? The rest is just... a time capsule of late 1960's lift music.
8th Jul '17 12:22:27 AM Godozo
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*** On the release it explicitly states that "Milli Vanilli are Rob Pilatus and Fab Morvan." False Advertising, in short.
2nd Jul '17 12:23:40 PM nombretomado
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* Why is it that Dark Neoclassical is listed as a subgenre of DarkWave on TheOtherWiki? I know that a lot of groups use synths to create that sound, but what about groups who create this type of music with acoustic instruments?

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* Why is it that Dark Neoclassical is listed as a subgenre of DarkWave on TheOtherWiki? Wiki/TheOtherWiki? I know that a lot of groups use synths to create that sound, but what about groups who create this type of music with acoustic instruments?



** Hugely entertaining tangential rant aside, the troper above appears to be mistaken; according to TheOtherWiki, the first US album credited to Milli Vanilli was released in 1989, they'd been releasing and charting (in Europe at least) since 1988, so it's perfectly valid for a 1980s music channel to play (some of) their music. To address the actual question, the duo who the songs are credited to are frauds, but the songs themselves still exist; it's not like someone destroyed all copies when the truth came out or it's illegal to play those songs or anything. Most music stations buy the rights to play a whole load of songs as part of a package rather than individually, particular when it comes to 'golden oldie' style hits, and they just get shoved on in the rotation along with the others, since who cares that much about a has-been Eighties/Nineties pop band who turned out to be lip-synching?

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** Hugely entertaining tangential rant aside, the troper above appears to be mistaken; according to TheOtherWiki, Wiki/TheOtherWiki, the first US album credited to Milli Vanilli was released in 1989, they'd been releasing and charting (in Europe at least) since 1988, so it's perfectly valid for a 1980s music channel to play (some of) their music. To address the actual question, the duo who the songs are credited to are frauds, but the songs themselves still exist; it's not like someone destroyed all copies when the truth came out or it's illegal to play those songs or anything. Most music stations buy the rights to play a whole load of songs as part of a package rather than individually, particular when it comes to 'golden oldie' style hits, and they just get shoved on in the rotation along with the others, since who cares that much about a has-been Eighties/Nineties pop band who turned out to be lip-synching?
24th May '17 12:18:31 PM Unicorndance
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* Headscratchers/{{Songdrops}}
11th Feb '17 3:44:39 AM DoctorNemesis
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** It's just a shorthand. Most stuff that typically gets sorted into "world music" is likely to have niche appeal at best in other countries, since it's generally traditional / folk music that doesn't necessarily translate well or have much of an audience outside of its original cultural contexts (and the stuff that ''does'' translate might more easily get sorted into "Pop", "Rock", "Electro" or whatever). Most stores almost certainly won't carry enough of it to really make it worth setting aside entire sections specifically to cater for, say, Burundian men's folk music or Vietnamese ''nhã nhạc'', so the examples that do make it through get sorted into "world music" so that the people who are looking for that kind of music can find it all in one place. As for people scoffing at this, they probably would -- but then, I wouldn't be entirely surprised if a lot of western music generally has limited appeal in non-western cultures and so has something similar happen to it as well. It's a cultural thing.

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** It's just a shorthand. Most stuff that typically gets sorted into "world music" is likely to have niche appeal at best in other countries, since it's generally traditional / folk music that doesn't necessarily translate well or have much of an audience outside of its original cultural contexts (and the stuff that ''does'' translate might more easily get sorted into "Pop", "Rock", "Electro" "Electronic", "Hip-Hop" or whatever). Most stores almost certainly won't carry enough of it to really make it worth setting aside entire sections specifically to cater for, say, Burundian men's folk music or Vietnamese ''nhã nhạc'', so the examples that do make it through get sorted into "world music" so that the people who are looking for that kind of music can find it all in one place. As for people scoffing at this, they probably would -- but then, I wouldn't be entirely surprised if a lot of western music generally has limited appeal in non-western cultures and so has something similar happen to it as well. It's a cultural thing.
11th Jan '17 5:51:00 PM ZombieAladdin
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* How do musicians get away with mentioning brand names without any legal problems? How did Men at Work get in trouble in "Down Under" for using a few phrases from "Kookaburra," yet they mention Vegemite and not get in trouble with Kraft Foods? How did Music/BarenakedLadies talk about ''Manga/SailorMoon'' in "One Week" and not have Creator/ToeiAnimation on their tails? Did Music/DeathCabForCutie get permission from the Greyhound Bus Company for "Soul Meets Body"?
15th Aug '16 4:48:13 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* Headscratchers/KidzBop
30th Jul '16 10:32:25 AM OrgaNik
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** What I cannot understand is that there have always been this sort of artists in the music industry, so why did Milli Vanilli get the massive backlash?
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