History Headscratchers / MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots

29th May '16 10:28:07 AM nombretomado
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* Why are all the flashbacks to the original MGS from the PS1 version and not the UpdatedRerelease The Twin Snakes? I know the voice clips from the past were, but not the graphics themselves (Including the eyesore that is the Young w Headband face camo).

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* Why are all the flashbacks to the original MGS from the PS1 [=PS1=] version and not the UpdatedRerelease The Twin Snakes? I know the voice clips from the past were, but not the graphics themselves (Including the eyesore that is the Young w Headband face camo).
13th Mar '16 6:03:39 PM ml0085
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* One the MGS2 flashbacks features [[spoiler: the Patriots's codec conversation with Raiden prior to his battle with Solidus]]. Snake never witnessed this, so why is it one of the flashbacks?

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* One the MGS2 flashbacks features [[spoiler: the Patriots's codec conversation with Raiden prior to his battle with Solidus]]. Snake never witnessed this, so why is it one of the his flashbacks?
13th Mar '16 6:00:24 PM ml0085
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*** Which simply is not supported by anything we see Snake do before the Metal Gear Solid 3 retcon that Big Boss wasn't Robotnik-level evil in his attempts to rule the world. NONE of the codec conversations regarding Big Boss in Metal Gear Solid 1 and 2 has Snake saying that Big Boss was anything less than a traitor, whereas even after Gray Fox had tried to kill him twice Snake was still full of gushing praise for a man described as his friend and mentor. It is pretty large plot hole actually.

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*** Which simply is not supported by anything we see Snake do before the Metal Gear Solid 3 retcon that Big Boss wasn't Robotnik-level evil in his attempts to rule the world. NONE of the codec conversations regarding Big Boss in Metal Gear Solid 1 and 2 has Snake saying that Big Boss was anything less than a traitor, whereas even after Gray Fox had tried to kill him twice Snake was still full of gushing praise for a man described as his friend and mentor. It is pretty large plot hole actually.actually.
* One the MGS2 flashbacks features [[spoiler: the Patriots's codec conversation with Raiden prior to his battle with Solidus]]. Snake never witnessed this, so why is it one of the flashbacks?
20th Jan '16 2:25:47 AM thatsnumberwang
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Added DiffLines:

** The idea ever since Metal Gear Solid 2 is that modern soldiers are nothing more than kids who have been hardened through VR training and nanomachines. And even units like the genome soldiers were essentially rookies who were hardened through genetic engineering. It is essentially a take on our ''Call of Duty'' culture. Real soldiers like Solid Snake who can shrug off such things are no longer the men that you are likely to meet on the battlefield.
20th Jan '16 2:16:37 AM thatsnumberwang
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** For all the aggression between the two during the first two games (MGSV spoiler notwithstanding), it's implied heavily that their relationship was similar to Big Boss and The Boss, so despite feeling betrayed by Big Boss, he still respected him a lot.

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** For all the aggression between the two during the first two games (MGSV spoiler notwithstanding), it's implied heavily that their relationship was similar to Big Boss and The Boss, so despite feeling betrayed by Big Boss, he still respected him a lot.lot.
*** Which simply is not supported by anything we see Snake do before the Metal Gear Solid 3 retcon that Big Boss wasn't Robotnik-level evil in his attempts to rule the world. NONE of the codec conversations regarding Big Boss in Metal Gear Solid 1 and 2 has Snake saying that Big Boss was anything less than a traitor, whereas even after Gray Fox had tried to kill him twice Snake was still full of gushing praise for a man described as his friend and mentor. It is pretty large plot hole actually.
15th Jan '16 12:47:02 PM Anddrix
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* Okay, forgive me for going all gun nerdy, but early on in Metal Gear Solid 4, it's established that most firearms in the world have had ID locks added to them, and everyone has nanoes in them. The two work together to ensure that someone who doesn't have the proper ID will never be able to fire a gun that requires it. When Snake acquires his custom M4 Carbine from Drebin, he attempts to test fire it at a nearby wall, but then says that he can't bring himself to pull the trigger. Drebin gives him an injection of surpressor nanomachines that will allow him to use weapons stripped of their [=IDs=]. Okay, logical. The gun doesn't block the trigger mechanism or anything like that - it just refuses to allow the user's nanobots permission to fire if they don't have the right ID, and the user suddenly finds his trigger finger muscles won't contract. Effective. Then, later, on the Volga, Ocelot takes control of the AI that controls all ID locked weapons systems in the world. He can make helicopters crash by pointing at them, which, while I'm not sure how he did that, is quite awesome. But what makes no sense here is that when he locks out all the US soldiers' weapons, they are able to pull the trigger. They repeatedly pull the trigger, in fact, to no effect, just making clicky noises. So this means that the ID lock system is nothing but a trigger disconnector, not interacting with soldier's nanoes at all. This flies in the face of what we saw earlier. Not only that, but if it's just a trigger disconnector, any two-bit gunsmith in the world could have easily stripped it out and returned the gun to it's regular state of being usable by anyone. Was this just an oversight, or did someone assume that [[ViewersAreMorons audiences just wouldn't understand]] that the soldiers can't fire their weapons unless we show them [[TheCoconutEffect repeatedly pulling the trigger and making clicky noises?]]

