History Headscratchers / Batman

15th Feb '18 2:51:17 PM SteveMB
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** I think some thugs believe Scarface is actually some kind of [[Film/ChildsPlay Chucky]]-esque possessed dummy.
** Well in the animated series one of Wesker’s minions forgets the rule of speaking to the dummy and ask a question directly to Wesker, causing “Scarface” to enrage, and Rhino to calm him down with “he’s knew and doesn’t know the rules”, so this seem to imply (in the TAS) that they do know he’s just crazy, but a criminal mastermind so is better to follow his lead.

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** I think some thugs believe Scarface is actually some kind of [[Film/ChildsPlay Chucky]]-esque [[DemonicDummy possessed dummy.
dummy]].
** Well in the animated series one of Wesker’s minions forgets the rule of speaking to the dummy and ask a question directly to Wesker, causing “Scarface” to enrage, and Rhino to calm him down with “he’s knew new and doesn’t know the rules”, so this seem to imply (in the TAS) that they do know he’s just crazy, but a criminal mastermind so is better to follow his lead.
14th Feb '18 3:48:09 PM SteveMB
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*** As Bruce on a date, he is no doubt impeccably cleaned and groomed. As Batman... well, crimefighting is sweaty work.
14th Feb '18 7:36:05 AM DoctorNemesis
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** Even leaving aside the incredibly questionable moral and ethical questions of beating the Joker ''almost'' to death, because of the simple fact that beating someone into a permanent vegetative state ''without'' killing them is ''really bloody hard''. Like insanely, impossibly hard. It's not like there's a little indicator that goes 'ding!' to let you know to stop when you've reached the point where you've beaten someone sufficiently to render them permanently comatose but where they are still alive. People in such states are usually lucky (for a given value of luck) to ''not'' be outright dead; in other words, they ''would'' have died if not for an incredible, percentage-breaking piece of good fortune (again for a given value of 'good'). It would take such an insane amount of planning, an insane amount of precision and an insane amount of luck on Batman's part to achieve this outcome and really, if his ethical stance has sufficiently shifted to allow him to be okay with beating the Joker to such a vicious degree that he's in a permanent, irreversible coma, he might as well just go all the way and outright beat the Joker to death. It'd be literally be easier.
13th Feb '18 5:12:42 PM DoctorNemesis
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** Also, Bruce Wayne is a grown adult by the time he starts up as Batman, with an independent source of wealth that is more or less his to do with as he sees fit and who, undeniable neuroses aside, is of sound mind. There is realistically only so much Alfred can do to stop him, however much or little he disapproves.

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** Also, Bruce Wayne is a grown adult by the time he starts up as Batman, with an independent source of wealth that is more or less his to do with as he sees fit and who, undeniable neuroses aside, is of sound mind.mind and not legally insane. There is realistically only so much Alfred can do to stop him, however much or little he disapproves.
13th Feb '18 6:29:12 AM DoctorNemesis
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** Also, while she may be popular with readers of her comic stories, that doesn't necessarily mean that literally everyone in the world loves her and thinks she's the best thing since sliced bread. She just might not have been tremendously popular with the people who have so far been in a position to make Batman stories.
13th Feb '18 6:24:48 AM DoctorNemesis
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** It should perhaps also be noted, in Batman's defence at least, that Batman usually only applies brutal force to criminals who are themselves trying to kill or seriously injure him or other people. It's as much making sure that they stop trying to kill or seriously injure him or other people as much as anything else. Criminals who give themselves up or who are otherwise harmless, he rarely seems to treat with disproportionate force; in at least one comic, when low-rent d-list hoodlum the Carpenter realises that she's completely outmatched and surrenders without a fight all we see him to is tie her hands behind her back and leave her for the police to collect.

