History GuideDangIt / Adventure

24th Feb '17 10:46:13 AM case
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* An example where the bad ending is harder to get then the good endings is the MyLittlePony fangame SuperFillyAdventure. In order to get it, you have to talk to everybody, and play at 11:30pm to 6:00am. [[ShmuckBait Though, it's better]] [[NightmareFuel to not get it.]]

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* An example where the [[EarnYourBadEnding bad ending is harder to get then than the good endings endings]] is the MyLittlePony fangame SuperFillyAdventure. In order to get it, you have to talk to everybody, and play at 11:30pm to 6:00am. [[ShmuckBait Though, it's better]] [[NightmareFuel to not get it.]]
11th Feb '17 8:24:34 PM grisha512345
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** How about the hidden reactor in the junk pile in [[VideoGame/SpaceQuestThePiratesOfPestulon part 3?]] Absolutely no hint is given that the thing is even there--for one thing, it's ''hidden behind the scenery''--but without it, the game comes to a dead stop. And this is one of the first puzzles that you have to solve in the entire game; you've barely started and you're already irredeemably stuck. That is, unless you either purchase a hint book or call the hint line (which conveniently charges per minute and, at the time, wasn't operational outside normal business hours anwyay).

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** How about the hidden reactor in the junk pile in [[VideoGame/SpaceQuestThePiratesOfPestulon [[VideoGame/SpaceQuestIIIThePiratesOfPestulon part 3?]] Absolutely no hint is given that the thing is even there--for one thing, it's ''hidden behind the scenery''--but without it, the game comes to a dead stop. And this is one of the first puzzles that you have to solve in the entire game; you've barely started and you're already irredeemably stuck. That is, unless you either purchase a hint book or call the hint line (which conveniently charges per minute and, at the time, wasn't operational outside normal business hours anwyay).
7th Jan '17 10:03:07 AM nombretomado
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** And really, this is one of many, many situations in ''KGB'' where the puzzles range from extreme difficulty to borderline impossible without third-party intervention. Two examples of this are the coded messages that player receives at the beginning of Chapter 1, and the end of Chapter 2. By the time you get to the end of the game, progress is dependent entirely upon trial-and-error. Aside from [[LauraBow Dagger Of Amon Ra]], I consider this to be one of, if not the hardest adventure game of all time.

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** And really, this is one of many, many situations in ''KGB'' where the puzzles range from extreme difficulty to borderline impossible without third-party intervention. Two examples of this are the coded messages that player receives at the beginning of Chapter 1, and the end of Chapter 2. By the time you get to the end of the game, progress is dependent entirely upon trial-and-error. Aside from [[LauraBow [[VideoGame/LauraBow Dagger Of Amon Ra]], I consider this to be one of, if not the hardest adventure game of all time.
22nd Dec '16 4:57:01 AM Gosicrystal
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* Creator/{{Infocom}}'s ''VideoGame/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' adventure game. Ye gods. Not only are many of the clues found in the literal in-game "guide," but there's no index on the thing, so you have to keep guessing searches. How else are you going to figure out that the Brownian motion is used to power the improbability drive? And in many puzzles, the Guide is about as informative as its entry on Earth. The early game is filled with LostForever items whose function is often obscure and which you have to obtain on a time limit. Most notorious of these is the Babel fish: unlike in the book, where Ford simply sticks one in Arthur's ear, getting one in the game involves a bizarre puzzle in which two items (one of them probably lost already) get combined in a way that makes absolutely no sense until tried. Being overly familiar with the book doesn't help all that much, since the game diverges from the book's story; you have to prevent [[spoiler:the dog swallowing the microscopic space fleet]] from happening like it does in the book.