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* Okay, forgive me for going all gun nerdy, but early on in Metal Gear Solid 4, it's established that most firearms in the world have had ID locks added to them, and everyone has nanoes in them. The two work together to ensure that someone who doesn't have the proper ID will never be able to fire a gun that requires it. When Snake acquires his custom M4 Carbine from Drebin, he attempts to test fire it at a nearby wall, but then says that he can't bring himself to pull the trigger. Drebin gives him an injection of surpressor nanomachines that will allow him to use weapons stripped of their [=IDs=]. Okay, logical. The gun doesn't block the trigger mechanism or anything like that - it just refuses to allow the user's nanobots permission to fire if they don't have the right ID, and the user suddenly finds his trigger finger muscles won't contract. Effective. Then, later, on the Volga, Ocelot takes control of the AI that controls all ID locked weapons systems in the world. He can make helicopters crash by pointing at them, which, while I'm not sure how he did that, is quite awesome. But what makes no sense here is that when he locks out all the US soldiers' weapons, they are able to pull the trigger. They repeatedly pull the trigger, in fact, to no effect, just making clicky noises. So this means that the ID lock system is nothing but a trigger disconnector, not interacting with soldier's nanoes at all. This flies in the face of what we saw earlier. Not only that, but if it's just a trigger disconnector, any two-bit gunsmith in the world could have easily stripped it out and returned the gun to it's regular state of being usable by anyone. Was this just an oversight, or did someone assume that [[ViewersAreMorons audiences just wouldn't understand]] understand that the soldiers can't fire their weapons unless we show them [[TheCoconutEffect repeatedly pulling the trigger and making clicky noises?]]
10th Nov '15 8:17:30 PM CrowTR0bot
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Added DiffLines:

**** Also, this troper could ''swear'' the dialogue used actually ''was'' from ''The Twin Snakes,'' considering that he very clearly heard Creator/RobPaulsen saying Gray Fox's lines in the various audio flashbacks.
19th Oct '15 9:16:27 AM NeutralPerson
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Added DiffLines:

** You do know you can overdose on drugs, right? The syringes are basically drugs for controlling nanomachines from going nuts (see what I did there?). In Namoi's words, "It's very potent, so use it sparingly", which is why overusing the syringe accelerated the cancer she has. At least, it'a assumed she succumbs to the cancer because of the syringe, but I think it's just classic overdose.


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** They likely did shrug it off, but we never see it on-screen to showcase one of the main points of the story, and that most people aren't hardened by this time.
19th Oct '15 9:12:13 AM NeutralPerson
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Added DiffLines:

** I blame it on bad writing. If I WERE to justify it however, it would be that Ocelot's self-hypnosis literally made him unable to do anything to control himself, let alone even be consciously aware of what's happening, which is why after Old Snake beats him atop the Arsenal Gear, he starts having a sort of seizure that is basically his off-switch for his temporary persona. Nanomachines explain everything, it seems.
24th Sep '15 6:07:23 PM DarkDeceiver
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[[spoiler: Big Boss]] explains it right then and there at the end. "So long as zero remains, one will become 100 again" "His sin is ours. And for that reason, I'm taking it upon myself to send Zero back to nothing".

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** [[spoiler: Big Boss]] explains it right then and there at the end. "So long as zero remains, one will become 100 again" "His sin is ours. And for that reason, I'm taking it upon myself to send Zero back to nothing".
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