History Headscratchers / MaryPoppins

6th Nov '17 7:49:28 AM palmer7
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*** Try explaining that to a 7-year-old boy who has just been introduced to the idea of donating to charity (i.e. "feed the birds").



*** Beside the point, he wanted to feed the birds (tuppence a bag).



** No. By that point both Mr Banks and the Old Men of the Bank have learned their lessons on a healthier work/life balance. That is the significance of them all flying kites with friends and families instead of slaving away over accountbooks in cold and lonely offices. The job is still there, and Mr Banks and the Old Men are going to go back to it (not spending a life of frivolity alone) but they've all learned that amidst the work they must make time for each other. Everyone should make time to fly a kite now and then.

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** No. By that point both Mr Mr. Banks and the Old Men of the Bank have learned their lessons on a healthier work/life balance. That is the significance of them all flying kites with friends and families instead of slaving away over accountbooks account books in cold and lonely offices. The job is still there, and Mr Mr. Banks and the Old Men are going to go back to it (not spending a life of frivolity alone) but they've all learned that amidst the work they must make time for each other. Everyone should make time to fly a kite now and then.



** Maybe it is happening in the minds of the children? But then, what prompts Bank's sudden epiphany?

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** Maybe it is happening in the minds of the children? But then, what prompts Bank's Banks' sudden epiphany?



*** Or at least not the things he wanted them to learn. Things Mary taught: 1) a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down, 2) the phrase "supercalifragilisticexpialidocious", 3) there's a time for laughter, but also a time for solmenity, 4) there's more to life than being in the 1%.

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*** Or at least not the things he wanted them to learn. Things Mary taught: 1) a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down, 2) the phrase "supercalifragilisticexpialidocious", 3) there's a time for laughter, but also a time for solmenity, solemnity, 4) there's more to life than being in the 1%.



** The entire film was produced and recorded inside a four-stage complex in Southern California. You'd be surprised at how much of "London" was actually matte paintings.



*** Fair point, he does use actual fireworks at one point against the "Hottentots".



* What was Mary Poppin's plan when she proposed the outing to the bank? If she thought the mere act of giving a tuppence to an old lady and feed some birds was going to change Mr. Banks' character completely, she either is too naive or overestimated the influence she had on him, if she *wanted* him to get fired (but then how did she foresee the riot at the bank?) that makes her completely unlikeable. The most probable outcome would have been that Michael was forced to put his money in a bank and Mr Banks feeling smug about having taught him a lifelesson, while Michael's resentment for his father grew. It all seems to come down to a huge BatmanGambit with way too many uncertainties. While she is magical, nothing in the movies or books (correct me if I'm wrong, since I haven't read all of them) suggests that she can tell the future.

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* What was Mary Poppin's Poppins' plan when she proposed the outing to the bank? If she thought the mere act of giving a tuppence to an old lady and feed some birds was going to change Mr. Banks' character completely, she either is too naive or overestimated the influence she had on him, if she *wanted* him to get fired (but then how did she foresee the riot at the bank?) that makes her completely unlikeable. The most probable outcome would have been that Michael was forced to put his money in a bank and Mr Mr. Banks feeling smug about having taught him a lifelesson, life lesson, while Michael's resentment for his father grew. It all seems to come down to a huge BatmanGambit with way too many uncertainties. While she is magical, nothing in the movies or books (correct me if I'm wrong, since I haven't read all of them) suggests that she can tell the future.



** Mary had a twofold goal, and it's in line with what Bert told Jane and Michael in the alley. 1- The kids think their father is a boring fuddy duddy who doesn't really love them but dislikes them at best. By the time they run from the bank they're convinced he doesn't love them let alone like them. 2- Banks knows from Winnie and all the Nannies they've gone through that his children are misbehaving little rapscallions (or just high spirited children of eight and 10 depending on your point of view) when not in his rightfully strict and regimented presence. But he's ''never seen that for himself''. Mary knows that if they're ever going to mend this family they are going to have to meet somewhere in the middle. So if she suggests feeding the birds, and the children ask -- George will allow it and maybe become a bit softer toward his children being children. If they pass up the bird feeding, the children will see the bank and realize that George is in a cage, just like Bert said. It didn't work out that way precisely, but the reaction was delayed. The children gave back the tuppence in hopes it would make up for their behaviour (which they realized was wrong and got their father in trouble), and seeing the tuppence made George realize his children were just being children, and he was about to be fired for something ''all'' adults, especially those with children of their own, should already know.

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** Mary had a twofold goal, and it's in line with what Bert told Jane and Michael in the alley. 1- The kids think their father is a boring fuddy duddy who doesn't really love them but dislikes them at best. By the time they run from the bank they're convinced he doesn't love them let alone like them. 2- Banks knows from Winnie and all the Nannies they've gone through that his children are misbehaving little rapscallions (or just high spirited children of eight 8 and 10 7 depending on your point of view) when not in his rightfully strict and regimented presence. But he's ''never seen that for himself''. Mary knows that if they're ever going to mend this family they are going to have to meet somewhere in the middle. So if she suggests feeding the birds, and the children ask -- George will allow it and maybe become a bit softer toward his children being children. If they pass up the bird feeding, the children will see the bank and realize that George is in a cage, just like Bert said. It didn't work out that way precisely, but the reaction was delayed. The children gave back the tuppence in hopes it would make up for their behaviour (which they realized was wrong and got their father in trouble), and seeing the tuppence made George realize his children were just being children, and he was about to be fired for something ''all'' adults, especially those with children of their own, should already know.