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* Creator/{{Infocom}}'s ''VideoGame/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' adventure game. Ye gods. Not only are many of the clues found in the literal in-game "guide," but there's no index on the thing, so you have to keep guessing searches. How else are you going to figure out that the Brownian motion is used to power the improbability drive? And in many puzzles, the Guide is about as informative as its entry on Earth. The early game is filled with LostForever {{Permanently Missable|Content}} items whose function is often obscure and which you have to obtain on a time limit. Most notorious of these is the Babel fish: unlike in the book, where Ford simply sticks one in Arthur's ear, getting one in the game involves a bizarre puzzle in which two items (one of them probably lost already) get combined in a way that makes absolutely no sense until tried. Being overly familiar with the book doesn't help all that much, since the game diverges from the book's story; you have to prevent [[spoiler:the dog swallowing the microscopic space fleet]] from happening like it does in the book.



* The interactive fiction game ''[[http://www.wurb.com/if/game/117 Jigsaw]]'' gives you plenty of opportunities to completely screw yourself out of victory without even knowing it. Most of them are about failing to collect all the jigsaw pieces in a time period before doing something that renders them LostForever (an in-game device does tell you if there are pieces you haven't discovered in that time yet, but it won't warn you when you're about to inadvertently make it impossible to get them), but the biggest one by a mile has to be the drawing competition at the very end of the game. To win it, you need to have collected a sketchbook and pencil hidden in a stool at the beginning of the game and sketched at least four animals over the course of the game. There's little indication in the game that this will become vital later on, and if you don't do it, you fail to get the competition prize ''and'' can't complete the game without it, even after you've spent hours slogging through all these LostForever-riddled historical {{Timed Mission}}s beforehand. ''Guide dang it!''

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* The interactive fiction game ''[[http://www.wurb.com/if/game/117 Jigsaw]]'' gives you plenty of opportunities to completely screw yourself out of victory without even knowing it. Most of them are about failing to collect all the jigsaw pieces in a time period before doing something that renders them LostForever [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost forever]] (an in-game device does tell you if there are pieces you haven't discovered in that time yet, but it won't warn you when you're about to inadvertently make it impossible to get them), but the biggest one by a mile has to be the drawing competition at the very end of the game. To win it, you need to have collected a sketchbook and pencil hidden in a stool at the beginning of the game and sketched at least four animals over the course of the game. There's little indication in the game that this will become vital later on, and if you don't do it, you fail to get the competition prize ''and'' can't complete the game without it, even after you've spent hours slogging through all these LostForever-riddled historical {{Timed Mission}}s beforehand. ''Guide dang it!''



* IllusionOfGaia had plenty of these, including but not limited to a puzzle where you had to stand still on a glowing tile for about 20 seconds, a point where you could not proceed without reading a letter that a party member ''slipped into your inventory while you were sleeping'', a fair number of small, essential items lying in completely arbitrary places somewhere in enormous dungeons that you could only find by a glint of light they would give off every few seconds, and a BonusDungeon that you could only access by collecting ''all 50'' of the Red Jewels scattered throughout the game with no clear pattern, most of which would be LostForever if you missed them. Fortunately, [[AllThereInTheManual the game's manual included a mini-walkthrough]] that would clue you in to the solutions of the more obscure puzzles.

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* IllusionOfGaia had plenty of these, including but not limited to a puzzle where you had to stand still on a glowing tile for about 20 seconds, a point where you could not proceed without reading a letter that a party member ''slipped into your inventory while you were sleeping'', a fair number of small, essential items lying in completely arbitrary places somewhere in enormous dungeons that you could only find by a glint of light they would give off every few seconds, and a BonusDungeon that you could only access by collecting ''all 50'' of the Red Jewels scattered throughout the game with no clear pattern, most of which would be LostForever [[PermanentlyMissableContent lost forever if you missed them.them]]. Fortunately, [[AllThereInTheManual the game's manual included a mini-walkthrough]] that would clue you in to the solutions of the more obscure puzzles.
23rd Nov '16 1:00:34 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''[[SimonTheSorcerer Simon the Sorcerer 3D]]'' is full of moments like this, but the final puzzle is just unforgettable. You're in front of a huge computer, and you must put a CD there. The problem is that the computer has no button to open the CD space. So, what to do? Oh, easy: just stand in front of the computer with the CD on your hand, and then open the CD space of your [[NoFourthWall REAL-LIFE COMPUTER]], so that the in-game computer opens. No previous hints at any point.

