History Headscratchers / MASH

10th Aug '17 6:17:27 PM Lightning4119
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** In "Love and Marriage" Hawkeye, Trapper, and Henry are playing poker with Zale and Radar in the Swamp when Frank confronts Mr. Kwang outside, starts yelling, and eventually opens fire. In "Deal Me Out," it takes a good two shots fired by John Ritter's character before they dive for cover. Clearly the sound of crashing, explosions, or gunfire doesn't provoke quite the same reaction anymore as it would with other people.




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** Some people really just dislike Hawkeye, and that pushes them towards defending Frank, since he's on the opposite side of Hawkeye 99% of the time. Plus, virtually every glimpse we get of the guy's home life and past is pretty depressing. He had an awful childhood thanks to his father, who apparently forbade talking at meals upon pain of a punch in the throat, pretended to like him, and [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking took away his nightlight.]] His mother doesn't seem to care about him much more than that, and he married for money rather than love (when they look at his wedding film, hardly anybody showed up and his wife looks like she'd prefer to be set on fire rather than marry Frank) and didn't have the guts to leave his wife for a woman it's implied he really did love. [[JerkAssWoobie He's a terrible person, but he's so pathetic it's hard not to feel sorry for him.]] At least until he opens his mouth again.




* Trivial point, but there's an episode where BJ is play-acting the role of what he imagines to be a stereotypical British officer and is taking the mannerisms UpToEleven. Couldn't help noticing he's wearing a beret with a Royal Tank Regiment cap-badge (probably something randomly selected from the costume department.) You wonder InUniverse in what circumstances he got hold of that: maybe a wounded tankie got sent to the MASH and oddments of kit ended up in the camp's lost Property box? A back-story begs to be written...

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\n** It's implied that Charles isn't as smart as he thinks he is, or rather than everyone is isn't as dumb as he thinks they are. Presumably he figures that they're just going to let that go, or perhaps the IRS wasn't as picky about those things back then.

* Trivial point, but there's an episode where BJ is play-acting the role of what he imagines to be a stereotypical British officer and is taking the mannerisms UpToEleven. Couldn't help noticing he's wearing a beret with a Royal Tank Regiment cap-badge (probably something randomly selected from the costume department.) You wonder InUniverse in what circumstances he got hold of that: maybe a wounded tankie got sent to the MASH and oddments of kit ended up in the camp's lost Property box? A back-story begs to be written...
written...
** Which episode was this?




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*** Considering his wristwatch is probably lodged between the man's lungs at the moment, he might just be guessing.
6th Aug '17 4:49:42 PM Lightning4119
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** See the [[Fridge/Mash Fridge page]] for a discussion on this.

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** See the [[Fridge/Mash Fridge page]] page for a discussion on this.
6th Aug '17 4:48:15 PM Lightning4119
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\n** See the [[Fridge/Mash Fridge page]] for a discussion on this.
6th Aug '17 4:44:58 PM Lightning4119
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** The two aren't mutually exclusive. It's shown repeatedly that Hawkeye can be abrasive or hard to work with sometimes, including his habit of yanking the phone out of someone's hand and yelling into it when they're trying to get something important done, like having more blood shipped to the unit or getting some shelling redirected. But Frank doesn't have a leg to stand on in that situation, considering how often he's shown cutting corners or not caring about his patients.







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** Presumably with [[HypercompetentSidekick Radar]] around, Potter doesn't need to be around nearly as often for things to get taken care of, and it's not like Potter needs to be around to supervise surgery. He comments himself in "Commander Pierce" that things around the camp generally run themselves, mostly because the 4077 is such a bunch of misfits and BunnyEarsLawyers that trying to run a by-the-book command is pointless.



* Since this series was way before my time, I'm curious about a reference that pops up in two different episodes: "Do you like Chinese food? Do you like walking in the rain?" Hawkeye once asked a nurse he was making out with this question, and responds to both with an enthusiastic, "Uh huh!", to which Hawkeye then asks, "How about we eat Chinese food in the rain?" Later still, BJ asked Radar the same question while he ate melted ice cream, to which he then adds with a straight face, "You could've been my wife", receiving only a look of confusion from Radar. So, what exactly is this in reference to?

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* Since this series was way before my time, I'm curious about a reference that pops up in two different episodes: "Do you like Chinese food? Do you like walking in the rain?" Hawkeye once asked a nurse he was making out with this question, and responds to both with an enthusiastic, "Uh huh!", to which Hawkeye then asks, [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs "How about we eat Chinese food in the rain?" rain?"]] Later still, BJ asked Radar the same question while he ate melted ice cream, to which he then adds with a straight face, "You could've been my wife", receiving only a look of confusion from Radar. So, what exactly is this in reference to?




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** Pointing, probably.
5th Aug '17 1:24:53 PM Vandalia92
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** Again, this is totally false. Mulcahy never told anyone that Schwartz was not a surgeon. Radar was the one who found it out, most likely when he requested his "201" file. If Mulcahy had told Hawkeye, he would not have been surprised when Radar told him. In addition, during the operating room scene after this, Mulcahy says "Good work Captain Casey." This proves that Mulcahy was not using the information he was told in "confession." (It is also important to note that the "seal of confession" only exists if it is a sacramental confession. One cannot simply "consider it" confession. If Schwartz was not Catholic, there would have been no confession, and there could have been no violation of the "seal." But this is moot since the allegation in the first post in this thread is false.
1st Aug '17 1:12:53 PM Vandalia92
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** This is the biggest myth that people have about the military: that rank means everything. It does not. In reality, position is more important than rank. For example, a Major who holds a staff position can tell a Major General what to do. (If you want to get technical, he has "staff authority" which is a delegation of his commander's authority.) As a hospital commander as a lieutenant colonel, the head of nursing and dentistry who were both colonels were subject to my direction and authority. Generally speaking, the most powerful people in the military are the middle ranking officers, and senior NCOs who control assignments. If Baldwin was delegated the authority to control surgery assignments in the Far East, then he has the complete authority to do so, no matter what the rank of the officer or the commander involved.