** Winnie can't get the children, she's too busy chaining herself to the Prime Minister's carriage. It's her turn, you know.

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** *** Winnie can't get the children, she's too busy chaining herself to the Prime Minister's carriage. It's her turn, you know.know.

27th Oct '17 11:19:59 PM saralexxia
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*** But if those things actually are possible, why couldn't they fall into that realistic side of life as well? If the magical stuff actually happened, then that means magic ''isn't'' just fantasy in that world, in which case why shouldn't it be used for serious things as well just like anything else that's useful? When used in a practical way, it could really make life easier, and in fact you even ''do'' see it being used in the movie for many purposes like this.
27th Oct '17 6:09:20 PM saralexxia
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*** Well yeah, they'd think she's insane at first. But would it really be that hard for her to immediately prove them wrong?
6th Oct '17 2:15:04 PM Sharlee
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** Mary Poppins is the nanny, not the governess. The children may have a tutor for their conventional schooling.
6th Oct '17 2:11:42 PM Sharlee
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*** Or they wouldn't consider r-r-rum punch their ''favorite'' flavor.
29th Aug '17 3:51:56 PM CrypticMirror
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** No. By that point both Mr Banks and the Old Men of the Bank have learned their lessons on a healthier work/life balance. That is the significance of them all flying kites with friends and families instead of slaving away over accountbooks in cold and lonely offices. The job is still there, and Mr Banks and the Old Men are going to go back to it (not spending a life of frivolity alone) but they've all learned that amidst the work they must make time for each other. Everyone should make time to fly a kite now and then.
29th Aug '17 10:42:04 AM palmer7
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* At the end of the movie, Mr. Banks loses his job and is "drummed out" of the bank. At that point, he becomes a changed man and suggests they go fly kites. All of a sudden, at the kite-flying "party", the Banks family runs into the board of trustees and Mr. Banks not only gets his job back, but a promotion as well. Could all this progress he's made be erased?



** Too rich and/or powerfl for anybody to touch him, probably.

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** Too rich and/or powerfl powerful for anybody to touch him, probably.


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*** Then how do you explain the cricket scene with the fireworks?


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** Winnie can't get the children, she's too busy chaining herself to the Prime Minister's carriage. It's her turn, you know.
23rd Aug '17 5:36:37 PM CharlesPhipps
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*** [[ComicallyMissingThePoint He disputes they met a man with a wooden leg named Smith.]]
7th Aug '17 3:35:38 PM sonar1313
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** I think it's fair to go easy on George here. Here in the 21st century, people in places like Silicon Valley are really excited and passionate about creating the future, and venture capitalists are just as excited to help bring it about by funding it (and not coincidentally, getting rich along the way.) George and the other bank partners are the venture capitalists of 1910, in a still-dawning Industrial Age, making possible the growth of a brave new world. That's just as exciting then as it is now. And they're doing it in a patriotic way that empowers the rise of the British Empire. (Even avaricious old Mr. Dawes is big on that - "When stand the banks of England", etc.) George is still young enough to be idealistic about that kind of thing, and probably is more than a little frustrated that his children don't share his enthusiasm.
20th Jun '17 6:25:42 PM Skylite
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** Mary had a twofold goal, and it's in line with what Bert told Jane and Michael in the alley. 1- The kids think their father is a boring fuddy duddy who doesn't really love them but dislikes them at best. By the time they run from the bank they're convinced he doesn't love them let alone like them. 2- Banks knows from Winnie and all the Nannies they've gone through that his children are misbehaving little rapscallions when not in his rightfully strict and regimented presence. But he's ''never seen that for himself''. Mary knows that if they're ever going to mend this family they are going to have to meet somewhere in the middle. So if she suggests feeding the birds, and the children ask -- George will allow it and maybe become a bit softer toward his children being children. If they pass up the bird feeding, the children will see the bank and realize that George is in a cage, just like Bert said. It didn't work out that way precisely, but the reaction was delayed. The children gave back the tuppence in hopes it would make up for their behaviour (which they realized was wrong and got their father in trouble), and seeing the tuppence made George realize his children were just being children, and he was about to be fired for something ''all'' adults, especially those with children of their own, should already know.

to:

** Mary had a twofold goal, and it's in line with what Bert told Jane and Michael in the alley. 1- The kids think their father is a boring fuddy duddy who doesn't really love them but dislikes them at best. By the time they run from the bank they're convinced he doesn't love them let alone like them. 2- Banks knows from Winnie and all the Nannies they've gone through that his children are misbehaving little rapscallions (or just high spirited children of eight and 10 depending on your point of view) when not in his rightfully strict and regimented presence. But he's ''never seen that for himself''. Mary knows that if they're ever going to mend this family they are going to have to meet somewhere in the middle. middle. So if she suggests feeding the birds, and the children ask -- George will allow it and maybe become a bit softer toward his children being children. If they pass up the bird feeding, the children will see the bank and realize that George is in a cage, just like Bert said. It didn't work out that way precisely, but the reaction was delayed. The children gave back the tuppence in hopes it would make up for their behaviour (which they realized was wrong and got their father in trouble), and seeing the tuppence made George realize his children were just being children, and he was about to be fired for something ''all'' adults, especially those with children of their own, should already know.
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