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* ''[[SimonTheSorcerer ''[[VideoGame/SimonTheSorcerer Simon the Sorcerer 3D]]'' is full of moments like this, but the final puzzle is just unforgettable. You're in front of a huge computer, and you must put a CD there. The problem is that the computer has no button to open the CD space. So, what to do? Oh, easy: just stand in front of the computer with the CD on your hand, and then open the CD space of your [[NoFourthWall REAL-LIFE COMPUTER]], so that the in-game computer opens. No previous hints at any point.
23rd Oct '16 1:05:38 PM nombretomado
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* On top of being one of the shining examples of NintendoHard, ''VideoGame/SolomonsKey'' was extremely fond of this trope. Not only does each group of levels have a secret level, each of those levels had a secret item that could only be found by making a brick and then destroying it in a certain spot of said room. There is never any indication as to which spot this might be. Beyond that, there are three extra rooms that are only accessible if you managed to find all twelve previous secret rooms and all twelve of Solomon's Seals. Not only is this never mentioned, but nobody even published a guide for the game. Most gamers didn't even know of half of these hidden items until the advent of {{GameFAQs}}.

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* On top of being one of the shining examples of NintendoHard, ''VideoGame/SolomonsKey'' was extremely fond of this trope. Not only does each group of levels have a secret level, each of those levels had a secret item that could only be found by making a brick and then destroying it in a certain spot of said room. There is never any indication as to which spot this might be. Beyond that, there are three extra rooms that are only accessible if you managed to find all twelve previous secret rooms and all twelve of Solomon's Seals. Not only is this never mentioned, but nobody even published a guide for the game. Most gamers didn't even know of half of these hidden items until the advent of {{GameFAQs}}.Website/{{GameFAQs}}.
30th Sep '16 11:38:15 PM zaphod77
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** Or how about the fact that, to open a case that contains an item that you need, you need to find out which word of the second verse of the Vogon's poem is the password (which changes every game), which can be figured out by pushing a button on the case itself. However, what it doesn't tell you is that the Vogon won't even ''say'' the second verse of his poem unless you enter the command ENJOY POETRY after the poem has started. You do get a small hint towards this (the Vogon reading the poem says you didn't look like you enjoyed it if you fail to input the command), but not many people would think that "enjoy" would be a verb that the game would recognise.

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** Or how about the fact that, to open a case that contains an item that you need, you need to find out which word of the second verse of the Vogon's poem is the password (which changes every game), will only work if you actually learn it in game, so you can't just look it up), which can be figured out by pushing a button on the case itself. However, what it doesn't tell you is that the Vogon won't even ''say'' the second verse of his poem unless you enter the command ENJOY POETRY after the poem has started. You do get a small hint towards this (the Vogon reading the poem says you didn't look like you enjoyed it if you fail to input the command), but not many people would think that "enjoy" would be a verb that the game would recognise.
13th May '16 9:03:10 AM JamesAustin
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* Try playing ''any'' Sierra game of the text-parser era without a hintbook, much less get a perfect score. Or something this side of ''{{Conquests of the Longbow}}'' without a hintbook. Of course Sierra had its own 900 number for hints, so if you wanted you could get mysterious charges on your parents' phone bill and tell them it was all in the interest of completing more games.

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* Try playing ''any'' Sierra game of the text-parser era without a hintbook, much less get a perfect score. Or something this side of ''{{Conquests of the Longbow}}'' ''VideoGame/ConquestsOfTheLongbow'' without a hintbook. Of course Sierra had its own 900 number for hints, so if you wanted you could get mysterious charges on your parents' phone bill and tell them it was all in the interest of completing more games.