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** This is the biggest myth that people have about the military: that rank means everything. It does not. In reality, position is more important than rank. For example, a Major who holds a staff position can tell a Major General what to do. (If you want to get technical, he has "staff authority" which is a delegation of his commander's authority.) As a hospital commander as a lieutenant colonel, the head of nursing and dentistry who were both colonels were subject to my direction and authority. Generally speaking, the most powerful people in the military are the middle ranking officers, and senior NCOs who control assignments. If Baldwin was delegated the authority to control surgery assignments in the Far East, then he has the complete authority to do so, no matter what the rank of the officer or the commander involved.
involved. This was also a problem with the episode "Friends and Enemies." An officer, no matter the rank, cannot assume command of a unit to which he is not assigned or which is not a subordinate unit to one he commands. As an example, as a Colonel I could not drive up to "Area 51" and order a Sgt to grant me access. Nor could I visit Parris Island and order a Drill Instructor to give his recruits the rest of the afternoon off.
16th Jul '17 10:04:37 PM Vandalia92
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** This is the biggest myth that people have about the military: rank means everything. In reality, position is more important than rank. For example, a Major who holds a staff position can tell a Major General what to do. (If you want to get technical, he has "staff authority" which is a delegation of his commander's authority.) As a hospital commander as a lieutenant colonel, the head of nursing and dentistry who were both colonels were subject to my direction and authority. Generally speaking, the most powerful people in the military are the middle ranking officers, and senior NCOs who control assignments. If Baldwin was delegated the authority to control surgery assignments in the Far East, then he has the complete authority to do so, no matter what the rank of the officer or the commander involved.

to:

** This is the biggest myth that people have about the military: that rank means everything. It does not. In reality, position is more important than rank. For example, a Major who holds a staff position can tell a Major General what to do. (If you want to get technical, he has "staff authority" which is a delegation of his commander's authority.) As a hospital commander as a lieutenant colonel, the head of nursing and dentistry who were both colonels were subject to my direction and authority. Generally speaking, the most powerful people in the military are the middle ranking officers, and senior NCOs who control assignments. If Baldwin was delegated the authority to control surgery assignments in the Far East, then he has the complete authority to do so, no matter what the rank of the officer or the commander involved.
16th Jul '17 10:47:45 AM nombretomado
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*** Conscientous objectors don't get a free pass out of the military. They just get assigned to non-combat roles. Which is exactly what Klinger's job as a corpsman was.

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*** Conscientous Conscientious objectors don't get a free pass out of the military. They just get assigned to non-combat roles. Which is exactly what Klinger's job as a corpsman was.



*** In RealLife, oddly enough, the above paragraph is exactly what Creator/LewAyres was trying to do in the first place in WW2 (the being an unarmed combat medic, that is, not the wearing dresses to get out of the Army) precipitating the scandal about him getting a conscientious objector status that derailed his Hollywood career -- it wasn't till halfway through the war that the post that Ayres actually wanted even existed, after which he served with distinction as a combat medic in the Pacific where [[WarIsHell medics were seen as fair game]]... in WW2 it really was "all or nothing".

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*** In RealLife, oddly enough, the above paragraph is exactly what Creator/LewAyres was trying to do in the first place in WW2 [=WW2=] (the being an unarmed combat medic, that is, not the wearing dresses to get out of the Army) precipitating the scandal about him getting a conscientious objector status that derailed his Hollywood career -- it wasn't till halfway through the war that the post that Ayres actually wanted even existed, after which he served with distinction as a combat medic in the Pacific where [[WarIsHell medics were seen as fair game]]... in WW2 [=WW2=] it really was "all or nothing".
15th Jul '17 11:54:48 AM Vandalia92
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** This is the biggest myth that people have about the military: rank means everything. In reality, position is more important than rank. For example, a Major who holds a staff position can tell a Major General what to do. (If you want to get technical, he has "staff authority" which is a delegation of his commander's authority.) Generally speaking, the most powerful people in the military are the middle ranking officers, and senior NCOs who control assignments. If Baldwin was delegated the authority to control surgery assignments in the Far East, then he has the complete authority to do so, no matter what the rank of the officer or the commander involved.

to:

** This is the biggest myth that people have about the military: rank means everything. In reality, position is more important than rank. For example, a Major who holds a staff position can tell a Major General what to do. (If you want to get technical, he has "staff authority" which is a delegation of his commander's authority.) As a hospital commander as a lieutenant colonel, the head of nursing and dentistry who were both colonels were subject to my direction and authority. Generally speaking, the most powerful people in the military are the middle ranking officers, and senior NCOs who control assignments. If Baldwin was delegated the authority to control surgery assignments in the Far East, then he has the complete authority to do so, no matter what the rank of the officer or the commander involved.
15th Jul '17 11:51:53 AM Vandalia92
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to:

** This is the biggest myth that people have about the military: rank means everything. In reality, position is more important than rank. For example, a Major who holds a staff position can tell a Major General what to do. (If you want to get technical, he has "staff authority" which is a delegation of his commander's authority.) Generally speaking, the most powerful people in the military are the middle ranking officers, and senior NCOs who control assignments. If Baldwin was delegated the authority to control surgery assignments in the Far East, then he has the complete authority to do so, no matter what the rank of the officer or the commander involved.
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