History Headscratchers / BeautyAndTheBeast

2nd Sep '17 1:57:51 PM huntdaddy
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** Considering the fact that Maurice was in great danger of freezing to death at that point, I'm guessing they figured getting him to safety was more important than worrying about the wolves attacking, which seems to be a 50/50 chance anyway, since they didn't seem to attack Belle when she first arrived to the castle. Even if they did happen to attack Belle again, I'm sure the Beast would've been keeping watch to make sure to scare them off again. Also, since the wolves got curb-stomped by the Beast the first time they attacked, they may have been hoping that the pack's instincts would tell them not to go after Belle again.
25th Aug '17 8:49:07 PM GrammarNavi
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** Especially since this was not a ''lynching'' but rather an involuntary ''commitment'' to an insane asylum, parents bringing their children is quite realistic. This kind of voyeuristic crowd is hardly unheard-of in more recent times, either: note that there's a scene in ''Literature/PeytonPlace'' (written in the 1950s and set in the 1940s) in which a crowd of small-town gawkers of all ages, apparently having nothing better to do with their time, gather around to watch the police hauling a bunch of the town's drunks out of a cellar. About the only thing keeping such crowds from gathering these days is the new communications technology; such meddlesome spectators can often just watch a news report about it on television or look up somebody's cell phone video of it on YouTube from the comfort of their homes.

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** Especially since this was not a ''lynching'' but rather an involuntary ''commitment'' to an insane asylum, parents bringing their children is quite realistic. This kind of voyeuristic crowd is hardly unheard-of in more recent times, either: note that there's a scene in ''Literature/PeytonPlace'' (written in the 1950s and set in the 1940s) in which a crowd of small-town gawkers of all ages, apparently having nothing better to do with their time, gather around to watch the police hauling a bunch of the town's drunks out of a cellar. About the only thing keeping such crowds from gathering these days is the new communications technology; such meddlesome spectators can often just watch a news report about it on television or look up somebody's cell phone video of it on YouTube Website/YouTube from the comfort of their homes.
29th Jul '17 5:03:54 PM Sharlee
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** Possibly she had ''two'' such mirrors, and left him one of them to imply that she'll ''always'' be watching, and judging, him. It's a way to ensure he'll keep the need to reform himself in mind. Likewise, the portrait depicting what he'd look like if he ''hadn't'' been cursed was probably her way of taunting/reminding him as well, because any mundane painting made before she'd cursed him would show an eleven-year-old boy.
29th Jul '17 4:57:50 PM Sharlee
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** Maurice is being ministered to by a ''talking candlestick and clock''. He's barely managing not to FreakOut, faint, and/or run screaming as it is: expecting him to meekly comply if they ask him to ''follow them'' - to the kitchen or anyplace else - would be asking too much of the poor guy's nerves.
29th Jul '17 4:52:42 PM Sharlee
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** Or maybe Maurice mentioned his daughter's love of reading while he was locked up. Presumably Beast didn't intend to feel his captive or empty the guy's chamber pot himself, so the servants would've had access to Maurice's cell and could've heard him moaning to himself about how poor Belle will have only her books for company without him.
29th Jul '17 4:43:35 PM Sharlee
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** At least, they'd be stuck that way until the Enchantress came back to check whether Prince Adam had learned his lesson or not. But the servants would have no way of knowing if she ever intended to return or if something might've happened to her in the meantime.
29th Jul '17 4:39:01 PM Sharlee
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** Part of the Beast's curse is that he succumbs to bestial impulses when he loses his temper. It's entirely possible that the Enchantress transformed the estate's livestock and pets to protect them from the Beast's own animal side. Alternately, she may have figured that the dog would no longer recognize the young prince as a Beast, and transformed it so ''it'' could no longer bite ''him''.
29th Jul '17 4:16:06 PM Sharlee
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*** Most of them probably ''weren't'' sentient, but more like trained animals or pre-programmed machines.
** Some of them may have been transformed animals, not just humans. Remember the dog-footstool? An estate that large would have its own livestock as well as kennels and vermin-control cats.
29th Jul '17 4:05:02 PM Sharlee
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** A clock is a perfectly sensible form for a butler to be transformed into. Who do you think is responsible for making sure that all the other servants' work is completed precisely on time?
8th Jun '17 12:04:21 PM HalfBloodPrincess
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** That would be because it's not 14th century, it's 18th century. Where are you getting 14th century? Belle's clothes are way too fitted for it be the Middle Ages, the Beast's blue jacket is pure 18th century, Gaston uses a ''gun'' for heaven's sake. Chimneys on village cottages and tile roofs are 17th century innovations. Stoves don't really show until the early 19th century! The printing press had been invented, and Maurice's wood-chopping gizmo runs on steam power. We have hit the beginning of the industrial revolution, people!
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