And after all that, you may want to read [[http://www.oldmanmurray.com/features/77.html this article]] and nod in agreement as you do so

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And after all that, you may want to read [[http://www.oldmanmurray.com/features/77.html this article]] and nod in agreement as you do so so ...
23rd Mar '16 8:10:39 AM ObsidianFire
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** Actually, if you are GenreSavvy you know you can trust Greenberg and should contact him, as you escaped the bad guys together at the end of chapter 1. And actually there are lots of hints that you should not trust your controller... but so subtle I would not have seen it without a walkthrough. And yes, you have no reason to distrust the woman who tells you not to contact Greenberg, but to be fair you have no reason to trust her either : you don't know her. As to why you are supposed to tail the guy you see drive off, it is because you have already linked him to the group (he was the one setting the date for the boat departure), and on the fishing boat, all the other members said that "the fourth member" will drive off at about 9 am. But you get stuck in unwinnable situation so many times that clearly is a design choice. Fortunately, you can backtrack to the last room you entered (good for instadeath), and if you have no save before the point of no return, you can at least restart the *chapter* instead of the whole game...

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** Actually, if you are GenreSavvy smart enough you know you can trust Greenberg and should contact him, as you escaped the bad guys together at the end of chapter 1. And actually there are lots of hints that you should not trust your controller... but so subtle I would not have seen it without a walkthrough. And yes, you have no reason to distrust the woman who tells you not to contact Greenberg, but to be fair you have no reason to trust her either : you don't know her. As to why you are supposed to tail the guy you see drive off, it is because you have already linked him to the group (he was the one setting the date for the boat departure), and on the fishing boat, all the other members said that "the fourth member" will drive off at about 9 am. But you get stuck in unwinnable situation so many times that clearly is a design choice. Fortunately, you can backtrack to the last room you entered (good for instadeath), and if you have no save before the point of no return, you can at least restart the *chapter* instead of the whole game...
26th Jan '16 11:17:24 AM GoldenKeyblade
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** Though this is arguably nowhere NEAR as horrible as one puzzle from Chapter 5. You need a parachute as part of an escape attempt in order to progress the plot, but one of the components needed is nowhere to be found. There is one path which seems to lead to a previously unexplored area, but there's a thorny hedge in the way. There are some goats nearby which might be able to eat the hedge, but you can't directly interact with them. What you need to do, [[SarcasmMode of course]], is [[spoiler: backtrack all the way to the orchard, get some apples, go to the house, make the apples into a fancy glass of cider, and finally '''pour said glass of cider on the hedge''' to make the goats eat it]]. Aside from the nonsensical solution ([[spoiler: do goats even like apple cider?]]), there's the fact that the previous time you had [[spoiler: a glass of something]], you gave it to someone in order to get them to talk to you; it's easy to assume the [[spoiler: cider]] would have a similar purpose.

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** Though this is arguably nowhere NEAR as horrible as one puzzle from Chapter 5. You need a parachute as part of an escape attempt in order to progress the plot, but one of the components needed is nowhere to be found. There is one path which seems to lead to a previously unexplored area, but there's a thorny hedge in the way. There are some goats nearby which might be able to eat the hedge, but you can't directly interact with them. What you need to do, [[SarcasmMode of course]], is [[spoiler: backtrack all the way to the orchard, get some apples, go to the house, make the apples into a fancy glass of cider, and finally '''pour said glass of cider on the hedge''' to make the goats eat it]]. Aside from the nonsensical solution ([[spoiler: do ([[spoiler:do goats even like apple cider?]]), there's the fact that the previous time you had [[spoiler: a glass of something]], you gave it to someone in order to get them to talk to you; it's easy to assume the [[spoiler: cider]] would have a similar purpose.
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