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** It should perhaps also be noted, in Batman's defence at least, that Batman usually only applies brutal force to criminals who are themselves trying to kill or seriously injure him or other people. It's as much making sure that they stop trying to kill or seriously injure him or other people as much as anything else. Criminals who give themselves up or who are otherwise harmless, he rarely seems to treat with disproportionate force; in at least one comic, when low-rent d-list hoodlum the Carpenter realises that she's completely outmatched and surrenders without a fight all we see him to do is tie her hands behind her back and leave her for the police to collect.
13th Feb '18 6:23:12 AM DoctorNemesis
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** It should perhaps also be noted, in Batman's defence at least, that Batman usually only applies brutal force to criminals who are themselves trying to kill or seriously injure him or other people. It's as much making sure that they stop trying to kill or seriously injure him or other people as much as anything else. Criminals who give themselves up or who are otherwise harmless, he rarely seems to treat with disproportionate force; as one example, in at least one comic, when low-rent d-list hoodlum the Carpenter realises that she's completely outmatched and surrenders without a fight all we see him to is tie her hands behind her back and leave her for the police to collect.

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** It should perhaps also be noted, in Batman's defence at least, that Batman usually only applies brutal force to criminals who are themselves trying to kill or seriously injure him or other people. It's as much making sure that they stop trying to kill or seriously injure him or other people as much as anything else. Criminals who give themselves up or who are otherwise harmless, he rarely seems to treat with disproportionate force; as one example, in at least one comic, when low-rent d-list hoodlum the Carpenter realises that she's completely outmatched and surrenders without a fight all we see him to is tie her hands behind her back and leave her for the police to collect.
13th Feb '18 6:21:53 AM DoctorNemesis
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** Even if we accept this, it still takes a certain amount of moral relativism and cold-heartedness to describe a boy witnessing his parents being murdered in front of him as a 'good' thing. It's probably more a bad thing which has had some unexpected positive consequences.






** It should perhaps also be noted in Batman's defence that Batman usually only applies brutal force to criminals who are themselves trying to kill or seriously injure him. It's as much making sure that they stop trying to kill or seriously injure him as much as anything else.

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** It should perhaps also be noted noted, in Batman's defence at least, that Batman usually only applies brutal force to criminals who are themselves trying to kill or seriously injure him. him or other people. It's as much making sure that they stop trying to kill or seriously injure him or other people as much as anything else.else. Criminals who give themselves up or who are otherwise harmless, he rarely seems to treat with disproportionate force; as one example, in at least one comic, when low-rent d-list hoodlum the Carpenter realises that she's completely outmatched and surrenders without a fight all we see him to is tie her hands behind her back and leave her for the police to collect.
13th Feb '18 6:16:09 AM DoctorNemesis
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** This is also, again in all fairness, partially an effect of ComicBookTime. Sure, if you read ten years of comics, it seems like Gotham never really seems to change... but those ten years of comics are coming out one issue a month at a time, and are usually set more-or-less contemporaneously. Gotham doesn't really change because the nature of comic books keeps it in a kind of stasis in order to facilitate more stories.

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** This is also, again in all fairness, partially an effect of ComicBookTime. Sure, if you read ten years of comics, it seems like Gotham never really seems to change... but those ten years of comics are coming out one issue a month at a time, and are usually set more-or-less contemporaneously. contemporaneously, and compose of multi-issue arcs which usually take place over a matter of weeks at most (so in a year's worth of comics, in practical terms we only really see about three-six months of Batman's life at most). Gotham doesn't really change because the nature of comic books keeps it in a kind of stasis in order to facilitate more stories.stories; if Gotham was a real city and we saw what happened to it over a more realistic period of time, Batman would probably have more visibly positive impact.
27th Jan '18 9:32:13 PM DoctorNemesis
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** Also, Bruce Wayne is a grown adult by the time he starts up as Batman, with an independent source of wealth that is more or less his to do with as he sees fit and who, undeniable neuroses aside, is of sound mind. There is realistically only so much Alfred can do to stop him, however much or little he disapproves.



Add that up, that’s more than 24 hours. So he has to have slack time to do low-priority, non-mindful habits like laundry, feeding himself, taking a shower, etc. And he doesn’t cut himself slack.

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Add that up, that’s that’s more than 24 hours. So he has to have slack time to do low-priority, non-mindful habits like laundry, feeding himself, taking a shower, etc. And he doesn’t cut himself slack.
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