History Headscratchers / Frasier

20th Mar '17 7:56:55 PM DoctorNemesis
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*** It should perhaps also be noted that Martin's point in that episode is less that the bullies are justified in targeting Frasier and Niles because they have classy interests and more because Frasier and Niles use their classy interests to make other people feel stupid and themselves superior.



* The woman ha a very heavy accent, is speaking in what is to her a second language, is speaking quite quickly, is clearly rather emotional, is talking to Frasier over a phone line, and French is still a second language to Frasier. Even if Frasier has a reasonably fluent command over the French language, these aren't exactly ideal conditions for perfect, flawless communication. The issue isn't that Frasier doesn't understand the word 'Monsieur', it's that he can't clearly make out that it ''is'' the word 'Monsieur' due to the various other communication issues going on.

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* The woman ha has a very heavy accent, is speaking in what is to her a second language, is speaking quite quickly, is clearly rather emotional, is talking to Frasier over a phone line, and French is still a second language to Frasier. Even if Frasier has a reasonably fluent command over the French language, these aren't exactly ideal conditions for perfect, flawless communication. The issue isn't that Frasier doesn't understand the word 'Monsieur', it's that he can't clearly make out that it ''is'' the word 'Monsieur' due to the various other communication issues going on.
17th Mar '17 7:44:51 AM DoctorNemesis
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*** Plus, well... it's hair. People cut their hair and grow it back all the time. It really ''isn't'' that big a deal.
17th Mar '17 7:35:23 AM DoctorNemesis
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* He appears in an episode earlier in Season 11 ("Frasier-Lite"), so I assume it wasn't a behind-the-scenes issue; I imagine the actor simply wasn't available for a cameo appearance and[=/=]or the writers couldn't figure out a way to naturally include him in a more substantial role.
17th Mar '17 7:27:49 AM DoctorNemesis
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** Besides which, whatever the reason behind Martin's fondness for his old chair (and it's most likely a mixture of both; the two aren't mutually exclusive), it's kind of academic at that point. In the first season example, the old chair is gone but it can be recovered; in the later example, the old chair is destroyed beyond repair. Since he's got the memories regardless, Martin can either continue to wallow in bitterness and rage over what is, at the end of the day, just a chair, or he can accept Frasier's gift and gesture in the spirit it's intended in and adopt what is an all-but-identical substitute for both reasons of comfort and sentiment. Since Martin is a relatively mature and decent man, he accepts the new chair.

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** Besides which, whatever the reason behind Martin's fondness for his old chair (and it's most likely a mixture of both; the two aren't mutually exclusive), it's kind of academic at that point. In the first season example, the old chair is gone but it can be recovered; in the later example, the old chair is destroyed beyond repair. Since he's The old chair is just a sentimental signifier; since Martin's got the memories regardless, Martin regardless of what happens to it, his choices are that he can either continue to wallow in bitterness and rage over what is, at the end of the day, just a chair, or he can accept Frasier's gift and gesture in the spirit it's intended in and adopt what is clearly an all-but-identical substitute for both reasons of comfort and sentiment.substitute. Since Martin is a relatively mature and decent man, he accepts the new chair.
17th Mar '17 7:14:52 AM DoctorNemesis
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** Besides which, whatever the reason behind Martin's fondness for his old chair (and it's most likely a mixture of both; the two aren't mutually exclusive), it's kind of academic at this point since the old chair is destroyed beyond repair. Since he's got the memories regardless, Martin can either continue to wallow in bitterness and rage over what is, at the end of the day, just a chair, or he can accept Frasier's gift and gesture in the spirit it's intended in and adopt what is an all-but-identical substitute for both reasons of comfort and sentiment. Since Martin is a relatively mature and decent man, he accepts the new chair.

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** Besides which, whatever the reason behind Martin's fondness for his old chair (and it's most likely a mixture of both; the two aren't mutually exclusive), it's kind of academic at this point since that point. In the first season example, the old chair is gone but it can be recovered; in the later example, the old chair is destroyed beyond repair. Since he's got the memories regardless, Martin can either continue to wallow in bitterness and rage over what is, at the end of the day, just a chair, or he can accept Frasier's gift and gesture in the spirit it's intended in and adopt what is an all-but-identical substitute for both reasons of comfort and sentiment. Since Martin is a relatively mature and decent man, he accepts the new chair.
16th Mar '17 8:52:05 PM DoctorNemesis
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** Frasier's unemployment lasts about nine episodes ("A Good Son" to "Roz, A Problem"). Assuming each week's episode takes place roughly a week apart for the characters, that's just over two months. If we add in the (roughly) three month break between the last episode of Season Five and the beginning of Season Six, that gives us about five months (maybe six to round it up). Assuming Frasier has some decent savings accrued and his investments haven't completely crashed, that's a fairly reasonable amount of time for him to be without work without it denting his lifestyle too much. Of course, as others have noted there's the question of how he's affording such an opulent lifestyle to begin with, but it's fiction and WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief has to kick in at some point.

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** Frasier's unemployment lasts about nine episodes ("A Good Son" ("Good Grief" to "Roz, A Problem").Loan"). Assuming each week's episode takes place roughly a week apart for the characters, that's just over two months. If we add in the (roughly) three month break between the last episode of Season Five and the beginning of Season Six, that gives us about five months (maybe six to round it up). Assuming Frasier has some decent savings accrued and his investments haven't completely crashed, that's a fairly reasonable amount of time for him to be without work without it denting his lifestyle too much. Of course, as others have noted there's the question of how he's affording such an opulent lifestyle to begin with, but it's fiction and WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief has to kick in at some point.
16th Mar '17 8:35:13 PM DoctorNemesis
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** Ultimately, we can probably boil this down to RuleOfDrama. In reality, the gallery probably would have allowed Frasier to return the painting for his money back, if only to maintain goodwill and a good reputation. But a story where Frasier buys a painting, learns from the artist that it's a fake, takes it to the gallery to return it... and gets his money back and an apology from the owner probably wouldn't have been quite as dramatically interesting to watch.


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** Frasier's unemployment lasts about nine episodes ("A Good Son" to "Roz, A Problem"). Assuming each week's episode takes place roughly a week apart for the characters, that's just over two months. If we add in the (roughly) three month break between the last episode of Season Five and the beginning of Season Six, that gives us about five months (maybe six to round it up). Assuming Frasier has some decent savings accrued and his investments haven't completely crashed, that's a fairly reasonable amount of time for him to be without work without it denting his lifestyle too much. Of course, as others have noted there's the question of how he's affording such an opulent lifestyle to begin with, but it's fiction and WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief has to kick in at some point.
16th Mar '17 8:16:26 PM DoctorNemesis
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*** On the other hand, Martin has no authority to authorise anyone to destroy something which doesn't belong to him whatsoever, tacitly or otherwise.

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*** On the other hand, Martin has no authority whatsoever to authorise anyone to destroy something which doesn't belong to him whatsoever, him, tacitly or otherwise.
16th Mar '17 8:15:54 PM DoctorNemesis
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*** On the other hand, Martin has no authority to authorise anyone to destroy something which doesn't belong to him whatsoever, tacitly or otherwise.
16th Mar '17 7:17:21 PM DoctorNemesis
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** Also, Frasier's show is live radio. There's a greater chance for blunders in live radio simply because it's spontaneous and there's more room for error, and you can't edit out the errors like you would if it was pre-recorded. And, of course, we see Frasier's blunders more than his successful shows because it's a sitcom and [[RuleOfFunny they're funny]]. Chances are nine out of ten of Frasier's shows are completely competent, professional and successful, but we don't see them because they wouldn't be funny.
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